Podcasts about APA

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  • 3,265PODCASTS
  • 11,031EPISODES
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  • May 26, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about APA

Show all podcasts related to apa

Latest podcast episodes about APA

Behavioral Health Today
Part 2: FAQs to Starting Therapy with Dr. Erin Elmore – Episode 153

Behavioral Health Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 35:27


In this concluding episode, we resume our today with Producer Peter Fenger and Dr. Erin Elmore. Erin is our co-host and Licensed Clinical Psychologist. She specializes in working with children and adolescents and is one of our most experienced content experts here at Triad. In our last episode, we discussed the different types of therapy access and which medium either online or in person would be a good fit. We talked about places to find a therapist, highlighted some details to help you find the right therapist, and some red flags to look out for. We'll resume our conversation today by talking about the application process and the beginning steps to getting ready for your first session.   If you are in crisis and need to speak to a therapist, please contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741 and speak with a crisis counselor. For a list of crisis hotlines, please visit https://blog.opencounseling.com/hotlines-us/ For more information about finding an In-Person therapist, we recommend psychologytoday.org, goodtherapy.com, or find-a-therapist.com. For more information about finding a therapist online, we recommend betterhelp.com, zencare.co, goodtherapy.org, ginger.io, or if you're seeking a child therapist, please visit presencelearning.com. For more information on Own Your Past Change Your Future by Dr. John Delony, please visit https://www.ramseysolutions.com/store/books/own-your-past-change-your-future-by-dr-john-delony For more information on Best Mental Health Apps for 2022, please visit: https://www.verywellmind.com/best-mental-health-apps-4692902 For more information about mental resources and about the APA, please visit: https://www.apa.org For more information about Psychology Tools Self-Help resources, please visit: https://www.psychologytools.com To view our own archive of past episodes and various topics around mental health, please visit: https://www.triadhq.com/bht

SiKutuBuku
Cara Membujuk Orang Lain dengan Berdebat | Thank You for Arguing

SiKutuBuku

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 10:57


Saya membahas buku Thank you for Arguing karya Jay Heinrichs. Buku ini membahas bagaimana menggunakan argumen untuk mendapatkan sesuatu yang kita inginkan. Apa yang kamu pikirkan soal argumen? Apakah artinya dua orang yang sedang saling berteriak satu sama lain? Sayangnya, ini yang seringkali digambarkan ketika bicara soal argumen. Padahal, argumen bukan hanya untuk bertengkar, tapi bisa digunakan untuk mencari kesepakatan satu sama lain.

Behavioral Health Today
Part 1: FAQs to Starting Therapy with Dr. Erin Elmore – Episode 152

Behavioral Health Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 30:28


In honor of Mental Health Month, we would like to speak to our listeners who might be thinking about starting therapy on their own and answer some frequently asked questions to better guide those starting therapy for the first time. In this episode (part 1 of 2), Producer Peter Fenger speaks with Dr. Erin Elmore. As you know, Erin is our co-host and Licensed Clinical Psychologist. She specializes in working with children and adolescents and one of our most experienced content experts here at triad. Together Peter and Erin discuss the process of starting therapy, different types of therapy access and which medium, either online or in-person, would be a good fit for those new to therapy. We talk about how to find a therapist, highlight details to understanding the levels of therapy degrees, using insurance, the application process, and some red flags to look out for. It takes a lot of courage to be a first-time client in therapy, but our goal is to make that process easier to understand and encourage others to seek needed help.   If you are in crisis and need to speak to a therapist, please contact the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741 and speak with a crisis counselor. For a list of crisis hotlines, please visit https://blog.opencounseling.com/hotlines-us/ For more information about finding an In-Person therapist, we recommend psychologytoday.org, goodtherapy.com, or find-a-therapist.com. For more information about finding a therapist online, we recommend betterhelp.com, zencare.co, goodtherapy.org, ginger.io, or if you're seeking a child therapist, please visit presencelearning.com. For more information on Own Your Past Change Your Future by Dr. John Delony, please visit https://www.ramseysolutions.com/store/books/own-your-past-change-your-future-by-dr-john-delony For more information on Best Mental Health Apps for 2022, please visit: https://www.verywellmind.com/best-mental-health-apps-4692902 For more information about mental resources and about the APA, please visit: https://www.apa.org For more information about Psychology Tools Self-Help resources, please visit: https://www.psychologytools.com To view our own archive of past episodes and various topics around mental health, please visit: https://www.triadhq.com/bht

Being LGBTQ
Episode 238: Dr Jack Bartel 'Trans Healthcare'

Being LGBTQ

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 37:34


Dr Jack Bartel is a transgender behavioural health specialist currently practising in Florida. He has an undergraduate degree from the University of Central Florida and a doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the Florida Institute of Technology. He also completed an APA accredited internship at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, Florida. In this interview Dr Bartel talks about the challenges facing the trans community in healthcare ad how to address them, being a trans doctor, the rise in transphobic rhetoric in the U.S. and much more! 

Southern Tomfoolery Plays
Apollo Protection Agency - Episode 169: Mordren a Feeling

Southern Tomfoolery Plays

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 123:18


The penultimate episode of Signal of Scream finds us checking in with the APA members stuck in Mordren's dream prison.Please support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/SouthernTomfoolerySouthern Tomfoolery Playshttps://www.southerntomfoolery.com/https://discord.gg/7KPfMCzhttps://twitter.com/SouthernTomfoolhttps://www.facebook.com/SouthernTomfoolery/https://www.instagram.com/southerntomfoolery/Starfinder - Signal of ScreamsTitle Music:"Signal of Screams Theme" by Adam KellyOther music:Kevin MacCleod - Incompetechincompetech.filmmusic.ioTabletop Audiotabletopaudio.comPurple Planet Musicwww.purple-planet.com/ (edited)

Signal Boost
Jenna Ryu!

Signal Boost

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 25:56


USA Today wellness reporter Jenna Ryu joins Zerlina on the show to discuss her latest piece, "Fetishization isn't flattery: The way we've dehumanized Asian women."

Astro Awani
Cerita Sebalik Berita: Bekalan ayam, benarkah penternak protes?

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 13:23


Isu ayam di negara seolah-olah tiada noktahnya? Kali ini ada pula ura-ura yang mengatakan penternak bakal lakukan protes? Apa ceritanya? Cerita Sebalik Berita tanya Wakil Astro AWANI Melaka, Shuhada Abdul Kadir mengenai perkara itu.

Cerita Sebalik Berita
Cerita Sebalik Berita: Bekalan ayam, benarkah penternak protes?

Cerita Sebalik Berita

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 13:23


Isu ayam di negara seolah-olah tiada noktahnya? Kali ini ada pula ura-ura yang mengatakan penternak bakal lakukan protes? Apa ceritanya? Cerita Sebalik Berita tanya Wakil Astro AWANI Melaka, Shuhada Abdul Kadir mengenai perkara itu.

The Thoughtful Counselor
EP228: The Black Male Experience: Mentorship and Mental Health

The Thoughtful Counselor

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 60:43


In this episode Dr. Jones and Dr. Townsend discuss the positive effects that mentorship has on Black men. They talk about the lived experiences of Black men and the protective factors needed to support Black men in their career/family life.   For more on Christopher, links from the conversation, and APA citation for this episode visit concept.paloaltou.edu The Thoughtful Counselor is created in partnership with Palo Alto University's Division of Continuing & Professional Studies. Learn more at concept.paloaltou.edu

Astro Awani
Agenda AWANI: Kes HFMD meningkat, ambil tahu risiko

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 23:45


Kes jangkitan HFMD meningkat 15 kali ganda berbanding tempoh sama tahun lalu. Apa langkah proaktif yang perlu diambil supaya risiko penularan jangkitan dapat dielak?

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia
From vegemite to kangaroo meat: The stories behind Australia's most iconic foods - Dari Vegemite hingga Daging Kanguru: Kisah dibalik Makanan Australia yang Paling Ikonik

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 24:46


Have you ever tried kangaroo or witchetty grub meat? What's your favourite Aussie sweet treat? In this episode of Australia Explained, we discuss some of the country's most iconic dishes.  - Pernahkah Anda mencoba memakan daging kanguru atau witchetty grub? Apa suguhan manis Australia favorit Anda? Dalam episode Australia Explained kali ini, kita membahas beberapa hidangan paling ikonik di negara ini.

Stuff Mom Never Told You
Women Around the World: Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu

Stuff Mom Never Told You

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 14:59


Today we highlight the work of Hinaleimoana Wong-Kalu to preserve Hawaii's native cultures and traditions.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Astro Awani
Agenda AWANI: Waspada Fenomena 'Kepala Air'

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 24:39


Apa itu fenomena ‘kepala air'? Mengapa ia boleh berlaku di kawasan sungai serta air terjun dan lebih membimbangkan di kawasan tumpuan orang ramai untuk beriadah sehingga ada insiden yang mengorbankan nyawa pengunjung? Diskusi #AgendaAWANI jam 9 mlm ini di saluran 501 dan astroawani.com

Astro Awani
Agenda AWANI: Pemilihan PKR: Apa tawaran baharu?

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 25:06


Jumlah ahli parti yang keluar mengundi secara fizikal masih terlalu rendah jika dibandingkan dengan pemilihan pada 2018. Apa tawaran baharu serta situasi terkini Pemilihan PKR 2022? Diskusinya dalam #AgendaAWANI jam 9 mlm ini di saluran 501 dan astroawani.com.

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia
I know I locked that door properly. But I might check it again, just once more. - 'Aku Tahu Aku Mengunci Pintu Itu dengan Benar. Tapi Mungkin Aku akan Memeriksanya Lagi, Sekali Lagi'

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 12:49


A recent report from the World Health Organisation announced that world-wide the COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically affected peoples' mental health. For example, fear of contamination appears to have increased Obsessive Compulsory behaviours related to hygiene.  What can be done to help people who suffer such mental stress?    - Sebuah laporan baru-baru ini dari Organisasi Kesehatan Dunia mengumumkan bahwa di seluruh dunia pandemi COVID-19 telah secara dramatis mempengaruhi kesehatan mental masyarakat. Misalnya, ketakutan akan kontaminasi tampaknya telah meningkatkan perilaku Obsesif Kompulsif terkait dengan kebersihan. Apa yang dapat dilakukan untuk membantu orang yang menderita tekanan mental seperti itu?

Raising Runners
Building resilience in youth

Raising Runners

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 27:19


In this episode I dive a little deeper into resilience and how we can help our kids develop it. Info from run club curriculum, Australian parent.net and APA. Feel free to email merakirunclub.com

Astro Awani
Agenda AWANI: Waspada HFMD 'mengganas'

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 28:10


Penularan jangkitan Penyakit Tangan, Kaki dan Mulut (HFMD) dalam kalangan kanak-kanak kembali membimbangkan kebelakangan ini. Apa yang perlu dilakukan untuk elak penularan HFMD?

Astro Awani
Agenda AWANI: Guru Tunjang Sekolah SEJAHTERA

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 28:09


"Guru Tunjang Sekolah SEJAHTERA" telah dipilih sebagai tema sambutan Hari Guru Kebangsaan 2022. Apa makna tema ini dan sejauh mana pentingnya dalam sistem Pendidikan negara?

Astro Awani
AWANI Pagi: HFMD, Apa Penjaga Perlu Tahu

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 26:53


Apa itu Penyakit Tangan Kaki dan Mulut (HFMD)? Bagaimana HFMD boleh merebak dan kenapa perlunya isolasi? Ikuti perbincangan mengenai topik ini dalam #AWANIpagi. #AWANInews #MalaysiaSihat

Parenting Understood
Ep. 46 - Searching for science on social media: A discussion with Dr. Cara Goodwin on what research really tells us about parenting

Parenting Understood

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 30:31


In this episode, we are excited to be joined by Dr. Cara Goodwin, founder of Parenting Translator. We discuss the role of research in information available to parents on parenting and child development. We focus on several important themes present in social media regarding parenting, including a one size fits all approach to parenting, attachment and behavior theory and reward systems. We also discuss the importance of realistic expectations for parents. Dr. Cara Goodwin has a Bachelor's in Psychology and Neuroscience from the University of Virginia, a Master's in Developmental Psychiatry from Cambridge University, a Master's in Child Psychology from Vanderbilt University, and a PhD in Child Psychology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She completed an APA accredited clinical psychology internship at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a postdoctoral fellowship at Duke University.  She is currently licensed as a clinical psychologist in the state of Virginia.  You can learn more about Dr. Goodwin and her work at: Parenting Translator If you are raising a Toddler and you'd like to learn more about Back Pocket Essentials, visit ThrivingToddler.com. 

What's New in Adapted Physical Education
Adapted Aquatics and APE Teaching Tips

What's New in Adapted Physical Education

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 54:25


Listen in on the May NCPEID APE Collaborative, featuring two well-experienced guest veterans in the field of APA, to discuss current issues in adapted aquatics as well as lessons and tips for adapting, innovating, and inventing in the APE field. Dr. Monica Lepore (@MonicaLepore), retired APE professor from West Chester University will be discussing current issues in adapted aquatics. Ann Griffin (@GWAEA_AdaptedPE), retired APE teacher and consultant from Grant Wood Area Education Agency in east central Iowa will be sharing her knowledge and expertise on the challenges and lessons she's learned from her 40 years of experience in the field.

Astro Awani
Cerita Sebalik Berita: Tinjauan susulan ban MADA pecah di Pokok Sena

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 14:58


Perkembangan gangguan bekalan air susulan loji rawatan air (LRA) terpaksa dihenti tugas akibat runtuhan ban kanan Terusan Tengah milik Lembaga Kemajuan Pertanian Muda (MADA) bersama Wakil Astro AWANI Kedah, Abdul Hadi Che Awang. Apa reaksi penduduk yang terjejas apabila kejadian ini berlaku ketika mereka masih meraikan sambutan Aidilfitri?

The Dream Journal
Dreams, the Body and Mysticism with Dr. Bruce Bynum

The Dream Journal

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022


We know that humanity originated in Africa. Africa is therefore at the root of all that makes us human: our spirituality, civilization, arts, sciences, philosophy, and even our conscious and unconscious minds. Today we welcome back poet and author Dr. Edward Bruce Bynum. We talk about his new book Our African Unconscious: The Black Origins of Mysticism and Psychology and about what he will be presenting at his welcoming keynote at the IASD Tucson conference in July. Bruce starts by marveling about how little we have changed biologically in 50,000 years yet how far we have come culturally and scientifically. We talk about how mysticism emerges out of physical and biological experiences and about the flexibility of our experience of time. We go into the history of mysticism and how it was not always dominated by old, white men including discussion of female priests of the ancient Asclepion temples and the growing modern recognition of Native Americans and other aboriginal cultures. We touch on OBEs, NDEs, precognitive dreams and pyramids as places if initiation. We take a call from Ray from Santa Cruz who brings up topics of life after death and past lives. He shares a short, powerful dream about a scarab. Bruce ends by reading his poem, “I dream”. BIO: Edward Bruce Bynum, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist and Diplomat in clinical psychology. He is nationally certified in biofeedback and is a senior fellow in the National Association for Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback. His focus is psychosomatic medicine, hypnosis and individual psychotherapy, and he is currently in private practice in Hadley Massachusetts. His most recent books include Our African Unconscious, Dark Light Consciousness (both of which are now available in audio form) and The Dreamlife of Families. New poetry books include The First Bird, The Magdalene Poems, The Luminous Heretic, and Gospel of the Dark Orisha. He recently received an APA award for “an outstanding and lasting contribution to the exploration of the farther reaches of the human spirit”. Contact him at ObeliskFoundation.com. Get your dreams out of lockdown at the 2022 IASD dream conference in Tucson July 17-21. Register and learn more at https://iasdconferences.org/2022/ We play clips from the following two guest-selected songs: Dream Weaver by Gary Wright and the Moody Blues, Ride My Seesaw. Outro music is Everything by Mood Science. Ambient music created by Rick Kleffel new every week. Many thanks to Rick Kleffel for also engineering the show, to Tony Russomano for answering the phones and to Ewa Malady for audio editing. Show aired on May 7, 2022. The Dream Journal is produced at and airs on KSQD Santa Cruz, 90.7 FM, streaming live at KSQD.org 10-11am Saturday mornings Pacific time.  Catch it live and call in with your dreams or questions at 831-900-5773 or at onair@ksqd.org. If you want to contact Katherine Bell with feedback, suggestions for future shows or to inquire about exploring your own dreams with her, contact katherine@ksqd.org, or find out more about her at ExperientialDreamwork.com. The complete KSQD Dream Journal podcast page can be found at ksqd.org/the-dream-journal. You can also check out The Dream Journal on the following podcast platforms:  Rate it, review it, subscribe and tell your friends. Apple Podcasts Google Play Stitcher  Spotify

Astro Awani
Agenda AWANI: Cari penyelesaian lindungi migran

Astro Awani

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 25:35


Apa penyelesaian komprehensif bagi perlindungan yang lebih baik terhadap pelarian Rohingya di negara ini? Hantar semula ke negara asal, adakah semudah itu? Diskusi 8.30 malam

PSETUHNYA
S2E32 - Kita Berhak Atas Udara Bersih, Bukan Asap Rokok bersama Meita Veruswati, MKM, PhD(c)

PSETUHNYA

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 49:39


Kita berhak atas udara bersih! Ini bener-bener hak manusia, loh! Ada hukumnya. Sering kali kita diganggu dengan asap rokok. Apakah itu ditempat makan, angkutan umum, ruang pertemuan dan lainnya. Sering kali mungkin kita ngalah. "Aduh ga enak menegurnya. Nanti orangnya tersinggung." Apa sih yang bisa kita lakukan? Apakah kita harus terus mengalah? Bagaimana mengurangi jumlah perokok di Indonesia? Narasumber kita Meita Veruswati, MKM, PhD(c) - (@mytasivasya) , seorang dosen di Universitas Muhammadiyah Prof. Dr. Hamka. Seorang peneliti mengenai pengendalian tobako (tombacco control), smoke free zone. Atau area bebas rokok. Enjoy listening!

The Thoughtful Counselor
Aperture Awareness: A Neurobiological Grounded Approach to Connected Conversation

The Thoughtful Counselor

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 60:43


Dr. Raissa Miller interviews Dr. Kathryn Ford about the centrality of openness in relationships. Dr. Ford discusses the relational neuroscience underlying her Aperture Awareness approach and offers practical and concrete strategies for fostering and enhancing openness. Dr. Ford shares specific examples from her clinical practice and provides listeners with ideas and resources for further learning.   For more on Kathryn, links from the conversation, and APA citation for this episode visit concept.paloaltou.edu The Thoughtful Counselor is created in partnership with Palo Alto University's Division of Continuing & Professional Studies. Learn more at concept.paloaltou.edu

Recovery Radio
Managing Our Relationships to Technology (with Don Grant)

Recovery Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 75:24


Welcome back to another episode of the Landmark Recovery Podcast! We are kicking off the month of May with a new theme, What is Success? May is also Mental Health Awareness Month, so we are really looking forward to the topics we have for you this month. In this episode of the Landmark Recovery Podcast, Dr. Don Grant and Michael Walsh discuss technology addiction and how the use of technology influences our everyday life. -- Dr. Grant is an internationally award-winning media psychologist, published researcher, Doctoral Addictions Counselor, and educator with specific expertise in technology's impact on mental health. He is President of the American Psychological Association Division 46 (The Society for Media Psychology & Technology), and Chair of both APA's “Device Management & Intelligence” and “Strategic Planning” Committees. He is also Executive Director of Outpatient Services for Newport Healthcare, which recently launched their new PHP/IOP adolescent treatment program under his leadership in Santa Monica, California. Dr. Grant designs, presents, and facilitates “Healthy Device Management” and “Good Digital Citizenship” treatment strategy and educational training workshops for clinicians, educators, parents, and school communities. Last summer, Dr. Grant was invited to join the APA Coalition for Psychology in Schools & Education, which was commissioned by the Centers for Disease Control to create a series of adolescent psychology focused support manuals on behalf of the DASH funded APA Safe and Supportive Schools Primers Project. Don and his team completed the last of these manuals in October, with the entire series soon to be distributed by the CDC to schools, administrators, and educators nationwide. Don's current research includes investigations of potential effects of social media, cyberbullying, and device driven attachment bonds on adolescents, teens, young adults, families, and our culture/relationships-at-large. -- This podcast is a production of Landmark Recovery, which offers treatment for drug and alcohol addiction. If you or someone you know needs help with substance abuse, please call Landmark Recovery at 888-448-0302.

Being Human
Episode 72: The DSM Disease (Part One)

Being Human

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 33:40


Welcome to Episode 72 of the Being Human Podcast: The DSM Disease (Part One) In this first episode of a two-part series, Dr. Greg begins to break open major flaws of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).  He highlights problems in how mental disorders and diseases are defined and gives a glimpse into how it will become harder for Catholic mental health professionals to adhere to both their faith and APA standards. (Note: Mature content discussed.) Discussed in this episode: What is the DSM?  The influence of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and the Diagnostic & Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) on the entire mental health field and beyond;   The history of homosexuality in the DSM and its removal due to political reasons;  The danger of not having objective criteria for defining human excellence and flourishing;  How the APA's relativistic view of the human person is problematic when defining mental disorders; The need for a disposition of compassion when addressing issues related to mental illness and sexuality;   The importance of recognizing the dignity of each human person.  Resources mentioned or relevant: The most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders;  Psychology as Religion: The Cult of Self-Worship by Dr. Paul Vitz; Dr. Robert Spitzer reading his letter of apology;   Learn more about IDDM (Mentorship), Dr. Greg's new model of care; Need help? Schedule a free 15-minute consultation call with our staff to discuss how we can support you!  Become a member of the Integrated Life Community to get access to every course Dr. Greg has created, AND the opportunity to participate in Integrated Life Intensives: time-limited, group experiences covering topics like boundaries, communication, trauma, forgiveness, and more!   Sign up for Being Human, our weekly newsletter, to stay up to date on exciting developments at CatholicPsych; Download The Integrated App for access to free audio exercises, the Catholic Mindfulness Virtual Retreat, courses, prayer resources, and more;  Visit our website to read the CatholicPsych blog, shop in the CatholicPsych bookshop, or discover other resources we have available.  If there is a topic or a question you would like Dr. Greg to address, please email your request to beinghuman@catholicpsych.com - we would love to hear from you!   Rate, review, and subscribe Please help us in our mission to integrate the Faith with Psychology by hitting subscribe and also sharing this podcast with your friends. Please consider rating or leaving a review of our show. It helps us reach other Catholics just like you who want to become more integrated, whole, and happy human beings. For Apple podcasts, click here, scroll to the bottom, tap to rate 5 stars, and choose “write a review”. Then type your sincere thoughts about the show! If you haven't already, make sure to subscribe so you don't miss out on any episodes. Subscribe to the podcast now!

Add to Cart with Kulap Vilaysack & SuChin Pak
APAHM 2022: Everything Everywhere All Month

Add to Cart with Kulap Vilaysack & SuChin Pak

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 25:55


It's that time of year again. The leaves are coming back, flowers are blooming, our Ku's birthday is here, and it's time to celebrate (even more than usual) all the Asian peoples of the world! We're kicking off APA Heritage Month with some of our favorite products, movies, shows, and books from APA folks.  Please note, Add To Cart contains mature themes and may not be appropriate for all listeners.    To see all products mentioned in this episode, head to @addtocartpod on Instagram. To purchase any of the products, see below. Kulap loves the Jasmine Mist from RANAVAT SuChin wrote an intro for My Life Growing up Asian in America, a beautiful book of essays You must watch We Are Lady Parts – it is hilarious and wonderful  SuChin and her friends had a night of cooking meals from Eric Kim's cookbook Korean American: Food That Tastes Like Home Friend of the pod Chriselle Lim has a new perfume out called Phlur - but hurry up because her first line sold out FAST! Everyone must go see Everything Everywhere All At Once! It is Kulap's FAVORITE MOVIE!!   Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.    Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium.    Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows: lemonadamedia.com/sponsors See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kencan Dengan Tuhan
Edisi Hari Senin, 2 Mei 2022 - Cinta yang tak terbatas

Kencan Dengan Tuhan

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 5:25


"Tetapi jika ada seorang yang tidak memeliharakan sanak saudaranya, apalagi seisi rumahnya, orang itu murtad dan lebih buruk dari orang yang tidak beriman." (1 Timotius 5:8) Renungan: Ada sepucuk surat yang merupakan ungkapan isi hati seseorang yang sudah lanjut usianya. Isinya demikian: "Aku yang sekarang berbeda dengan aku yang dahulu. Bukan hanya kulitku yang keriput, tenagaku pun rasa-rasanya mulai melemah. Aku tidak lagi sekuat dahulu. Ingatanku pun tidak setajam dahulu. Untuk itu aku minta maaf karena telah merepotkanmu. Maafkan aku karena mengganggu waktu makanmu bersama keluarga kecilmu, ketika tanpa sengaja aku mengotori pakaianku dengan makanan yang kumakan, sehingga kamu harus membersihkannya. Maafkan aku karena telah membuang waktumu yang berharga itu untuk menjawab pertanyaan yang kuulang-ulang. Maafkan aku telah menambah pekerjaan rumahmu untuk memandikan aku. Belum lagi setiap kali aku susah untuk berdiri dari tempat tidurku, maka aku akan memanggilmu. Maafkan aku, karena sudah merepotkanmu, Nak." Ketika saya berkunjung ke salah satu panti jompo, dan melihat kondisi para lansia yang tinggal di sana mungkin seperti itulah isi hati mereka seperti yang tertulis dalam surat tersebut. Memasuki usia senja yang hampir malam, tidak banyak orang dapat menebarkan senyum kebahagiaan di wajahnya. Rasa khawatir dan takut ada di benak mereka. Banyak lansia menjadi khawatir dan takut membebani orang-orang terdekat karena keberadaan mereka. Mereka mungkin takut menjadi sedih jika suatu saat mendengar keluh kesah dari orang-orang terdekat karena lelah mengurusi mereka yang telah menua. Oleh karenanya, ada di antara mereka yang akhirnya memilih panti jompo sebagai solusi terbaik. Sebagai seorang anak mungkin kita akan menganggap reaksi ini sebagai sesuatu yang berlebihan. Pikir kita, tidaklah mungkin kita akan berlaku kasar kepada orang tua yang telah membesarkan kita. Namun, cobalah untuk memahami perasaan orang tua kita yang telah lanjut usianya. Untuk itu kita harus menjaga, merawat dan memperhatikan mereka dengan penuh kesabaran dan kasih sayang. Jika kita sungguh-sungguh yakin dapat menjadi anak yang berbakti kepada mereka hingga ujung usia mereka, maka yakinkanlah mereka akan hal itu. Dengan demikian, hati mereka pun akan menjadi tenang, sehingga mereka dapat menikmati masa tua mereka dengan berbahagia bersama kita dan juga keluarga kecil kita. Tidaklah rugi jika kita diberi kesempatan untuk merawat orang tua kita yang telah lanjut usia. Ingatlah bagaimana pengorbanan mereka. Telah banyak keringat dan air mata yang mereka cucurkan dalam merawat dan membesarkan kita. Apa yang kita berikan kepada mereka saat ini, tidaklah sebanding dengan apa yang telah mereka berikan kepada kita. Jadi, sayangilah dan berikanlah pelayanan terbaik kita kepada mereka. Tuhan Yesus memberkati. Doa: Tuhan Yesus, ampunilah aku karena selama ini, baik ku sadari maupun tidak ku sadari, aku telah menyakiti hati kedua orang tuaku. Amin. (Dod).

Radio Health Journal
When Does Grief Become A Disorder?

Radio Health Journal

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 13:25


Everyone grieves differently, but some can become completely debilitated by their sorrow for years. The American Psychiatric Association recently recognized this type of grief as a diagnosis called Prolonged Grief Disorder. One doctor behind the decision talks about how this will help people find a way out of that cycle of grieving.   Learn more at: https://radiohealthjournal.org/prolonged-grief-disorder/

PRAMBORS PODCAST
Eps 21 "Real Talk"

PRAMBORS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 14:15


Setelah cukup lama nggak lihat Kayla di pantry kantor sejak punya pacar, akhirnya Fernandi punya momen bareng sahabatnya itu. Mereka sempat growing apart sejak Kayla kekeuh pengen punya pacar dan mulai coba virtual dating di sana sini. Awalnya, buka puasa itu jadi ajang update life yang seru. Sampai akhirnya, percakapan malah membawa mereka ke sebuah pengakuan besar yang selama ini disimpan rapat-rapat oleh keduanya. Dengerin episode Balada Cerita Ramadhan 2022 setiap Senin - Jumat & jangan lupa ikutan kuisnya di Twitter dan berkesempatan dapetin uang tunai 300 ribu rupiah! Caranya jawab pertanyaan berikut ini di akun Twitter kamu: Apa hewan yang dijadikan perumpamaan oleh Fernandi, pas lagi ceramahin Kayla? A. Ikan B. Ubur-ubur Jawab dengan format: NAMA UMUR KOTA JAWABAN #PramborsBCR2022 Tungguin deh siapa tau kamu yang dapet uang tunai 300ribu! #PramborsBCR2022

The Couples Therapist Couch
Bill Doherty on the Ethical Lives of Clients

The Couples Therapist Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 54:05


In today's episode I spoke with Dr. William Doherty about the role of a therapist when clients bring us difficult situations, decisions, and ethical dilemmas they are facing in their lives. As therapists we are in a unique position to help people these very personal issues, but we have to be skilled at how we do that. Dr. William Doherty has been a leader in pushing the field of couples therapy to new heights. He is a professor at the University of Minnesota, creator of Discernment Counseling, and author of several books on therapy and relationships including his new book, The Ethical Lives of Clients: Transcending Self-Interest in Psychotherapy. Find out more at dohertyfoundation.org and discernmentcounseling.com The Couples Therapist Couch is the podcast for Couples Therapists about the practice of couples therapy. The host, Shane Birkel, interviews an expert in the field of couples therapy each week. Please subscribe to the podcast for more great episodes. Find out more about the Couples Therapist Inner Circle This episode is sponsored by Clearly Clinical Continuing Ed.  Clearly Clinical is the nation's premier podcast Continuing Ed provider, and features industry experts from across the world.  Clearly Clinical is an approved CE provider with the APA, ASWB, NBCC, NAADAC, CCAPP, and CAMFT, and is women-owned, founded by Elizabeth Irias, LMFT.  Clearly Clinical supports minority and women presenters, and donates to  Feeding America.  And the best part?  Clearly Clinical is literally the most affordable continuing ed provider in the country, bringing you unlimited CE courses for just $60 a year.  As a promo for my listeners, you can use the code COUCH to get an additional 10% off.  They have a number of free podcast CE courses, too, including a CE interview with Dr. Julie Gottman.  Check those out at their website, ClearlyClinical.com. 

PRAMBORS PODCAST
Eps 20 "The New Girl"

PRAMBORS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 15:37


Amy super duper jealous ketika Ghina, si anak baru yang cantik dan kaya raya mendapat perhatian dari orang-orang termasuk gebetannya, Mas Ilham. Amy pun sering menjadikan Ghina bahan gosip ke dua sahabatnya, Natalya dan Deryan. Sampai suatu hari, Ghina mendengar kata-kata jahat Amy secara tidak langsung. What will happen to Amy and the new girl? Dengerin episode Balada Cerita Ramadhan 2022 setiap Senin - Jumat & jangan lupa ikutan kuisnya di Twitter dan berkesempatan dapetin uang tunai 300 ribu rupiah! Caranya jawab pertanyaan berikut ini di akun Twitter kamu: Apa yang dilakukan Ghina, setelah tahu Amy ngomongin dia? A. Nge-remote kerjaan dari rumah B. Balik marah dan kesel ke Amy Jawab dengan format: NAMA UMUR KOTA JAWABAN #PramborsBCR2022 Tungguin deh siapa tau kamu yang dapet uang tunai 300ribu! #PramborsBCR2022

What's the F***ing Point?
Ben J. Munday on on Breaking Through Barriers via the Body

What's the F***ing Point?

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 61:15


The word “somatic” is very on-trend right now (…unless you're the APA and you've surreptitiously withdrawn contuing education credits for all somatic-focused trainings because you're a bunch of rigid, evidence-based-yet-evidence-denying buttheads)… oh, did I say that?I digress. The science** is clear that somatic (AKA body-focused) approaches are effective for treating trauma, anxiety, depression, and more— and, outside of mental health issues, that working directly with the body (as opposed to just the mind) is beneficial for increasing a sense of confidence/self-efficacy and decreasing the buildup of daily stress that can lead to burnout. Among other benefits too abundant to list in this one paragraph!The guest for this episode is Ben Munday, who went from growing up in a very masculine environment to being surrounded by powerful women in the fashion industry. When he decided he wanted to make a career shift to focus on coaching women in business, he experienced in his coach training how powerful working directly with the body could be, and knew he wanted to make somatic work core to both his own lifestyle and his approach with clients.As you'll hear quickly in our conversation, Ben is a smart, kind, and grounded person— and it was a pleasure talking with him about topics we're both passionate about.If you love the episode and decide to schedule a free consultation call with Ben, make sure to tell him Bodyful podcast sent you and he will give you a discount if you decide to book!FIND BEN ONLINE: his website (I highly recommend downloading the free guidebook), LinkedIn, and on Instagram.For full show notes including Ben's full bio and links to resources mentioned in the episode, head to https://gaiacenter.co/blog/bodyful-17.----------------------------------------------------Did you love this episode? Please tell a friend, and subscribe to Bodyful for a new episode every 2 weeks!✨ For Previous Bodyful episodes and show notes✨ In Tennessee and looking for therapy? Check out The Gaia Center.✨ Get the monthly Gaia Center newsletter with exclusive content & tips from our therapists✨ Learn about coaching, speaking, and other stuff Val is up to

Everything Co-op with Vernon Oakes
Stacey Sutton discusses the Ideology of Black-led Co-ops & the Solidarity Economy Ecosystem

Everything Co-op with Vernon Oakes

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 49:03


Professor Stacey Sutton discusses the Ideology of Black-led Cooperatives and the Solidarity Economy Ecosystem. The discussion focused on discussion will focus on Sutton's research study "Real Black Utopias," a cooperative city research study, where she examines the infrastructure and ideology of Black-led cooperatives and solidarity economy ecosystem in multiple cities. Stacey Sutton partners with grassroots and community organizations committed to racial and economic justice, equitable development, anti-displacement, participatory democracy, and cooperative economics. Her scholarship and teaching are in community economic development, with a central focus on racial and economic justice; economic democracy and worker-owned cooperatives; movement building and the solidarity economy; gentrification and dispossession; neighborhood small business dynamics; and disparate effects of punitive policy. Sutton has led APA award-winning student projects for the Plan Making Studio and co-developed feasibility studies for community partners in her Solidarity Economy course. She served as the principal investigator of a Mellon Foundation Sawyer Seminar (entitled Urban Edges – Dreams, Divisions, and Infrastructures: Comparative Cross-Disciplinary Dialogues about 21st Century American Cities) that brought together leaders within and beyond the academy to advance visions of more just and equitable cities. Sutton has supported the work of numerous community organizations in Chicago and was appointed to the Community Wealth Building Working Group, Office of Equity and Racial Justice in the City of Chicago's Office of the Mayor. Sutton received a BA from Loyola University in Baltimore, an MBA from New York University, an MS from the New School for Social Research in New York, and a joint Ph.D. in Urban Planning and Sociology from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ.

Decoding Healthcare Innovation
#24: Using Digital Health to Address Chronic Conditions with Dr. Omar Manejwala of DarioHealth

Decoding Healthcare Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 28:54


What you'll get out of this episodeIn this episode, Rebecca talks to Omar Manejwala, MD, Chief Medical Officer of DarioHealth. He focuses on the impact of behavior on chronic diseases at scale. He is also one of the nation's leading experts on addiction medicine, substance use disorders, behavioral health and mental illness. His clear explanations of behavioral science makes him easy to listen to and learn from. How Dr. Manejwala got to DarioHealth and why What the arc of digital health adoption and re-imagining of care looks like What will emerge as novel in the digital health space and why About Omar Manejwala, MDChief Medical Officer of DarioHealthDr. Manejwala is keen on solving for the impact of behavior on chronic diseases at scale. His mission is to improve health and reduce costs by making engagement and retention in effective healthcare the path of least resistance. He's also particularly interested in the unique challenges of transitioning direct to consumer digital health and virtual care solutions to B2B2C markets. In March 2020 he joined DarioHealth (NASDAQ:DRIO) to make effective care for chronic conditions the path of least resistance. Before that he was the Chief Medical Officer of Catasys, a firm that blends human engagement and technology to reduce the need for expensive acute medical care by addressing its fundamental behavioral health drivers. Dr. Manejwala has an MBA from U. Va, is a Distinguished Fellow of the APA, a Fellow of ASAM, and is board certified in Psychiatry, Addiction Medicine and Medical Management.  About DarioHealthWith tens of thousands of active users worldwide and proven clinical outcomes, DarioHealth is a global digital therapeutics solution leader revolutionizing the way people manage their chronic conditions. Built for and around the user, Dario has created individualized solutions that combine best practices in digital technologies, analytics, hardware, and personal coaching that gently instruct, encourage, and inspire users to self-manage their health day to day. Read More Connect with Omar Manejwala, MD on LinkedIn Find out more about DarioHealth  Related Content: Episode 19: The Evolution of Telemental Health with Dr. Tom Insel, author of Healing     Coming UpJoin us next time when we'll be interviewing Liz Powell of G2G consulting about raising non-dilutive funding in healthcare and why it's important to have a policy/government strategy, even as a startup.                                  Join the ConversationAre you a digital health or health system innovator? Tell us what topics and people you'd like us to cover in future episodes:– Website – LinkedIn – Twitter – Instagram – YouTubeFollow our daily updates on LinkedIn:– Carrie – RebeccaAbout Your HostsCarrie Nixon and Rebecca Gwilt are partners at Nixon Gwilt Law, a healthcare innovation law firm exclusively serving Providers, Digital Health Companies, and Life Science Businesses seeking to transform the way we receive and experience healthcare. Find out more at NixonGwiltLaw.com. This podcast is produced by Slice of Healthcare LLC. 

PRAMBORS PODCAST
Eps 19 "Pesan Terakhir"

PRAMBORS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 12:09


Setiap Ramadhan, Yasmin pasti menunggu-nunggu untuk taraweh bareng pacarnya dari SMA yang tinggal hanya 5 rumah dari dirinya. Tetapi, hari ini Yasmin nggak merasa semangat buat pergi setelah kembali gagal dalam kompetisi menari. Rifky, sang pacar berusaha menyemangati Yasmin dan menghiburnya. Sayangnya, Yasmin malah merasa ganjal. Seakan yang berjalan dengannya bukan Rifky yang ia kenal. Dengerin episode Balada Cerita Ramadhan 2022 setiap Senin - Jumat & jangan lupa ikutan kuisnya di Twitter dan berkesempatan dapetin uang tunai 300 ribu rupiah! Caranya jawab pertanyaan berikut ini di akun Twitter kamu: Apa yang dilakukan Rifky ketika Yasmin menangis di akhir cerita? A. Bawain makanan B. Menjemput Yasmin Jawab dengan format: NAMA UMUR KOTA JAWABAN #PramborsBCR2022 Tungguin deh siapa tau kamu yang dapet uang tunai 300ribu! #PramborsBCR2022

SiKutuBuku
Drama Twitter vs Elon Musk: Strategi Pertahanan Pil Racun

SiKutuBuku

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 9:39


Saya membahas soal perseteruan antara Elon Musk dan Twitter. Sebagai pemilik saham terbesar, konglomerat Elon berusaha untuk mencaplok Twitter dengan memperbanyak kepemilikan sahamnya. Direksi Twitter pun tidak tinggal diam, mereka berencana untuk mengaktifkan poison pills atau pil beracun untuk memaksa Elon untuk mengurungkan niatnya. Apa sih itu poison pill? Apakah Elon berani menelan pil racun tersebut?

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
Reflections on Content Creation and the Therapy Profession

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 35:22


Reflections on Content Creation and the Therapy Profession Curt and Katie chat about our principles and philosophies as they relate to the work we do, including podcast creation. We also reflect on the feedback we've received on episodes with large listenership as well as other typical responses we get to the work we do. Considering content creation as part of your business? This isn't a how-to, but it certainly can give you things to consider before you dive in. In this podcast episode we talk about how we put together the podcast We've received a lot of feedback recently about our episodes and we wanted to talk about how we make decisions on what we talk about, who we interview, whether we call folks out on the podcast, and how we edit the episodes. Our Philosophy and Principles for creating content for the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide “We can talk about how to navigate the career, but at some point, we become complicit in a broken system. And so, we've been talking about how to balance: how do we give the tools to navigate what is, and then also give the empowerment and/or the validation that advocacy needs to happen.” – Katie Vernoy How to navigate the career as is (tools and strategies to survive in this field) The importance of advocacy in moving forward with our field How to strategically time advocacy for best effect How we take in feedback and respond Responding to Feedback from our Audience on our “What's New in the DSM-5-TR?” Episode The concern about the Autism diagnosis changes Whether we should have called out Dr. Michael B. First and the impressions of what was said Grappling with the tension between protecting our audience and getting our guests on record and/or advocating for change in the larger systems How people can impact what becomes DSM 6 (and the efforts we are advocating for) The feedback we received and how we sort through it and improve The limits of our capacity Our plans for additional interviews to address the changes “It's been my experience in advocacy, that large systems end up ignoring those individual voices. Those individual voices are incredibly powerful when they're used in the right place at the right time.” – Curt Widhalm A Broader View of the Feedback We Receive on the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Podcast The depth of the conversation and our ability to deepen conversations with additional episodes Audience members anchoring on the title or episode artwork and not looking at the whole episode when pieces of the content resonate in a different way Our Plan Going Forward with the Podcast Advocacy, information, and focus on the profession Not as much of a focus on business building, money mindset, and side hustles Real conversations about the realities of working in this profession Working to leave the profession better than we find it   Our Generous Sponsors for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: Thrizer Thrizer is a new modern billing platform for therapists that was built on the belief that therapy should be accessible AND clinicians should earn what they are worth. Their platform automatically gets clients reimbursed by their insurance after every session. Just by billing your clients through Thrizer, you can potentially save them hundreds every month, with no extra work on your end. Every time you bill a client through Thrizer, an insurance claim is automatically generated and sent directly to the client's insurance. From there, Thrizer provides concierge support to ensure clients get their reimbursement quickly, directly into their bank account. By eliminating reimbursement by check, confusion around benefits, and obscurity with reimbursement status, they allow your clients to focus on what actually matters rather than worrying about their money. It is very quick to get set up and it works great in completement with EHR systems. Their team is super helpful and responsive, and the founder is actually a long-time therapy client who grew frustrated with his reimbursement times The best part is you don't need to give up your rate. They charge a standard 3% payment processing fee! Thrizer lets you become more accessible while remaining in complete control of your practice. A better experience for your clients during therapy means higher retention. Money won't be the reason they quit on therapy. Sign up using THIS LINK if you want to test Thrizer completely risk free! Sign up for Thrizer with code 'moderntherapists' for 1 month of no credit card fees or payment processing fees! That's right - you will get one month of no payment processing fees, meaning you earn 100% of your cash rate during that time! Melissa Forziat Events & Marketing Today's episode of The Therapy Reimagined podcast is brought to you by Melissa Forziat Events & Marketing. Melissa is a small business marketing expert who specializes in marketing advice for businesses that have limited resources.  Are you looking to boost your reach and get more clients from social media?  Check out the “How to Win at Social Media (even with no budget!)” course from marketing expert, Melissa Forziat. It can be so hard to get engagement on social media or to know what to post to tell the story of your brand.  It can be even harder to get those conversations to turn into new clients. Social media marketing isn't just for businesses that have a ton of money to spend on advertising.  Melissa will work you step-by-step through creating a smart plan that fits within your budget.  How to Win at Social Media is packed full of information. Usually a course as detailed as this would be priced in the thousands, but to make it accessible to small businesses, it is available for only $247.  PLUS, as a listener of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide, you can use promo code THERAPY to get 10% off.  So, if you are ready to go to the next level in your business, click THIS LINK and sign up for the How to Win at Social Media course today! Please note that Therapy Reimagined/The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Podcast is a paid affiliate for Melissa Forziat Events & Marketing, so we will get a little bit of money in our pockets if you sign up using our link. Thank you in advance!    Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! The Therapy Reimagined Mission Our Patreon Buy Me A Coffee Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: What's New in the DSM-5-TR? A Living Wage for Prelicensees Mission Driven Work Therapists are Not Robots Why You Shouldn't Sell Out to Better Help Advocacy in the Wake of Looming Healthcare Shortages   Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: Patreon Buy Me A Coffee Podcast Homepage Therapy Reimagined Homepage Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube   Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group   Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano https://groomsymusic.com/   Transcript for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide podcast (Autogenerated):   Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode of The Modern Therapist Survival Guide is brought to you by Thrizer.   Katie Vernoy  00:03  Thrizer is a modern billing platform for private pay therapists. Their platform automatically gets clients reimbursed by their insurance after every session. Just by billing your clients through Thrizer you can potentially save them hundreds every month with no extra work on your end. The best part is you don't need to give up your rate they charge a standard 3% payment processing fee. By using the link in the show notes you can get a month of billing without processing fees just to test them out for your clients.   Curt Widhalm  00:30 Listen at the end of the episode for more information.   Katie Vernoy  00:34 This episode is also brought to you by Melissa Forziat Events and Marketing   Curt Widhalm  00:39 Melissa Forziat is a small business marketing expert who specializes in marketing advice for businesses that have limited resources, including the very special course How to Win at Social Media, Even with No Budget. Stay tuned to the end of the episode to learn how you can get the most from social media marketing, even with little to no budget.   Announcer  00:59 You're listening to The Modern Therapist Survival Guide where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  01:12 Welcome back modern therapists. This is The Modern Therapist Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists and things that we do the things that we have come up in our field, the ways that we want to spread our messages. And if you're not a therapist, welcome and listen to it from the angle of our intended audience being therapists. Katie is laughing at me because she said that this is an episode where we're not supposed to sound defensive.   Katie Vernoy  01:53 Oh, dear, we're already off track. Thanks, Curt. No, I think this is an episode where you have to be completely transparent like this is this is an episode that we need to do. And I think that there's positive and wonderful things that we need to talk about. And there's some stuff that we might have some feels about to use the language of the young folks today.   Curt Widhalm  02:15 I don't know who you think is the young folks today?   Katie Vernoy  02:19 Fine, fine. Let's move forward.   Curt Widhalm  02:22 All right. We have a lot of new listeners here over the last few months. And we want to thank you for joining us each week. And it's been a while since Katie and I have clarified a lot of things about our podcast, this is maybe an opportunity for some of our new listeners to get to know us in a little bit different way and for our longtime listeners to maybe be able to have a little bit better understanding of what Katie and my process is. And the working title of this episode is. So you want to be a content creator. This is really less of a how to episode and more of a here's the things that have come up in our process that helps us to define how we largely go about things. Now a lot of our listeners who have joined us recently found us through our DSM five episodes, some of our continuing education content. And what we want to do in this episode is kind of talk about what some of the things are that have come up for us as content creators here over the last few months, and how we made some of the decisions that we've made and kind of some of the principles that we do in making our product, something that hopefully all of you enjoy.   Katie Vernoy  03:49 Starting with the principles. I think when we first started and this was way back in 2017, I think the idea was, let's put together a podcast that has conversations that don't typically happen, at least not in public spaces. A lot of therapists, I think, have some of these conversations in the background. But it's not something that is happening in grad school. It's not something that's happening in supervision frequently, and it's kind of the realities, the survival guide tactics of how do we actually navigate this career. And what we've found over the years is that the additional piece is like yeah, we can talk about how to navigate the career but at some point, we become complicit in a broken system. And so we we've been talking about how to balance how do we give the tools to navigate what is and then also give the empowerment and or the validation that advocacy needs to happen. And then each of us can step up in our own ways, whether it's in how we practice individually in our offices, or what we say to our legislators or those kinds of things like how can we advocate true change for our profession, you know, whether it's equity, whether it's pay, whether it's decolonizing, our practices, all of the things that we've wanted to make sure that stay in the forefront, we recognize that it's a hard way to balance because if we completely destroy mental health right now, because it's not working then, there's no mental health. But if we complicitly and complacently stand by and continue to reinforce how it's being done, then we're not making any progress. And so we're trying to walk that line to be able to say, Hey, this is what the profession is, this is how you can navigate it. And this is what we see as a potential future. And let's give you the tools to be able to help us all come together as modern therapists to push towards that new future.   Curt Widhalm  05:45 A lot of what our conversations on the back end have been here over the last month or so has been about a lot of the response that we've had, hearing from some of our audience members directly, following some of the online interpretations and reactions to our DSM-5 update episode where we had Dr. Michael be first as the APA, co author of the DSM-5-TR. And our background conversations between Katie and I have been why did we make the decisions that we made with this particular episode? And how does this fit within a lot of what Katie was just describing as our principals here. And Katie and I have been long involved in a lot of advocacy work, and know that some of the reactions that we've seen the immediate petitions to change the autism diagnostic criteria, based on the information that was presented in that episode, to prevent the DSM-5-TR from having those very changes made. And Katie and my work in advocacy, we knew that that kind of an effort is mis timed, because those books were already published in sitting in warehouses all around the world at that point that understanding some of the advocacy process is very much an important piece of this, that you hear us in a number of our episodes across time talking about advocacy. I don't know that the emphasis on how freaking long things take...   Katie Vernoy  07:33 So long, so long   Curt Widhalm  07:35 ...is something that people tend to forget. And there's oftentimes this very reactionary in the moment sort of thing that happens that people lose their enthusiasm, because then there's a next in the moment sort of thing happens. And this is why our principals are so important to us is because it helps us in deciding not only what we address, but how and importantly, when we address them. And if you want to hear in depth kind of discussion about it. We'll link in our show notes over at MTSG podcast about our efforts several years ago to get a mental health professionals organization to make a statement on paying pre licensed therapists a living wage. This is a long term process sort of thing. And I think that this starts to speak into some of the criticisms that we've been hearing about the DSM-5 episode from some of our audience here.   Katie Vernoy  08:37 The other element that I think is important is being able to go into conversations with reasonable expectations of what's going to happen in the conversation. And so there's the timing of the advocacy, but there's also getting a full picture of what the actual situation is. And I know for me, in interviewing Dr. First, I was expecting a lot more pushback on the questions we actually asked around inclusion around the discussions with folks with lived experience, around the limitations of the diagnoses. And the fact that he was willing to engage in those made me very excited. Now, as we had the conversation. There were a few different things that I was trying to pay attention to. And this is I guess, this goes into kind of editing choices as well as kind of the advocacy element of it. I wanted him on record about kind of what his perspective was, what his process was those kinds of things and I know that there was some language that he used, it was pretty cringy, there was a lot of outdated language, there was a little bit of editing to try to soften that for our audience as kind of a protective measure for our audience. But we couldn't edit out the cringiness of this individual. My concern, and this is something I've grappled with. And I, maybe maybe we would do it differently if we interviewed him again tomorrow. But I wanted to hear all of the pieces. I wanted it all on record. And so there were things that he said that I might have called him out on in person. But recognize that was potentially risking getting the next question answered. And the next question answered. It potentially risked the interview not happening, him not being recorded and on record with the things that he ended up saying. And to me, I felt like there was this really push pull on how do we protect our audience? And how do we move forward with the advocacy that needs to happen around this outdated medical model book that we all have to use?   Curt Widhalm  10:51 I think to that point, this is our protection of our audience, is within the scope of Katie and my principles. And I hope that our principles aligned with a lot of yours. But, you know, being very clear to what Katie said earlier, we are about advancing our profession, we are about better pay, we're about better education. And we incorporate a lot of social justice work within that. And it's very informed by a lot of social justice work. To peel back the curtains a little bit on our process. We do edit our podcasts, we aren't as clear as what our finished product is. We've edited...   Katie Vernoy  11:09 Clearly not.   Curt Widhalm  11:12 ...we edit out ums and coughs, and we allow our guests to be able to say, Hey, I didn't say that correctly, would you edit that back? Let me restate this in another way. And because we develop relationships with a lot of people who come on this podcast, we're very accommodating of that. And in this particular recording, part of what we consider is, is it important to advocate in this particular moment on something that's informative of our principles, and potentially lose the entire interview in the first place, then it becomes Katie and me pissing off one person and not having a podcast, whereas the 1000s of people who have downloaded, listened to, reacted to, made their own commentary, on what was said, is much more important within the advocacy process than us calling out one particular person at one time.   Katie Vernoy  12:44 Yeah.   Curt Widhalm  12:45 We feel that it's a lot more important to be able to hear, again, the very outdated and potentially harmful ideas of people who are in positions of power, much more so than being able to correct them in a moment by moment basis. And this is part of seeing advocacy as a much bigger unfolding process. And I think that a lot of the commentary that we've seen have separated, Katie and me from the comments by Dr. Michael First. But I see that people are also, you know, kind of holding us accountable on this too. And it's very much a stylistic decision. Just because we didn't push back on it doesn't mean that we agree with it. In fact, hopefully, this gives a lot more emphasis to our calls to action that will be coming over the next few months and several years as it leads up to whenever the DSM-6 comes out, of better being able to advocate for who's on these committees and how their processes are because this is information that had that episode just been. Here's the straightforward updates of what's happening. I don't think that would have ever shown up to the light of day.   Katie Vernoy  14:07 Sure. And I think the additional piece, I guess there's more than one piece, but that additional piece to that is I wanted to get to how do people impact this process, and we have him on record talking about that process and how people can take stances and give feedback and all those things. And I also was able to say to him like, hey, yeah, reach out to these lived experience and diagnostic communities to get feedback, like proactively seek it out. And he said, Oh, well, we kind of do that. Actually. That's a good idea. So it's, maybe it's small, but it's still there's things on record that can be used by folks who are advocating with the APA, that who are advocating around some of these changes where it's like, hey, the guy who is running this Committee, said it was a good idea or said this was their process. Here's why this process isn't happening. We need to address it, I mean, I think it's just it's creating a body of evidence. But I do want to go back to kind of our audience and the, and the harmful language. And I want to take that in. I really want to think about that because to me, I, I recognize that there are spots bias, different things that frame what I think is going to be harmful and not harmful. And I and I know we talked about this, Curt, that like the two of us had a larger goal with that that interview. And so I don't want us to lose sight that there were folks who are were harmed by some of the language that Dr. First used. And I'm not sure how to specifically address that. I mean, maybe we put content warnings on on things, you know, I'm not sure. I'm not sure how to do that. I mean, I don't know what what additional thoughts you've had around it, Curt. But I just for me, I feel like there are two things that are happening. And I think we may lean more towards like the let's get stuff done. Let's not worry about the small things in the moment with the larger picture. But for some of the folks that are responding, it didn't feel small, and it wasn't small to them, and it was harmful to them. And I don't know how to I'm gonna be honest, I don't know how to resolve that, given our advocacy efforts and the desire to get someone with that level of power over the next iteration of both the ICD and the DSM on record. And so I'm not sure where to go with that.   Curt Widhalm  16:27 It's been my experience in advocacy, that large systems end up ignoring those individual voices. Those individual voices are incredibly powerful when they're used in the right place at the right time. And it's kind of looking at where our experience is where our tools really are effective in being able to affect these larger systems that when Katie and I have been in congressional offices, when we've been talking to legislators, when we've been talking to professional organizations, those voices, when they're expressed at the right time, are incredibly impactful for humanizing what is happening, working in the macro systems doesn't negate that the micro systems are happening. But for systemic change to happen, we have to address the macro systems in the ways that the macro systems have shown that they can be changed.   Katie Vernoy  17:30 Sure, yeah. And I think that's it goes back to our principles around recognizing that we have to work within if we want to be therapists, right now, we, we must work at least, you know, sufficiently within the system that's created while also trying to disrupt it. And so it's, it's a hard line to walk I know, we're never, we're never going to say we can always do it, right. You know, like we're gonna have times when we we miss judge or miss title. And I think that, that we, you know, when folks have called us out, when we've missed us in the past, we oftentimes do come back and have deeper conversations. And so please keep holding us to account for the things that are happening in the micro system, so to speak. But recognize that you know, that there are times when we may disagree based on the goals we have in the macro system. Does that make sense?   Curt Widhalm  18:20 Yeah.   Katie Vernoy  18:21 Okay.   Curt Widhalm  18:22 And I think that this also speaks to what we noticed as content creators, is some of the accountability that people feel like they're holding us to, are things that we actually already do. It's just that...   Katie Vernoy  18:38 Exactly.   Curt Widhalm  18:39 Now, in the aftermath of the DSM-5 episode, one of the comments that I keep coming back to is a one from a deleted now deleted user on Reddit. The comment says, the interview starts talking about autism around minute 13. It's not an in accessible interview, and that it has no transcript or subtitles, so fuck them for that, too. And then, in this post, several people posted links to the episode where the transcripts already existed in the first place. And one of the things that if you're considering going into content creation, helping you potentially avoid some obstacles and these kinds of things, and being clear about your principles, really does help in that. We've been making things accessible for quite a while.   Katie Vernoy  19:30 And we haven't always but it does, there's a cost involved. And we're doing this for free for the most part, you know, we've we've been able to start getting sponsors at different points. But we're not making a whole bunch of money where we can have fancy solutions. And so we've, we took this feedback that people couldn't find the transcripts. And so we've we've added a little solution, so they're easier to find now, but we are both two therapists, we both have our own practices. We do some consulting but like this is not our full time job. And so we're trying, I guess maybe this is where I'm sounding defensive, I'm not trying to, but like, we're doing the best that we can. But I think, to me, when I hear this, I see something where we're trying to make a difference. You know, we're trying to do some stuff to bring some things to light to move things forward. And we're not going to always get it right. But we are a way easier target to get mad at than the large system. So don't wait like don't waste your your energy on calling us out for stuff like not having transcript because we actually do, like use that energy towards the actual change you want and not on two random podcasters.   Curt Widhalm  20:40 And we got several comments in the first week, after directing, you know, emphasis towards are we going to have follow up episodes about the changes in the DSM, we will, it takes some turnaround time for us, especially on something that that book wasn't even available for three weeks after the podcast aired, which was nearly a month after we made the interview, to Katie's point of we're two podcasters. If you want us to be able to do more, here's our pitch to join our Patreon and make it to where we can have a full time job doing this kind of stuff. But in the meantime, our turnaround and response times is sometimes very much around what we're capable of doing around our regular day to day practices and families and all of that kind of stuff. In the past, we've been sometimes able to turn things around literally overnight. That's not something that can necessarily be relied upon, in this particular space for us and until you join our Patreon and wonderful things. It's something we're we absolutely do do our best. It's that we're in a slow moving profession too. Nothing about you know, really anything is going to be best addressed by a podcast on something that needs to happen in an extremely timely manner.   Katie Vernoy  22:13 Sure, and I think to expand out kind of what we're doing as our follow on to the DSM-5 updates is that we've been reaching out to folks in the Autistic community in the grief community in the trans and gender nonconforming community. And as well as people in the trauma community to be able to have in depth conversations with folks with lived experience around, for example, with the Autistic community, we want someone that can talk with us about the diagnosis stuff that's going on to DSM-5-TR but also self diagnosis and, and those types of things. So we can really have a conversation with someone that's living it versus us saying like, yeah, we disagree, you know, or, or we agree with this part, but not that part. I mean, like, we have our own opinions, and we'll share them. But we don't want to be the only voices speaking to this. And it takes time to be able to identify the people or persons, the person or persons that people are people. Yeah, I don't know, to find the right, the right folks to be able to have the real conversation that we need to have, as we've continued forward and our audiences grow we've found it even more important not to just say, like, hey, our friends, so and so is in this community, let's reach out to them, but actually saying like, Who is the person that is making the most noise that has the biggest audience who can actually make a difference in this space, let's amplify that voice on the podcast and whatever way that we can. And so we're still learning, we're still growing. And we don't, we can't... People are not popping on the podcast immediately. Like, everybody's got schedule issues. And and we're we're wanting to have a great conversation versus a fast conversation.   Curt Widhalm  23:51 And, you know, this is hopefully where some of the people that we are reaching out to at this point, we'll be able to build and combine our efforts of this community. And their's to elevate some of this stuff. And hopefully, as we get those things organized and recorded in the upcoming months that you'll be able to see that. So here's also your reminder to subscribe and not miss any of our content. One of the other things within this process, though, is also the way that people have anchored on to very slight aspects of the content that we put out whether it's a specific comment within a larger, longer format, whether it's wanting deeper, more informative things out of what is relatively a smaller format, and what I mean by that is, we also try to make our episodes 30 ish minutes. We sometimes wax poetic most of our episodes, I think ended up around 40 minutes or so but it's an incredibly weird balance. Of people on one hand can take one very, very small piece of what is happening in an episode and make assumptions about the rest of the content or ignore the rest of the content based on that, or on the other hand, we've also had some criticisms of, we don't go deep enough and 30 minutes when it's two or three or four voices, depending on how many people that we have on a particular episode. That goes by very, very fast.   Katie Vernoy  25:30 What and when especially the one that said we didn't go deep enough, I mean, we did respond with like two or three more episodes to discuss the nuance of what was was being asked for. I think, to me, the thing that makes sense, and I want to take full ownership of this, because oftentimes, I'm the one that's titling the episode. And sometimes we're, we're framing the episode in a particular way, because we think that's what's most compelling. And that seems to be another thing that folks will anchor on. And if I've titled without thought, you know, to a specific element, or it's been framed in a certain way, I think folks have difficulty looking at the whole piece. And so I wanted to, I want to say, I have very much been trying to be thoughtful about titles so that people will get a sense of what's actually on the episode. But there's definitely times when people have have responded to the title only, and either decided they would not listen to the episode because the title was not one that they liked. Or they framed the whole episode based on that title and their interpretation of the title. And so I'm working on it, folks, I'm trying to get better Curt usually helps. But like sometimes we're you know, we divide and conquer, so to speak, he does more editing, I do more of the show notes and episode artwork. And so this is a two to four person, maybe five person, little enterprise here. And none of us do this only, like we all have other stuff going on. And so and even life stuff, like we talked about a couple weeks ago, can get in the way of us being able to do stuff, but like, we recognize that sometimes something resonates, and it's hard to look at the whole piece. But before, before taking too drastic an action like giving us a really bad review. Or blasting us on social like try to listen it to it as a holistic piece if you can.   Curt Widhalm  27:28 And it does help and we do respond. She can email Maggie over at podcast@therapyreimagined.com with feedback about stuff and she's not Katie or myself. She's a very wonderful part of our team that, be nice to Maggie. But...   Katie Vernoy  27:43 Yes, please be nice to Maggie.   Curt Widhalm  27:45 But I think it helps to, once again, just kind of clarify the things that we do. It's The Modern Therapist Survival Guide, we want to encourage and help each of you along your journey, and be able to provide some guidance or put some things within perspective or advocate for some things. It's why we've really started moving away from some of the more coachy aspects of our content. We've done some in the past and part of keeping conversations going is not having the same conversations over and over again. And while we're hesitant to say we're never going to have a coach on here, again, or something like that, we do have a back catalogue with plenty of people to talk to you about how to set up a practice. There are plenty of other podcasts who can have that same conversation over and over again. And that's a great space for them to be in. It's not where our space is. Our space is about advocacy, it's talking about the things that are affecting our practices, it's being able to provide timely, hey, here's your surprise, here's the no surprises act, it's it's being able to help channel some of the energy and emphasis of the conversations that we're having to make change, it's being able to take the action steps. If you want cheerleaders of here's how you go and set up your office. Great, not us.   Katie Vernoy  29:30 I think there's like you said there's a lot of back catalogue stuff that has business building and practice building and I am also hesitant to say we won't have a coach on I think the the difference that we want to bring to it is that we want to get into the stuff that's not polished. We want the real conversations, we want this stuff that goes into what it's really like to be a therapist now what it really is to be able to do work and have a private practice and...   Curt Widhalm  30:04 Or work in community mental health. And...   Katie Vernoy  30:07 ...well, let me finish my my thought here just really quickly, but like to be able to compete when there's disruptors in the space like BetterHelp, and all of the tech companies that are coming in and dominating the space, to work in community mental health and identify a pathway forward, to have a sustainable career, if that's where you decide to be. I mean, like, there's, there's a lot that is in there, that's not, here are the five steps on how you market your practice. Now, we certainly have episodes like that. But I think, to me, it's more about the reality of the therapist, as a person and a professional. Not, this is how you build your practice. So I don't think we're going to avoid those topics. It's more that we're not going to have the same conversation over and over again, about money mindset, and how you avoid burnout. And how you start a side hustle like, we have those episodes, you can go back and look at them. But we're not going to keep having that conversation over and over again.   Curt Widhalm  31:06 And what we are going to have is, here's the updates as they're coming along in the field. Here's amplifying voices from marginalized communities, whether it's therapists, whether it's the systemic barriers that continue to cause mental health problems, whether it's the systemic barriers to having an appropriate mental health workforce on both an individual and a national and universal level, that at its core, this is a podcast about being able to leave our field in a better place than where it was when we started. And that is going to be an ever evolving conversation. And we're thankful that you're holding us accountable in this process, we just really want to make sure that we're all on the same page so we can actually take these things and make them into change.   Katie Vernoy  32:06 I think that's where we finished. That's a good place to stop. Thanks, Curt.   Curt Widhalm  32:11 We talked about a number of our episodes in the show notes, you can find those at MTSGpodcast.com, as well as all of our back catalogue and we did make some references to Patreon and you can also support us on Buy me a Coffee and very awesome thank you to those people who are patrons and coffee buyers. And until next time, I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy.   Katie Vernoy  32:39 Thanks again to our sponsor, Thrizer.   Curt Widhalm  32:42 Thrizer is a new billing platform for therapists that was built on the belief that therapy should be accessible and clinicians should earn what they're worth. Every time you bill a client through Thrizer an insurance claim is automatically generated and sent directly to the client's insurance. From their Thrizer provides concierge support to ensure clients get their reimbursements quickly, directly into their bank account. By eliminating reimbursement by cheque, confusion around benefits and obscurity with reimbursement status they allow your clients to focus on what actually matters rather than worrying about their money. It's very quick to get set up and it works great in complement with EHR systems.   Katie Vernoy  33:21 Their team is super helpful and responsive and the founder is actually a long term therapy client who grew frustrated with his reimbursement times. Thrizer lets you become more accessible while remaining in complete control of your practice. A better experience for your clients during therapy means higher retention. Money won't be the reason they quit therapy. If you want to test Thrizer completely risk free our very special link is bit.ly/moderntherapists, you sign up for thrice or with the code 'moderntherapists' you will get one month of no payment processing fees meaning you earn 100% of your cash rate during that time.   Curt Widhalm  33:56 This episode is also brought to you by Melissa Forziat Events and Marketing.   Katie Vernoy  34:01 Are you looking to boost your reach and get more clients from social media? Check out the How to Win at Social Media, Even with No Budget course from marketing expert Melissa Forziat. It can be so hard to get engagement on social media or to know what to post to tell the story of your brand. It can be even harder to get those conversations to turn into new clients. Social media marketing isn't just for businesses that have a ton of money to spend on advertising. Melissa will work you step by step through creating a smart plan that fits within your budget.   Curt Widhalm  34:30 How to Win at Social Media is packed full of information. Usually a course as detailed as this would be priced in the 1000s. But to make it accessible to small businesses, it is available for only $247. Plus as a listener of The Modern Therapist Survival Guide. You can use the promo code 'therapy' to get 10% off. If you are ready to go to the next level in your business. Click the link in our show notes over at MTSGpodcast.com. And sign that for the How to Win at Social Media course today.   Announcer  35:04 Thank you for listening to The Modern Therapist Survival Guide. Learn more about who we are and what we do at MTSGpodcast.com. You can also join us on Facebook and Twitter. And please don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss any of our episodes.

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia
Key Issues Spark Heat in Leaders' Debate - Isu-isu Kunci Memanas Dalam Debat Calon Perdana Menteri

SBS Indonesian - SBS Bahasa Indonesia

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2022 6:57


The debate on the candidates for the Prime Minister of Australia has begun. What are the issues raised? - Acara debat para calon Perdana Menteri Australia telah dimulai. Apa saja isu-isu yang disampaikan?

PSETUHNYA
S2E30 - Rangkuman Buku: The China Study tulisan T. Colin Campbell, PhD dan Thomas M. Campbell II, MD

PSETUHNYA

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 51:53


Buku the China Study adalah salah satu buku di dunia kesehatan yang sempet heboh dan bahkan sampai sekarang pun masih suka dibicarakan. Apa lagi di dunia plant-based, vegetarian dan vegan. Sosok T. Colin Campbell, PhD, seorang dosen di Cornell University ini banyak memiliki pengaruh di dunia nutrisi. Beliau adalah orang dibalik istilah "whole food plant-based" atau sering disingkat WFPB. Dari pengalaman perjalanan kehidupannya sebagai seorang peneliti, pertama-tama pada tikus, namun kemudian pada manusia, membuat dia yakin bahwa pola makan nabati adalah yang terbaik. Dari seorang yang yakin bahwa protein hewani adalah yang terbaik untuk mengisi "protein gap" pada orang-orang malnutrisi di negara berkembang, pandangannya berubah setelah melihat orang-orang di Cina, yang didokumentasinya di dalam buku the China Study ini. Selamat mendengarkan!

Qualitative Conversations
Episode 32: Episode 32. Grad Student Committee Event on Writing and Academia

Qualitative Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 73:04


In this episode, the QR SIG's Graduate Student Committee hosts a conversation with Dr. Cassie Brownell, Dr. Stephanie Shelton, and Dr. Sandra Guzman Foster about how to successfully navigate graduate school, dissertation reading and writing, and the job market. Below is a transcript of the conversation. Carlson Coogler  0:11  Yeah, so everybody, welcome. Thank you so much for coming to our first but hopefully not our last invited speaker about this hosted by the graduate student committee of the qualitative research SIG of AERA, my name is Carlson and I'm the chair of this wonderful group of people who make up the graduate student committee. And so first and foremost, I want to acknowledge them and around a virtual applause. Thanks for all their hard work. This would not have happened without them as what our groups are initiatives not happened without them. So thank you so much to Amir, Deleasa, Jen, Kristen, Ashley, and Mariia for the incredible job y'all have done with all of this and running and supporting our three initiatives, the reading group, the writing group, and the dissertation slash add group while being yourselves graduate students and therefore very busy. Second, I want to welcome our attendees and encourage you to participate in our initiatives. And so if you are not already on our listserv, you can send us an email and that qrsiggrads@gmail.com. And then we can put that in the chat, but also that's on the flyer. So if you if you're interested in joining the reading the writing of the dissertation group finding out more about, then we encourage you to join our listserv for that. So, and groups will be meeting soon. So if you have you're not missing anything if you haven't gotten started yet. Third, and of course, very importantly, I want to thank our speakers. We are so grateful for your time and energy and are eager to  [...]. Thanks so much. So first is Dr. Cassie Brownell. She is an assistant professor of curriculum teaching and learning in the Ontario Institute for Studies and education at the University of Toronto. Her research takes up issues of educational justice and equity in early childhood. Drawing on critical socio cultural theory, Cassie examines children's socio political development through school based studies as well as community based research. She has received funding from the National Academy of Education slash the Central Research Foundation, Canada's Social Sciences and Human Humanities Research Council, the International literacies Association and the National Council of Teachers of education. Samples of her research can be found in the pages of anthropology and education quarterly theory into practice, Teachers College record and research in the teaching of English. Dr. Sandra L. Guzman boster earned her PhD in educational leadership and policy studies at Arizona State University, where she was also at Gates Millennium Scholar and a Spencer interdisciplinary fellow. Prior to joining the University of the Incarnate Word Dr. Guzman Foster work as an educational consultant, where she worked on several projects such as leading research and evaluation teams and fieldwork, developing course curriculum for online programs, and serving as a research subject matter expert, Dr. Guzman foster brings experienced an online hybrid pedagogy, curriculum development, teacher education, program evaluation, educational research and social justice education. Additionally, Dr. Guzman Foster has taught at the K 12 level community college level at the university level in Texas, Arizona and Colorado. A first generation college graduate Dr. Stephanie Ann Shelton is Associate Professor of qualitative research and program chair of the educational research program and the College of Education at the University of Alabama and affiliate faculty member in the Department of gender and race studies and the Gifted Education Program, research interests are often interview and focus group base and include examining intersections of gender identities, gender expressions, sexualities, race and class and educational context. publications have appeared in qualitative inquiry, the International Journal of qualitative studies and education, qualitative research journal GLP, a journal of lesbian and gay studies, the International Journal of Transgender Health, The Journal of lesbian studies, and teaching and teacher education. She has published four books, including feminism and intersectionality in academia, women's narratives and experiences in higher education 2018, which was reprinted in 2020, and the just published Encyclopedia of queer studies and education. She was the 2020, recipient of the American Educational Research Association, Early Career Award and measurement and research methodology, and the 2021, recipient of the NCTE LGBTQ plus leadership and advocacy at work. So without further ado, I will pass this over to Dr. Brownell. Dr. Brownel  4:19  Thanks so much for having us. It's super exciting to be here with you all. And especially for this first event with such phenomenal co speakers here with me. I tend to speak a little fast, especially when I get excited. So I'm going to turn on the captions here for folks as well. So as mentioned, my name is Cassie Brownell, I'm an assistant professor just in my fourth year having just completed my interim tenure review this past year, and I have put together a bit of a slideshow to organize my thoughts and share with you all and so the link is available for you here. Just the tinyurl.com QR dash reading that you're also welcome to find me on Twitter either now or later. And I've framed this around motivation and procrastination, the lessons and overwhelm and academic reading. And I'm going to hopefully share some tips and tricks, but a little bit of my own journey with you as well. So to get us started just an overview of what I'll be talking about today, and I'm gonna begin with a portrait of a reader to be myself. And then moving forward talking about building your stack borrowing some language from NCTE, which I know Dr. Shelton will appreciate thinking about reading practice and reading as practice. And then thinking beyond overwhelm, which I think is a common thing when we're thinking about reading, at least for someone like me. So to begin, I wanted to insert a little comment here about this is really a portrait of a reluctant reader. So it felt like this image of this woman on her phone with her computer, that maybe with a text that she's turned her back to a really represents me a lot of days. And this is my reaction to how I felt to being asked to participate today was saying, what you asked me, I wouldn't say I particularly like reading. And then thinking, whenever I'm reading, I feel like I have to read a sentence, a paragraph, a page over and over again. And that's true, both as someone who is trying to often grasp ideas, theories, or in different sorts of ways remember the things that I'm reading. But it's also true in that I am someone who was recently diagnosed with ADHD. And so that sort of executive dysfunction and working memory is something that I've really been working through. And so I have a sigh here as well, in that having recently been diagnosed and started on some medications. Reading for me is something that is really quite different. And it's given me a new energy as I've moved forward with reading. So I'm coming to you today as someone who's practice reading a bit more recently in a new way, where I'm not having to reread sentences, pages and paragraphs over and over or reread articles over and over. But as someone who also has have had a lot of difficulty in reading at different times. So in thinking about those sorts of experiences, I wanted to start by talking a bit about myself as a reader, and both in graduate school and now as a faculty member. And so I have four big ideas here. The first is talking about building your stamina. And this is something that I borrow from my time when I was a first grade teacher. And we used to use this kind of program where we would talk about how you needed to build a young learners ability to sit and to read for longer periods of time. So we would start with just two minutes, two minutes of reading, and build up to having a little first grader who then is able to sit and read for 20 minutes. And this is something that I see as being really common and necessary for us in the world of academia, and learning to sit and read for long periods of time, or to pick up our reading and be interrupted by family members. But to come back to it in the same sort of way. And so in the same ways that we might build our stamina for working out, we need to do that too, for reading as well as for writing. The second sort of thing that I came into graduate school thinking about, and thanks to the wisdom of colleagues at Michigan State University who were farther along than I was in the program, as well as the wisdom of some of our faculty members who taught our initial pro seminars was to really not be afraid to divide and conquer our readings. So with a group of colleagues who are in my cohort, my first year at graduate school, we would take our readings for our Pro Seminar and each of us would really hone in on one particular reading, and then we would come together and we would share about those readings, having skimmed the other ones or maybe had more time to read some of them more closely than others. But it provided us a space to try out some of the ideas and you might want to talk about in class, to work through some of the questions you might have had in reading the different texts. But it also helped us to know that we didn't have to read every single word, which is something that I will come back to you throughout this sort of short presentation. Another thing that I think is really important that I definitely cried the first time my friend when Watanabe, who was a Michigan State student, and a bit more senior to me asked was, don't you the parts of an article, and I definitely didn't. So learning to deconstruct an article and identify that the parts that often exist, especially with an empirical work in qualitative research would be things like the abstract and the introduction and knowing how important those are to read really closely to give you a sense of what that pieces may be about, and then taking time to look at those different headings. And so those might be things related to the literature, review, the theoretical framework, the methods, the findings, and then moving forward to the discussion and conclusion. But knowing which parts of those you might want to hone in on to bolster your reading of that particular text or your understanding or to even just begin to understand if this is a piece that you really want to spend time thinking. So learning how to deconstruct an article is something that I talk about with my graduate students, as well as my undergraduate students in the various courses that I'm teaching. And if you're someone who's coming into graduate school or has been in graduate school and doesn't yet know how to recite those parts of an article don't feel bad I was I mentioned I definitely cried when she asked me because I felt frustrated that I didn't yet the fourth thing I have is that we have these reading rabbit holes that we can go down into and I think that reading rabbit holes can be really helpful. So for myself, I read everything by him Haas Dyson, he you and Karen Rowland really early on in my graduate school career as they're folks who are really engaged with ideas of qualitative research with critical lenses in thinking about children's play writing and literaciesAnd those are things I was really interested in. At the same time, I also went down other reading rabbit holes where I was then able to identify things that really weren't in my area were one of the things that I wanted to spend my focus and my time on. So I think that rabbit holes are great in terms of we can really come to know a researcher or an area very well, and know how those fit for us. But we can also use those opportunities to really think about the ways in which they maybe don't fit for us. And maybe we need to think differently about them in terms of thinking about myself now as a faculty member. And with some help from Carlson and Ashley, who are on the call and providing some additional prompts for how to go about this talk. One of the things that I think is really interesting is to think about how my reading has shifted. So as someone who is working often on multiple projects, my reading at this point is very much project driven. So I'm doing a lot of work right now in child radio, working with some middle grades, kids who are engaging in radio production themselves. And so really reading a ton about radio about podcasting about how that happens often at secondary and post secondary levels. But there's less about that for children. But that also means I'm reading in digital literacies. That means I'm reading in thinking about community based literacies. At other times, too, I'm also working on other projects that still relate to my dissertation. So I'm reading things about immigration, and I'm reading things related to the various methods that I use across these different projects. And so in many ways, I come to those readings with particular ideas about what it is I want to get out of them. So I do a lot of project based reading at this point that is a bit different than maybe in graduate school when I was reading both for coursework, as well as for my dissertations. I also read a lot in terms of maybe some of my stuff, if I'm stuck in my methods, I might go back to a really foundational text. That's also true for framing any theoretical framing that maybe I want to read additional empirical articles that have made use of that framing to see the ways in which they have applied it so that I can start to think about that for myself a little bit differently. I also do a lot of review based reading. And I say that both is someone who reviews for journals. So I'm an editor of curriculum inquiry and do a lot of reading for them, as well as people reviewing for various journals in qualitative research or in literacies in early childhood. And that's a great opportunity for me to keep up with what's new in the field. And at the same time, I'm to also engage in review of students work, my colleagues work as they're working to submit things as well. The last sort of thing I have here is inspiration seeking reading, which I think is something that I talked a lot about with my colleague John Wargo is thinking about, sometimes we just need to read something beautiful to help us get through the stuck points or think through our projects, and make sense of the words and work that we want to put forward ourselves. And so that's definitely something that I have been thinking a lot about, and try to incorporate into my everyday life if that's a book on Audible, or if that's like some poetry or some other short reading, or novels as well. So the next kind of thing I want to talk about is building our stack. So I've told you a bit about myself and my reading practices and how they've evolved. But thinking about how do we start to build our own stack. So I'm stealing a little bit from that old wedding adage of something old, something new, something borrowed, and something blue. But I'm putting Google in talking about things that are old, it's important for us to know like these foundational scholars and texts, and I put foundational in text because we know that there's a lot of inequities that have persisted in under representation of women, Junior Scholars, people of color, queer people, and so on. And so we need to be critical of foundational texts that of course, we do need to know them to some, in some respect, even if we're critiquing them, in terms of something new I BrowZine. So browsing on impress a text online BrowZine is a tool that you can do that you can connect it to your library and see articles that are actually not yet available, even on journal websites, but maybe they'll be published there. So that's a great way to pay attention to new articles, as well as following scholars on Twitter or following hashtags on Twitter following hashtags like a cite black women, just to help to bring yourself into conversation with newer pieces and different sorts of ways borrowed reading scholars and texts that are outside of your area. I think that's outside of your area of your little niche that is your dissertation work, but also maybe your specific field. And so I'm someone that is strongly in education, but I often borrow from writing Rhetoric and Composition scholars, I borrow from sound scholars who are involved in like ethnomusicology, or an anthropology in different sorts of ways. And those sorts of things have helped to make me think differently about my methods, but also about some of the work that I'm engaged in Googled, of course, we can set up our keywords, search things with keywords on Google Scholar, we can also set up different daily alerts reading his practice, I have here this image of this woman with headphones on but with music with books with the plant, so thinking about what it is that you need to be successful. How does this change based on what kind of reading you're doing when you're reading something theoretical? Is that different than reading something empirical? How, where do you need to be? What kinds of settings do you need to set up for yourself to find success in these sorts of moments? And I also think it's important that we have a plan for reading and a plan for how we're going to connect and recall the information. So that includes creating long and short term reading goals with wiggle room, but also developing a personally meaningful kind of system for collatingTax. So I just put up a made up little thing here in terms of planning, I think it's useful to create like a long term plan for your vaults semester or for the summer for your reading, as well as for your writing. And that might mean you're reading for coursework at the same time that you're doing things for your dissertation. But maybe you're incorporating reading in other ways in terms of listening to podcasts, watching lectures, or also reading those fun, beautiful books. As I mentioned, things like the library book on Audible is really great. At the same time, there's a ton of resources available for how you can connect this work and ways in which you can recall it to scholars here that offer a ton of different insights, our role, patto, Cecco, Vega, and just Calarco, whose book I have here, and it's really great. They talk about things using citation management systems using color coding, but I think the primary thing we want to think about as we're reading is what you're reading, how does it push you forward in terms of helping you with your argument, or maybe helping you to understand how your argument would be countered? And what can you do to help you in that way, for me, I'm not someone who uses a management system and that citation management system, but I have a notebook where I take all of my notes, and I organize things often related to projects. So you don't have to feel bad if you're not someone who color codes, or someone who doesn't use a citation management system. There's lots of ways in but there's tons of resources. I mean, it's really about finding out what works for you. So a few recommendations to close out and help us move beyond overwhelm. And some of these are borrowed from Jeff Calarco, and others. But the first is to read like a researcher. So when we're approaching our texts that we're reading, it's important that we bring our questions that maybe we have for a specific thing I want to know about radio for in particular, but perceiving those questions or like new answers, so coming with a research question to the piece that you're reading, the next thing is just to take the first step. So sometimes it's really hard for me to just get initiated on a task. So sometimes it's helpful to just read the first chapter or just the abstract, or maybe to read a book review before you actually read a book to get a better feel for it, and to make yourself more comfortable with it. The next thing is to make decisions, you have to decide where to focus your efforts. In times, we're not going to be able to read every word, I haven't read every word of every book behind me. Instead, I read really strategically in terms of reading it for chapter to find out what chapters I want to read or skimming articles and different sorts of ways to focus specifically on the frame at work, or specifically on the methods or specifically on the findings. It's also important for you to track what you read. As I mentioned, I jot notes in a notebook. Some people write annotated bibliographies, others write direct quotes that they might want to incorporate into a document. And then they use that later. A few other things we want to think about this guy right here has lots of distractions, it is important that we limit our distractions that we have around us. So pausing notifications, using things like Do Not Disturb on your phone or on your computer, finding time away from others, maybe taking a writing retreat, sitting somewhere new visiting a cafe, instead of staying just in your home, maybe partaking in a favorite treat, like treating yourself to coffee as a means to sit down and write. Another idea is to consider reading as writing, I really see these as recursive process practices. So we really need to treat them like that when we're spending time reading, we know it's going to push us forward in our writing. And when we're writing, we're always building from those things that we've read. And those are things that we shouldn't forget. The last thing is just to remember that you really need to evolve your practice. So you and your reading practice are not static. As I mentioned at the beginning, I've had a lot of things that have shifted my practices, interbreeding and the different experiences I've had, and the things that I've learned from others have really pushed me forward in these sorts of ways. So I encourage you to think about that for yourself as well. So I'll close there, I'm just offered that if you have any questions, comments, compliments, or suggestions, you can feel free to reach out to me on Twitter. And I'm very excited to hear from our other panelists today. Thank you. Carlson Coogler  18:29  Great. Thank you so much. That was wonderful. We're going to now move to Dr. Grayson Foster, who will be talking about writing. Dr. Guzman Foster  18:39   Thank you, Dr. Brownell, that was awesome. All right. So what I'm going to do today is I'm going to just share some tips, tricks and tips on how to get through with your how to really cope with your writing your dissertation. So the first thing and I do take note that institutions are different in what they do. But I really want to emphasize the importance of choosing a topic that you're passionate about, I believe, and I've seen with students who don't choose a topic that they're passionate about never finishing their abd they don't move on. But if it's something that you're passionate about, you're more likely to actually follow through with it and actually finish I hear different stories across the country about how students choose their topics. The one thing I want to encourage you to do is to not let anyone choose it for you. Again, this is your baby, your project. You choose what you're passionate about time. When you're writing your dissertation, you must be realistic. A lot of times the very first thing I ask my students when I meet with them is what is your timeline, and life happens. So you need to make sure you make room for those kinds of things. Also, reach out to your family to know what it's about to occur. You're doing your dissertation research. And writing goes along with that you're collecting data. And if you have a full time job or you're working talk to your employer to say this is about to happen in case any major projects are coming along so that we can manage your time better. I find that once students don't schedule a time to do their writing, they fall further behind, and then it takes them a little bit longer to actually finish. And not only that, they become discouraged and never pick up again. And so be realistic. And a little bit, I'm gonna talk about what you need to do as far as writing is concerned. But that time piece is so important, right every day as if it's an appointment, put it in your calendar. Also, if you're like, an age myself, but I didn't have a cell, I was doing my dissertation research. So what I would do without carry a little notebook in my purse, and wherever I was, whether I was in the waiting office, and my doctor, if I was waiting for someone that I was picking up, I would write anything that would come into my mind, I actually put that also on my nightstand because believe it or not, you dream about your dissertation, at least I did. And some of my students actually share that they do the same thing. So I put a notebook on my nightstand because I wake up with these thoughts about something an aha moment or some kind of something that I realized happen with data analysis. And I would write it down because believe it or not, I wouldn't remember the next day because of course, it happened while I was sleeping. But when I would pick up my notebook and see what I wrote, It makes total sense. And so that was one way also that I actually kept track of my thoughts. Because again, you're constantly thinking about your dissertation and you want to finish, you want to make sure it's great writing. But if you don't write every day, you're going to lose that passion and that motivation. And I think that students need to understand that it's important that you write every day, because if you go too long without writing, you may not want to pick up again, this is the one I really want to talk about, you need to silence your inner critic, all of us have that inner critic. And the idea is that you are at the point where you are because you worked hard, you are at the point that you are because you are a scholar, you are at the point where you are. So get rid of that inner critic that tells you Oh, you're never gonna finish or this is too much what am I get myself into silence that inner critic, it is so important that you do that. I know that's very hard to do, because I've been there myself. However, once I saw as my my inner critic being started to flow better, I started to find more motivation, more energy to actually finish my writing. Because you can't get discouraged when you read, you know, you receive comments from your committee or chair about revise and rewrite, know that it's not a personal attack on you. It's to help strengthen your writing, to help strengthen your study to make sure that you are able to demonstrate that you can actually do this. And you can, you wouldn't be at this point, if you couldn't. So make sure that you actually silence that inner critic chunking, which is a term I use sometimes when I was a K 12 teacher when you do things in different small parts. So I would do my chapter for small parts, I do my analysis and small parts, my conclusions, my findings, even the proposal piece, the first few chapters in small parts, and then put everything together at the very end. That worked for me may not work for you. But I highly recommend that you don't try to finish everything in one sitting. But basically try to do small parts every day. And that's where that little writing piece comes in work on one section one day work in another section another day. And the very end, you'll find that it's easier to put everything together because you've actually put the pieces and written the pieces. Now it's a matter of you putting together like a puzzle. And so working in small parts to me is one way to make sure that you don't get burned out that you don't get demotivated, it gives you fresh eyes every time you come back to another park the next day or the next week, and vice versa. This is something that I think is really hard for students to understand is that you're striving for progress, not perfection. Remember, this is your first time for many of you to actually do a research project or dissertation. And that doesn't mean that it can't be perfect. But I think many of us are perfectionist, and we tend to work towards that. But if you do that you're gonna burn yourself out. So it's about making progress, right and with your, hopefully with your charities, your advocate, that progress will be able to, you'll feel that progress, you'll see that progress. And at the very end, you'll see how much tremendous progress you've made. So remember that it's not about being perfect. It's about making progress for that final stage where you actually complete your dissertation and defend your dissertation. And that run is beautiful writing that you've actually completed on your own. Now, when I say on your own, that means you're writing it on your own, but you don't have to do this alone. I think too many times people and our students think they need to do this by themselves. No, you don't reach out to your peers, reach out to your chair, reach out to your committee members. You don't have to do this alone. It's okay to ask for feedback. It's okay to ask questions. It's okay to ask for help. Again, isolation, I think is really not a really good habit to have when you're writing, especially when you're writing your dissertation. Reach out to your peers. I know many of my students actually have partners that they're working with. And that seems to work really well because they keep each other motivated. They pump each other up. They give each other accolades. They also give each other constructive feedback, right because that feedback is very important, especially when it comes from your peers because I believe that our peers it's funny because I think that many times, peer teaching and peer alert learning is so much more stronger than myself doing it because I like to think of it as they're talking in student language versus faculty language. That makes sense. But I believe that our peers really are helpful. And again, reach out to your committee members, because that's what they're there are there, that's when they are there for. One thing I need to really explain is that you need to practice self compassion as well. This is not easy. Dissertation. Work takes time. dissertation writing takes time, you go through many different phases, you go through many different revisions, revisions, so it's easy to get discouraged. But when you do reach a point where you've made progress, reward yourself, do something nice for yourself, go get a pedicure, I don't know, go get a manicure, read a book that's not an academic book, go see a movie, hang out with your friend, call your mom, do something that is nice for yourself, because that's a reward that you've actually made progress and you deserve it. You can't continue to work. And if you don't ever do that, if you don't take care of yourself. And what will happen is you'll end up being frustrated, stressed, and you may actually hate your dissertation, which we hope that doesn't occur. One of the things that many people do, and I'm guilty of this as well is not for many While You Write tend to always want to go back and you make either color code and you run yourself, you have to go back and do proper citation. To save time, I would highly recommend that you actually do proper citation while you're writing so that way when you do defend your dissertation, and it's ready to go, and if you hire an editor, they'll have less work to do. And it'll be much more quicker to get your dissertation to come to the university so it can get published. Because what happens is sometimes, this is the last part they asked you to format, they asked you to do all the formatting correctly. And I don't know if everybody's APA but we do APA and then that takes time. And some people don't actually do it and believe it or not, they don't finish. And to me, that just seems like a just a lost cause. So if you can try to cite as you write because I think and format as you write because it does help save time at the end. Sometimes we think that this is going to be the best work that we're gonna ever do in a whole entire life. It's not our dissertation is not always our best work. It is a time where you can prove and demonstrate that you can actually do a research project. All of us who are overachievers, myself included perfectionist, myself included, have a hard time with this sometimes, but just know it is going to be great work, but it's not going to be your best. And that's okay. That's okay. Because guess what, as you're moving forward, and you finally get past this step more is to come more work is to come and more best work, several best works will come after your dissertation. You'll kill yourself with stress thinking that this has to be your best work. And then finally, I want to remind you guys and ladies, that you are scholars, you will not be here right now, if you are not a scholar, every student who enters my classroom are scholars don't let anyone ever take that away from you, you are a scholar, and you're going to do this reading, you're going to finish this reading. So remember a topic that you're passionate about. Write every day, do small parts, making appointments you're writing every day, keep a notebook or your phone or your nightstand so you can record anything. And then also don't do this alone. Reach out to others, whether it's your peers, or your chair or your committee members. Those are the tips that I have for you to actually finish your dissertation. If you find yourself demotivated, just not sure that you want to move forward. That's what your peers are there for. And that's what your chairs there for. Because guess what I know myself as a chair, I'm the biggest cheerleader for my students, and I advocate for them. But I'm also there for them. And space is life happens. Whatever happens, life happens to get them back on track. So those are my tips and tricks. I hope that you enjoy them. And let me know if you have any questions and reach out to me. Carlson Coogler  28:44  Great, thank you so much. Really wonderful, Doc. Now we're now going to move to Dr. Shelton, who will be talking about the dissertation and job search process.Dr. Shelton  28:55  As Carlson mentioned as part of my introduction, that I'm a first generation student. And so I want to bring that back up just because I want to emphasize that neither part of what I'm about to talk about was there's nothing intuitive about it. I always felt like maybe I was an idiot, or I was behind or whatever, because I didn't get certain things. And I would just I want to emphasize that whether you're first generation or not, there's nothing intuitive about the distribution or the job search. And if you don't know things that's natural and normal, and you need to not be embarrassed about finding out and so I'm going to talk about the two together first, Dr. Guzman Foster's presentation leads really nicely and it's an I think so for both the dissertation and the job talk. I do the job search. I do want to emphasize that you have options. I think a lot of times and academia there are defaults, and a lot of times because students don't know and are hesitant to ask, they don't know that there are choices and I'm gonna talk more about what that means in just a bit but you're in not stuck with a particular format or particular type of job trajectory. The other thing is for both a dissertation and for job searches to be really intentional and realistic for the intentionality, I'm really emphatic with my students, they need to make sure that there's not a lot of wasted motion doctoral programs can be very exhausting. And to waste a lot of motion is not a good use of your time, your energy, your resources, or your capacity. And then the trajectory as well. Like it's really important. I'll talk more about that too. But it's really important to be really honest with yourself about what you need to feel happy to feel like you've been successful and to be able to take care of yourself, and others you might be responsible for. And then the other thing for both the dissertation and the job search is finding faculty who support you. And I know that a number of you have those people, but some of you don't. And it's really important that you have access to faculty who are committed to help him make sure that you're okay that you're supported, that if you ask questions that you worry are dumb, they're going to be there to help provide information and feedback and support so that you realize like number one, I'm not dumb. But number two, here's the next step. Or here's what you need to understand. I remember very vividly sitting with my advisor, and I was Peters Samgorinsky, at the University of Georgia. And I was like, Peter, I don't know what the hell I'm doing. And he's like, Yeah, nobody does. And that was simultaneously horrifying and comforting. But it took a lot to say to him, I didn't know what I was doing. And so I just want to really emphasize that there are choices, there are options, there are ways to make this process, both processes, dissertation and job search work well, for you. There's other parts of it, you don't have a lot of control over but these are things that you do have control over. And so I'm gonna I'm going to emphasize theseFor dissertations. I'm going to talk through each of these. And then if there's more information that you want in any particular one, when we get to the q&a Certainly asked. So the first thing about dissertations is that there's more than two formats, a lot of institutions like it's either the five chapter dissertation or nothing. And then other institutions think that they're really progressive, because they have the five chapter dissertation and the three article option. Those are both great options. So those are certainly formats that have served many people well. But there's a lot of other ways to approach dissertations too. And you need to really think about if the five chapter dissertation has done a great deal of sense for you, if the three chapter or the three article, dissertation doesn't seem to be a good alignment, there's other options. And what's really important is that a lot of institutions, especially us based public institutions, previous dissertations that have been successfully defended are often public domain. And which means that you can access those for free. And there's been a range of dissertations that have for example, made like national news and so on a student at Georgia whose dissertation was a fashion show, but was a PhD in literacy, a student at Clemson whose whose dissertation was a rap album, we've had students here at Alabama who have done dissertations that involve, for example, like soundscapes and an art gallery walkthroughs as part of their research methodology, PhD, and in each moment, it was really appropriate for that particular student that they do their dissertation in an unconventional way. And so I really just I want to emphasize, if your faculty members seem I don't know how to do that, I don't know what that looks like. It's okay to provide them resources. But it's also okay to reach out to various communities. There's a lot of online communities on various social media platforms, for example, but to understand that the five chapter dissertation and the three article dissertation are not the only ways that one can dissertate Sometimes other approaches just make better sense for you.The other thing is, when you're getting ready to do your dissertation, you need to really think about what is the plan post dissertation because one of the ways that you are intentional about the format of your dissertation is being intentional about what your dissertation supposed to accomplish for you. I will say that when I was a doc student, I elected to do the three articles dissertation, I could, I think I would have had the support to have done whatever I ultimately elected to do, so long as I was able to make it make sense. But I decided I wanted to do the three article because I wanted to have articles ready to send out because my intention was to get a research methodology job, which nearly always as is that a research intensive institution. So I knew that publication was going to be really important for my future success. But what that means is my dissertation format aligned with my goals and my trajectory for myself. And so you need to really think about like how what I'm going to do in my dissertation going to help me with post dissertation, because if you're just thinking about the dissertation as I gotta get it done, whatever. I've seen, a lot of people have to do a lot of just really tedious and exhausting work to try to then rip the scenes out of the dissertation to make it be something that is more useful for them. Had they just chosen a different format that was more aligned with their goals. Everything would have been better correlated. Another thing is and this is gonna sound really silly to some of you, but I'm being really sincere about it. Does your dissertation feel good to you? Does it feel good for you? Because this is a pretty big commitment. In nearly all cases, there's a lot of data collection, there's a lot of data analysis in most cases, and there's a lot of writing. And if you're miserable for the entirety of the time that you're working on your dissertation, that's not a great place to be. That's not a healthy place to be. And I also want to really emphasize it's not a normal place to be, I feel like academia does this really phenomenal job of normalizing stress, normalizing exhaustion, normalizing anxiety, and it doesn't have to be that way. Your dissertation should be something where ideally you feel empowered, you feel excited, and that's not going to necessarily be the case all the time. Because we all get tired, we all get frustrated, but the dissertation overall should feel good. And if it doesn't, what what are the issues that are getting in the way of it feeling right? If you're going like a good fit, I feel like it's something that's helping you to feel successful and whatever those issues are, like, are they resolvable? Are they like, are they resolvable by virtue of maybe renegotiating some aspects of the situation format? Are they resolvable? Maybe I'm pulling in like a new faculty member to be a committee member to help support other aspects that the other committee members aren't not are not super aware of? or understand. If they're not resolvable? Why are they not resolvable? And to what degree can you live with those because I do recognize that some doctoral students don't have a lot of say in control. But I do think that it's really important as much as possible. And this goes back to the points earlier about taking care of yourself, making sure that your dissertation is not something that is just you just feel like it's beating you down.Related to that, be realistic, and be kind to yourself, I have seen students have this attitude of, I'm going to do all these things. I'm going to get all this done, and I'm going to write my dissertation over spring break. I'm not going to say it's not possible, I am going to say that it's not necessarily realistic. I mean, it's certainly not being kind to yourself. And so when faculty members tell you things like maybe you should revisit your timeframe, maybe you should revisit the plan that you have, a lot of times they're not doing that to undermine you. They're not doing that to try to throw obstacles in your way. Sometimes it's because they're trying to help you do yourself a favor. And so be realistic, how long, for example, it takes for you to write a course paper, a dissertation is a different level of that. And so whatever that course paper timetable is, you need to multiply that several times over and think about how can I make sure that what I'm doing again, feels good. Another thing I'm going to add, it always really frustrated me when I was a doc student, when people would treat the dissertation like it was some sort of like mythological beast that had to be endured and slayed. Everybody that gets a doctoral degree generally knows that dissertation is coming at the end. And so don't treat it like it's some kind of dragon that you have to pass through the cave and avoid the gaping jaws of the beast. It's an expected part of the journey. And if you work to be intentional, it can be really enjoyable. In many moments. I will say as a side note that for my dissertation, when I started writing it, collecting the data was great, I got to interact with participants that were really wonderful and amazing. analyzing the data was a lot of work. But it also was great, because I felt like I was really learning things. But when I started writing it, I had a whole new perspective and a whole new appreciation for just how amazing my participants were. And it really made me sad that some of my peers just it just felt like they were just surviving and enduring their dissertation. And it didn't need to be that way. And sometimes faculty feed into that, because a lot of times faculty unfortunately participate. And this idea that academia needs to be a you need to be exhausted, you need to be stressed out, you need to be busy. And so try to surround yourself with people that support you approaching this process in healthy, sustainable and positive ways. You've got to do it. So do it in a way that makes sense and is sensible, and is kind your committee, their job should be earlier, the previous speaker talked about, I'm a student's best cheerleader, your committee should be there to make you better, and one of their jobs and making you better. And this was referenced, I think in both of the previous talks, but definitely the writing one. They're going to provide you feedback. And I think sometimes that feels like it's just criticism, like I did everything wrong and didn't do everything right. But their job, they're allocating a lot of energy and time and expertise, and trying to give you constructive feedback to make you better. No committee should just give you a blank check and be like, Oh, this is great. You just do whatever you want to do. It's great. And I've seen that happen. I've seen students construct committees because they knew that this was the path of least resistance. That's not a great use of your time. It's not a great use of your knowledge. It's not a great use of your doctoral journey, to just basically be given this free pathway to completion that's not honoring the process that you've engaged and it's not honoring at the end you putting Doctor in front of your name. Conversely, however, faculty shouldn't create these obstacle courses they shouldn't constantly be obstructionist. In terms of you moving forward, and so making sure that you have you select your committee in nearly all cases, making sure that when you choose those people, you're choosing people that are they're prepared to, in fact, be your cheerleaders to tell it to give you potentially hard feedback, but also being prepared to help guide you through what to do with that feedback. And the last thing, and this is gonna sound really silly. But do you make sure your committee members can actually work together, there's a lot of personalities in academia, I'm sure you have all found that to be the case. And there are sometimes instances where faculty members are just paradigmatically, opposed like that, just their understanding of how data gets analyzed how findings get written up, they're just they're completely, they're completely incongruent. And that's not necessarily useful for you. And so make sure when you're building this committee of cheerleaders and support system, that they're also willing and able to support one another, it makes your experience so much easier. And these are things that by and large, I think you have control over there's a lot of aspects that dissertation you don't necessarily have a lot of control over. But these are things that to some degree to differing degrees, depending on where you are, you do have some say in most of these aspects of it.For the for the job market, the job market could just about be a full time job. I was stunned when I went on the job market, just how much time being on the job market took, it was shocking to me, frankly. And most of the time, when you're on the job market, you're also like deserting, you're getting ready to defend etc. And so it's a lot. And so I think it's useful for you to be prepared for the fact that you're going to have to carve some space and energy and time out to apply for jobs. So relative to you applying for jobs. First and foremost, there's more out there than just research intensive and teaching intensive jobs. The university that I went to was a research intensive institution and the department that I graduated from was a very publish or perish culture. And the effect of that was that as doctoral students, we were basically raised, if you will, to understand that the purpose of a PhD was solely to seek tenure track research intensive jobs, ultimately. And finally, that's what I decided that I wanted for a range of reasons. But at the beginning, I didn't feel like I had any choice. And it wasn't until I was probably in year three or four that I realized hold out like, this isn't what I have to do. Because that expectation was so normalized that it felt like it was the only choice. There are a range of different kinds of positions out there. I have friends, I have a friend who sought out positions specifically at small liberal arts colleges, because she wanted that connectedness. She wanted that really small student body. She wanted the connectedness between faculty, she wanted to feel like the institution was really knitted into the community where it was situated, she is thriving there. Because she was really thoughtful about what she needed to be happy and successful post PhD. Another friend knew that she loved teaching she wanted to teach, that's what she wanted to do. So that's what she looked for. In job posts, she wanted to be a faculty member, there are other people that I came from a K 12 classroom too. And I renew my teaching certificate before I graduated as a just in case. But there were a number of people that elected that they wanted to go back into a k two o'clock classroom, that was their choice. And they again, love it. They're delighted there. And there was really a culture in the department that sought to make them feel like they had failed somehow, by pursuing the very trajectory that they had, that they were after. And so just be really aware of the fact that you have choices, you have options, whatever the default, whatever the assumption is at your university, in your department in your program, you actually you have some choices, and you don't have to default to those just because other if you're going to the doctor for your name, other people shouldn't get to tell you what to do with your life.The other thing is be really honest with yourself about what's sustainable for success. And I'm going to give you an example of this. I had a friend, I have a friend, I don't know why I'm using past tense. I have a friend when we were doctoral students, again, it was very publisher perish culture. So we're all publishing our little hearts out not knowing what we're doing, frankly. And it made her miserable. She hated to have to publish, but then she because of the culture, and that department saw research intensive jobs. And so then she landed in a tenure track job where she was expected to publish extensively. And she's been miserable. And I frankly worry about her regularly because I wonder what would it have been like? Had you felt like you had choices? What would it have been like had you better aligned, where you landed as a faculty member with what gave you joy, what you felt like you were really good at versus what you felt like you had to do and so be really honest, if you really enjoy the research, that's great. Know that about yourself if you find teaching tedious and annoying. Know that about yourself. If teaching is what gives you joy. That's where you find yourself putting energy and time know that about yourself. If you know that you don't want to have a part in higher education know that about yourself.I do want to be really honest and say there are fewer tenure track jobs every year and more more universities and colleges post clinical positions and research based positions, the University of Alabama has started to have more and more assistant research professor positions, for example. And that's not scary. It's just real. Because, again, this is an opportunity for you to be really honest with yourself. There's I have a couple of colleagues here, who are assistant research professors, and will eventually move into being Associate Research professors. That was their jam, they want to do research, they want to pursue grants, they want to pursue fellowships, they didn't want to allocate a ton of time to teaching and teaching, preparation, and so on. So that shift in the market was really useful for them. And so know that about yourself, but also just have a realistic notion of what the market looks like, this year has looked really good relative to quality and your track jobs, frankly, last year, not good at all. Who knows, I went to the job market two years, the first year was really awful. It was the great recession. And there were two jobs that whole year. And both of them really wanted like advanced people. And as a doc student, I was not that person next year was there are also non academic jobs that you can keep in mind you can be aware of there are tons of government agencies or tons of nonprofits that are very interested in PhDs and interested in the skill sets a PhD earnings earners have and so be aware of the fact that you don't have to go into academia, nor do you have to go into some facet of education. For example, this is a qualitative research SIG sponsored event. And so a lot of you presumably are interested in research, there's lots of places to value those skill sets. And frankly, some of them pay better than higher education, I would also recommend that if you are early in your doctoral journey, I know that initially, we would have a listserv, and there would be all kinds of like job posts that would be sent out and I'd be like, I'm in my first year delete, I realized after the fact, it really is useful to look at them just to have a notion of what people are asking for, to have a notion of what jobs are out there. Because it was really like, once I started to pay attention to them, I realized, like, you can look at a job post to be like, Oh, that's so cool, I want that or I don't want that job at all ever. And that tells you something about yourself. And it tells you something about what you need to do relative to your pathway to make yourself competitive for some of those jobs. And related to that, when you're looking at the job posts. If you're close to the finish line, use your research or skills that have gotten you to the point where you're at the finish line and like really examine them really look at what they're asking for. And so to that effect, applying for jobs, I only have one more slide for this one. When you're applying for jobs, there is always a required section, or a mandatory section pay attention to that because that is not suggested. Typically, those required elements are actually required, by law, required by accreditation standards, whatever. But if you look at that job posting, there's required thing that you don't meet, you're almost certainly not going to be competitive for that job. We had an assistant professor of qualitative research job here at the university. One of the required aspects was, whoever replied have at least 18 hours in qualitative research methodology coursework, and we weeded out probably 60% of the applicants because they didn't meet that requirement. And that wasn't something we had any control over that was required. And so pay attention to what they say is required because you actually do need to be able to check those things off. Research the institution find out what it's like what what is an institution? What are they about? What are their missions? Were their visions? They aligned with yours? Does this seem like a play? Like, are you excited? You're gonna have to probably live in this place. Is it exciting to live in this place? Or does it make you potentially miserable? Research them use the skills that have gotten you through your doctoral journey research them? Look at who they've recently hired and or who they recently tenure? Are the lots of people leaving and people seem really happy and successful? Are people staying for long periods of time? What are the people who recently got hired? What are their meters look like beforehand? People who recently got tenure, what are their views look like? It gives you a notion of what does it mean to be successful in this place relative to getting hired and then being able to stay?When you are when you're like applying for this job I'm applying for this job is the jam. It's awesome. Write a letter for that job generic cover letters for job for academic jobs, you're not going to work, it's going to get you tossed out. You need to pay attention to what the job post says and incorporates some of that language and acknowledged some aspects of what they're asking for in that cover letter. If you want to actually move into potentially having an interview to get an interview. There's really standard interview questions that are pretty typical for most academic jobs, things like why do you want to work here at this institution? What about the what about this job excites you? If they're research intensive, they're gonna ask you questions about your research trajectory, with their teaching intensive, they're gonna ask you questions about like your teaching experience, and so on. A lot of the job interview questions that are fairly that you would expect are actually pretty typical, especially at the preliminary interview stage. And so prepare for those do you get a campus visit even if it's virtual these days? Practice before you go especially like your either your job talk and or teaching demonstration depending on what they're asking of you and do it in front of other people get feedback from them. My first research job talk practice was awful. But it was really useful to hear myself say it and know that I sucked because then I could get feedback and make it better. And then essentially, because it's cliche, but you're interviewing them to, I interviewed for and had a campus visits were an institution that it was very clear to me like I was gonna be super miserable in that space, and that you need to be aware of those things when you need to decide like, am I going to be okay with being miserable here for whatever amount of time? Or is this just not a place for me. And then the other thing is, there's aspects of the job search and the job hiring process in academia that you have no control over. And a lot of times, it's not personal, it's hard not to take it personally. But when they didn't want me, they didn't hire me, whatever. But sometimes they need a very specific skill, they need a very specific complimentary person to like another person that's there. It's not actually about you, and you don't have any control over that you can't like change the very nature of who you are and your scholarship to accommodate this institution. You wouldn't want to do that anyway. And so sometimes, if you don't get an interview, if you don't get a campus visit, if you don't get the job, it's not actually anything that you did. It's just that you weren't the right fit. And it's hard to hear that, but it's true. I've seen it on both sides as both the job candidate and as someone who's been a search committee chair and search committee member, and as somebody who's helped to negotiate hiring, and then actually, that was my last slide. I thought I had another one. So that those are mine. That's my overview. And as the others had said, I'm very happy to take questions and be as honest as I can possibly be.Carlson Coogler  51:08  Great. Thank you so much, Dr. Shelton. Okay, so we are going to move to the question and answer portion. And please, if everyone will, please put your questions in the chat as a reminder, then the committee members will be pulling those and we will ask them to our participants. And also I am going to go ahead and put in the chat, we have a quick little first our email if you want to get in contact with us, if you don't want to to our listservs. And also a quick little forums, you can give us some feedback on this event. And you know, what topics you might want to hear about in the future, that sort of thing. So if you would please fill that out after at the end of this meeting? That will be awesome. Okay, our first question. And again, it's panel so anyone can answer. What do you wish you spent more time on as a person professionally, and as a junior academic, like professionally, while you are pursuing your PhD, Dr. Shelton  51:55  I think I wish that I had spent more time taking courses and other disciplines, it's really easy to put yourself into a silo as a doctoral student, because it's very, it's very much a degree of like, milestones seven inches wide. That's how it's designed to work. But like looking back, I realized, like, there were moments when I could have taken a class like in a different department or in a different college. And I really, I think that I don't think it would have changed my trajectory in terms of where I landed. But I think it potentially would have offered me new ways of thinking, new ways of considering research and so on. And so that's one thing that I do regret as a doc student that I wish I had done. Dr. Brownel  52:31  I think that one of the things that I heard maybe later in my doctoral career that I wish I would have known in years like one and two more so I guess, but I think learning how to cautiously say no, and no thank you to things while also keeping doors open. And I think that's true, both in terms of opportunities to be on panels or to engage in like lots of different activities. But I think learning how to say no, early on is a useful thing, especially as I think my co panelists mentioned, like you're working towards this goal of your dissertation is not the end of your career, but like hopefully a launch pad for the rest of your career. And so making sure that you do get an array of like experiences, but making sure that those experiences are things that you're really committed to, and that will really push your work, your thinking, your connections, your network and your well being in useful ways. Because sometimes you get a little stretch and overwhelmed because we feel like we have to do everything in graduate school. Dr. Shelton  53:30  I'm going to add another thing real quick, if that's okay, if you will allow me the lot like the other thing that I wish I had known early on, was it no one knows what they're doing. I feel like I like the entirety of my first year of my doctoral experience. I felt like other people knew what was happening. Other people knew what was going on. Like, they knew all this terminology. They knew all these theorists, they're using all these big words. And as I progressed through my doctoral degree, I realized like, they didn't know anything, they didn't they had vocabulary to throw around to make it sound like they knew stuff. But like they didn't know anything, either. And, and so like, just recognizing that like the whole imposter syndrome, people that people talk about, it's real, but like, You're not an idiot. I think that's I think what I wish I had realized I wasn't dumb. I wasn't behind. I just wasn't participating in this facade, and this fronting that people would like often do.Dr. Brownel  54:19  I'm gonna jump back in again, I'm really sorry, Carlson, because I'm gonna throw this out because similar to Stephanie, I feel those sorts of ways. But I think that this book is really great. Just Clark, this book, which is a field guide to grad school, which talks about like the hidden curriculum of graduate school, because there's a lot of that that's true both for Professor Orient, but especially in graduate sc

The Thoughtful Counselor
EP226: Rethinking Lifespan Development

The Thoughtful Counselor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 60:13


Dr. Margaret Lamar interviews Drs. Kelly Coker, Kristi Cannon, Savitri Dixon-Saxon, and Karen Roller about their new project taking a new look at lifespan development. They share the importance of understanding lifespan development within the context and culture the clients experience and grow. The conversation includes how we can better conceptualize our clients using a contextual and cultural lens of lifespan development For more on Drs. Kelly Coker, Kristi Cannon, Savitri Dixon-Saxon, and Karen Roller, links from the conversation, and APA citation for this episode visit concept.paloaltou.edu   The Thoughtful Counselor is created in partnership with Palo Alto University's Division of Continuing & Professional Studies. Learn more at concept.paloaltou.edu

The Secret Teachings
The Secret Teachings 4/19/22 - Cultural BDSM 3: Safe Word

The Secret Teachings

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 120:01


The public has been suffocated, restrained, and muzzled for the last two years under 'mitigation' torture techniques that can only be classified as cultural BDSM. Remnants of this hygiene-bio-medical-theater like the Federal Transportation Mask Mandate had remained for travelers until April 18, 2022, when Federal Judge Kathryn Kimball Mizelle uttered the 'safe word' and vacated the order on grounds that the CDC did not have statutory authority from Congress to enact such a rule, that they violated the APA in not providing comments from the public, and further that they gave zero reasoning behind the order. Now the liberal media that always believes an empowered woman has launched an assault on the powerful female judge to discredit the law and demean her position. In a panic, the media has also turned to their 'experts' to encourage compliant masking to ensure the shamemask of obedience doesn't slip too far before the next demand of the governmental dominatrix.

Two Psychologists Four Beers
Episode 85: People Dealing With the Pandemic Pretty Well, Study Finds

Two Psychologists Four Beers

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 67:33


Originally, Yoel and Alexa set out to discuss a study examining stress and decision-making during the pandemic. However, they get sidetracked by the ways that data are packaged - first by APA, and then by NPR - into a newsworthy account that may not tell the whole story. They identify ways in which the summary statements and headlines may exaggerate or twist the data into a more interesting narrative. Despite their skepticism, they consider NPR's advice about how to improve day-to-day decision-making. In a particularly humble moment, Yoel concedes that he should have known better than to buy a car without air conditioning.

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
What is Eco Anxiety? An Interview with Dr. Thomas Doherty

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 42:48


What is Eco Anxiety? An Interview with Dr. Thomas Doherty Curt and Katie interview Dr. Thomas Doherty about Eco Anxiety. We look at the history of eco anxiety, what therapists should know about the environment, the concept of environmental identity, and how we can support clients with Eco Anxiety in therapy. We look at ways to bring these topics up with our clients as well as empower them to take action. An Interview with Dr. Thomas J. Doherty Thomas is a clinical and environmental psychologist based in Portland, Oregon, USA. His multiple publications on nature and mental health include the groundbreaking paper “The Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change,” co-authored by Susan Clayton, cited over 700 times. Thomas is a fellow of the American Psychological Association (APA), Past President of the Society for Environmental, Population and Conservation Psychology, and Founding Editor of the academic journal Ecopsychology. Thomas was a member of the APA's first Task Force on Global Climate Change and founded one of the first environmentally-focused certificate programs for mental health counselors in the US at Lewis & Clark Graduate School. Thomas is originally from Buffalo, New York. In this podcast episode we talk about what therapists should know about Eco Anxiety In preparation for Earth Day, we wanted to understand more about Eco Anxiety and what therapists can do to support our clients and the planet. What is Eco Anxiety? The history of Eco Anxiety, including worry about the use of chemicals, climate change The importance of words, personal experiences, how the client sees the world The diagnoses that align with this area, the types of impacts on clients What Should Therapists Know About the Environment? Resources related to climate change How to explore Environmental Identity Understand our own Environmental Identity The 3 basic psychological impacts from the environment (disaster, chronic, or ambient) The benefits of nature and how people in all environments can access them What is your Environmental Identity? “Our environmental identity is really all of our values and experiences regarding nature, in the natural world.” – Dr. Thomas Doherty Relationship to the natural world Significant experiences in the outdoors The nuance of bringing these ideas up in Urban areas What “nature” means to each of us “One of the things I tell people is that, around the world, there's millions of people that are working on climate change issues, and all these different areas, and people are studying things, and they're building things. And it's really inspiring to be around some of this stuff. So that's an important message to get out to people it. Yes, it's a big issue. But there's a ton of people working on this, think of all the people even in the Los Angeles area that are going to work every day, on climate and public health.” - Dr. Thomas Doherty How Can We Support Clients with Eco Anxiety in Therapy? Understanding the basics on the environment and climate change Building capacity to be with these issues Reeling in the anxiety, imagination Understanding the waves of emotions and completing the anxiety cycle Giving clients permission to talk about the environment and how to open up the conversations Coping strategies specific to Eco Anxiety Suggestions for activism and what clients can do to improve the environment Helping clients to identify if they are doing enough Where to find resources on environmental efforts How therapists can employ climate awareness in their practices Our Generous Sponsors for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: Thrizer Thrizer is a new modern billing platform for therapists that was built on the belief that therapy should be accessible AND clinicians should earn what they are worth. Their platform automatically gets clients reimbursed by their insurance after every session. Just by billing your clients through Thrizer, you can potentially save them hundreds every month, with no extra work on your end. Every time you bill a client through Thrizer, an insurance claim is automatically generated and sent directly to the client's insurance. From there, Thrizer provides concierge support to ensure clients get their reimbursement quickly, directly into their bank account. By eliminating reimbursement by check, confusion around benefits, and obscurity with reimbursement status, they allow your clients to focus on what actually matters rather than worrying about their money. It is very quick to get set up and it works great in completement with EHR systems. Their team is super helpful and responsive, and the founder is actually a long-time therapy client who grew frustrated with his reimbursement times The best part is you don't need to give up your rate. They charge a standard 3% payment processing fee! Thrizer lets you become more accessible while remaining in complete control of your practice. A better experience for your clients during therapy means higher retention. Money won't be the reason they quit on therapy. Sign up using bit.ly/moderntherapists if you want to test Thrizer completely risk free! Sign up for Thrizer with code 'moderntherapists' for 1 month of no credit card fees or payment processing fees! That's right - you will get one month of no payment processing fees, meaning you earn 100% of your cash rate during that time! Melissa Forziat Events & Marketing Today's episode of The Therapy Reimagined podcast is brought to you by Melissa Forziat Events & Marketing. Melissa is a small business marketing expert who specializes in marketing advice for businesses that have limited resources.  Are you looking to boost your reach and get more clients from social media?  Check out the “How to Win at Social Media (even with no budget!)” course from marketing expert, Melissa Forziat. It can be so hard to get engagement on social media or to know what to post to tell the story of your brand.  It can be even harder to get those conversations to turn into new clients. Social media marketing isn't just for businesses that have a ton of money to spend on advertising.  Melissa will work you step-by-step through creating a smart plan that fits within your budget.  How to Win at Social Media is packed full of information. Usually a course as detailed as this would be priced in the thousands, but to make it accessible to small businesses, it is available for only $247.  PLUS, as a listener of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide, you can use promo code THERAPY to get 10% off.  So, if you are ready to go to the next level in your business, click THIS LINK and sign up for the How to Win at Social Media course today! Please note that Therapy Reimagined/The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Podcast is a paid affiliate for Melissa Forziat Events & Marketing, so we will get a little bit of money in our pockets if you sign up using our link. Thank you in advance!  Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! Dr. Thomas Doherty's Practice Sustainable Self Climate Change and Happiness Podcast Dr. Thomas Doherty's Consultation and Training Program on the Environment The Psychological Impacts of Global Climate Change by Thomas J. Doherty and Susan Clayton NY Times: Climate Change Enters the Therapy Room Climate Psychology Alliance Project Draw Down Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: What's New in the DSM-5-TR with Dr. Michael B. First What You Should Know About Walk and Talk Therapy part 1 What You Should Know About Walk and Talk Therapy part 2 (Law and Ethics) Shared Traumatic Experiences Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: Patreon Buy Me A Coffee Podcast Homepage Therapy Reimagined Homepage Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube   Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group   Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano https://groomsymusic.com/   Transcript for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide podcast (Autogenerated): Curt Widhalm  00:00 This episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide is brought to you by Thrizer.   Katie Vernoy  00:04 Thrizer is a modern billing platform for private pay therapists, their platform automatically gets clients reimbursed by their insurance after every session. Just by billing your clients through Thrizer you can potentially save them hundreds every month with no extra work on your end. The best part is you don't need to give up your rate they charge a standard 3% payment processing fee. By using the link in the show notes, you can get a month of billing without processing fees just to test them out for your clients.   Curt Widhalm  00:30 Listen at the end of the episode for more information.   Katie Vernoy  00:34 This episode is also brought to you by Melissa Forziat Events and Marketing   Curt Widhalm  00:39 Melissa Forziat is a small business marketing expert who specializes in marketing advice for businesses that have limited resources, including the very special course How to Win at Social Media, Even with No Budget. Stay tuned to the end of the episode to learn how you can get the most from social media marketing, even with little to no budget,   Announcer  00:59 You're listening to The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide where therapists live, breathe and practice as human beings. To support you as a whole person and a therapist, here are your hosts, Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy.   Curt Widhalm  01:15 Welcome back modern therapists. This is The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide. I'm Curt Widhalm with Katie Vernoy. And this is the podcast for therapists about literally at this point, just everything that we come across in our practice in our field. After a couple of 100 episodes, we continue to find new areas that we're hearing conversations in the background and wanting to be able to put you our audience in touch with the people who are leading some of these conversations. And as close as we can tie this into Earth Day, we wanted to talk about eco anxiety and those clients presenting with concerns about climate change. And this being an area that we've been aware of for a while but figured we would get somebody who's really, really smart about this. So welcoming to the podcast today Dr. Thomas Doherty, a psychologist up in the Portland area, and with his podcast, also Climate Change and Happiness. We are very happy to have you here today. Thanks for joining us.   Dr. Thomas Doherty  02:25 Thanks, Curt and Katie, I'm glad to be here.   Katie Vernoy  02:28 We are so excited to have you here. And to have this conversation. The first question that we ask everyone is who are you? And what are you putting out into the world?   Dr. Thomas Doherty  02:38 Yeah, that's a great question for all of us to think about every day, you know, today I'm thinking about being a parent of a parent of a 14 year old and getting her out to school, I have my day, I work from home, mostly these days, because of the pandemic, a lot of my practice has shifted to my home office. And so I'm, and I'm a psychologist and I have most recently been really immersed in this area of environmental identity and people's connections with nature and their concerns about nature and the natural world and climate change. And that is something I've been interested in. But now, you know, the world has caught up to me a little bit on this, and a lot of other people are interested in it too. So it's really, that's kind of where my where my focus is these days and exploring some of these issues.   Curt Widhalm  03:23 So let's start from the basics here and kind of work our way up into some of the bigger ideas. Let's start with defining what is eco anxiety and maybe how that's a little bit different than kind of passing concerns around environmental transition sort of stuff.   Dr. Thomas Doherty  03:40 I'll make a point that we can cycle back to about this because people, we have anxiety when we're concerned about some, you know, we're apprehensive about some potential threat in the future. But you know, there's a saying in therapy, you know, you've heard where we care. And so anxiety is a signal to us. But it's also a signal that we have values and we have things that we care about and things that are important to us, right. And so very quickly into the eco anxiety conversation, I like to pivot to that value piece because it helps to ground people. And we can get to that. But eco anxiety is a term that started by my reckoning, it started to be used in the media around 2007, give or take. And it was originally describing people's concerns around just these kind of insidious environmental issues that we know about that are that are hard to track, like plastics, in the food chain or chemicals, or various kinds of you know, these kind of forever chemicals that are floating around. And it really insidious kind of feeling that that's kind of where that that term first originated in my research of it. And then of course, it's more recently been attached to people's concerns about climate change, and the potential changes that could happen to the environment and other species. So it has It has a history and then it you can go back to say, even people's concerns about nuclear war and during the Cold War, or people's concerns about chemicals in the environment, going back to Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, which was published in the early, early 1960s. So it does have a little bit of a history if you dig this idea of being concerned about the state of the world. But in the last couple of years, it's really been amped up because of the predicted, you know, disasters and events associated with climate change have been happening to people, and they've been happening close to where you live. And we've been seeing this on the news or even personally, experiencing in terms of heat, smoke, fires, severe storms, flooding. And so that's, that's kind of taken this, this kind of general, you know, existential concern that all of us have at one time or another, and really, really amped it up for people.   Katie Vernoy  05:55 It's so interesting, because when you talk about that, I feel like especially for those of us on the West Coast, it feels very present related to the fires. You're up in Portland and I, before we were started, I gotten to Portland a couple of times, and, and I think it's an amazing city. And the first time I really got to explore it, it was under ashes. And air quality was pretty, pretty gnarly. And it was something you know, well, before the pandemic, folks were wearing masks just to try to get through day to day and it, it felt very apocalyptic to be there, the sky is this horrible color, or maybe, you know, in a weird way, a beautiful color, but then there's also just ash raining down and, and to me, it feels very logical to say like, this is going to impact all of us. And for some folks that might impact more dramatically. This this idea that the world is failing is coming to an end that we're destroying the planet. And so what's it mean? Is there is there a kind of subclinical, like, I'm worried and care about the environment? And there's clinical eco anxiety? Like, is there a discernment there, that we can make for our audience?   Dr. Thomas Doherty  07:08 Yeah, I would say so. And it's really neat that we're, we're, you know, the, the listeners are therapists, because we can get into this kind of thing. So a lot of it is, it's really juicy, it's about our meaning, it's about the words that we use, you know, so when I start to when I start to talk to people, I'm immediately being very observant to what they what their language is, what their personal experiences are, you know, even using terms like apocalyptic and stuff like that, it gives us a clue to how we're seeing things, right. And then there's that people, I have some control over my words, and I have some control over what language I use. And so they immediately were, were started, just like any other kind of therapeutic issue, whatever, whatever it happens to be, we're just really listening for the narrative, you know, and therapists, of course, themselves have been influenced by this as well. So that's also been a tripping point is that the last couple of years therapists themselves have been, they're human, and they're, they live in Portland, or whatever. And they're dealing with the smoke and the heat. So they're going through it also. So all the therapists that were listening, that are listening are going through this as well. So we're not sheltered from this, there's no special eco anxiety diagnosis, as you know, there's, and I know you were talking to DSM experts. And so it's really touchy about, you know, what's in the DSM. And there's really important rules about diagnostic categories are made. So what we're dealing with is, and we don't need a new diagnosis, we we have the tools, we can diagnose someone's feelings of depression, or anxiety or trauma, with quite amply with existing DSM. And so anxiety is a normal emotion, we all feel it, it's a healthy, useful emotion we were, that's how humans survive, we, you know, anxiety keeps us alive. And also we have social anxiety and different other kinds of anxiety about our performance, and how we fit in with our tribe of people and all that sort of stuff. So, so we have to remind ourselves that anxiety is normal and some anxiety about the future. And there's so many things to be anxious about in the, in the, in our global interconnected world, all of us sit with some anxieties, from time to time, that's quite normal. And it helps us to be the best people that we can be like with any other kind of anxiety issue. To me, there's three levels, there's normal feelings, there's adjustment level problems, that would be kind of adjustment disorder level. And then there are, you know, more diagnostic problems, like, like someone might meet criteria for an anxiety disorder. So if someone's concerns about the environment are affecting significantly affecting their sleep, or their diet or their relationships or their work or going to school, you know, if there's that significant impact on activities of life, then, you know, if the patient or client is, is amenable to that, I mean, that's, that's, we can use that label to help them. Yeah. So, and I think our goal is to allow I think a lot of people myself maybe yourselves as well, we all of us will move into that adjustment disorder category from time to time, you know, in the sense of wow, we're really needing to do some extra work to adjust to this stressor that we have. And it could, it could be temporarily affecting our sleep or things like that. So that part of the goal is to keep people in the adjustment. And, you know, keeping them toward health, and helping them to not fall into the deeper diagnostic issues.   Curt Widhalm  10:25 I'll maybe for spicing this up a bit come at this from more of the alarmist side then, you know, this seems to be, you know, following all of the climate predictions, everything else seems to be getting worse and worse. And in managing some of these conversations with our clients, we're going through this too. And it's, it feels like it's so much bigger than what any one of us individuals can do. And it seems like a lot of us are managing these conversations, it's just kind of like well, put your head down and hope for the best and focus on the positives. But I'm imagining that that is not the only things that we should be doing here.   Dr. Thomas Doherty  11:08 Yeah, yeah, it is. And that's part of it is bearing witness to this, you know, it is scary, it is overwhelming, I will go through moments of overwhelm, too, I mean, and it, it's a paradox, the more you know, ignorance is bliss. And if you don't know much about this, you don't, it's not concerning you, because some of these things are far away, for you don't necessarily have to link, you know, weather changes to the climate. So certain people are more vulnerable. Even traditionally, people have been more vulnerable people that are environmentally minded, in general, people that are environmental professionals, or conservation professionals, or teachers or scientists, public health people, you know, so those people have been vunerable are more vulnerable, because they know a lot, putting your head down for a moment is fine, you know, that's okay. But, you know, it's about building capacity, you know, it's about building capacity to be with these issues, you know, some basic kinds of cognitive behavioral and other kinds of therapy techniques are helpful about just helping people to, to kind of grade what is the true danger today, like, how are things going right? Today, when you walk outside your door, it just keeping you know, getting people into the present moment, helping people to be more mindful, essentially reeling in, reeling in the anxiety, I say, you know, your your horses are going to one of my chair therapy sayings is that your horses are going to ride like you, if I My imagination is going to go on, on anything, just don't, your horses are gonna ride, but just don't ride them, you know, so let your imagination is going to do what it's going to do. But let's come back to the present moment. And so I feel like there's a wave function here where people get really stressed, and we kind of help just pull it together, build some capacity to take in a little more. And then, you know, so this ride, you know, there's this kind of despair, empowerment curve that happens in environmental work in general. But in any kind of important work, you know, you're trying to write a novel or anything, you're gonna go through periods where you're up in periods where you're down. And so it's helping people just to get into that little longer flow. But not sugarcoating it either. I mean, that's not helpful. It is, it is scary, and it is dangerous. And ultimately, people do need to find a way to take some action, you know, because that's the way to complete the anxiety cycle is, is to take some action. So so it gets really existential gets political, we need to be like really upfront about all that.   Katie Vernoy  13:27 You said that folks who don't know kind of can keep their heads down or not even know they need to keep their heads down, that that kind of ignorance is bliss.   Dr. Thomas Doherty  13:36 Yeah.   Katie Vernoy  13:37 And it feels like in, in these times, therapists can't be ignorant to these issues, because so many folks who are walking into our doors or are opening up our virtual office windows, I think that they are worried about these things. And so what do you think are the basics that all therapists should know about this?   Dr. Thomas Doherty  14:00 Yeah, yeah. And it is becoming it is becoming a competency, right, either a sub competency that everybody needs to know a little bit about and then some people are choosing to, to make this more of a subspecialty we're just in the new territory for that. I mean, I do a training program like a 10 week, Zoom based program for therapists, eco and climate conscious therapists that I've been doing, I started last fall and I'm into my third round of doing that. And then I have people I have therapists in from around the US and also from Canada and Australia and England and Germany. And so people are reaching out to me about that. And they are because there are very few resources. There's the climate psychology alliance in the US and in the UK, and they're they're really working hard to try to bring things together so it's it's not a it's not a barren territory. There's there's things happening, but it's it's still new. And so what should all therapists know? That's a good question. On the positive side, I think the most positive thing, and the thing that I tend to go to with clients is this idea that I mentioned earlier of environmental identity, right. So this is an idea that really is, is, is, is ready for primetime, it's the sense that we have it, all of us have an identity in relation to nature in the natural world, how we see ourselves in relation to nature and other species and places, it's similar to our other kinds of identity, like our gender identity, or cultural identity, or sexual identity, these kinds of identities, we need to give people some information about them, so they can think about them and articulate them, and then kind of take pride in them and, and enact them, right. And so our environmental identity is really all of our values and experiences regarding nature, in the natural world. Climate change, and environmental issues really, really threaten some of that to us. And, and one of the big problems in the modern world, you know, is that people haven't been, unless they're sort of Environmental Studies student or nature writer, or, you know, an outdoor educator or something very few people have been taught to really get clear on their environmental identity, we pick it up, and it's kind of tacit, and it's kind of in us and we could either of you, we could talk about your your significant experiences, you know, whether someone's an urban person or a rural person, or they have done outdoor, they feel comfortable doing outdoor camping, or they have pets, or they have connection with other species, it's everybody's story is slightly different. But you know, that that's the value. And that's the base where we would then take action in the future to be the person we want to be. So as you know, I think, hoping that all therapists can help people to help clarify their environmental identity, why is this important to you? Where did you come from? What does it mean to you? And this becomes a base that you can get really strong on. And then I think it calms people down and it says, Okay, this is this is a real thing. This is part of mean, this is why I'm concerned, and some of that free floating anxiety will come down. And so that's, that's one, that's one piece. The other the other piece, I would say is there's three basic impacts from mental health, mental health impacts of climate change that people should be aware of. The first one is kind of obvious as disaster impacts when you're really affected by a specific situation, like a heatwave, or, or fires or any kind of thing. And there's a whole range of, you know, disaster psychology research and Mental Health First Aid and things like that, that you can, you can learn about. The second is the more chronic impacts, which would be being displaced, like being a climate, refugee, chronic chronic economic problems, you know, things that last a long time and then are that aren't easily solved. And then that immediately dovetails with all environmental justice issues, and people's placement and things like that. So it brings in, you know, social environmental, justice, focus. And then the third category is the, the kind of ambient impacts the subjective emotional impacts of just watching things from afar. And depending on where you are, as a therapist, you might find clients in any of those boxes, or multiple boxes. And so the approach is slightly different.   Curt Widhalm  18:05 And you've written an article on this it for American Psychologists that will link in the show notes that goes into those features a lot more deeply than here in a minute on our podcast here. I want to go back t