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Best podcasts about Wang

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Latest podcast episodes about Wang

Pacific Beat
Pacific Islanders in Australia consider the win of the Labor Party as a win for climate action

Pacific Beat

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 43:55


Pacific Islanders in Australia celebrate the win of the Labor Party as a win for climate action, and research confirms that the volcanic eruption that devastated Tonga earlier this year was the biggest volcanic explosion yet recorded by modern sensors.

Hackberry House of Chosun
Extreme Devotion, Pastor Wang

Hackberry House of Chosun

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 3:00


It is 1950's China. The good pastor refuses to hang a picture of Chairman Mao in his church. You can imagine the result of that decision. Or can you-

The Arts of Travel
Chang Che on Wang Huning: The Mind behind Xi & the Modern CCP

The Arts of Travel

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 66:08


I spoke to Chang Che of SupChina for a fascinating conversation on Wang Huning, the strategist behind Xi Jinping & the Modern CCP We discuss Wang's role in crafting China's authoritarianism to implement capitalist reforms, how Wang's writings convinced party leaders that America would ultimately collapse, the current state of Nihilism in both the US and China amongst young people, and the contrasting legacy of China's 'Covid-Zero' and America's "Covid for Everyone". For more w. Chang please read his work on Sup China here: https://supchina.com/author/changche/ You can also find a website of all his writings here: https://changnche.com/ Music by Prod Riddiman: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hyLbRJEFSa8

JS Party
The third year of the third age of JS

JS Party

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 60:10


In 2020, Shawn (swyx) Wang wrote: Every 10 years there is a changing of the guard in JavaScript. I think we have just started a period of accelerated change that could in thge future be regarded as the Third Age of JavaScript. We're now in year three of this third age and Swyx joins us to look back at what he missed, look around at what's happening today, and look forward at what might be coming next.

Discover CircRes
May 2022 Discover Circ Res

Discover CircRes

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 30:37


This month on Episode 36 of Discover CircRes, host Cynthia St. Hilaire highlights original research articles featured in the April 29 and May 13 issues of Circulation Research. This episode also features a conversation with Dr Patricia Nguyen and Jessica D'Addabbo from Stanford University about their study, Human Coronary Plaque T-cells are Clonal and Cross-React to Virus and Self.   Article highlights:   Zanoli, et al. COVID-19 and Vascular Aging   Wang, et al. JP2NT Gene Therapy in a Mouse Heart Failure Mode   Harraz, et al. Piezo1 Is a Mechanosensor in CNS Capillaries   Zhao, et al. BAT sEVs in Exercise Cardioprotection   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Hi, and welcome to Discover CircRes, the podcast of the American Heart Association's journal, Circulation Research. I'm your host, Dr Cyndy St. Hilaire, from the Vascular Medicine Institute at the University of Pittsburgh. And today, I'll be highlighting the articles from our April 29th and May 13th issues of Circulation Research. I also will speak with Dr Patricia Nguyen and Jessica D'Addabbo from Stanford University about their study, Human Coronary Plaque T-cells are Clonal and Cross-React to Virus and Self.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The first article I want to share is titled Vascular Dysfunction of COVID 19 Is Partially Reverted in the Long-Term. The first author is Agostino Gaudio and the corresponding author is Luca Zanoli. And they're from the University of Catania. Cardiovascular complications, such as endothelial dysfunction, arterial stiffness, thrombosis and heart disease are common in COVID 19. But how quickly such issues resolve, once the acute phase of the illness has passed, remains unclear. To find out, this group examined aortic and brachial pulse wave velocity, and other measures of arterial stiffness in 90 people who, several months earlier, had been hospitalized with COVID 19. These measurements were compared with data from 180 controls, matched for age, sex, ethnicity and body mass index, whose arterial stiffness had been assessed prior to the pandemic. 41 of the COVID patients were also examined 27 weeks later to assess any changes in arterial stiffness over time. Together, the data showed arterial stiffness was higher in COVID patients than in controls. And though it improved over time, it tended to remain higher than normal for almost a year after COVID.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        This finding could suggest residual structural damage to the arterial walls or possibly, persistent low-grade inflammation in COVID patients. Either way, since arterial stiffness is a predictor of cardiovascular health, its potential longterm effects in COVID patients deserves further longitudinal studies.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The second article I want to share is titled Gene Therapy with the N-Terminus of Junctophilin-2 Improves Heart Failure in Mice. The first author is Jinxi Wang and the corresponding author is Long-Sheng Song from the University of Iowa. Junctophilin-2 is a protein with a split personality. Normally, it forms part of the heart's excitation contraction coupling machinery. But when the heart is stressed, JP2 literally splits in two, and sends its N-terminal domain, JP2NT, to the nucleus, where it suppresses transcription of genes involved in fibrosis, hypertrophy, inflammation and other heart failure related processes. However, if this stress is severe or sustained, the protective action of JP2NT is insufficient to halt the progressive failure. This group asked. "What if this N-terminal domain could be ramped up using gene therapy to aid a failing mouse heart?"   Cindy St. Hilaire:        To answer this question, they injected adenoviral vectors encoding JP2NT into mice either before or soon after transaortic constriction, or TAC, tack, which is a method of experimentally inducing heart failure. They found, in both cases, that the injected animals fared better than the controls. Animals injected before TAC showed less severe cardiac remodeling than control mice, while those treated soon after TAC exhibited slower loss of heart function with reduced ventricle dilation and fibrosis. These data suggest that supplementing JP2NT, via gene therapy or other means, could be a promising strategy for treating heart failure. And this data provides a basis for future translational studies.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The third article I want to share is titled Piezo1 Is a Mechanosensor Channel in Central Nervous System Capillaries. The first and corresponding author is Osama Harraz from the University of Vermont. Neurovascular coupling is the process whereby transient activation of neurons leads to an upsurge in local blood flow to accommodate the increased metabolic needs of the cell. It's known that agents released from active neurons trigger changes in local capillaries that prompt vasodilation, but how these hemodynamic changes are sensed and controlled is not entirely clear. This group suspected that the mechanosensory protein Piezo1, a calcium channel that regulates dilation and constriction of other blood vessels, may be involved. But whether Piezo1 is even found in the microcirculation of the CNS was unknown. This group shows that Piezo1 is present in cortical capillaries of the brain and the retina of the mouse, and that it responds to changes in blood pressure and flow.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Ex vivo preparations of mouse retina showed that experimentally induced changes in hemodynamics caused calcium transients and related currents within capillary endothelial cells, and that these were dependent on the presence of Piezo1. While it is not entirely clear how Piezo1 influences cerebral blood flow, its pressure induced activation of CNS capillary endothelial cells suggest a critical role in neurovascular coupling.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The last article I want to share is titled Small Extracellular Vesicles from Brown Adipose Tissue Mediate Exercise Cardioprotection. The first authors are Hang Zhao and Xiyao Chen. And the corresponding authors are Fuyang Zhang and Ling Tao from the Fourth Military Medical University. Regular aerobic exercise is good for the heart and it increases the body's proportion of brown adipose tissue relative to white adipose tissue. This link has led to the idea that brown fat, possibly via its endocrinal activity, might somehow contribute to exercise related cardioprotection. Zhao and colleagues now show that, indeed, brown fat produces extracellular vesicles that are key to preserving heart health. While mice subjected to four weeks of aerobic exercise were better protected against subsequent heart injury than their sedentary counterparts, blocking the production of EVs prior to exercise significantly impaired this protection. Furthermore, injection of brown fat derived EVs into the hearts of mice lessened the impact of subsequent cardiac injury.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The team went on to identify micro RNAs within the vesicles responsible for this protection, showing that the micro RNAs suppressed an apoptosis pathway in cardiomyocytes. In identifying mechanisms and molecules involved in exercise related cardio protection, the work will inform the development of exercise mimicking treatments for people at risk of heart disease or who are intolerant to exercise.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Lastly, I want to bring up that the April 29th issue of Circulation Research also contains a short Review Series on pulmonary hypertension, with articles on: The Latest in Animal Models of Pulmonary Hypertension and Right Ventricular Failure, by Olivier Boucherat; Harnessing Big Data to Advance Treatment and Understanding of Pulmonary Hypertension, by Christopher Rhodes and colleagues; New Mutations and Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Hypertension: Progress and Puzzles in Disease Pathogenesis, by Christophe Guignabert and colleagues; Group 3 Pulmonary Hypertension From Bench to Bedside, by Corey Ventetuolo and colleagues; and Novel Approaches to Imaging the Pulmonary Vasculature and Right Heart, by Sudarshan Rajagopal and colleagues; and Understanding the Pathobiology of Pulmonary Hypertension Due to Left Heart Disease, by Jessica Huston and colleagues.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Today, Dr Patricia Nguyen and Jessica D'Addabbo, from Sanford University, are with me to discuss their study, Human Coronary Plaque T-cells are Clonal and Cross-React to Virus and Self. And this article is in our May 13th issue of Circulation Research. So, Trisha and Jessica, thank you so much for joining me today.   Jessica D'Addabbo:    Thank you for having us.   Patricia Nguyen:         Yes. Thank you for inviting us to your podcast. We're very excited to be here.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah. And I know there's lots of authors involved in this study, so unfortunately we can't have everyone join us, but I appreciate you all taking the time.   Patricia Nguyen:         This is like a humongous effort by many people in the group, including Roshni Roy Chowdhury, and Xianxi Huang, as well as Charles Chan and Mark Davis. So, we thank you.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        So atherosclerosis, it stems from lipid deposition in the vascular wall. And that lipid deposition causes a whole bunch of things to happen that lead to a chronic inflammatory state. And there's many cells that can be inflammatory. And this study, your study, is really focusing on the role of T-cells in the atherosclerotic plaque. So, before we get into the nitty gritty details of your study, can you share with us, what is it that a T-cell does normally and what is it doing in a plaque? Or rather, let me rephrase that as, what did we know a T-cell was doing in a plaque before your study?   Patricia Nguyen:         So, T-cells, as you know, are members of the adaptive immune system. They are the master regulators of the entire immune system, secreting cytokines and other proteins to attract immune cells to a diseased portion of the body, for example. T-cells have been characterized in plaque previously, mainly with immunohisto chemistry. And their characterization has also been recently performed using single cell technologies. Those studies have been restricted to mainly mirroring studies, studies in mice in their aortic walls, in addition to human carotid arteries. So, it is well known that T cells are found in plaque and a lot of attention has been given to the macrophage subset as the innate immune D. But let's not forget the T-cell because they're actually composed about... 50% in the plaque are T-cells.   Patricia Nguyen:         And we were particularly interested in the T-cell population because we have a strong collaboration with Dr Mark Davis, who's actually the pioneer of T-cell biology and was the first to describe the T-cell receptor alpha beta receptor in his lab in the 1970s. So, he has developed many techniques to interrogate T-cell biology. And our collaboration with him has allowed us and enabled us to perform many of these single cell technologies. In addition, his colleague, Dr Chen, also was pivotal in helping us with the interrogation and understanding of the T-cells in plaque.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        And I think one of the really neat strengths of your study is that you used human coronary artery plaques. So, could you walk us through? What was that like? I collect a lot of human tissue in my lab. I get a lot of aortic valves from the clinic. And it's a lot of logistics. And a lot of times, we're just fixing them, but you are not just fixing them. So, can you walk us through? What was that experimental process from the patient to the Petri dish? And also, could you tell us a little bit about your patient population that you sampled from?   Jessica D'Addabbo:    So, these were coronary arteries that we got from patients receiving a heart transplant. So, they were getting a heart transplant for various reasons, and we would receive their old heart, and someone would help us dissect out the coronary arteries from these. And then, we would process each of these coronary arteries separately. And this happened at whatever hour the hearts came out of the patient.   Jessica D'Addabbo:    So sometime, I was coming in at 3:00 AM with Dr Nguyen and we would be working on these hearts then, because we wanted the samples to be as fresh as possible. So, we would get the arteries. We would digest out the tissue. And then, we would have certain staining profiles that we wanted to look at so that we could put the cells on fax to be able to sort the cells, and then do all the downstream sequencing from there.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        So, in terms of, I don't know, the time when you get that phone call that a heart's coming in to actually getting those single cells that you can either send a fax or send a sequencing, how long did that take, on a good day? Let's talk only about good days.   Jessica D'Addabbo:    Yeah. A lot of factors went into that, sometimes depending on availability of things. But usually, we were ready with all of the materials in advance. So, I'd say it could be anywhere from six to 12 hours, it would take, to get everything sorted. Then, everything after that would happen. But that was just that critical period of making sure we got the cells fresh.   Patricia Nguyen:         So we have to credit the CT surgeons at Stanford for setting up the program or the structure, infrastructure, that enables us to obtain this precious tissue. That is Jack Boyd and Joseph Woo of CT surgery. So, they have enabled human research on hearts by making these tissues available. Because as you know, a transplant... They can say the transplant's happening at 12:00 AM, but it actually doesn't happen until 4:00 AM. And I think it's very difficult for a lab to make that happen all the time. And I think having their support in this paper was critical. And this has allowed us, enabled us, to interrogate kind of the spectrum of disease, especially focusing on T-cells, which are... They make a portion of the plaque, but the plaque itself has not like a million cells that are immune. A lot of them are not immune. So, enabling us to get the tissue in a timely fashion where they're not out of the body for more than 30 minutes enables us to interrogate these small populations of cells.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's actually the perfect segue to my next question, which is, how many cells in a plaque were you able to investigate with the single cell analysis? And what was the percentage again of the T-cells in those plaques or in... I guess you looked at different phases of plaque. So, what was that spectrum for the percentage of T-cells?   Patricia Nguyen:         So, for 10X, for example, you need a minimum of 10,000 captured cells. You could do less, but the utility of the 10X is maximized with 10,000. So, many times before the ability to multiplex these tissues, we were doing like capturing 5,000 for example. And the number of cells follows kind of the disease progression, in the sense that as a disease is more severe, you have more immune cells, in general. And it kind of decreases as it becomes more fibrotic and scarred, like calcified. So, it was a bit challenging to get very early just lipid-only cells. And a lot of those, we captured like 3000 or something like that. And efficiency is like 80% perhaps. So, you kind of capture…   Cindy St. Hilaire:        And also, how many excised hearts are going to have early athero? So, it's...   Patricia Nguyen:         Well, there are... nonischemics will have...   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Oh, okay. Okay.   Patricia Nguyen:         So, the range was nonischemic to ischemic.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Oh great.   Patricia Nguyen:         So, about a portion... I would say one third of the total heart transplants were ischemic. And a lot of them were non ischemic. But as you know, the nonischemic can mix with ischemia. And so, they could have mild to moderate disease in the other arteries, for example, but not severe like 70%/90% obstruction.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Wow. That's so great. That's amazing. Amazing sample size you have. So T-cell, it's kind of an umbrella term, right? There's many different types of T-cells. And when you start to get in the nitty gritty, they really do have distinct functions. So, what types of T-cells did you see and did you focus on in this study?   Jessica D'Addabbo:    So, the two main types of T-cells are CD4 positive T-cells and CD8 positive T-cells. And we looked at both of these T-cells from patients. We usually sorted multiple plates from each. And then, with 10X, we captured both. But our major finding was actually that the CD8 positive t-cell population was more clonally expanded than the CD4 population, which led us to believe that these cells were more important in the coronary artery disease progression and in the study that we were doing because for a cell to be clonally expanded, it means it was previously exposed to an antigen. And so, if we're finding these T-cells that are clonally expanded in our plaques, then we're hypothesizing that they were likely exposed to some sort of antigen, and then expanded, and then settled into the plaque.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        And when you're saying expansion, are you talking about them being exposed to the antigen in the plaque and expanding there? Or do you think they're being triggered in the periphery and then honing in as a more clonal population?   Patricia Nguyen:         So, that's a great question. And unfortunately, I don't have the answer to that. So basically-   Jessica D'Addabbo:    Next paper, next paper.   Patricia Nguyen:         Exactly. So, we... Interesting to expand on Jessica's answer. Predominantly what was found, as you said, was memory T-cells, so memory T-cells expressing specific markers, so memory versus naive. And these were effector T-cells. And memory meaning they were previously expanded by antigen engagement, and just happened to be in the plaque for whatever reason. We do not know why T-cells specifically are attracted to the plaque, but they are obviously there. And they're in a memory state, if you will. And some of them did display activation markers, which suggested that they clonally expanded to an antigen. What that antigen is, is the topic of another paper. But certainly, it is important to understand that these patients that we recruit, because they were transplant patients, they're not actively infected, right? That is a exclusionary criteria for transplants, right?   Patricia Nguyen:         So, that means these T-cells were there for unclear reasons. Why they're there is unclear. Whether they are your resident T-cells also is unclear, because the definition of resident T-cell still remains controversial. And you actually have to do lineage tracking studies to find out, "Okay, where... Did they come from the bone marrow? Did they come from the periphery? How did they get there?" Versus, "Okay. They were already there and they just expanded, for whatever reason, inside the plaque."   Cindy St. Hilaire:        So, your title... It was a great title, with this provocative statement, "T-cells are clonal and cross react to virus and self." So, tell us a little bit more about this react to virus and self bit. What did your data show?   Jessica D'Addabbo:    So, because of the way we sequenced the T-cell receptor, we were able to have paired alpha and beta chains. And because we knew the HLA type of the patients, we were able to put the sequences that we got out after we sequenced these through an algorithm called GLIPH, which allows us to look at the CDR3 region of the T cell receptor, which is the epitope binding region. And there are certain peptide. They're about anywhere from three to four amino acids long. These are mapped to certain binding specificities to known peptides. And so, basically, we were able to look at which epitopes were most common in our plaques. And we found that after comparing these to other epitopes, that these were actually more binding to virus. Patricia Nguyen:         So let me add to what Jessica stated, and kind of emphasize the value of the data set, if you will. So, this is, I believe, the first study that provides the complete TCR repertoire of coronary plaque, and actually any plaque that I know of, which is special because we know that there is specificity of TCR binding. It's more complicated than the antibody that binds directly from B cells to the antigen, because the T-cells bind processed antigen. So, the antigens are processed by antigen presenting cells like Dendritic cells and macrophages. And they have a specific HLA MHC class that they need to present to. And they need both arms, the antigen epitope and the MHC, to activate the T-cell. So unfortunately, it's not very direct to find the antigen that is actually activating the T-cell because we're only given a piece of it. Right?            Patricia Nguyen:         But we have provided a comprehensive map of all the TCRs that we find in the plaque. And these TCRs have a sequence, an immuno acid sequence. And luckily, in the literature, there is a database of all TCR specificities. Okay. So, armed with our TCR repertoire, we can then match our TCR repertoire with an existing database of known TCR specificities. Surprisingly, the matching TCRs are specific to virus, like flu, EBV and CMB. And also, because this was done in the era of COVID, we thought it would be important to look at the coronavirus database. We did find that there were matches to the coronavirus database. Even though our finding is not specific to SARS, it does lend to some potential mechanistic link there as well.   So, because this is all computational, it is important to validate. So, the importance of validation requires us to put the TCR alpha beta chain into a Jurkat cell, which is a T-cell line that does not have alpha beta chains on it, and then expose it to what we think is the cognate antigen epitote, with the corresponding HLA MHC APC. Because you don't have all those pieces, it will not work. Yes. So importantly, we did find that what we predicted to have the specificity of a flu peptide had specificity to a flu peptide.   Patricia Nguyen:         So then, the important question was, "Okay, these patients aren't infected, right? Why are these things here? Is there a potential cross reactivity with self peptides?"   Patricia Nguyen:         So luckily, our collaborator, Dr Charles Chan, was able to connect us with another computational algorithm that he was familiar with, whereby we were able to take the peptide sequences from the flu and match them with peptide sequencing from proteins that are self and ubiquitous. And we demonstrated, again, these T-cells were activated in vitro. That is why we concluded that there's a potential cross reactivity between self and virus that can potentially lead to thrombosis associated with viral infections. Of course, this all needs to be proved in vivo.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Sure, sure.   Patricia Nguyen:         It's that first step for other things.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        The other big immune cell that we know is in atherosclerotic plaques and that's macrophages. And they can help to present antigens and things like that. And they also help to chew up the necrotic bits. And so, do you think that this T-cell component is an earlier, maybe disease driving, process or an adaptive process that goes awry as a secondary event? Patricia Nguyen:         So, I'm a fan of the T-cell. So... I'm with team T cell. I would like to think that it is playing an active role in pathology in this case and not a reactive role, in the sense of just being there. I think that the T-cell is actively communicating with other cells within the plaque, and promoting pro fibrotic and pro inflammatory reactions, depending on the T-cell. So, a subset of this paper was looking at kind of the interactions between the T-cell and other cells within the plaque, like macrophages and smooth muscle cells. And as we know, T-cells are activated and they produce cytokines. Those cytokines then communicate to other cells. And we found that, computationally, when you look at the transcriptome, there is a pro-inflammatory signature of the T-cell that resides in the more complex stage. And then, there's an anti-inflammatory signature that kind of resides in the transition between lipid and fibro atheroma, if you will.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        So, do you know, or is it known, how dynamic these populations are? Obviously, the hearts that you got, the samples you got, didn't have active infections. But do you know perhaps even how long ago they happened, or even how soon after there might be an infection or an antigen presented that you could get this expansion? And could that be a real driver of rupture or thrombosis?   Patricia Nguyen:         So, in theory, you would suppose that T-cells expanding and dividing and producing more and more cytokines would then lead to more macrophages coming, more of their production of proteinases that destroy the plaque. Right? So yes, in theory, yes. I think it's very difficult to kind of map the progression of T cell clonality in the current model that we have, because we're just collecting tissues. However, in the future, as organoids become more in science and kind of a primary tissue, where we can... For example, Mark Davis is making organoids with spleen, and also introducing skin to that.   Patricia Nguyen:         And certainly, we could think of an organoid involving the vasculature with immune cells introduced. And so, I think, in the next phase, project 2.0, we can investigate what... like over time, if you could model atherosclerosis and the immune system contribution, T-cells as well as macrophages and other immune cells, you can then kind of map how it happens in humans. Because obviously, mice are different. We know that mice... Actually, the models of transgenic mice do not rupture. It's very hard to make them rupture. Right?   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Well, if you stop feeding them high fat diet, the plaque goes away.   Patricia Nguyen:         For sure, for sure. So I think.. I mean, Mark Davis is a huge proponent of human based research, like research on human tissue. And as a physician scientist, obviously I'm more inclined to do human based research. And Jessica's going to be a physician someday soon. And I'm sure she's more inclined to do human based research. And certainly, the mouse model and in vitro models are great because you can manipulate them. But ultimately, we are trying to cure human diseases.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Mice are not little humans. That's what we say in my lab. I similarly do a lot of human based stuff and it's amazing how great mice are for certain things, but still how much is not there when we need to really fully recapitulate a disease model.   So, my last question is kind of regarding this autoimmune angle of your findings. And that is, women tend to have more autoimmune diseases than men, but due to the fact that you are getting heart transplants, you've got a whole lot more men in your study than women. I think it was like 31 men to four women. But, I mean, what can you do? It's the nature of heart transplants. But I'm wondering, did you happen to notice...Maybe the sample size perhaps is too small, but were there any differences in the populations of these cells between women and men? And do you think there could be any differences regarding this more prevalence of autoimmune like reactions in women?   Patricia Nguyen:         So, that's an interesting question, but you hit it on the nose when you said "Your sample is defined mainly by men." And in addition, the samples that were women tend to have less disease. And they tend to be nonischemic in etiology. So, I think that kind of restricts our analysis. And perhaps, I guess, future studies could model using female tissues, for example, instead of only male. But the limitation of all human studies is sample availability. And perhaps, human organoid research can be less limited by that. And certainly, mouse research has become more evenly distributed of male and female mice.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah. Suffice it to say, human research is hard, but you managed to do an amazing and really important study. It was really elegant and well done. Congratulations on what is an epic amount of time. 12-hour experiments are no joke, and really beautiful data. So, thank you so much for joining me today, Dr Nguyen and Miss almost Dr D'Addabbo. Congrats and I'm really looking forward to seeing your future work.   Jessica D'Addabbo:    Thank you so much.   Patricia Nguyen:         Thanks so much.   Jessica D'Addabbo:    Thank you for having us. This is wonderful.   Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's it for the highlights from the April 29th and May 13th issues of Circulation Research. Thank you so much for listening. Please check out the Circ Res Facebook page and follow us on Twitter and Instagram with the handle @Circres and #Discover CircRes. Thank you to our guests: Dr Patricia Nguyen, and soon to be Doctor, Jessica D'Addabbo, from Stanford University.   This podcast was produced by Ishara Ratnayaka, edited by Melissa Stoner, and supported by the editorial team of Circulation Research. Copy text for the highlighted articles was provided by Ruth Williams. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Haler. And this is Discover CircRes, you're on the go source for the most exciting discoveries in basic cardiovascular research. This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2022. The opinions expressed by the speakers of this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more information, visit aha journals.org.  

Commonplace: Conversations with Poets (and Other People)

ADDITIONAL INFOSelected Work by Doreen Wangwith Rachel Zucker et al., “Commonplace goes to Taiwan,” Part 1 and Part 2.with Mish Liang Hsu, 一年的告白/ Dos Salidas.“The roadmap of regret, curiosity and sound: How I decided to make a podcast with my dying mother,” CommonWealth Magazine.“The Kundiman 2018 Series, Pt. 1,” Racist Sandwich."The Analects," Angels Flight: Literary West.Also ReferencedGhost Island MediaV ConatyKatie FerneliusArielle GreenbergNatalie Diaz and Roger ReevesGinsbyrgTorrey PetersDouglas KearneyDavid NaimanKaren BrodyBrenda Lin (author of The Wealth Ribbon)Dianne Wolkstein, Rachel's motherOedipusJesusSigmund FreudThe Grand Permission: New Writings on Poetics and Motherhood, ed. Brenda Hillman and Patricia DienstfreyYanyiIsaac Ginsberg-MillerHeidi BroadheadD. A. PowellLaurel SnyderRecommended by ChrisSharon OldsCathy Park Hong, Minor Feelings: An Asian American ReckoningCommonplace has no institutional or corporate affiliation and is made possible by you, our listeners! Support Commonplace by joining the Commonplace Book Club: https://www.patreon.com/commonplacepodcast

Leaders in Cleantech
Janelle Wang, Acton – 95

Leaders in Cleantech

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 36:57


What's it all about? eScooters, eBikes, last mile solutions and all things Micro-mobility. Great to see how design thinking and innovation applies not just to technology, but to company cultures and business models. This week I talk about the challenges and opportunities for micro-mobility and mobility as a service across cities in various parts of the world, and how building an innovative company culture has helped Acton grow rapidly and globally. About Janelle Wang:  Co-Founder and CEO of Acton, Janelle is a Designer turned Entrepreneur with 15 years of Strategic Planning, New Category Creation & Design Thinking for Fortune 500s to Start Ups, bringing breakthrough Innovation and Sustainability to reality. She is leading the charge to help shape a new, more efficient, vibrant and livable urban environment. She holds 50+ patents in micromobility and sustainability solutions. Janelle has an M.S. in Industrial Design from Purdue University. Janelle was selected as one of “19 Influential Women In Mobility” in 2019, she was awarded Female CEO of the Year in 2016, and has been featured in WSJ, FastCompany, CNN, VOGUE, BBC, and more.. About Acton: ACTON, headquartered in Silicon Valley, offers Mobility-as-a-Service (MaaS) solution packages from multimodal vehicles to advanced IoT to move people and goods efficiently & intelligently. ACTON partners with automakers, cities, ride-share operators, and private property owners. Together, we make our cities better places to live. ACTON is unique in its range of mobility solutions on offer. ACTON has won numerous awards and has been featured in various media, internationally. ACTON creates excellence in riding dynamics, safety, serviceability, ease of use, design aesthetics, and sustainability. With over 100 patents, more than 100 cities globally, tens of millions of rides, ACTON is leading the way. Social links:  Janelle Wang on LinkedIn: (61) Janelle Wang | LinkedIn Acton website: ACTON | Supercharging City 3.0 | California Acton on LinkedIn: (61) ACTON: Overview | LinkedIn Acton on Instagram: ACTON (@actonallday) • Instagram photos and videos About Hyperion Cleantech Group: Hyperion Cleantech Group is the holding company for businesses focused exclusively in cleantech talent acquisition, retention, leadership development. working with some of the most innovative cleantech companies in the world, helping to find extraordinary talent to enable their growth and success. Partnering with leading cleantech VCs, as well as directly with founders and entrepreneurs in the sector. With our clients we are transforming business and growing a strong and prosperous cleantech economy. We work across EMEA and NORAM, with teams based in the UK, Germany and the US. EPISODE LINKS Acton's latest acquisition hints at the future of docked micromobility Acton's latest acquisition hints at the future of docked micromobility – TechCrunch Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die: Chip Heath, Dan Heath: 8601410083830: Books: Amazon.com Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't Amazon.com: Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap...And Others Don't (Audible Audio Edition): Jim Collins, Jim Collins, HarperAudio: Audible Books & Originals Follow us online, write a review (please) or subscribe I'm very keen to hear feedback on the podcast and my guests, and to hear your suggestions for future guests or topics. Contact via the website, or Twitter. If you do enjoy the podcast, please write a review on iTunes, or your usual podcast platform, and tell your cleantech friends about us. That would be much appreciated. Twitter https://twitter.com/Cleantechleader Facebook https://www.facebook.com/DavidHuntCleantechGuide Instagram https://www.instagram.com/davidhuntcleantech/

The Leadership Podcast
TLP307: How to Transition from a ‘Knower' Mindset to a ‘Learner' Mindset

The Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 42:08


Joe Schurman teaches from his deep experience in the software, machine learning, AI, and processes that organizations need today as they transition to data-driven technology companies. He names some of the cloud services and tech tools he uses to lead clients to start with a user case, break it into stories,  build a team led by the solution owner, assign the stories to developers to build, and iterate product demos until the Minimum Loved Project (MLP) is achieved. Joe offers observations on investing the “right” amount of time in projects, and wisdom on developing a learner mindset.   Key Takeaways [2:06] Joe Schurman is a 2nd-degree black belt in Kung Fu. He once judged a competition in Las Vegas. He has four children; two daughters and two sons. [2:57] Joe is an expert on the fringes of what we can do with computing technology. What we can do changes every day. In the past couple of years, from an AI perspective, with data and automation, it's taken leaps and bounds. [4:30] We're still pretty far away from general AI, despite Sophia, an AI robot that was granted Saudi Arabian citizenship in 2017. Today's AI depends on the programming we give a machine and its interpretation and output. Joe's focus is narrow or weak AI. His business colleagues call it magic. Computer vision is an area he loves. [5:45] Joe uses a lab environment across Google Cloud Platform, Microsoft Azure, and Amazon Web Services. The capabilities that have come up in the last year are “just insane” with what you can do with computer vision and building libraries of what the machine can see. [6:06] Joe loved seeing a computer vision capability demonstration at AWS re:Invent of tracking every NFL player on the field and predicting injuries and other types of output and insights in real-time. The machine used narrow AI to access a library seeded with “a ton” of data to interpret the action. [7:15] What you can do with this technology comes down to the data that you feed the engine. Think about the amounts of data that organizations have to sift through to generate reflective or predictive insights. Auto machine learning helps organize the data into useful information such as anomaly detection in software engineering. The data can also come from tools like GitHub and Jira. [8:25] Joe did a fun computer vision project on UAPs for the History Channel, working with some of the nation's top military leaders, building a library of video and audio data to be able to detect unidentified aerial phenomena that were not supposed to be entering our airspace, and curating that library. [10:06] AI started with the idea of speeding up processes, such as getting an app to market faster or gathering insights quicker to make business decisions more timely. [11:28] AI can enhance human performance. Joe starts by finding people who know how to fail fast; to get a Minimum Viable Product (MVP) out the door. Solutions such as quality engineering automation, test automation, and monitoring services for DevOps detect bugs and performance issues quickly and ensure that the quality of the team is sound.[12:47] Joe notes the importance of individuals performing, contributing to, and collaborating as a team. Set your organization and standards governance up first. Look for a platform of technology to leverage that enables you to build and tinker. Finding the latest and greatest tool is no good unless it provides the right level of collaboration with their platform and connection to different processes. [14:53] When introducing ML to an organization, start with discovery, to understand the culture and talent within the organization. How are they communicating today? Joe sees the biggest gap between data scientists and data engineers. Projects tend to fail without collaboration, regardless of the tech. If the data scientists don't understand the domain, then the platform is irrelevant,[17:28] Joe stresses the need for a methodology in place to make any of these aspirations work for your organization. After discovery, there's an align phase. Focus on the outcome and the use case. The solution owner is crucial. The solution owner leads the technology team and brings them together around the client's outcome to develop that use case.[18:12] If you can't take an actual use case and break it down into bite-sized chunks or user stories, then the project will never be on the right track. Start with the use case to mitigate risks. Break the use case into user stories. Match the user stories with the number of engineers that can develop a number of user stories within a given time frame. [18:38] Those user stories given to the engineers are deducted into Story Points, in the Agile Process of engineering software. Price Waterhouse Coopers (PcW) has taken it to the next level, being able to do Engineering as a Service, being able to do it at scale, and being able to pivot quickly.[18:58] Joe explains what can happen if you have a great idea, take three to six months to break down the use case, and fill all the requirements, but hand it off to the Dev team that has no idea what the use case is: you get irrelevant software that doesn't tie back to the outcome! [19:22] Keep the solution team engaged in building the bridge between the subject matter expert stakeholders and the engineers. Every two weeks, demonstrate the iteration or program increment you have built. Does it match the outcome? Does it provide any relevance? Then take the feedback and figure out what happened in that iteration. Fix errors. You will build a product that has value to launch. [20:45] Communicate a lot, so all the people are on the same page! When you have stovepiped organizations where the departments don't talk to one another, you waste time, effort, and money building a product no one will use. One of Joe's colleagues, José Reyes, uses the term Minimum Lovable Project (MLP), where people rally around the outcome, not just the tech. [22:33] What skills and knowledge will the leaders of PwC need to endure for the next five years? Joe says first are character and attitude; people that have a hunger to build something, with a fail-fast mentality, and that are excited to learn constantly, that read every day and learn new technology. [24:27] Then know the tools. Documents exist on the internet for every solution and there is access to services like GitHub to download projects and starter templates without being an expert but just reading the README file and installing the base-level template, learning as you go, and as you tinker. That's way more valuable than coming in as a book-smart expert in a specific product or technology. [24:57] When it comes to tooling, there are products like the Atlassian platform with Confluence and Jira. For an AI stack, Joe typically works with AWS, GPC, and Microsoft, more so on the Amazon side with AWS AI tools, like Rekognition, Glue DataBrew, Redshift ML, Comprehend, and more. Amazon, Microsoft, and Google produce so much documentation and certification to get you up to speed. [26:30] Judgment, wisdom, and character will not be replaced by AI anytime soon. There's still room for philosophy in leadership. There are tools and technologies to speed up the processes, but not the individuals. There are no general AI solutions out yet to replace a pod of application developers, designers, and solution owners to execute a successful MVP or MLP out the door for a client. [27:55] Advice to CEOs: Be patient and understanding. Be willing to fail fast. Support tinkering and R&D, even if the project doesn't work out. Organizations are generally realizing that today they need to be data-driven, technology companies but there is still hesitance over the risk that needs to be taken. [30:03] Why would an insurance company or other traditional company need R&D? Look at Loonshots, by Safi Bahcall for some ideas about R&D. [30:56] Joe shares how he got to this point in his career. He wanted to play baseball but started at Compaq (now HP) when he was 18, writing scripts in Unix and other environments. Just being able to make certain changes to help clients get products faster and seeing the quick response from the outcomes felt like a home run to him! [31:49] Years later, Joe went on his own, with a vision to create telehealth before telemedicine was a thing, using Skype for Business and Microsoft Lync, enabling an API for that. Seeing people connect through a technology he had built, replaced the need to be a baseball star! Joe is grateful for the break he got at a young age and enjoys his work. [33:22] When Joe first started, he was trying to be the smartest person in the room, seeing the instant gratification of making code snippets that tested successfully. Eventually just building the app wasn't enough for him. He got the dopamine hit from seeing users interacting with his code and seeing its value. [34:58] Joe's mentors include many people he worked with. X. D. Wang at Microsoft Research inspired him to tinker, build, and focus on the short-run more than the long-run. Randeep Sing Pal at Microsoft Unified Communications was another great mentor. Also Steve Justice and Chris Mellon, in terms of character and collaboration. Joe shares how they mentored him. [37:23] Jan says something we forget about technology is that there are a lot of failures and attempts before the success hits. We have to be mindful of that as leaders to give people time and space to do really creative, cool things. [38:01] Joe appreciates the opportunity to discuss these things. Joe spent a lot of his career building software solutions that were way ahead of their time. It's frustrating to see telemedicine so successful now, but not when he attempted it. He had to learn to let go. It's not just about releasing bleeding-edge tech; you've got to find some value associated with it to resonate with the end-user. [39:31] Always think about the outcome and understand your audience first. And then be able to supplement the back end of that with bleeding-edge technology, development, tinkering, failing fast, and all the things that go with software engineering. Also, be humble! Get perspective from outside your bubble to build a better solution and be a better person. [40:49] WHenever you're setting out to build anything, start with a press release! Write a story of what it would look like if it were released today. Then just work back from there!   Quotable Quotes “There are so many new and cool technologies and innovations that are coming out at the speed of thought, which are pretty fascinating.” “I've been in real cloud engineering for about a decade, and from an AI perspective, with data and automation, over the past five to 10 years, in terms of running on a cloud environment, and it's just taken leaps and bounds.” “You've got to be able to connect that [data] environment to a use case or an outcome. If you can't do that and you can't enable a data scientist to understand the domain, then the data platform is irrelevant. I see a lot of performance issues occur because of that disconnect.” “If you can't take an actual use case and break it down into bite-sized chunks or user stories, then the project will never be on the right track.” “In this industry, you're constantly learning; constantly reading. I'm reading every day and learning about new technology every day and how to apply it and how to tinker with it. I need people on the team … that have that ability or that hunger to tinker and learn.” “Transitioning from a ‘knower' mindset to a ‘learner' mindset was the biggest shift for me.” “Always think about the outcome and understand your audience first. And then be able to supplement the back end of that with bleeding-edge technology, development, tinkering, failing fast, and all the things that go with software engineering.”   Resources Mentioned Joe Schurman, PwC Joe Schurman on LinkedIn PwC Sophia robot granted citizenship I, Robot film Weak AI Google Cloud Platform Microsoft Azure Amazon Web Services AWS re:Invent GitHub Atlassian Jira Unidentified, The History Channel José Reyes, PwC The Shackleton Journey Atlassian Confluence AWS Rekognition AWS Glue DataBrew AWS Redshift ML AWS Comprehend Steve Justice on LinkedIn Chris Mellon Loonshots: How to Nurture the Crazy Ideas That Win Wars, Cure Diseases, and Transform Industries, by Safi Bahcall  

Moonman In The Morning Catch Up - 104.9 Triple M Sydney - Lawrence Mooney, Gus Worland, Jess Eva & Chris Page

Falling asleep on the field at the Olympics, can we guess your football team from your maccas order, and does society favour the beautiful when it comes to shopping in your undies? Plus all the latest from the Bulldogs Blowup with Brent Read. Who will coach the rest of the season? Triple M Breakfast With MG, Jess & Pagey See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

All Of It
Asian Americans and Mental Health Awareness

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 26:58


The month of May in the United States is both Mental Health Awareness Month and Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month. Dr. Jenny T. Wang, a Taiwanese-American clinical psychologist who also founded the Instagram account @asiansformentalhealth, has written a new book that combines the spirit of both month-long celebrations, called, Permission To Come Home: Reclaiming Mental Health as Asian Americans. The book comes after the pandemic caused a rise in hate crimes against Asian-Americans in the United States. Dr. Wang joins us to talk about the importance of seeking mental health care as an Asian-American, as well as the obstacles that make care harder, and take your calls.

Taco the Town
Episode 164: Third Street Social! ON LOCATION! (w/ Natalie Fieleke, Hannah Williams and Po Wang)

Taco the Town

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 65:51


We're back on the South Plaza this week checking out the tasty tacos at THIRD STREET SOCIAL with special Taco Reviewer Guests NATALIE FIELEKE (Snack & Style Aficionado) and Savor & Swirl Co-owner HANNAH WILLIAMS! Natalie tells us about her days working at Taco Bell as a teen! (What secrets did she learn? Did she get to use the meat hose?) Hannah remembers her weird childhood Taco Bell order! (Sour Cream and Black Olive Taco?) Natalie fills us in on her recent trip to Mexico and DAVE WANTS TO PAINT A NEW TACO MURAL! WHO WANTS TO HIRE HIM? Also: Ketchup in Taco meat? Yay or Nay? In the Taco Ticker we taco 'bout Dolly Parton and Doja Cat releasing the parody musical "Mexican Pizza: The Musical" on Tik Tok to celebrate Taco Bell bringing back the Mexican Pizza! And we tell the tale of the Couple who found a bag of 1950's McDonalds good in the walls of their home while doing a renovation! Were the fries still crispy? What other fast food relics are out there waiting to be found?! Did Tom Pendergast leave a half eaten box of chicken in the walls of the building we are recording in?! In Town of The Taco we ask 'What's Your New KC Slogan'? And who is your favorite KC Historical Figure? Our guests sip on some delicious Spicy Margs as we chat with PO WANG the culinary director at Third Street who introduced us to his tasty tacos (and Burger)! That's right, we review our First Burger on T3 as we go HAM on the Animal BURGER! Dave eats a Taco that reminds him of a taco he ate in a past life centuries ago! And Dave also reveals what he thought of his first visit to Whataburger! In Random Taco Question of the Week we ask: If Tacos weren't called tacos what would you name them? And What would you fill your personal pinata with? TACO THE TOWN AT THIRD STREET SOCIAL! LIKE A PINATA FILLED WITH GUACAMOLE, THIS ONE IS CHOCK FULL OF GOODNESS! (Just don't hit us or green stuff with start spewing out.) Editor: MATT ALLEN. Music: SUNEATERS courtesy of Lotuspool Records. Sponsors: Our Music by The Bump Band. KCK Taco Trail. 

Outbound Metrics | B2B Outbound Sales
#159 (Re-Air): CMO and CEO Outreach: Email + Direct Mail + Phone + LinkedIn = 85% Open Rate, 40% Reply Rate, and $1.8M+ Opportunity Value (Will Wang)

Outbound Metrics | B2B Outbound Sales

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 29:23


If you're in sales you know how important it is to have buy-in from prospects who are high on the corporate ladder. This includes Directors, VPs, and C-Level executives. Having a member of upper management on your side can make or break any deal. But, the problem is that these people are some of the most coveted prospects at any company. Every salesperson, marketer, and growth hacker is trying to get the attention of these people. Their inboxes and phones get pounded with emails and phone calls every day. So, with all that noise - how do you break through? My guest in this episode has found a way. Using a multichannel approach he's achieved 85% open rates and 40% reply rates from CEOs and CMOs at Enterprise level companies. His efforts generated millions of dollars in opportunity value. In this episode we'll step into his shoes and discuss exactly what was going through his head when he created the campaign. We'll do a deep dive and step-by-step we'll look at how he achieved success. Will Wang is the Chief Marketing Strategist at Growth Labz. Growth Labz helps businesses implement sales and marketing systems that not only brings them a steady flow of leads, but does so in a way that is cost and time effective. They are laser focused on getting results quickly (days, not weeks or months) and aim to be "cost neutral" within the first month. In fact, they only take on clients if we KNOW we can deliver a 10x ROI for them. Join the Facebook Group (B2B SaaS Cold Outreach Mastery): http://morgandwilliams.com/fbgroup

Commonplace: Conversations with Poets (and Other People)

ADDITIONAL INFOSelected Work by Doreen Wangwith Rachel Zucker et al., Commonplace goes to Taiwan, Part 1 and Part 2with Mish Liang Hsu, 一年的告白/ Dos Salidas“The roadmap of regret, curiosity and sound: How I decided to make a podcast with my dying mother,” CommonWealth MagazineAlso ReferencedV ConatyKatie FerneliusArielle GreenbergNatalie Diaz and Roger ReevesGinsbyrgTorrey PetersDouglas KearneyDavid NaimanKaren BrodyBrenda Lin (author of The Wealth Ribbon)Dianne Wolkstein, Rachel's motherOedipusJesusSigmund FreudThe Grand Permission: New Writings on Poetics and Motherhood, ed. Brenda Hillman and Patricia DienstfreyYanyiIsaac Ginsberg-MillerHeidi BroadheadD. A. PowellLaurel SnyderRecommended by ChrisSharon OldsCathy Park Hong, Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning

Kinky Katie's World
#410 – Let Your Kink Flag Fly

Kinky Katie's World

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 63:50


Big nipple holes... Tampa Bay Screams coming soon... What is Katie listening to... Light up your boobs from the inside with this new product... Cupping, but for your butt... Can you vacuum suck your butt bigger??? Balloons for your sexual pleasure | Looners... Bernie the Bunny... Kink flags and their meanings... Jizz eaters VS Wizz eaters... Man almost died from his wife farting on him during oral... Dirty Girl of the Week - @smalllatinabby... Katie's fit last week, and the response from fans... Handmaid's Tale fantasy... Episode of "Rule 34"... Hold my key Katie, or not... Another man that removed his own Weiner and balls... Should a therapist help you remove your own Wang??? Tits Man - Twitter @alyssiaamorexxx... Are older men coming out of the closet more often lately??? Is being a size queen worth it??? Katie will watch your dirty vids... How lady bugs have sex... Pregnant man advertisement... Snail sex... Do Grey sweat pants make men gay... The environment Katie cultivates... Real grape flavor only... You can do it Duffy Moon... Get some photos of Greek Statue nuts... Debby does demons.

The Hiker Podcast | Day Hiking, Backpacking, Thru Hiking
Emmeline Wang | The Hiker Podcast

The Hiker Podcast | Day Hiking, Backpacking, Thru Hiking

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 36:52


This Week Andy is excited to welcome Climber, Backpacker, Storyteller, Model and Advocate Emmeline Wang to the show!  Climbing and the outdoor environment are what inspire Emmeline to advocate for the things that matter: our earth, social equity and justice, and finding peace through the chaos we all experience. Emmeline lives for getting high off the ground, playing in the vertical world, and protecting the places that we love. Check out more from Emmeline at https://emmelinewang.com Follow Emmeline on Instagram:https://www.instagram.com/emmelinewang   Phone Credit: Rachel Ross https://www.instagram.com/rach4thesky/  This weeks episode was recorded and edited in its entirety at the podcast studios at Catalyst Ashland. Catalyst Ashland is a family-run, BIPOC, and veteran-owned business in the heart of Downtown Ashland, Oregon. A collective creative co-working space serving the community and its visitors, especially BIPOC, LGBTQ, and Southern Oregon friends to support and encourage diverse entrepreneurship and collaboration. For more information about Catalyst Ashland go catalystashland.com   Our host Andy is now an Ambassador for Gregory Packs. To get 15% off your order, and help Andy out use promo code ‘Andy15' when you check out at https://www.gregorypacks.com/ ... We'd like to thank our sponsors: CNOC Outdoors making our adventures the best possible, simple, enjoyable, fulfilling and sustainable. Use the link & be sure to use coupon code 'Hiker Podcast' for 10% off trekking poles. https://tinyurl.com/2p93ecrv CS Instant Coffee makers of environmentally sustainable and great tasting instant coffee for the trail. Use the link to get yours and help the show: https://cs-instant-coffee.peachs.co/a/andy-neal . Sawyer Products: MORE THAN AN OUTDOOR COMPANY. For more information go to https://www.sawyer.com Big thank you to our Patreon Patron's for supporting The Hiker Podcast: www.patreon.com/andynealplussizehiker The Music for the Hiker Podcast is licensed from Musicbed.com. This weeks opening song is “Kindred Spirits” by Analog Heart which you can listen on our Spotify Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/playlist/5lXwaTWf2f0CUnXiogxCLj?si=c12c1fa33cd94c64 Follow Host Andy Neal on Instagram: www.instagram.com/andyfilmsandhikes Go to www.hikerpodcast.com for all our social media accounts, email, and all the ways to listen to The Hiker Podcast! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hikerpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hikerpodcast/support

Littérature sans frontières
Ling Xi, la grâce et la douleur selon l'écrivaine chinoise de langue française

Littérature sans frontières

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 29:00


Ling Xi a quitté sa Chine natale en 1998 pour intégrer une grande école de commerce parisienne, elle a ensuite travaillé dans des sociétés financières. Elle est l'auteure en langue française de plusieurs fictions : «Été strident» (Actes Sud, 2006), «La Troisième moitié» (Maurice Nadeau, 2010) et «L'Épaule du cavalier» (Maurice Nadeau, 2016). Son nouveau roman «Gorge des Tambours» vient de paraître aux éditions Verdier.   "Au bourg des Vieux Ficus dans les années cinquante, tous les garçons méprisent Mu Er, pour sa beauté androgyne, et tous les garçons sont épris de sa Sixième Sœur, pour la même raison. La Sixième Sœur Mu, qui n'aime que Wang Wen, ne répond pourtant pas à sa déclaration d'amour et épouse en 1959 un inconnu, qu'elle suit dans un lointain désert. Après son départ, Wang Wen, à force de contempler les traits de la bien-aimée dans le visage de son ami Mu Er, finit par éprouver des sentiments troubles pour lui. Devenu officier de génie en 1965, Wang Wen ne reviendra pas du lieu de son affectation. À la nouvelle de sa mort sept ans plus tard, Mu Er demande la main de la sœur du défunt, Wang Ran, le garçon manqué qui a les manières viriles de son frère. Bien des années plus tard, Mu Er a disparu mystérieusement et ce sont divers narrateurs, issus des familles Mu et Wang, qui se succèdent pour, autour de leurs propres obsessions, témoigner et mener l'enquête. Dans cette fresque qui couvre plus d'un siècle d'histoire chinoise et reflète le conditionnement des individus, la mise au pas des instincts et l'aliénation des esprits en proie à la culpabilité, nous suivons trois générations de personnages – les grands-pères pêcheurs de cadavres ; la nommée Bellissime qui met au monde cinq filles avant de donner naissance à un fils, évitant ainsi la répudiation ; Mu Yi, le marinier au long cours, dont le faciès rappelle étonnement celui de son perroquet Gris-gris ; la Grêlée, mère du beau Wang Wen… Jeux de miroirs aux multiples retournements, drames privés sur fond d'un siècle de tourmentes et de puritanisme poussé jusqu'à la terreur. Chant aux grandes amours manquées, à la douleur de l'espérance, à l'héroïque joie aux heures les plus sombres de l'adversité." (Présentation des éditions Verdier)

What's This Called? w/ Ricardo Wang
14 May 2022 (Female Voices)

What's This Called? w/ Ricardo Wang

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022


In light of current events bringing reproductive rights into the national conversation this episode of What’s This Called? is a presentation of all female artists and female led groups. PLAYLIST: Linda Hoyle “Pieces Of Me” [Pieces Of Me / The Fetch] Moor … Continue reading →

SuperFastBusiness® Coaching With James Schramko
920 – 3 Evergreen Marketing Strategies to Help You Grow No Matter What Facebook Does, with Will Wang

SuperFastBusiness® Coaching With James Schramko

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 32:58


Do Facebook algorithm changes concern you? These three marketing strategies from Growth Labz's Will Wang work regardless of what Facebook does.

Epicenter - Learn about Blockchain, Ethereum, Bitcoin and Distributed Technologies
Chun Wang: stakefish – From Proof-of-Work to Proof-of-Stake

Epicenter - Learn about Blockchain, Ethereum, Bitcoin and Distributed Technologies

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 47:38


Chun Wang started mining Bitcoin in 2011 and later created F2Pool, one of the leading Proof-of-Work mining pools. Despite his deep involvement in Proof-of-Work, Chun also recognized the transformative impact of Proof-of-Stake and started stakefish. stakefish has become one of the leading staking provider.Chun joined us to talk about his journey and reflections on Bitcoin, Ethereum and Proof-of-Stake. We also dove into the topic of humans becoming a multi-planetary species and whether Bitcoin's consensus could be modified to allow mining on different planets.Topics covered in this episode:Chun's background and how he got into cryptoWhy he created the mining pool F2PoolThe biggest differences between running validators like stakefish vs a mining pool like F2PoolWhat led him to build stakefishChun's views on EthereumWhy Bitcoin is more decentralized than EthereumThe future of Proof-of-StakeStakefish's Ethereum staking productChun's thoughts of MEV and how will stakefish deal with it in the futureMaking Bitcoin multiplanetaryEpisode links: stakefishF2Poolstakefish on TwitterChun on TwitterSponsors: Gnosis Safe: Gnosis Safe is a smart wallet for securely managing digital assets and allows you to define customized access permissions. - https://epicenter.rocks/gnosissafeTally Ho: Tally Ho is a new wallet for Web3 and DeFi that sees the wallet as a public good. Think of it like a community-owned alternative to MetaMask. - https://epicenter.rocks/tallycashSteakwallet: Steakwallet is your new favorite multi-chain, mobile wallet. Tired of having a different wallet for every chain? Get Steakwallet today and get the power of Web 3 across all chains right at your fingertips: https://steakwallet.fi/ -This episode is hosted by Brian Fabian Crain. Show notes and listening options: epicenter.tv/443

ThatFKingShow
Dr.Greenthumb vs Dr.Friendbeast

ThatFKingShow

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 66:53


The adventures of Abigail Stabitha III on the Her Majestys Tiddie continue after her epic (but incredibly) short battle against the War B*stards. With some time on her hands after playing sticky belly for weeks, she gets to put together a full compliment of crew members before bumping into a planet and...  Boo Lemont!Both survivors of Earths destruction get to chat with the Cretes, a giant alien race made of stone but only one gets to party...Two teams enter, but only one team leaves... Website - TotalCultZone.ComElectronic mail - FKingHello@gmail.comAbbie StabbyTwitchInstagramFacebookAyesha RaymondLinktree for Ayesha RaymondMUSICArmageddon vacation introСукины Сыны / Sons Of Bitches (RU) - Мальчики/Девочки / Boys/GirlsAd breakLobo Loco - Helges Friend woke upGiorgio De Campo - Freesound Music - Swinging into La La LandAmazon recap themeSilence is Sexy - EnnioThe party theme"Dr.Greenthumb" - Cyprus Hill

The Continuous Action
Bonus: China's Surveillance State 

The Continuous Action

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 39:12


This bonus episode features our full interview with Maya Wang, the senior China researcher for Human Rights Watch. As Maya explains, a comprehensive, multi-layered surveillance system blankets much of China with one primary goal: to ensure that the Chinese communist party can rule forever. We included an excerpt of this interview in Episode 3, “The Eyes On Your Face.” But the rest of Wang's harrowing account of this surveillance system was too compelling to leave on the cutting room floor. Join us for a deeper dive into China's surveillance state. The Continuous Action is sponsored by The Project On Government Oversight. Stay tuned on the latest from POGO: pogo.org/subscribe For show notes, visit: pogo.org/series-collections/the-continuous-action/ See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Hear Her Sports
Iris Wang Badminton: Olympics and Beyond…Ep125

Hear Her Sports

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 48:56


Olympian Iris Wang is a singles badminton player from Los Angeles, California. She started playing as a young kid and has been competing internationally and frequently medaling for more than a decade in singles, doubles, and team competitions. She competed in the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio, won bronze medals in both the 2015 and 2019 Pan Am Games, and has had a world ranking as high as 30th. In January she was eledted to the Badminton World Federation Athletes' Commission, a position she will hold through 2025. Iris graduated with a bachelor's in business economics from UCLA. Outside of badminton, she enjoys reading, drawing, and binging Netflix shows. Join Hear Her Sports Patreon https://www.patreon.com/hearhersports Find all episodes hearhersports.com Find Iris on IG at https://www.instagram.com/ibleepbloop/

Epigenetics Podcast
The Role of Histone Dopaminylation and Serotinylation in Neuronal Plasticity (Ian Maze)

Epigenetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 33:53


In this episode of the Epigenetics Podcast, we caught up with Ian Maze from Ichan School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator to talk about his work on the role of histone dopaminylation and serotinylation in neuronal plasticity. The Maze group focuses on understanding the complex interplay between chromatin regulatory mechanisms in brain and neuronal plasticity. The lab places an emphasis on psychiatric disorders associated with monoaminergic (e.g., serotonin, dopamine, etc.) dysfunction, such as major depressive disorder and drug addiction. In particular the Maze team has investigated cocaine addiction and its effect on chromatin by serotonylation and dopaminylation of Histone H3 Tails.   References Maze, I., Covington, H. E., Dietz, D. M., LaPlant, Q., Renthal, W., Russo, S. J., Mechanic, M., Mouzon, E., Neve, R. L., Haggarty, S. J., Ren, Y., Sampath, S. C., Hurd, Y. L., Greengard, P., Tarakhovsky, A., Schaefer, A., & Nestler, E. J. (2010). Essential Role of the Histone Methyltransferase G9a in Cocaine-Induced Plasticity. Science, 327(5962), 213–216. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.1179438 Farrelly, L. A., Thompson, R. E., Zhao, S., Lepack, A. E., Lyu, Y., Bhanu, N. V., Zhang, B., Loh, Y.-H. E., Ramakrishnan, A., Vadodaria, K. C., Heard, K. J., Erikson, G., Nakadai, T., Bastle, R. M., Lukasak, B. J., Zebroski, H., Alenina, N., Bader, M., Berton, O., … Maze, I. (2019). Histone serotonylation is a permissive modification that enhances TFIID binding to H3K4me3. Nature, 567(7749), 535–539. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-019-1024-7 Lepack, A. E., Werner, C. T., Stewart, A. F., Fulton, S. L., Zhong, P., Farrelly, L. A., Smith, A. C. W., Ramakrishnan, A., Lyu, Y., Bastle, R. M., Martin, J. A., Mitra, S., O'Connor, R. M., Wang, Z.-J., Molina, H., Turecki, G., Shen, L., Yan, Z., Calipari, E. S., … Maze, I. (2020). Dopaminylation of histone H3 in ventral tegmental area regulates cocaine seeking. Science, 368(6487), 197–201. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.aaw8806   Related Episodes Development of Integrative Machine Learning Tools for Neurodegenerative Diseases (Enrico Glaab) Epigenetic Influence on Memory Formation and Inheritance (Isabelle Mansuy) CpG Islands, DNA Methylation, and Disease (Sir Adrian Bird)   Contact Active Motif on Twitter Epigenetics Podcast on Twitter Active Motif on LinkedIn Active Motif on Facebook Email: podcast@activemotif.com

NYLA
Kinija, Lietuva ir Maggie Wang

NYLA

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 41:32


Wang Cuiqi, arba kitaip Maggie Wang, gimė Lietuvoje. Dabar Maggie yra 23 metai ir daugumą šio laiko Lietuvoje jos šeima buvo maža – ji ir mama. Tiesa, Maggie sako, jog aplink buvo žmonių, kurie reiškė daugiau nei draugai. Šiuo metu jos mama Wang Xiaozhong jau yra grįžusi gyventi atgal į Kiniją.

Dear Asian Americans
145 // Jenny T. Wang, PhD // Best Selling Author - Permission to Come Home // Asians For Mental Health

Dear Asian Americans

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 55:46


Dr. Jenny Tzu-Mei Wang, psychologist, speaker, and best selling author of Permission to Come Home, joins Jerry to talk about the importance of our individual and collective mental health, her journey into the psychology field, and inadvertently becoming a safe haven for many within the Asian American community via her instagram account @asiansformentalhealth. Listen today to learn about Jenny's path to writing a book for people, the ways that she cares for herself, and how we can all grow together. Learn more about Jenny at JennyWangPhD.comMeet JennyDr. Jenny Wang is a Taiwanese American clinical psychologist and national speaker on Asian American mental health and racial trauma in Asian American, BIPOC, and immigrant communities. Her work focuses on the intersection of Asian American identity, mental health, and social justice. She is the founder of the @asiansformentalhealth Instagram community, in which she discusses the unique experiences of Asian diaspora and immigrant communities. She spearheaded the Asian, Pacific Islander, and South Asian American Therapist Directory and its companion Canadian directory to help Asians seek culturally-reverent mental health providers.Connect with JennyWeb: JennyWangPhD.comInstagram: @AsiansForMentalHealthBuy Permission to Come HomeBookshopEpisode 145 with Jenny Wang is #2 is a 10 part special series with Stand with Asian Americans entitled "Dear Asian Americans, What Now?" exploring what we are going through as a community during the past two+ years amidst the rising anti-Asian violence and hate crimes. We thank our friends at SwAA for their support of Dear Asian Americans.Learn more about Stand with Asian Americans:Web: StandwithAsianAmericans.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/StandwithAAsInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/standwithasianamericans/// Support Dear Asian Americans:Merch: https://www.bonfire.com/store/dearasianamericans/Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/jerrywonLearn more about DAA Creator and Host Jerry Won:LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jerrywon/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jerryjwon/// Listen to Dear Asian Americans on all major platforms:Transistor.fm: http://www.dearasianamericans.comApple: https://apple.dearasianamericans.comSpotify: https://spotify.dearasianamericans.comStitcher: https://stitcher.dearasianamericans.comGoogle: https://google.dearasianamericans.com  Follow us on Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/dearasianamericans Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/dearasianamericans Subscribe to our YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/dearasianamericans // Join the Asian Podcast Network:Web: https://asianpodcastnetwork.com/Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/asianpodcastnetwork/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/asianpodcastnetwork/Dear Asian Americans is produced by Just Like Media:Web: http://www.justlikemedia.comInstagram.com: http://www.instagram.com/justlikemedia

TV 2 NBA
Ep 71: Bilde & Wang og alt det indimellem med en masse spørgsmål...

TV 2 NBA

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 72:56


En køretur med lommen fyldt af spørgsmål fra dejlige, engagerede og kloge lyttere. Tag med på tur og tag med på en lytter!

Hangin With Wang
Episode 54 - NL Hair Team and WHOOPS

Hangin With Wang

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 65:09


In episode 54 of the Hangin' With Wang Podcast, we unveil our selections for the National League All-Hair Team and our top fuck-ups throughout life (and there are plenty of them). Segment 1: Intro and Explanation With the studio undergoing extensive renovations, Aj and Wang were forced to turn to an old  (and unconventional) trick to help optimize audio and record the podcast. Going "under the covers," if you will. Segment 2: National League All-Hair Team Kenley Janson: Atlanta Braves Steven Okert: Miami Marlins Trevor Williams: New York Mets Michael Hermosillo: Chicago Cubs Josh Hader: Milwaukee Brewers Cole Tucker/Dillon Peters: Pittsburgh Pirates Charlie Blackmon: Colorado Rockies Phil Bickford: LA Dodgers Mike Clevinger: Cleveland Indians Segment 3: WHOOPS... We are not perfect (shocker); therefore, we've had some hilarious fuck-ups throughout the years. Aj and Wang recall some of their most significant mishaps and why they're hilarious.

9m8lah8lah
EP11: 相見恨晚的創作歌手 Joanna Wang王若琳

9m8lah8lah

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 51:42


因為19年金曲獎的緣份,9m88遇見了Joanna,雙Jo的神奇橋樑因此接上!沒得獎的88在當晚隨即收到得獎的Joanna的合作邀請。時隔多年,終於在2022推出了翻唱合作歌曲 。這次兩位創作者用中英雙聲道的方式,聊創作方法以及對生活和事業的洞見,彼此迥異與不謀而合的地方都彌足珍貴!註:訪問中Joanna使用英文較多,建議用打開英文耳朵的心態收聽

Le labo - RTS
Fantômes dignes (2/2)

Le labo - RTS

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 56:49


Image : J. Benquet Episode 2 : La Côte lave plus blanc - travailleuses dans le nettoyage Fantômes Dignes est une création radiophonique sur Nyon et les ouvrier·ère·s, le rapport à la précarité et à sa définition. Dans cette deuxième partie, vous vous immergerez aux côtés de personnes assignées femmes, qui vivent ou ont vécu la précarité quotidiennement dans le secteur du nettoyage - ou lʹanalysent. Des paysages sonores hybrides émaillent cette réalisation, fruits dʹannées de travail du son. Réalisation et toutes techniques: Jonathan Benquet Regard extérieur: Gérald Wang et Carmen Sage Son additionnel: David Schaffer Avec les voix de: Chloé, Tabata, Hélène, Fleur Blanche, Silvia Mariño Mamani, Morgane Kuehni, Isabelle Smeckens et Flavia Papadaniel. Merci à: Chloé Démétriadès, Abdeslam Landry, Bruno Eduardo Maria, Mireille Reymond-Dollfus, le Collectif de soutien et de défense aux sans-papiers de La Côte, l'Espace Néo-Martine, Anastase Démétriadès, Jessica Vaucher, Claire Dessimoz, Clara Alloing, Héloïse Crisinel, Sophie Légeret, Guillermo Montaño, Gérald Wang et Carmen Sage. Soutiens: Le Labo, l'Espace Eeeeh! Contact: fantomesdignes@riseup.net

TED Talks Technology
The real hotbed of innovation (hint: it's not big cities) | Xiaowei R. Wang

TED Talks Technology

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 8:56


"To see and understand the countryside is a crucial part of moving towards a more livable future for everyone," says coder, artist and organizer Xiaowei R. Wang. They've observed that some of the most careful, thoughtful innovation is happening in the world's rural communities, like Chinese chicken farmers using biometrics tracking and blockchain to improve supply chain transparency. In this talk, they advocate for a new perspective on the countryside: not as places lacking in tech or digital media literacy but as centers of humble innovation that emphasize community and sustainability.

Renew Church OC
City Monks Series | Easter | Wilson Wang

Renew Church OC

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 43:45


Renew is a church for imperfect people only.

 We are back in person!!
 Come visit us at 10am
 1535 Deerpark Dr., Fullerton CA 92870 Announcements, Offering, and Updates: linktr.ee/RenewchurchOC

Drop the BS w/ Dr. Kirleen
78: Using Acupuncture for Your Mental Health w/Dr. Winnie Chan Wang

Drop the BS w/ Dr. Kirleen

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 47:29


Talk therapy and medications are wonderful ways to treat mental health issues. However, there are many other therapeutic avenues that could be beneficial but are often not explored. One such therapeutic approach is the use of Acupuncture. Acupuncture is a form of alternative medicine and a component of traditional Chinese medicine in which thin needles are inserted into the body. Many people swear by Acupuncture's ability to heal physical and emotional trauma. To help us unpack this subject I've brought in trauma-informed licensed acupuncturist Dr. Winnie Wang. Dr. Wang believes that trauma is the root cause of many physical and emotional illnesses, she focuses on releasing trapped emotions in organs and meridians (energy pathways). About Our GuestWinnie Chan Wang is a trauma-informed licensed acupuncturist, Reiki practitioner, shadow worker, and shamanic Tao healer. She is also a professor in Acupuncture at Alhambra Medical University. In her private practice, Winnie honors her clients as divine self-healers, navigating their healing journeys as co-pilots. Winnie combines the medical science of a clinically trained acupuncturist with the spiritual knowledge of a shaman to help her clients process their trauma by channeling source healing energy and guided breathwork. Key TakeawaysYour body keeps the score of mental health "injuries". To deal with your mental health, you have to deal with your physical health.Take the time to listen to your body. Your physical pain could be alerting you to deeper emotional wounds. Physical health problems such as headaches, fatigue, and stomach pain may be indicators of an underlying emotional health problem.Mentions: Dr. Winnie Wang https://mindfulhealingheart.com/Drop The BS Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/dropthebspodcast/Psychology Today: https://www.psychologytoday.com/usNeely Counseling Center: www.neelycounseling.com

Fire Science Show
049 - What burns inside a battery with Francesco Restuccia

Fire Science Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 58:01


So we all know batteries burn... but do we know what exactly does burn? What is inside this tiny metal cylinder that scares so many of us? We try to understand it a bit more with Dr Francesco Restuccia of Kings College London, who is an expert in battery fire safety and self-heating. And this combination of skills gave him a unique view of the challenges of fire safety of batteries - especially the ones that are stored in warehouses and not fueling anything. Francesco takes me on a journey into the world of cathodes, anodes and electrol... I mean battery juice.  Knowing what is inside and why it burns is fundamental to understanding how can we protect the world from the risks arising from Li-ION batter technology. And I hope this podcast episode is a concise introduction to this!And here is a paper choice curated by Francesco, containing the important papers discussed within the episode (because we discuss real science here! :))X. He, C. Zhao, Z. Hu, F. Restuccia, F. Richter, Q. Wang, G. Rein. The effects of heat transfer on accelerating rate calorimetry of thermal runaway of Lithium-ion batteries, Process Safety and Environmental Protection, VVol 162, 2022, pp684-693. X.He, Z. Hu, F. Restuccia, H. Yuan, G. Rein. Self-heating ignition of large ensembles of Lithium-ion batteries during storage with different states of charge and cathodes, Applied Thermal Engineering, Vol 197,  2021, 117349.Z. Hu, X. He, F. Restuccia, G. Rein. Anisotropic and homogeneous model of heat transfer for self-heating ignition of large ensembles of Lithium-ion batteries during storage, Applied Thermal Engineering, Vol 197, 2021, 117301. 3P. Christensen, Z. Milojevic, M.S. Wise, M. Ahmeid, P.S. Attidekou, W. Mrozik, N.A. Dickman, F. Restuccia, S.M. Lambert, P.K. Das. Thermal and mechanical abuse of electric vehicle pouch cell modules, Applied Thermal Engineering,Vol 189 2021,116623L. Diaz Bravo, X. He, Z. Hu, F. Restuccia, M. Marinescu, J. Barreras, Y. Patel, G. Offer, G. Rein. Meta-review of fire safety of Lithium-ion batteries: industry challenges and research contributions, Journal of the ElectrochemistrySociety Vol 167 090559, 2020. X. He, F. Restuccia, Y. Zhang, Z. Hu, X. Huang, J. Fang, G. Rein. Experimental study of self-heating ignition of lithium-ion batteries during storage: effect of the number of cells, Fire Technology, Vol 56, 2020, pp 2649–2669--- Cheers to Dr Matt Bonner of Trigon Fire for the surprise song. Make sure to check out his episode on facades, as music is just one of his skills.https://www.firescienceshow.com/004-facade-fires-and-ai-with-matt-bonner/

New Books in World Affairs
Ban Wang, "China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in World Affairs

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 58:18


Ban Wang's book China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision (Duke University Press, 2022), traces the evolution of modern China from the late nineteenth century to the present. With a focus on tensions and connections between national formation and international outlooks, Wang shows how ancient visions persist even as China has adopted and revised the Western nation-state form. The concept of tianxia, meaning “all under heaven,” has constantly been updated into modern outlooks that value unity, equality, and reciprocity as key to overcoming interstate conflict, social fragmentation, and ethnic divides. Instead of geopolitical dominance, China's worldviews stem as much from the age-old desire for world unity as from absorbing the Western ideas of the Enlightenment, humanism, and socialism. Examining political writings, literature, and film, Wang presents a narrative of the country's pursuits of decolonization, national independence, notions of national form, socialist internationalism, alternative development, and solidarity with Third World nations. Rather than national exceptionalism, Chinese worldviews aspire to a shared, integrated, and equal world. Ban Wang is the William Haas Endowed Chair Professor in Chinese Studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. His major publications include The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-Century China (Stanford UP 1997), Illuminations from the Past (Stanford UP 2004), History and Memory (in Chinese, Oxford UP, 2004), and Narrative Perspective and Irony in Chinese and American Fiction (2002). He edited Words and Their Stories: Essays on the Language of the Chinese Revolution (Brill, 2010); Chinese Visions of World Order (Duke UP 2017). He co-edited Trauma and Cinema (Hong Kong UP, 2004), The Image of China in the American Classroom (Nanjing UP, 2005), China and New Left Visions (Lexington, 2012), and Debating Socialist Legacy in China (Palgrave, 2014). Linshan Jiang is Ph.D. candidate in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/world-affairs

New Books in History
Ban Wang, "China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 58:18


Ban Wang's book China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision (Duke University Press, 2022), traces the evolution of modern China from the late nineteenth century to the present. With a focus on tensions and connections between national formation and international outlooks, Wang shows how ancient visions persist even as China has adopted and revised the Western nation-state form. The concept of tianxia, meaning “all under heaven,” has constantly been updated into modern outlooks that value unity, equality, and reciprocity as key to overcoming interstate conflict, social fragmentation, and ethnic divides. Instead of geopolitical dominance, China's worldviews stem as much from the age-old desire for world unity as from absorbing the Western ideas of the Enlightenment, humanism, and socialism. Examining political writings, literature, and film, Wang presents a narrative of the country's pursuits of decolonization, national independence, notions of national form, socialist internationalism, alternative development, and solidarity with Third World nations. Rather than national exceptionalism, Chinese worldviews aspire to a shared, integrated, and equal world. Ban Wang is the William Haas Endowed Chair Professor in Chinese Studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. His major publications include The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-Century China (Stanford UP 1997), Illuminations from the Past (Stanford UP 2004), History and Memory (in Chinese, Oxford UP, 2004), and Narrative Perspective and Irony in Chinese and American Fiction (2002). He edited Words and Their Stories: Essays on the Language of the Chinese Revolution (Brill, 2010); Chinese Visions of World Order (Duke UP 2017). He co-edited Trauma and Cinema (Hong Kong UP, 2004), The Image of China in the American Classroom (Nanjing UP, 2005), China and New Left Visions (Lexington, 2012), and Debating Socialist Legacy in China (Palgrave, 2014). Linshan Jiang is Ph.D. candidate in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Political Science
Ban Wang, "China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 58:18


Ban Wang's book China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision (Duke University Press, 2022), traces the evolution of modern China from the late nineteenth century to the present. With a focus on tensions and connections between national formation and international outlooks, Wang shows how ancient visions persist even as China has adopted and revised the Western nation-state form. The concept of tianxia, meaning “all under heaven,” has constantly been updated into modern outlooks that value unity, equality, and reciprocity as key to overcoming interstate conflict, social fragmentation, and ethnic divides. Instead of geopolitical dominance, China's worldviews stem as much from the age-old desire for world unity as from absorbing the Western ideas of the Enlightenment, humanism, and socialism. Examining political writings, literature, and film, Wang presents a narrative of the country's pursuits of decolonization, national independence, notions of national form, socialist internationalism, alternative development, and solidarity with Third World nations. Rather than national exceptionalism, Chinese worldviews aspire to a shared, integrated, and equal world. Ban Wang is the William Haas Endowed Chair Professor in Chinese Studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. His major publications include The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-Century China (Stanford UP 1997), Illuminations from the Past (Stanford UP 2004), History and Memory (in Chinese, Oxford UP, 2004), and Narrative Perspective and Irony in Chinese and American Fiction (2002). He edited Words and Their Stories: Essays on the Language of the Chinese Revolution (Brill, 2010); Chinese Visions of World Order (Duke UP 2017). He co-edited Trauma and Cinema (Hong Kong UP, 2004), The Image of China in the American Classroom (Nanjing UP, 2005), China and New Left Visions (Lexington, 2012), and Debating Socialist Legacy in China (Palgrave, 2014). Linshan Jiang is Ph.D. candidate in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Chinese Studies
Ban Wang, "China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Chinese Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 58:18


Ban Wang's book China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision (Duke University Press, 2022), traces the evolution of modern China from the late nineteenth century to the present. With a focus on tensions and connections between national formation and international outlooks, Wang shows how ancient visions persist even as China has adopted and revised the Western nation-state form. The concept of tianxia, meaning “all under heaven,” has constantly been updated into modern outlooks that value unity, equality, and reciprocity as key to overcoming interstate conflict, social fragmentation, and ethnic divides. Instead of geopolitical dominance, China's worldviews stem as much from the age-old desire for world unity as from absorbing the Western ideas of the Enlightenment, humanism, and socialism. Examining political writings, literature, and film, Wang presents a narrative of the country's pursuits of decolonization, national independence, notions of national form, socialist internationalism, alternative development, and solidarity with Third World nations. Rather than national exceptionalism, Chinese worldviews aspire to a shared, integrated, and equal world. Ban Wang is the William Haas Endowed Chair Professor in Chinese Studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. His major publications include The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-Century China (Stanford UP 1997), Illuminations from the Past (Stanford UP 2004), History and Memory (in Chinese, Oxford UP, 2004), and Narrative Perspective and Irony in Chinese and American Fiction (2002). He edited Words and Their Stories: Essays on the Language of the Chinese Revolution (Brill, 2010); Chinese Visions of World Order (Duke UP 2017). He co-edited Trauma and Cinema (Hong Kong UP, 2004), The Image of China in the American Classroom (Nanjing UP, 2005), China and New Left Visions (Lexington, 2012), and Debating Socialist Legacy in China (Palgrave, 2014). Linshan Jiang is Ph.D. candidate in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/chinese-studies

New Books Network
Ban Wang, "China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 58:18


Ban Wang's book China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision (Duke University Press, 2022), traces the evolution of modern China from the late nineteenth century to the present. With a focus on tensions and connections between national formation and international outlooks, Wang shows how ancient visions persist even as China has adopted and revised the Western nation-state form. The concept of tianxia, meaning “all under heaven,” has constantly been updated into modern outlooks that value unity, equality, and reciprocity as key to overcoming interstate conflict, social fragmentation, and ethnic divides. Instead of geopolitical dominance, China's worldviews stem as much from the age-old desire for world unity as from absorbing the Western ideas of the Enlightenment, humanism, and socialism. Examining political writings, literature, and film, Wang presents a narrative of the country's pursuits of decolonization, national independence, notions of national form, socialist internationalism, alternative development, and solidarity with Third World nations. Rather than national exceptionalism, Chinese worldviews aspire to a shared, integrated, and equal world. Ban Wang is the William Haas Endowed Chair Professor in Chinese Studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. His major publications include The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-Century China (Stanford UP 1997), Illuminations from the Past (Stanford UP 2004), History and Memory (in Chinese, Oxford UP, 2004), and Narrative Perspective and Irony in Chinese and American Fiction (2002). He edited Words and Their Stories: Essays on the Language of the Chinese Revolution (Brill, 2010); Chinese Visions of World Order (Duke UP 2017). He co-edited Trauma and Cinema (Hong Kong UP, 2004), The Image of China in the American Classroom (Nanjing UP, 2005), China and New Left Visions (Lexington, 2012), and Debating Socialist Legacy in China (Palgrave, 2014). Linshan Jiang is Ph.D. candidate in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Intellectual History
Ban Wang, "China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 58:18


Ban Wang's book China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision (Duke University Press, 2022), traces the evolution of modern China from the late nineteenth century to the present. With a focus on tensions and connections between national formation and international outlooks, Wang shows how ancient visions persist even as China has adopted and revised the Western nation-state form. The concept of tianxia, meaning “all under heaven,” has constantly been updated into modern outlooks that value unity, equality, and reciprocity as key to overcoming interstate conflict, social fragmentation, and ethnic divides. Instead of geopolitical dominance, China's worldviews stem as much from the age-old desire for world unity as from absorbing the Western ideas of the Enlightenment, humanism, and socialism. Examining political writings, literature, and film, Wang presents a narrative of the country's pursuits of decolonization, national independence, notions of national form, socialist internationalism, alternative development, and solidarity with Third World nations. Rather than national exceptionalism, Chinese worldviews aspire to a shared, integrated, and equal world. Ban Wang is the William Haas Endowed Chair Professor in Chinese Studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. His major publications include The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-Century China (Stanford UP 1997), Illuminations from the Past (Stanford UP 2004), History and Memory (in Chinese, Oxford UP, 2004), and Narrative Perspective and Irony in Chinese and American Fiction (2002). He edited Words and Their Stories: Essays on the Language of the Chinese Revolution (Brill, 2010); Chinese Visions of World Order (Duke UP 2017). He co-edited Trauma and Cinema (Hong Kong UP, 2004), The Image of China in the American Classroom (Nanjing UP, 2005), China and New Left Visions (Lexington, 2012), and Debating Socialist Legacy in China (Palgrave, 2014). Linshan Jiang is Ph.D. candidate in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books in East Asian Studies
Ban Wang, "China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision" (Duke UP, 2022)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 58:18


Ban Wang's book China in the World: Culture, Politics, and World Vision (Duke University Press, 2022), traces the evolution of modern China from the late nineteenth century to the present. With a focus on tensions and connections between national formation and international outlooks, Wang shows how ancient visions persist even as China has adopted and revised the Western nation-state form. The concept of tianxia, meaning “all under heaven,” has constantly been updated into modern outlooks that value unity, equality, and reciprocity as key to overcoming interstate conflict, social fragmentation, and ethnic divides. Instead of geopolitical dominance, China's worldviews stem as much from the age-old desire for world unity as from absorbing the Western ideas of the Enlightenment, humanism, and socialism. Examining political writings, literature, and film, Wang presents a narrative of the country's pursuits of decolonization, national independence, notions of national form, socialist internationalism, alternative development, and solidarity with Third World nations. Rather than national exceptionalism, Chinese worldviews aspire to a shared, integrated, and equal world. Ban Wang is the William Haas Endowed Chair Professor in Chinese Studies in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Comparative Literature at Stanford University. His major publications include The Sublime Figure of History: Aesthetics and Politics in Twentieth-Century China (Stanford UP 1997), Illuminations from the Past (Stanford UP 2004), History and Memory (in Chinese, Oxford UP, 2004), and Narrative Perspective and Irony in Chinese and American Fiction (2002). He edited Words and Their Stories: Essays on the Language of the Chinese Revolution (Brill, 2010); Chinese Visions of World Order (Duke UP 2017). He co-edited Trauma and Cinema (Hong Kong UP, 2004), The Image of China in the American Classroom (Nanjing UP, 2005), China and New Left Visions (Lexington, 2012), and Debating Socialist Legacy in China (Palgrave, 2014). Linshan Jiang is Ph.D. candidate in the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, University of California, Santa Barbara. Her research interests are modern and contemporary literature, film, and popular culture in mainland China, Taiwan and Japan; trauma and memory studies; gender and sexuality studies; queer studies; as well as comparative literature and translation studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

通勤學英語
每日英語跟讀 Ep.K358: 為何要討論女性古典音樂家的穿著?

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 5:27


每日英語跟讀 Ep.K358: Fashion, fabrics and fishtails: Why we need to talk about what female classical performers wear   Discussing clothing is something of a taboo in classical music, for performers as much as critics. “Most musicians don't feel like they can talk about it,” says Jocelyn Lightfoot, managing director of the London Chamber Orchestra. There is the entrenched idea that classical musicians are supposed to be heard and not seen. In this performance ideal, the performer's personality — expressed through his or her choice of clothing — is excised, deferring to “the music itself”. 在古典音樂中,討論服裝是一種禁忌,對表演者和評論家來說都是如此。“大多數音樂家都不覺得他們可以談論它” 倫敦室內管絃樂團 (London Chamber Orchestra)董事總經理喬斯林·萊特富特(Jocelyn Lightfoot)說。有一種根深蒂固的觀念認為,古典音樂家應該是被聽到而不是被看到。在這種表演理念中,表演者的個性 - 通過他或她選擇的衣服來表達 – 都是被切除,完全源於“音樂本身”。 Those musicians who step outside the norm in their clothing choices have, accordingly, been subject to severe criticism. But at least part of the controversy surrounding artists like violinist Nigel Kennedy, with his jeans and spiky hair, is that they remind us that live music is a visual medium. We don't just hear — we see musicians performing. 因此,那些在服裝選擇上超越常規的音樂家受到了嚴厲的批評。但是,圍繞著小提琴家奈傑爾·甘迺迪(Nigel Kennedy)等牛仔褲和尖頭髮的藝術家的爭議至少有一部分的人,他們提醒我們,現場音樂是一種視覺媒介。我們不只是聽到 - 我們也看到音樂家表演 For women, the stakes of their clothing choices are considerably higher because women are more frequently sexualized than their male counterparts. While Kennedy's informal clothes were criticized by some as “ludicrous,” the furore around pianist Yuja Wang betrays this double standard. As much ink has been spilt over Wang's hemlines as her playing – and with a couple of exceptions, commentary has focused on how “short and tight” her dresses are. 對於女性來說,她們選擇服裝的風險要高得多,因為女性比男性更頻繁地被性物化。雖然甘迺迪的非正式服裝被一些人批評為「荒謬可笑」,但圍繞鋼琴家王裕佳的憤怒暴露了這種雙重標準。就像她的演奏一樣,王的下擺也是有兩極看法——除了幾個例外,評論都集中在她的裙子有多“短而緊”。 The problem isn't that critics are talking about Wang's clothes. It's that by viewing everything she wears through a sexualized lens, they're presenting her as a sexual object first and an artist second. There is no room in this worldview for women's clothes to be both an artistic and personal choice. Perhaps part of the issue is that fashion lies outside the traditional classical critic's toolkit. 問題不在於批評者在談論王的衣服。而是通過性物化的鏡頭觀察她所穿的一切,他們首先將她呈現為性物件,其次是藝術家。在這種世界觀中,女性服裝既不能成為藝術選擇,也可以作為個人選擇。也許部分問題在於,時尚不在傳統古典音樂批評家的工具包之內。 The inability to talk about Wang's clothing in a sensitive and respectful way reveals damaging and longstanding assumptions around women and their dress on the classical stage. The notion that what we see might “distract from” music, rather than shape our experience of it, stems from a centuries-old division of body and mind, physicality and rationality, that claims classical music as purely cerebral stuff. The body has no place here. And this idea is gendered. Rationality and the mind have historically been coded masculine, sensuality and the body feminine, with the result that women and their bodies have been marginalized within classical music. 無法以敏感和尊重的方式談論王的服裝,揭示了古典舞臺上圍繞女性及其著裝的破壞性和長期存在的假設。我們所看到的可能會“分散”對於音樂的注意力,而不是塑造我們對音樂的體驗,這種觀念源於幾個世紀以來對身體和思想,物理性和理性的劃分,它聲稱古典音樂是純粹的大腦的東西。身體在這裡沒有位置。這個想法是性別化的。理性和心靈歷來被編碼為男性化,性感和身體女性化,結果女性及其身體在古典音樂中被邊緣化。 The denial of Wang's agency also feeds into racist stereotypes around the submissiveness and inexpressiveness of both women and classical musicians of Asian descent — stereotypes that Wang's clothing choices actively disrupt. 對王的行為的否認也助長了圍繞亞裔女性和古典音樂家的順從和無表情的種族主義刻板印象——王的服裝選擇積極地打破了這些刻板印象。 We need to find ways of talking about women's clothes that respect them as artistic choices, and integral to performance. Dress is becoming more important as questions around diversity and inclusion are pushed to the forefront of institutions' agendas. The London Chamber Orchestra, for example, has recently removed the dress code for its players. Dispensing with the heavily gendered expectations of black tie is partly, Lightfoot says, to celebrate the individuality of the orchestra's players and build an inclusive space for musicians whose “way of expressing themselves physically doesn't fit with that classical music stereotype.” But it's also to create a “mirror between the audience and orchestra,” reaching out to those “who don't feel welcome in a concert hall.” 我們需要找到談論女性服裝的方法,尊重她們的藝術選擇,並且是表演不可或缺的一部分。隨著圍繞多樣性和包容性的問題被推到機構議程的最前沿,著裝變得越來越重要。例如,倫敦室內管絃樂團(London Chamber Orchestra)最近取消了對演奏者的著裝要求。萊特富特說,摒棄對黑色領帶的高度性別化的期望,部分原因是為了慶祝樂團演奏者的個性,併為那些“表達自己身體的方式不符合古典音樂刻板印象”的音樂家建立一個包容性的空間。但這也是為了在觀眾和管弦樂隊之間創造一面鏡子,向那些“在音樂廳里不受歡迎的人”伸出援手。 Moreover, social media has made classical music “so much more visual” says Maxine Kwok, a violinist in the London Symphony Orchestra. Orchestras and soloists alike are now attuned to the branding possibilities it offers, from sharing clips of concerts to photographs of rehearsals in jeans and jumpers. And this can, perhaps, be a way of making musicians more accessible. 此外,社交媒體使古典音樂“更加直觀”,倫敦交響樂團的小提琴家Maxine Kwok說。管弦樂隊和獨奏家現在都適應了它提供的品牌可能性,從分享音樂會的剪輯到穿著牛仔褲和毛衣排練的照片。這也許可以成為使音樂家更容易接近的一種方式。

The Chinese History Podcast
Wang Yangming and the School of Mind: An Interview with Professor George L. Israel

The Chinese History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 55:58


Wang Yangming 王陽明 (born Wang Shouren 王守仁, 1472-1529) is one of the most famous pre-modern Chinese intellectuals and the founder of the School of Mind (心學) of Neo-Confucianism, which was hugely influential in the later half of the Ming Dynasty. In addition to being philosopher, he was also an accomplished statesman, military leader, and calligrapher. In this episode, we speak with Professor George L. Israel, an expert on the study of Wang Yangming, who will introduce us to Wang's life and career, his thoughts and tenants, and his reception in the Ming and the Qing, as well as in neighboring Korea and Japan, and how Wang is viewed in China today. We apologize for some audio issues with this recording. Contributors Professor George L. Israel Professor George L. Israel is a Professor of History at Middle Georgia State University. His research is primarily on Ming intellectual history and Neo-Confucianism, with a particular focus on the famous Ming Neo-Confucian philosopher Wang Yangming, and he has published extensively about that subject in both English and Chinese.   Yiming Ha Yiming Ha is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of California, Los Angeles. His current research is on military mobilization and state-building in China between the thirteenth and seventeenth centuries, focusing on how military institutions changed over time, how the state responded to these changes, the disconnect between the center and localities, and the broader implications that the military had on the state. His project highlights in particular the role of the Mongol Yuan in introducing an alternative form of military mobilization that radically transformed the Chinese state. He is also interested in military history, nomadic history, comparative Eurasian state-building, and the history of maritime interactions in early modern East Asia. He received his BA from UCLA and his MPhil from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Credits Episode no. 11 Release date: May 1, 2022 Recording location: Los Angeles, CA/Macon, GA Transcript Bibliography courtesy of Professor Israel Images Cover Image: An official portrait of Wang Yangming (Image Source) Grand Hall of Wang Yangming's former residence in Shaoxing (