Podcast appearances and mentions of Brian Poole

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  • 53PODCASTS
  • 94EPISODES
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  • 1EPISODE EVERY OTHER WEEK
  • Aug 14, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Brian Poole

Latest podcast episodes about Brian Poole

Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints
New Orleans Saints Release Interesting Unofficial Depth Chart Ahead of First Preseason Game

Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 25:44


Breaking down the New Orleans Saints first unofficial depth chart released ahead of their first NFL preseason matchup against the Baltimore Ravens. The early, unofficial poll positions give some idea of what the Saints preseason roster could look like. Starting with the offensive skill positions, no decisions yet at quarterback, Taysom Hill and Jameis Winston still yet to be named Saturday's starter. Wide receiver, running back, and right end have some interesting nuances including where Juwan Johnson is listed among the big pass-catchers. When it comes to the trenches, there are very few surprises on the offensive line with one of the top units in the NFL. However, the interior defensive line has generated much curiosity over the offseason, and this depth chart is no exception with the placement of Shy Tuttle. On the defense, some of the biggest questions are looming. Who will start next to Demario Davis? How soon will Kwon Alexander be healthy and can he eclipse the young talent that's stood out on Airline Drive? And of course, which corner will start next to Marshon Lattimore? A quick look at the depth chart gives you a good idea of what's expected at corner with Paulson Adebo, Brian Poole, Prince Amukamara, and Ken Crawley all as options unless another corner is added before the regular season begins. The unofficial depth chart: https://twitter.com/nick_underhill/status/1426333902856130561?s=20 Follow & Subscribe to the Locked On Saints Podcast on these platforms… 

Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints
Taysom Hill, 1st Team Reps, More Day 2 New Orleans Saints Training Camp Headlines

Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 22:27


Taysom Hill and Jameis Winston are set to battle it out in New Orleans Saints Training Camp for the right to be Drew Brees's successor. Taysom Hill has gotten the early first team reps over the first two days of camp, but Jameis Winston is set to rotate in soon. both quarterbacks have been efficient but mechanics, passing depth, decision-making and much more continue to be under a microscope as the Saints look for their starting QB ahead of the 2021 NFL season. On the defensive side, Patrick Robinson looks to be ahead at the second cornerback spot opposite Marshon Lattimore, meanwhile the newly signed Brian Poole takes on a key depth role. The linebackers Zack Baun and Pete Werner continue to rotate next to Demario Davis and the defensive line is already producing some standouts including Noah Spence and an early look at first-round draft pick Payton Turner. As Saints camp continues, pads are set to come on at the top of next week. On Saturday, they'll be back in helmets and shells with fans expected to be in attendance. Some veterans are already starting to stand out, including newly signed wide receiver Chris Hogan, but which experienced player will continue to separate themselves as the young guys get their bearings? Follow Ross on Twitter @RossJacksonNOLA Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Who Dat Confessional
Ep 498.8: Michael Thomas' late surgery could cost him games | Saints sign Chris Hogan & Brian Poole

Who Dat Confessional

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 70:25


Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints
New Orleans Saints Training Camp Primer with John Hendrix of Saints News Network

Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 31:10


New Orleans Saints training camp is right around the corner, so John Hendrix of Saints New Network joins today's episode of Locked On Saints. First, Ross and John break down everything you need to know around Michael Thomas' timetable and the young wideouts on the roster who will need to step up and produce in the All-Pro's absence. Tre'Quan Smith made his name as a deep threat on the outside in college, now he'll be asked to show he can still operate downfield. Marquez Callaway flashed in big moments last season, he now has the chance to show he's more than just a flash in the pan. Meanwhile, more players on the market remain that could be impactful for the Saints. Even though they signed Chris Hogan, names like Alshon Jeffrey, Kenny Stills, and more are still available. John and Ross then discuss the value of the recent Brian Poole signing. Even though Poole bring value to a team that may need to ask Patrick Robinson to move from the slot to outside, the Saints shouldn't be done at the position with boundary corners still available for pursuit. Finally, John breaks down what he's excited to see on the offense and defensive sides of the ball in camp as well as under-the-radar storylines to watch. The quarterback battle between Jameis Winston and Taysom Hill may headline camp, but the wide receiver position, Adam Trautman's ascension atop his position group, and several talented young names on defense are worth your attention. Along with a QB battle, there will also be a punter battle to enjoy between Blake Gillikin and Nolan Cooney. From the signal callers to the special teamers, Saints camp in no way lacks of intrigue. Follow John on Twitter @JohnJHendrix Follow Ross on Twitter @RossJacksonNOLA Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Big Easy In The Big Apple: New Orleans Saints Podcast
Michael Thomas Injury, Brian Poole Signing

Big Easy In The Big Apple: New Orleans Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 24:14


This weeks edition of The Straight Up Saints Podcast with Chris Rosvoglou talks about the MT injury and the Brian Poole signing.

Under the Dome with CD
Footenotes July 26th 2021

Under the Dome with CD

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021


Hour 1: In hour one, Kevin talked about the Astros sweep of the Rangers this weekend and threw some shade at the Yankees. Then he talked about Michael Thomas’ injury and what the Saints need to work on in training camp. He also talked about the Saints signing free-agent Brian Poole. Kevin took some phone calls […]

Just Jets
New York Jets Training Camp Preview & Brian Poole Signs With Saints

Just Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 47:00


In episode 76, Matt discusses Training Camp, Brian Poole leaving, and answering your voicemail.Shop: https://bit.ly/3oclrNnUSE PROMO CODE JETS20 FOR 20% OFF AND FREE SHIPPING AT https://www.manscaped.comSocial:Twitter: https://twitter.com/mattolearyny​Facebook: https://facebook.com/mattolearyny​Instagram: https://instagram.com/mattolearyny​Call in and leave a voicemail: 631-517-0782JUST JETS PODCASTSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2SLeGnXApple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/just-jets/id1499021318Just Jets Clips Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC1fLr6PvJcO8qz2XbAJjmAA

Locked On Steelers – Daily Podcast On The Pittsburgh Steelers
Steelers free agent options running out? Fights in training camp, Melvin Ingram and Trai Turner fitting in

Locked On Steelers – Daily Podcast On The Pittsburgh Steelers

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 29:28


Chris Carter, NFL and NCAAF analyst, goes over the latest free agents signed by other teams like Steven Nelson, Malik Hooker and Brian Poole and how it impacts the Steelers' plans. Then he'll break down how Melvin Ingram and Trai Turner are fitting in at training camp and his takes on the scraps happening between the Steelers defensive and offensive linemen. Follow Chris Carter on Twitter: @CarterCritiques. Theme music is 'Soul Kick' by Ceddy P, and 'Too Easy' by Nerdboy. Both from their label Renaissance Music. Find more from their label here. This show is part of the Locked on Podcast Network. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints
New Orleans Saints Strengthen Secondary with Brian Poole Signing

Locked On Saints - Daily Podcast On The New Orleans Saints

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 28:12


The New Orleans Saints have a clear need at cornerback opposite from, and possibly temporarily in place of, Marshon Lattimore. This weekend, they signed former New York Jets and Atlanta Falcons cornerback Brian Poole. Here's how he fits into the Saints secondary, could shake it up, and how the signing could affect a versatile chess piece like C.J. Gardner-Johnson. Even with the signing of Poole, the Saints may still be in the market for an outside cornerback. With Steven Nelson having now signed with the Philadelphia Eagles,, which corners are still on the market? Dre Kirkpatrick has already been brought in, but how about a young option like Gareon Conley? Still some potential out there to address a position of need with a career outside cornerback. Michael Thomas will be unavailable for the opening of the 2021 season, but for how long? We now have a timeline to track, as well as further details on exactly how things went down that led to the receiver's ankle surgery not happening until June. Who steps up in his stead? Follow Ross on Twitter @RossJacksonNOLA Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Canal Street Chronicles: for New Orleans Saints fans
Michael Thomas Injury News and Analysis; Saints sign Brian Poole

Canal Street Chronicles: for New Orleans Saints fans

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 14:55


New Orleans Saints analysts for Canal Street Chronicles Brenden Ertle breaks down the impact of the late surgery of Saints receiver Michael Thomas. What this means for his 2021 season, how this affects the team, and his future with the team. Also discussing the signing of slot cornerback Brian Poole. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Toco e Tackle
Toco e Tackle NFL #94: Os melhores free agents disponíveis

Toco e Tackle

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 66:12


Vários jogadores importantes seguem disponíveis no mercado em busca de um novo time, no podcast desta semana, falamos sobre quais os possíveis destinos dessas estrelas e se ainda são capazes de produzir em alto nível. Tem jogador de todas as posições e idades, entre eles: Richard Sherman, Mitchell Schwartz, LeVeon Bell, e muito mais. Também abordamos a greve de Stephon Gilmore nos Patriots em busca de um novo contrato e as principais notícias da semana. Onde encontrar: (6:45) Richard Sherman; (15:10) Mitchell Schwartz; (23:00) KJ Wright; (29:55) Melvin Ingram; (36:40) Le'veon Bell e Todd Gurley; (45:30) Brian Poole; (48:10) greve de Stephon Gilmore; (56:25) rapidinhas da semana. QUER FAZER PARTE DO GRUPO DE REDATORES DO TOCO E TACKLE? Mande um email para tocoetacklepod@gmail.com ou entre em contato nas redes sociais. Siga nosso Twitter e o nosso Instagram: @tocoetackle. Visite nosso site: https://tocoetackle.com. Assine nossa newsletter semanal: https://tocoetackle.substack.com/ Edição: Jonatan Mombach; Apresentação: Juan Grings; Comentários: Jonas Faria e Jonatan Mombach.

Andy George Leadership Podcast
Episode 29: Interview with Brian Poole on What All Churches Need to Know About Audio, Video, and Lighting

Andy George Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2021 20:26


Links:Guest: Brian PooleInstagram | Email: Brian@solutionstride.com Andy GeorgeTwitter | Instagram | FacebookKen HesterTwitter | Instagram | FacebookJamie BufordTwitter | Instagram | FacebookCrossroads Fellowship | YouTube

The Jets Zone
The Jets Zone: Brian Poole potential reunion, New York Jets OTAs update

The Jets Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2021 33:15


Boy Green discussed the potential of Brian Poole re-signing + agreeing to a long-term deal with Heavy + answering all your mailbag questions!

Purple Daily
Minnesota Vikings can STILL sign these NFL free agents

Purple Daily

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 30:33


Minnesota Vikings best remaining options in free agency; should the Vikings sign Brian Poole or Richard Sherman; Danielle Hunter contract update; Should Geno Atkins be brought in?; Larry Fitzgerald as WR3?; If Kellen Mond isn’t ready to be the backup, should the Vikings bring in a true veteran backup QB.

The Third Class Ticket Radio Show
Super Sounds of the sixties - Episode 44

The Third Class Ticket Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2021 120:17


Episode 44 of Tommy's weekly trip through the music of the 60's This weeks playlist is The Tokens - The Lion Sleeps tonight Rufus Thomas - Walking the dog Nancy Sinatra - The Boots are made for walking The Isley Brothers - This old heart of mine Freddie & the dreamers - You were made for me Johnny Nash - Cupid Jimi Hendrix - Hey Joe Jose Feliciano - Light my fire Jimi Hendrix - Voodoo Chile The Honey combs - Have i the right? The McCoys - hang on sloopy Arthur Conley - Sweet soul music Brian Poole & the tremeloes - Twist & shout Bern Eliott & the fen men - Nobody but me Barrett Strong - Money (thats what i want) Adam Faith - The Time has come The Symbols - The best part of Breaking up Ken dodd - Eight by ten Ben E King - Stand by me The Foundations - In the bad bad old days (before you loved me) The McCoys - Fever Junior walker and the all stars - Pucker up buttercup Count five - Phsychotic reaction The Equals - Softly Softly Betty everett & Jerry Butler - Aint that loving you baby Lonnie Donegan - Puttin' on the style Sam Cooke - Chain Gang Solomon Burke - What I'd Say Sam Cooke - I fall in love every day The McCoys - Up and down Migil 5 - Mockin' bird hill Lulu - Call me Dave dee, dozy, beaky, mick & Tich - Hold tight Neil Christian - that's nice Millie - Sweet William Robert Parker - barefootin The Ivy league - Tossing & Turning

Breaking Tables Podcast
BILLS BACKERS MIAMI | BREAKING TABLES

Breaking Tables Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2021 70:12


Join in as we talk about Bills Backers Miami and Bills with Jonathan Holler and Brian Poole, Chapter leaders of Bills Backers Miami! Lube your earholes because we talk everything from events in South Florida to predicting a 17-0 record! Bills Mafia, I present to you Bills Backers Miami!

Locked On Gators - Daily Podcast On Florida Gators Football & Basketball
Brett DioGuardi Interview & 247 Sports Bold Prediction

Locked On Gators - Daily Podcast On Florida Gators Football & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 15, 2021 27:50


Percy Harvin and Brian Poole NFL recaps, Florida Gators bold prediction from 247 Sports, and a draft prospect interview! Brandon Olsen discusses all of these things on today's episode How did Percy Harvin and Brian Poole carve their NFL roles? What is 247 Sports' bold prediction that is disrespectful? Brett DioGuardi joins the show to talk about his time as a Gator and the pre-draft process Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

All Eyez on Cleveland podcast
Browns FA Profile: Star Safety John Johnson III featuring Doc Holliday

All Eyez on Cleveland podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2021 41:21


Special Guest Doc Holliday  - Former NFL RB for the Rams and Co-Host of 'Bleav in Rams' Podcast Browns new safety John Johnson III Troy Hill's marketWR Anthony Miller Rams with new QB StaffordRelationship with Issac Bruceand much more...Get 20% Off and Free Shipping with the code 'EYEZ' at Manscaped.com. That’s 20% off with free shipping at manscaped.com and use code 'EYEZ.' Unlock your confidence and always use the right tools for the job with Manscaped. 

All Eyez on Cleveland podcast
Fixing The Browns Safety Room

All Eyez on Cleveland podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2021 42:28


Karl Joseph's Free AgencyPerformanceMarket ValueDC Joe Woods wants to play three safetiesHow bad Sendejo, Redwine and Joseph were in coverageHow to fix the roomFree Agency Targets

All Eyez on Cleveland podcast
JJ Watt's Best Fit and the Browns critical offseason with Ellis Williams of Cleveland.com

All Eyez on Cleveland podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021 49:15


Fantasy Football Legends
Offseason: New York Jets

Fantasy Football Legends

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2021 26:15


Diego Lozano analiza linea por linea a los Jets. Mekhi Becton, Marcus Maye, Quinnen Williams y Brian Poole los puntos brillantes de los Jets. C.J. Mosley le puede dar vida a una defensiva muerta. La ofensiva debe de cambiar linea por linea. Zach Wilson es el mejor fit para los Jets por encima de Justin Fields. Robert Saleh y LaFleur podría resultar bien pero es un proyecto a largo plazo. Kenny G a los Jets es el fit perfecto para Diego, Zach y Kenny rockeando en el Metlife Stadium suena ideal. Jaycee Horn es el corner que puede convertirse en el CB1 del equipo. Este puede ser uno de los backfields menos sexys de la liga en la tierra de Fantasy.

All Eyez on Cleveland podcast
Browns Free Agent Files: CB Kevin Johnson - Performance, market value & potential upgrades

All Eyez on Cleveland podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 15, 2021 15:03


Browns CB Kevin Johnson's role as nickel cornerbackPerformancePFF GradesSplitsPotentials upgrades on the free agent market 

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 112: "She Loves You" by The Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2021 45:20


This week's episode looks at "She Loves You", the Beatles in 1963, and the start of Beatlemania in the UK. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Glad All Over" by the Dave Clark Five. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources As usual, I have created a Mixcloud playlist containing every song heard in this episode (except for the excerpt of a Beatles audience screaming, and the recording of me singing, because nobody needs those.) While there are many books on the Beatles, and I have read dozens of them,  All These Years Vol 1: Tune In by Mark Lewisohn is simply the *only* book worth reading on the Beatles' career up to the end of 1962. It is the most detailed, most accurate, biography imaginable, and the gold standard by which all other biographies of musicians should be measured. I only wish volumes two and three were available already so I could not expect my future episodes on the Beatles to be obsolete when they do come out. There are two versions of the book -- a nine-hundred page mass-market version and a 1700-page expanded edition. I recommend the latter.  I have read literally dozens of books on the Beatles, and used bits of information from many of them, but the ones I specifically referred to while writing this episode, other than Tune In, were: The Complete Beatles Chronicle by Mark Lewisohn, All The Songs: The Stories Behind Every Beatles Release by Jean-Michel Guesdon, And The Band Begins To Play: The Definitive Guide To The Songs of The Beatles by Steve Lambley, The Beatles By Ear by Kevin Moore, Revolution in the Head by Ian MacDonald, and The Beatles Anthology.   "She Loves You" can be found on Past Masters, a 2-CD compilation of the Beatles' non-album tracks that includes the majority of their singles and B-sides.    Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Today, we're going to look at a record that is one of the most crucial turning points in the history of rock music, and of popular culture as a whole, a record that took the Beatles from being a very popular pop group to being the biggest band in Britain -- and soon to be the world. We're going to look at "She Loves You" by the Beatles: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "She Loves You"] When we left the Beatles, they had just released their first single, and seen it make the top twenty -- though we have, of course, seen them pop up in other people's stories in the course of our narrative, and we've seen how Lennon and McCartney wrote a hit for the Rolling Stones. But while we've been looking the other way, the Beatles had become the biggest band in Britain. Even before "Love Me Do" had been released, George Martin had realised that the Beatles had more potential than he had initially thought. He knew "Love Me Do" would be only a minor hit, but he didn't mind that -- over the sessions at which he'd worked with the group, he'd come to realise that they had real talent, and more than that, they had real charisma.  The Beatles' second single was to be their real breakthrough. "Please Please Me" was a song that had largely been written by John, and which had two very different musical inspirations. The first was a song originally made famous by Bing Crosby in 1932, "Please": [Excerpt: Bing Crosby, "Please"] Lennon had always been fascinated by the pun in the opening line -- the play on the word "please" -- and wanted to do something similar himself. The other influence is less obvious in the finished record, but makes sense once you realise it. A lot of Roy Orbison's records have a slow build up with a leap into falsetto, like "Crying": [Excerpt: Roy Orbison, "Crying"] Now, I'm going to have to do something I'm a little uncomfortable with here, and which I've honestly been dreading since the start of this project two years ago -- to demonstrate the similarity between "Please Please Me" and an Orbison song, I'm going to have to actually sing. I have a terrible voice and appalling pitch, and I could easily win an award for "person who has the least vocal resemblance to Roy Orbison of anyone in existence", so this will not be a pleasant sound, but it will hopefully give you some idea of how Lennon was thinking when he was writing "Please Please Me": [Excerpt: Me singing "Please Please Me"] I'm sorry you had to hear that, and I hope we can all move past it together. I promise that won't be a regular feature of the podcast. But I hope it gets the basic idea across, of how the song that's so familiar now could have easily been inspired by Orbison. Lennon had played that to George Martin very early on, but Martin had been unimpressed, thinking it a dirge. At Martin's suggestion, they took the song at a much faster tempo, and they rearranged the song so that instead of Lennon singing it solo, he and McCartney sang it as a duo with Everly Brothers style harmonies. They also changed the ascending "come on" section to be a call and response, like many of the Black vocal groups the Beatles were so influenced by, and by taking elements from a variety of sources they changed what had been a derivative piece into something totally original. For good measure, they overdubbed some harmonica from Lennon, to provide some sonic continuity with their earlier single. The result was a very obvious hit: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Please Please Me"] After they'd finished recording that, George Martin said to them, "Gentlemen, you've just made your first number one" -- there are a number of slight variations of the wording depending on when Martin was telling the story, but it was something very close to that. Now that the Beatles had recorded something that really displayed their talents, they were clearly on their way to becoming very big, and it was at this point that George Martin brought in the final part of the team that would lead to that success; someone who would work closely with himself, the Beatles, and Brian Epstein. Dick James was someone who had himself had been a successful performer -- he's most famous now for having recorded the theme tune for the 1950s Robin Hood TV series: [Excerpt: Dick James, "Robin Hood"] That record had been produced by George Martin, as had several of James' other records, but James had recently retired from singing -- in part because he had gone prematurely bald, and didn't look right -- and had set up his own publishing company. George Martin had no great love for the people at Ardmore and Beechwood -- despite them having been the ones who had brought the Beatles to him -- and so he suggested to Brian Epstein that rather than continue with Ardmore and Beechwood, the group's next single should be published by Dick James. In particular, he owed James a favour, because James had passed him "How Do You Do It?", and Martin hadn't yet been able to get that recorded, and he thought that giving him the publishing for another guaranteed hit would possibly make up for that, though he still intended to get "How Do You Do It?" recorded by someone. Epstein had been unsure about this at first -- Epstein was a man who put a lot of stock in loyalty, but he ended up believing that Ardmore and Beechwood had done nothing to promote "Love Me Do" -- he possibly never realised that in fact it was them who were responsible for the record having come out at all, and that they'd had a great deal to do with its chart success. He ended up having a meeting with James, who was enthused by "Please Please Me", and wanted the song. Epstein told him he could have it, if he could prove he would be more effective at promoting the song than Ardmore and Beechwood had been with "Love Me Do". James picked up the telephone and called the producer of Thank Your Lucky Stars, one of the most popular music programmes on TV, and got the group booked for the show. He had the publishing rights. "Please Please Me" and its B-side "Ask Me Why" were published by Dick James Music, but after that point, any songs written by the Beatles for the next few years were published by a new company, Northern Songs. The business arrangements behind this have come in for some unfair criticism over the years, because Lennon and McCartney have later said that they were under the impression that they owned the company outright, but in fact they owned forty percent of the company, with Epstein owning ten percent, and the remaining fifty percent owned by Dick James and his business partner Charles Silver.  Obviously it's impossible to know what Lennon and McCartney were told about Northern Songs, and whether they were misled, but at the time this was very far from a bad deal. Most songwriters, even those with far more hits under their belt at the time, wrote for publishing companies owned by other people -- it was almost unheard of for them to even have a share in their own company. And at this time, it was still normal for publishing companies to actually have to work for their money, to push songs and get cover versions of them from established artists. Obviously the Beatles would change all that, and after them the job of a publisher became almost nonexistent, but nobody could have predicted how much the entire world of music was about to change, and so the deal that Lennon and McCartney got was an astonishingly good one for the time. This is something that's also true of a lot of the business decisions that Epstein made for the group early on. The Beatles earned incalculably less than they would have if they'd got the kind of contracts that people who started even a year or so after them got -- but their contracts were still vastly superior to anything that other performers in British music at the time were getting. Remember that Larry Parnes' teen idols were on a fixed salary, as were, for example, all the members of the Dave Clark Five except Clark himself, and you can see that the assumptions that apply when you look at later acts don't apply here. Either way, Dick James now had the publishing of what became the Beatles' first number one: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Please Please Me"] At least, it became the Beatles' first number one as far as anyone paying attention in 1963 was concerned. But it's not their first number one according to any modern reference. These days, the British charts are compiled by a company called the Official Charts Company. That company started, under another name, in 1969, and is run by a consortium of record companies and retailers. If you see anywhere referring to "the UK charts" after 1969, that's always what they're referring to. In 1963, though, there were multiple singles charts in Britain, published by different magazines, and no single standard music-industry one. "Please Please Me" went to number one in the charts published by the NME and Melody Maker, two general-interest magazines whose charts were regarded by most people at the time as "the real charts", and which had huge audiences. However, it only made number two in the chart published by Record Retailer, a smaller magazine aimed at music industry professionals and the trade, rather than at the wider public. However, because the Official Charts Company is an industry body, the people who ran it were the people Record Retailer was aimed at, and so when they provide lists of historical charts, they use the Record Retailer one for the period from 1960 through 69 (they use the NME chart for 1952 through 59). So retroactively, "Please Please Me" does not appear as a number one in the history books, but as far as anyone at the time was concerned, it was. The record that kept "Please Please Me" off the top on the Record Retailer charts was "The Wayward Wind" by Frank Ifield: [Excerpt: Frank Ifield, "The Wayward "Wind"] Oddly, Ifield would himself record a version of "Please", the song that had inspired "Please Please Me", the next year: [Excerpt: Frank Ifield, "Please"] As a result of the success of "Please Please Me", the group were quickly brought into the studio to record an album. George Martin had originally intended to make that a live album, recorded at the Cavern, but having visited it he decided that possibly the huge amounts of condensation dripping from the ceiling might not be a good idea to mix with EMI's expensive electronic equipment. So instead, as we talked about briefly a couple of months back, the group came into Abbey Road on a rare day off from a package tour they were on, and recorded ten more songs that would, with the A- and B-sides of their first two singles, round out an album. Those tracks were a mixture of six songs that they performed regularly as part of their normal set -- covers of songs by the Cookies, the Shirelles, and Arthur Alexander, plus "Twist and Shout" and the soft pop ballad "A Taste of Honey", all of which they'd performed often enough that they could turn out creditable performances even though they all had colds, and Lennon especially was definitely the worse for wear (you can hear this in some of his vocals -- his nose is particularly congested on "There's a Place"), plus four more  recent Lennon and McCartney originals. By the time that first album came out, Lennon and McCartney had also started expanding their songwriting ambitions, offering songs to other performers. This had always been something that McCartney, in particular, had considered as part of their long-term career path -- he knew that the average pop act only had a very small time in the spotlight, and he would talk in interviews about Lennon and McCartney becoming a songwriting team after that point. That said, the first two Lennon/McCartney songs to be released as singles by other acts -- if you don't count a version of "Love Me Do" put out by a group of anonymous session players on a budget EP of covers of hits of the day, anyway -- were both primarily Lennon songs, and were both included on the Please Please Me album. "Misery" was written by Lennon and McCartney on a tour they were on in the early part of the year. That tour was headlined by Helen Shapiro, a sixteen-year-old whose biggest hits had been two years earlier, when she was fourteen: [Excerpt: Helen Shapiro, "Walking Back to Happiness"] Shapiro had also, in 1962, appeared in the film It's Trad, Dad!, which we've mentioned before, and which was  the first feature film directed by Richard Lester, who would later play a big part in the Beatles' career. Lennon and McCartney wrote "Misery" for Shapiro, but it was turned down by her producer, Norrie Paramor, without Shapiro ever hearing it -- it's interesting to wonder if that might have been, in part, because of the strained relationship between Paramor and George Martin. In the event, the song was picked up by one of the other artists on the tour, Kenny Lynch, who recorded a version of it as a single, though it didn't have any chart success: [Excerpt: Kenny Lynch, "Misery"] Lennon apparently disliked that record, and would mock Lynch for having employed Bert Weedon as the session guitarist for the track, as he regarded Weedon as a laughable figure. The other non-Beatles single of Lennon/McCartney songs that came out in early 1963 was rather more successful. Billy J Kramer and the Dakotas were another act that Brian Epstein managed and who George Martin produced. Their first single, "Do You Want To Know A Secret?" was a cover of a song mostly written by Lennon, which had been an album track on Please Please Me. Kramer's version went to number two on the charts (or number one on some charts): [Excerpt: Billy J. Kramer and the Dakotas, "Do You Want To Know A Secret?"] They also gave a song to Kramer for the B-side -- "I'll Be On My Way", which the group never recorded in the studio themselves, though they did do a version of it on a radio show, which was later released on the Live at the BBC set. In 1963 and 64 Lennon and McCartney would write a further three singles for Kramer, "I'll Keep You Satisfied", "Bad to Me", and "From a Window", all of which also became top ten hits for him. and none of which were ever recorded by the Beatles. They also gave him "I Call Your Name" as a B-side, but they later recorded that song themselves. As well as the Rolling Stones, who we've obviously looked at a few weeks back, Lennon and McCartney also wrote hits in 1963 and early 64 for The Fourmost: [Excerpt: The Fourmost, "I'm In Love"] Cilla Black: [Excerpt: Cilla Black, "It's For You"] And Peter & Gordon: [Excerpt: Peter & Gordon, "World Without Love"] As well as a flop for Tommy Quickly: [Excerpt: Tommy Quickly, "Tip of My Tongue"] Kramer, the Fourmost, and Black were all managed by Epstein and produced by Martin, while Quickly was also managed by Epstein, and they were part of a massive shift in British music that started with "Please Please Me", and then shifted into gear with Gerry and the Pacemakers, another act managed by Epstein, who Martin also produced. Their first single was a version of "How Do You Do It?", the song that Dick James had published and that Martin had tried to get the Beatles to record: [Excerpt: Gerry and the Pacemakes, "How Do You Do It?"] "How Do You Do It?" went to number one, and when it dropped off the top of the charts, it was replaced by the Beatles' next single. "From Me to You" was a song they wrote on the tour bus of that Helen Shapiro tour, and lyrically it was inspired by the NME's letter column, which had the header "From You To Us": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "From Me To You"] "From Me To You" often gets dismissed when talking about the Beatles' early hits, but it has a few points worth noticing. Firstly, it's the first Beatles single to be written as a true collaboration. Both sides of the "Love Me Do" single had been written by McCartney, with Lennon helping him fix up a song he'd started and largely finished on his own. And in turn, both "Please Please Me" and its B-side were Lennon ideas, which McCartney helped him finish. "From Me to You" and its B-side "Thank You Girl" were written together, "one on one, eyeball to eyeball", to use Lennon's famous phrase, and that would be the case for the next two singles. It's also an interesting stepping stone. The song retains the harmonica from the first two singles, which would be dropped by the next single, and it also has the octave leap into falsetto that "Please Please Me" has, on the line "If there's anything I can do", but it also has the "ooh" at the end of the middle eight leading back into the verse, a trick they'd picked up from "Twist and Shout", and an opportunity for Lennon and McCartney to shake their heads while making a high-pitched noise, a bit of stagecraft that set the audiences screaming and which turned up again in the next single. The other notable aspect is that the song is more harmonically sophisticated than their previous work. McCartney always singles out the change to the minor of the dominant at the start of the middle eight (on the word  "arms") as being interesting: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "From Me To You"] And that is an interesting change, and it sets up an unexpected key change to F, but I'd also note the change from G to G augmented at the end of the middle eight, on the "fied" of "satisfied". That's a very, very, Lennon chord change -- Lennon liked augmented chords in general, and he'd already used one in "Ask Me Why", but the G augmented chord in particular is one he would use over and over again. For those who don't understand that -- chords are normally made up of three notes, the first, third, and fifth of the scale for a major chord, and the flrst, flattened third, and fifth of a scale for a minor chord. But you can get other chords that have unexpected notes in them, and those can be particularly useful if you want to change key or move between two chords that don't normally go together. All the Beatles had particular favourite odd chords they would use in this way -- Paul would often use a minor fourth instead of a major one, and John would use it occasionally too, so much so that some people refer to a minor fourth as "the Beatle chord". George, meanwhile, would often use a diminished seventh in his songwriting, especially a D diminished seventh. And John's chord was G augmented. An augmented chord is one where the fifth note is raised a semitone, so instead of the first, third and fifth: [demonstrates] it's the first, third, and sharpened fifth: [demonstrates] In this case, John moves from G to G augmented right as they're going into the climax of the middle eight, so the top note of the chord goes higher than you'd normally expect, giving an impression of being so excited you just can't stop going up. "From Me To You" knocked "How Do You Do It" off the top of the charts, and at this point, the British music scene had been changed irrevocably. While we've seen that, according to the Official Charts Company, the number one records in the UK for eleven of the first fourteen weeks of 1963 were by either Cliff Richard, the Shadows, or ex-members of the Shadows, with only Frank Ifield breaking their dominance, between the eleventh of April 1963 and the sixteenth of January 1964, thirty-two out of forty weeks at the top were taken up by the Beatles, Gerry and the Pacemakers, and Billy J Kramer and the Dakotas -- all acts from Liverpool, managed by Brian Epstein and produced by George Martin. And two of the other acts to hit number one in that period were Brian Poole and the Tremeloes, who were a London band, but doing a Motown cover, "Do You Love Me?", in a style clearly inspired by the Beatles' version of "Twist and Shout", and The Searchers, another band from Liverpool who rose to prominence as a result of the sudden dominance of Liverpudlian acts, and who we'll be looking at next week. The only pre-April acts to go to number one for the rest of 1963 were Frank Ifield and Elvis. In 1964 there was only Roy Orbison. There would be occasional number one hits by older acts after that -- Cliff Richard would have several more over his career -- but looking at the charts from this time it's almost as if there's a switch thrown, as if when people heard "Please Please Me", they decided "that's what we want now, that's what music should be", and as soon as there was more supply of stuff like that, as soon as the next Merseybeat single came out, they decided they were going to get that in preference to all other kinds of music. And of course, they were choosing the Beatles over every other Merseybeat act. The Beatles were, of course, a great band, and they are still nearly sixty years later the most commercially successful band ever, but so much has focused on what happened once they hit America, and so much time has passed, that it becomes almost impossible to see clearly just how huge they became how quickly in Britain. But they dominated 1963 culturally in the UK in a way that nothing else has before or since.  And the song that cemented that dominance was their next single, "She Loves You": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "She Loves You"] "She Loves You" was another step forward in the group's songwriting, and in the technical aspects of their recording. The group were, at this point, still only recording on two-track machines, but Norman Smith, the engineer, and his assistant Geoff Emerick, came up with a few techniques to make the sound more interesting. In particular, Emerick decided to use separate compressors on the drums and bass, rather than putting them both through the same compressor, and to use an overhead mic on Ringo's drums, which he'd never previously used.  But it was the songwriting itself that was, once again, of most interest. The idea for "She Loves You" came from McCartney, who was particularly inspired by a hit by one of the interchangeable Bobbies, Bobby Rydell, who was in the charts at the time with "Forget Him": [Excerpt: Bobby Rydell, "Forget Him"] McCartney took the idea of having a song be one side of a conversation with someone about their relationship, and decided that it would be an interesting idea to have the song be telling someone else "she loves you", rather than be about the singer's own relationships, as their previous singles had been. Everything up to that point had been centred around the first person addressing the second -- "Love ME Do", "PS I Love You", "Please Please ME", "Ask ME Why", "From ME to You", "Thank You Girl". This would be about addressing the second person about a third. While the song was McCartney's idea, he and Lennon wrote it together, but it was Harrison who added a crucial suggestion -- he came up with the idea that the final "Yeah" at the end of the chorus should be a major sixth instead of a normal chord, and that they should end with that as well: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "She Loves You"] George Martin was not keen on that -- while the Beatles saw it as something exciting and new, something they'd not done before, to Martin it was reminiscent of the 1940s -- both the Andrews Sisters and Glenn Miller would use similar tricks, and it was quite dated even then, being a standard technique of barbershop harmony. But to the Beatles, on the other hand, it didn't matter if other people had done it before, *they'd* not done it before, and while they agreed to try it both ways, Martin eventually agreed that it did sound better the way they were doing it. "She Loves You" took, by the standards of the Beatles in 1963, an inordinately long time to record -- though by today's standards it was ridiculously quick. While they had recorded ten tracks in ten hours for the Please Please Me album, they took six hours in total to record just "She Loves You" and its B-side "I'll Get You". This is partly explained by the fact that Please Please Me consisted of songs they'd been playing every night for years, while John and Paul finished writing "She Loves You" only four days before they went into the studio to record it. The arrangement had to be shaped in the studio -- apparently it was George Martin's idea to start with the chorus -- and there are clear edits in the final version, most audibly just before and after the line "you know it's up to you/I think it's only fair" [Excerpt: The Beatles, "She Loves You"] For those of you who want to see if you can spot the edits, they're most audible on the original CD issue of Past Masters vol. 1 from the eighties -- the later CD versions I have (the 2009 Mono Masters CD and the 2015 reissue of the 1 compilation) have been mastered in a way that makes the edits less obvious. As far as I can tell, there are six audible edit points in the song, even though it's only two minutes twenty-one -- a clear sign that they had to do a lot of studio work to get the song into a releasable shape. That work paid off, though. The single sold half a million advance copies before being released, quickly sold over a million, and became the biggest-selling single in British history -- there wouldn't be another single that sold more until fourteen years later, when Paul McCartney's solo single "Mull of Kintyre" overtook it. While "Please Please Me" and "From Me To You" had been big hits, it was "She Loves You" that caught the cultural moment in the UK. The "Yeah Yeah Yeah" chorus, in particular, caught on in a way few if any cultural phenomena ever had before. The phenomenon known as Beatlemania had, by this point, started in earnest. As the Beatles started their first national tour as headliners, their audiences could no longer hear them playing -- every girl in the audience was screaming at the top of her lungs for the entire performance.  Beatlemania is something that's impossible to explain in conventional terms. While I'm sure everyone listening to this episode has seen at least some of the footage, but for those who haven't, the only way to explain it is to hear the level of the screaming compared to the music. This is from some newsreel footage of the Beatles playing what was then the ABC in Ardwick. It's fascinating because most of the footage of Beatlemania shows gigs in the US at places like Shea Stadium or the Hollywood Bowl -- places where you get enough people that you can understand how they made that much noise. But this is a medium-sized theatre, and having been there many times myself (it's now the Manchester Apollo) I actually can't imagine how a crowd in that venue could make this much noise: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Twist and Shout", Ardwick ABC] I won't be including that on the Mixcloud, by the way, as the noise makes it unlistenable, but the footage can easily be found on YouTube and is worth watching.  After "She Loves You" came their second album, With The Beatles, another album very much along the same lines as the first -- a mixture of Lennon/McCartney songs and covers of records by Black American artists, this time dominated by Motown artists, with versions of "Money", "Please Mr Postman", and the Miracles' "You Really Got A Hold On Me", all with Lennon lead vocals. That went to number one on the album charts, knocking Please Please Me down to number two. "She Loves You", meanwhile, remained at number one for a month, then dropped down into the top three, giving Brian Poole and the Tremeloes and Gerry and the Pacemakers a chance at the top spot, before it returned to number one for a couple of weeks -- the last time a record would go back to number one after dropping off the top until "Bohemian Rhapsody" went back to number one after Freddie Mercury died, nearly thirty years later. But while all this had been going on in Britain, the Beatles had had no success at all in the USA. Capitol, the label that had the right of first refusal for EMI records in the US, had a consistent pattern of turning down almost every British record, on the grounds that there was no market in the US for foreign records. This also meant that any record that EMI tried to license to any other label, that label knew had been turned down by Capitol. So the Beatles' first singles and album were licensed by a small label, VeeJay, who mostly put out soul records but also licensed Frank Ifield's material and had a hit act in The Four Seasons. VeeJay was close to bankruptcy, though, and didn't do any promotion of the Beatles' music. "She Loves You" was put out by an even smaller label, Swan, whose biggest hit act was Freddie "Boom Boom" Cannon. But Brian Epstein and George Martin were convinced that the Beatles could break America, and the group's next single was written specifically with the American audience in mind, and recorded using the unbelievably advanced technology of four-track tape machines -- the first time they'd used anything other than two-track: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "I Want To Hold Your Hand"] "I Want To Hold Your Hand" went to number one in the UK, of course, replacing "She Loves You" -- the only time that an artist would knock themselves off the number one spot until 1981, when John Lennon did it as a solo artist in far more tragic circumstances. At this point, the Beatles had the number one and two spots on the singles chart, the number one and two positions on the album charts, and were at numbers one, two and three on the EP chart.  It would also be the start of Beatlemania in the USA. After the Beatles' famous appearance on the Royal Variety Performance, at the time the most prestigious booking an entertainer could get in the UK, Brian Epstein flew to New York, with a few aims in mind. He brought Billy J. Kramer with him, as he thought that Kramer had some potential as a lounge singer and could maybe get some club work in the US, but mostly he was there to try to persuade Capitol to release "I Want to Hold Your Hand", using the news coverage of Beatlemania as a reason they should pick up on it. By this time, Capitol were running out of excuses. Given the group's popularity was at a different level from any other British artist ever, they had no reason not to release "I Want to Hold Your Hand". They agreed they would put it out on January the thirteenth 1964. [Excerpt: The Beatles, “I Want to Hold Your Hand”] Epstein also had two more meetings while he was in New York. One was with the makers of the Ed Sullivan Show -- Sullivan had been in London and been at the airport when the Beatles had arrived back from a trip abroad, and had seen the response of the crowds there. He was mildly interested in having the group on his show, and he agreed to book them. The other meeting was with Sid Bernstein, a promoter who had been in the UK and was willing to take a gamble on putting the group on at Carnegie Hall. Both of these were major, major bookings for a group who had so far had no commercial success whatsoever in the US, but by this point the Beatles were *so* big in the UK that people were willing to take a chance on them. But it turned out that they weren't taking a chance at all. In November, a CBS journalist had done a quick "look at those wacky Brits" piece to use as a filler in the evening news, including some footage of the Beatles performing "She Loves You". That had originally been intended to be shown on November the 22nd, but with President Kennedy's murder, the news had more important things to cover. It was eventually shown, introduced by Walter Cronkite, on December the tenth. Cronkite's broadcast got the attention of his friend Ed Sullivan, who had already more or less forgotten that he'd booked this British group whose name he couldn't even remember. He phoned Cronkite and asked him about these "Bugs, or whatever they call themselves", and started actually promoting their appearance on his show. At the same time, a fifteen-year-old girl named Marsha Albert in Maryland was very impressed with "She Loves You", after seeing the news report and wrote to a DJ called Carroll James, asking "Why can't we have this music in America?" James got a friend who worked as a flight attendant to bring him a copy of "I Want to Hold Your Hand" on her next return from the UK, and started playing it on December the seventeenth. He played it a *lot*, because the audience loved it and kept calling in for more. Capitol tried to get him to stop playing the record -- they weren't planning on releasing it for another month yet! What was he doing, actually promoting this record?!  Unfortunately for Capitol, by the time they got round to this, DJs at a couple of other stations had heard about the reaction the record was getting, and started playing their own copies as well. Capitol changed the release date, and put the record out early, on December the twenty-sixth. It sold a quarter of a million copies in the first three days. By the week of its originally scheduled release date, it was at number one on the Cashbox chart, and it would hit the same position on Billboard soon after. By the time the Beatles arrived in America for their Ed Sullivan show, it was half-way through a seven-week run at the top of the charts, and only got knocked off the top spot by "She Loves You", which was in its turn knocked off by "Can't Buy Me Love". The Beatles had hit America, and the world of music would never be the same again.

The Jets Zone
The Jets Zone: Daniel Wade, LA Chargers preview (Week 10)

The Jets Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2020 43:56


Boy Green breaks down the latest news with the team: Pierre Desir cut, Pat Elflein acquired, Brian Poole to IR, injury report update, & why Sam Darnold may have played his last down in a New York Jets uniform!Plus Daniel Wade of 'Locked on Chargers' joins the show to preview the game on Sunday, talk relevant storylines, and more!

JetNation Radio - New York Jets Talk.
Sam Darnold Ruled out Again; How Jets can Ruin the Tank

JetNation Radio - New York Jets Talk.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2020 69:00


On this week's episode of JetNation Radio, Glenn and Alex discuss Sam Darnold's health, Joe Flacco getting another start and just how things could go wrong for the tank in the coming weeks.  They'll also cover the release of Pierre Desir, Brian Poole being placed on IR and the health of Mekhi Becton.  They'll also cover the suddenly struggling Seattle Seahawks and what it means for the Jets on draft day along with Jamal Adams trying to shift focus to the Jets while he struggles in Seattle. There's also the addition of former Vikings third-round pick Pat Elflein who was claimed earlier this week   JetNation Radio would like to thank our sponsor MILE Social.  If you need help running your company's social media platforms, pay MILE Social a visit at MILESocia.com.  Whether it's facebook, twiter, instagram or tiktok, MILE Social has got you covered.

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 845 - Jets vs Patriots Postgame Report w/Andy Vasquez

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2020 35:53


Scott Mason talks with Jets beat reporter Andy Vasquez of NorthJersey.com to discuss the Jets' 30-27 loss to the New England Patriots at MetLife Stadium in week 9 of the 2020 NFL season. Andy joins the show to recap the Jets' loss to the Patriots including the Jets playing their best game of the season especially on offense, a strong day for Joe Flacco and the Jets' receivers, an excellent second half for the Patriots which included dominating time of possession, some shining stars on defense including Foley Fatukasi and Harvey Langi, injury updates on Mekhi Becton and Brian Poole, words after the game from Adam Gase, Joe Flacco, and Jamison Crowder in the locker room, and more. Play Like A Jet is a presentation of the Turn on the Jets Digital podcast network…. To advertise on Play Like A Jet, please visit https://www.advertisecast.com/PlayLikeAJet or email Overtime@AdvertiseCast.com   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Live Mic
BYU study on a COVID-19 vaccine

Live Mic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2020 8:38


Dr. Brian Poole, Associate Professor in the microbiology and molecular biology department at BYU, joins Lee to discuss confidence in the COVID-19 vaccine. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Bart and Hahn
Hour 1: #AskHal and Brian Poole

Bart and Hahn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2020 43:40


The guys ask Yankee fans what they want The Michael Kay Show to ask Hal Steinbrenner. Plus, Jets CB Brian Poole joins the show.

Bart and Hahn
Brian Poole

Bart and Hahn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2020 11:42


Jets cornerback Brian Poole joined the show to discuss the Week 5 loss to the Cardinals and preview Week 6 against the Dolphins.

Ray Collins' Podcast
RNI Time Trip - Ray Collins (Oct 1963)

Ray Collins' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2020 60:01


Music & Memories (Oct 63) Radio Northsea International (online Sat 7pm UK time) music from: Drifters, Ray Charles, Beatles, Brian Poole & The Tremeloes, Elvis Presley, Tommy Roe, Adam Faith and more...

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 100: "Love Me Do" by the Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2020 93:27


This week there are two episiodes of the podcast going up, both of them longer than normal. This one, episode one hundred, is the hundredth-episode special and is an hour and a half long. It looks at the early career of the Beatles, and at the three recordings of "Love Me Do". Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on "Misirlou" by Dick Dale and the Deltones. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ ----more---- Resources No Mixclouds this week, as both episodes have far too many songs by one artist. The mixclouds will be back with episode 101. While there are many books on the Beatles, and I have read dozens of them, only one needs to be mentioned as a reference for this episode (others will be used for others). All These Years Vol 1: Tune In by Mark Lewisohn is simply the *only* book worth reading on the Beatles' career up to the end of 1962. It is the most detailed, most accurate, biography imaginable, and the gold standard by which all other biographies of musicians should be measured. I only wish volumes two and three were available already so I could not expect my future episodes on the Beatles to be obsolete when they do come out. There are two versions of the book -- a nine-hundred page mass-market version and a 1700-page expanded edition. I recommend the latter. The information in this podcast is almost all from Lewisohn's book, but I must emphasise that the opinions are mine, and so are any errors -- Lewisohn's book only has one error that I'm aware of (a joke attributed to the comedian Jasper Carrott in a footnote that has since been traced to an earlier radio show). I am only mortal, and so have doubtless misunderstood or oversimplified things and introduced errors where he had none.   The single version of "Love Me Do" can be found on Past Masters, a 2-CD compilation of the Beatles' non-album tracks that includes the majority of their singles and B-sides. The version with Andy White playing on can be found on Please Please Me. The version with Pete Best, and many of the other early tracks used here, is on Anthology 1.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Errata I pronounce the name of Lewisohn's book as "All Those Years" instead of "All These Years". I say " The Jets hadn't liked playing at Williams' club" at one point. I meant "at Koschmider's club"   Transcript   The Beatles came closer than most people realise to never making a record. Until the publication of Mark Lewisohn's seminal biography All These Years vol 1: Tune In, in 2013 everyone thought they knew the true story -- John met Paul at Woolton Village Fete in 1957, and Paul joined the Quarrymen, who later became the Beatles. They played Hamburg and made a demo, and after the Beatles' demo was turned down by Decca, their manager Brian Epstein shopped it around every record label without success, until finally George Martin heard the potential in it and signed them to Parlophone, a label which was otherwise known for comedy records. Martin was, luckily, the one producer in the whole of the UK who could appreciate the Beatles' music, and he signed them up, and the rest was history. The problem is, as Lewisohn showed, that's not what happened. Today I'm going to tell, as best I can the story of how the Beatles actually became the band that they became, and how they got signed to EMI records. I'm going to tell you the story of "Love Me Do": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Love Me Do (single version)"] As I mentioned at the beginning, this episode owes a *huge* debt to Mark Lewisohn's book. I like to acknowledge my sources, anyway, but I've actually had difficulty with this episode because Lewisohn's book is *so* detailed, *so* full, and written *so* well that much of the effort in writing this episode came from paring down the information, rather than finding more, and from reworking things so I was not just paraphrasing bits of his writing. Normally I rely on many sources, and integrate the material myself, but Lewisohn has done all that work far better than any other biographer of any other musician. Were the Beatles not such an important part of music history, I would just skip this episode because there is nothing for me to add. As it is, I *obviously* have to cover this, but I almost feel like I'm cheating in doing so. If you find this episode interesting at all, please do yourself a favour and buy that book.  This episode is going to be a long one -- much longer than normal. I won't know the precise length until after I've recorded and edited it, of course, but I'm guessing it's going to be about ninety minutes. This is the hundredth episode, the end of the second year of the podcast, the end of the second book based on the podcast, and the introduction of the single most important band in the whole story, so I'm going to stretch out a bit. I should also mention that there are a couple of discussions of sudden, traumatic, deaths in this episode. With all that said, settle in, this is going to take a while. Every British act we've looked at so far -- and many of those we're going to look at in the next year or two -- was based in London. Either they grew up there, or they moved there before their musical career really took off. The Beatles, during the time we're covering in this episode, were based in Liverpool. While they did eventually move to London, it wasn't until after they'd started having hits. And what listeners from outside the UK might not realise is what that means in terms of attitudes and perceptions. Liverpool is a large city -- it currently has a population of around half a million, and the wider Liverpool metropolitan area is closer to two million -- but like all British cities other than London, it was regarded largely as a joke in the British media, and so in return the people of Liverpool had a healthy contempt for London. To give Americans some idea of how London dominates in Britain, and thus how it's thought of outside London, imagine that New York, Washington DC, and Los Angeles were all the same city -- that the financial, media, and political centres of the country were all the same place. Now further imagine that Silicon Valley and all the Ivy League universities were half an hour's drive from that city. Now, imagine how much worse the attitudes that that city would have about so-called "flyover states" would be, and imagine in return how people in large Midwestern cities like Detroit or Chicago would think about that big city.  In this analogy, Liverpool is Detroit, and like Detroit, it was very poor and had produced a few famous musicians, most notably Billy Fury, who was from an impoverished area of Liverpool called the Dingle: [Excerpt: Billy Fury, "Halfway to Paradise"] But Fury had, of course, moved to London to have his career. That's what you did. But in general, Liverpool, if people in London thought of it at all, was thought of as a provincial backwater full of poor people, many of them Irish, and all of them talking with a ridiculous accent. Liverpool was ignored by London, and that meant that things could develop there out of sight. The story of the Beatles starts in the 1950s, with two young men in their mid-teens. John Winston Lennon was born in 1940, and had had a rather troubled childhood. His father had been a merchant seaman who had been away in the war, and his parents' relationship had deteriorated for that and other reasons. As a result, Lennon had barely known his father, and when his mother met another man, Lennon's aunt, Mary Smith, who he always called Mimi, had taken him in, believing that his mother "living in sin" would be a bad influence on the young boy. The Smith family were the kind of lower middle class family that seemed extremely rich to the impoverished families in Liverpool, but were not well off by any absolute standard. Mimi, in particular, was torn between two very different urges. On one hand, she had strongly bohemian, artistic, urges -- as did all of her sisters. She was a voracious reader, and a lover of art history, and encouraged these tendencies in John. But at the same time, she was of that class which has a little status, but not much security, and so she was extremely wary of the need to appear respectable. This tension between respectability and rebellion was something that would appear in many of the people who Lennon later worked with, such as Brian Epstein and George Martin, and it was something that Lennon would always respond to -- those people would be the only ones who Lennon would ever view as authority figures he could respect, though he would also resent them at times. And it might be that combination of rebellion and respectability that Lennon saw in Paul McCartney. McCartney was from a family who, in the Byzantine world of the British class system of the time, were a notch or so lower than the Smith family who raised Lennon, but he was academically bright, and his family had big plans for him -- they thought that it might even be possible that he might become a teacher if he worked very hard at school. McCartney was a far less openly rebellious person than Lennon was, but he was still just as caught up in the music and fashions of the mid-fifties that his father associated with street gangs and hooliganism. Lennon, like many teenagers in Britain at the time, had had his life changed when he first heard Elvis Presley, and he had soon become a rock and roll obsessive -- Elvis was always his absolute favourite, but he also loved Little Richard, who he thought was almost as good, and he admired Buddy Holly, who had a special place in Lennon's heart as Holly wore glasses on stage, something that Lennon, who was extremely short-sighted, could never bring himself to do, but which at least showed him that it was a possibility. Lennon was, by his mid-teens, recreating a relationship with his mother, and one of the things they bonded over was music -- she taught him how to play the banjo, and together they worked out the chords to "That'll Be the Day", and Lennon later switched to the guitar, playing banjo chords on five of the six strings.  Like many, many, teenagers of the time, Lennon also formed a skiffle group, which he called the Quarrymen, after a line in his school song. The group tended to have a rotating lineup, but Lennon was the unquestioned leader. The group had a repertoire consisting of the same Lonnie Donegan songs that every other skiffle group was playing, plus any Elvis and Buddy Holly songs that could sound reasonable with a lineup of guitars, teachest bass, and washboard. The moment that changed the history of the music, though, came on July the sixth, 1957, when Ivan Vaughan, a friend of Lennon's, invited his friend Paul McCartney to go and see the Quarry Men perform at Woolton Village Fete. That day has gone down in history as "the day John met Paul", although Mark Lewisohn has since discovered that Lennon and McCartney had briefly met once before. It is, though, the day on which Lennon and McCartney first impressed each other musically. McCartney talks about being particularly impressed that the Quarry Men's lead singer was changing the lyrics to the songs he was performing, making up new words when he forgot the originals -- he says in particular that he remembers Lennon singing "Come Go With Me" by the Del-Vikings: [Excerpt: The Del-Vikings, "Come Go With Me"] McCartney remembers Lennon as changing the lyrics to "come go with me, right down to the penitentiary", and thinking that was clever. Astonishingly, some audio recording actually exists of the Quarry Men's second performance that day -- they did two sets, and this second one comes just after Lennon met McCartney rather than just before. The recording only seems to exist in a very fragmentary form, which has snatches of Lennon singing "Baby Let's Play House" and Lonnie Donegan's hit "Puttin' on the Style", which was number one on the charts at the time, but that even those fragments have survived, given how historic a day this was, is almost miraculous: [Excerpt: The Quarrymen, "Puttin' on the Style"] After the first set, Lennon met McCartney, who was nearly two years younger, but a more accomplished musician -- for a start, he knew how to tune the guitar with all six strings, and to proper guitar tuning, rather than tuning five strings like a banjo. Lennon and his friends were a little nonplussed by McCartney holding his guitar upside-down at first -- McCartney is left-handed -- but despite having an upside-down guitar with the wrong tuning, McCartney managed to bash out a version of Eddie Cochran's "Twenty-Flight Rock", a song he would often perform in later decades when reminding people of this story: [Excerpt: Paul McCartney, "Twenty-Flight Rock"] This was impressive to Lennon for three reasons. The first was that McCartney was already a strong, confident performer -- he perhaps seemed a little more confident than he really was, showing off in front of the bigger boys like this. The second was that "Twenty-Flight Rock" was a moderately obscure song -- it hadn't charted, but it *had* appeared in The Girl Can't Help It, a film which every rock and roll lover in Britain had watched at the cinema over and over. Choosing that song rather than, say, "Be-Bop-A-Lula", was a way of announcing a kind of group affiliation -- "I am one of you, I am a real rock and roll fan, not just a casual listener to what's in the charts". I stress that second point because it's something that's very important in the history of the Beatles generally -- they were *music fans*, and often fans of relatively obscure records. That's something that bound Lennon and McCartney, and later the other members, together from the start, and something they always noted about other musicians. They weren't the kind of systematic scholars who track down rare pressings and memorise every session musician's name, but they were constantly drawn to find the best new music, and to seek it out wherever they could. But the most impressive thing for Lennon -- and one that seems a little calculated on McCartney's part, though he's never said that he thought about this that I'm aware of -- was that this was an extremely wordy song, and McCartney *knew all the words*. Remember that McCartney had noticed Lennon forgetting the words to a song with lyrics as simple as "come, come, come, come, come into my heart/Tell me darling we will never part", and here's McCartney singing this fast-paced, almost patter song, and getting the words right.  From the beginning, McCartney was showing how he could complement Lennon -- if Lennon could impress McCartney by improvising new lyrics when he forgot the old ones, then McCartney could impress Lennon by remembering the lyrics that Lennon couldn't -- and by writing them down for Lennon, sharing his knowledge freely. McCartney went on to show off more, and in particular impressed Lennon by going to a piano and showing off his Little Richard imitation. Little Richard was the only serious rival to Elvis in Lennon's affections, and McCartney could do a very decent imitation of him. This was someone special, clearly. But this put Lennon in a quandary. McCartney was clearly far, far, better than any of the Quarry Men -- at least Lennon's equal, and light years ahead of the rest of them. Lennon had a choice -- invite this young freak of nature into his band, and improve the band dramatically, but no longer be the unquestioned centre of the group, or remain in absolute control but not have someone in the group who *knew the words* and *knew how to tune a guitar*, and other such magical abilities that no mere mortals had. Those who only know of Lennon from his later reputation as a massive egoist would be surprised, but he decided fairly quickly that he had to make the group better at his own expense. He invited McCartney to join the group, and McCartney said yes. Over the next few months the membership of the Quarry Men changed. They'd been formed while they were all at Quarry Bank Grammar School, but that summer Lennon moved on to art school. I'm going to have to talk about the art school system, and the British education system of the fifties and early sixties a lot over the next few months, but here's an extremely abbreviated and inaccurate version that's good enough for now. Between the ages of eleven and sixteen, people in Britain -- at least those without extremely rich parents, who had a different system -- went to two kinds of school depending on the result of an exam they took aged eleven, which was based on some since-discredited eugenic research about children's potential. If you passed the exam, you were considered academically apt, and went to a grammar school, which was designed to filter you through to university and the professions. If you failed the exam, you went to a secondary modern, which was designed to give you the skills to get a trade and make a living working with your hands. And for the most part, people followed the pipeline that was set up for them. You go to grammar school, go to university, become a lawyer or a doctor or a teacher. You go to secondary modern, leave school at fourteen, become a plumber or a builder or a factory worker. But there are always those people who don't properly fit into the neat categories that the world tries to put them in. And for people in their late teens and early twenties, people who'd been through the school system but not been shaped properly by it, there was another option at this time. If you were bright and creative, but weren't suited for university because you'd failed your exams, you could go to art school. The supposed purpose of the art schools was to teach people to do commercial art, and they would learn skills like lettering and basic draughtsmanship. But what the art schools really did was give creative people space to explore ideas, to find out about areas of art and culture that would otherwise have been closed to them. Keith Richards, Pete Townshend, Ian Dury, Ray Davies, Bryan Ferry, Syd Barrett, and many more people we'll be seeing over the course of this story went to art school, and as David Bowie would put it later, the joke at the time was that you went to art school to learn to play blues guitar. With Lennon and his friends all moving on from the school that had drawn them together, the group stabilised for a time on a lineup of Lennon, McCartney, Colin Hanton, Len Garry, and Eric Griffiths. But the first time this version of the group played live, while McCartney sang well, he totally fluffed his lead guitar lines on stage. While there were three guitarists in the band at this point, they needed someone who could play lead fluently and confidently on stage. Enter George Harrison, who had suddenly become a close friend of McCartney. Harrison went to the same school as McCartney -- a grammar school called the Liverpool Institute, but was in the year below McCartney, and so the two had always been a bit distant. However, at the same time as Lennon was moving on to art school after failing his exams, McCartney was being kept back a year for failing Latin -- which his father always thought was deliberate, so he wouldn't have to go to university. Now he was in the same year at school as Harrison, and they started hanging out together. The two bonded strongly over music, and would do things like take a bus journey to another part of town, where someone lived who they heard owned a copy of "Searchin'" by the Coasters: [Excerpt: The Coasters, "Searchin'"] The two knocked on this stranger's door, asked if he'd play them this prized record, and he agreed -- and then they stole it from him as they left his house. Another time they took the bus to another part of town again, because they'd heard that someone in that part of town knew how to play a B7 chord on his guitar, and sat there as he showed them. So now the Quarrymen needed a lead guitarist, McCartney volunteered his young mate. There are a couple of stories about how Harrison came to join the band -- apparently he auditioned for Lennon at least twice, because Lennon was very unsure about having such a young kid in his band -- but the story I like best is that Harrison took his guitar to a Quarry Men gig at Wilson Hall -- he'd apparently often take his guitar to gigs and just see if he could sit in with the bands. On the bill with the Quarry Men was another group, the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group, who were generally regarded as the best skiffle band in Liverpool. Lennon told Harrison that he could join the band if he could play as well as Clayton, and Harrison took out his guitar and played "Raunchy": [Excerpt: Bill Justis, "Raunchy"] I like this story rather than the other story that the members would tell later -- that Harrison played "Raunchy" on a bus for Lennon -- for one reason. The drummer in the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group was one Richy Starkey, and if it happened that way, the day that George joined the Quarry Men was also the day that John, Paul, George, and Ringo were all in the same place for the first time. George looked up to John and essentially idolised him, though Lennon thought of him as a little annoying at times -- he'd follow John everywhere, and not take a hint when he wasn't wanted sometimes, just eager to be with his big cool new mate. But despite this tiny bit of tension, John, Paul, and George quickly became a solid unit -- helped by the fact that the school that Paul and George went to was part of the same complex of buildings as Lennon's art college, so they'd all get the bus there and back together.  George was not only younger, he was a notch or two further down the social class ladder than John or Paul, and he spoke more slowly, which made him seem less intelligent. He came from Speke, which was a rougher area, and he would dress even more like a juvenile delinquent than the others. Meanwhile, Len Garry and Eric Griffiths left the group -- Len Garry because he became ill and had to spend time in hospital, and anyway they didn't really need a teachest bass. What they did need was an electric bass, and since they had four guitars now they tried to persuade Eric to get one, but he didn't want to pay that much money, and he was always a little on the outside of the main three members, as he didn't share their sense of humour. So the group got Nigel Walley, who was acting as the group's manager, to fire him. The group was now John, Paul, and George all on guitars, and Colin Hanton on drums. Sometimes, if they played a venue that had a piano, they'd also bring along a schoolfriend of Paul's, John "Duff" Lowe, to play piano. Meanwhile, the group were growing in other ways. Both John and Paul had started writing songs, together and apart. McCartney seems to have been the first, writing a song called "I Lost My Little Girl" which he would eventually record more than thirty years later: [Excerpt: Paul McCartney, "I Lost My Little Girl"] Lennon's first song likewise sang about a little girl, this time being "Hello, Little Girl". By the middle of 1958, this five-piece group was ready to cut their first record -- at a local studio that would cut a single copy of a disc for you. They went into this studio at some time around July 1958, and recorded two songs. The first was their version of "That'll Be the Day": [Excerpt: The Quarry Men, "That'll be the Day"] The B-side was a song that McCartney had written, with a guitar solo that George had come up with, so the label credit read "McCartney/Harrison". "In Spite of All the Danger" seems to have been inspired by Elvis' "Trying to Get to You": [Excerpt: Elvis Presley, "Trying to Get to You"] It's a rough song, but a good attempt for a teenager who had only just started writing songs: [Excerpt: The Quarry Men, "In Spite of All the Danger"] Apparently Lowe and Hanton hadn't heard the song before they started playing, but they make a decent enough fist of it in the circumstances. Lennon took the lead even though it was McCartney's song -- he said later "I was such a bully in those days I didn’t even let Paul sing his own song." That was about the last time that this lineup of Quarry Men played together. In July, the month that seems likely for the recording, Lowe finished at the Liverpool Institute, and so he drifted away from McCartney and Harrison. Meanwhile Hanton had a huge row with the others after a show, and they fell out and never spoke again. The Quarry Men were reduced to a trio of Lennon, McCartney, and Harrison. But -- possibly the very day after that recording if an unreliable plaque at the studio where they recorded it is to be believed -- something happened which was to have far more impact on the group than the drummer leaving. John Lennon's mother, with whom he'd slowly been repairing his relationship, had called round to visit Mimi. She left the house, and bumped into Nigel Walley, who was calling round to see John. She told him he wasn't there, and that he could walk with her to the bus stop. They walked a little while, then went off in different directions. Walley heard a thump and turned round -- Julia Lennon had been hit by a car and killed instantly. As you can imagine, John's mother dying caused him a huge amount of distress, but it also gave him a bond with McCartney, whose own mother had died of cancer shortly before they met. Neither really spoke about it to each other, and to the extent they did it was with ultra-cynical humour -- but the two now shared something deeper than just the music, even though the music itself was deep enough. Lennon became a much harder, nastier, person after this, at least for a time, his natural wit taking on a dark edge, and he would often drink too much and get aggressive. But life still went on, and John, Paul, and George kept trying to perform -- though the gigs dried up, and they didn't have a drummer any more. They'd just say "the rhythm's in the guitars" when asked why they didn't have one. They were also no longer the Quarry Men -- they didn't have a name. At one point late in the year, they also only had two guitars between the three of them -- Lennon seems to have smashed his in a fit of fury after his mother's death. But he stole one backstage at a talent contest, and soon they were back to having three. That talent show was one run by Carroll Levis, who we talked about before in the episode on "Shakin' All Over". The three boys went on Levis' show, this time performing as Johnny & The Moondogs --  in Manchester, at the Hippodrome in Ancoats, singing Buddy Holly's "Think it Over": [Excerpt: The Crickets, "Think it Over"] Lennon sang lead with his arms draped over the shoulders of Paul and George, who sang backing vocals and played guitar. They apparently did quite well, but had to leave before the show finished to get the last train back to Liverpool, and so never found out whether the audience would have made them the winner, with the possibility of a TV appearance. They did well enough, though, to impress a couple of other young lads on the bill, two Manchester singers named Allan Clarke and Graham Nash. But in general, the Japage Three, a portmanteau of their names that they settled on as their most usual group name at this point, played very little in 1959 -- indeed, George spent much of the early part of the year moonlighting in the Les Stewart Quartet, another group, though he still thought of Lennon and McCartney as his musical soulmates; the Les Stewart Quartet were just a gig.  The three of them would spend much of their time at the Jacaranda, a coffee bar opened by a Liverpool entrepreneur, Allan Williams, in imitation of the 2is, which was owned by a friend of his. Lennon was also spending a lot of time with an older student at his art school, Stuart Sutcliffe, one of the few people in the world that Lennon himself looked up to. The Les Stewart Quartet would end up indirectly being key to the Beatles' development, because after one of their shows at a local youth club they were approached by a woman named Mona Best. Mona's son Pete liked to go to the youth club, but she was fairly protective of him, and also wanted him to have more friends -- he was a quiet boy who didn't make friends easily. So she'd hit upon a plan -- she'd open her own club in her cellar, since the Best family were rich enough to have a big house. If there was a club *in Pete's house* he'd definitely make lots of friends. They needed a band, and she asked the Les Stewart Quartet if they'd like to be the resident band at this new club, the Casbah, and also if they'd like to help decorate it.  They said yes, but then Paul and George went on a hitch-hiking holiday around Wales for a few days, and George didn't get back in time to play a gig the quartet had booked. Ken Brown, the other guitarist, didn't turn up either, and Les Stewart got into a rage and split the group. Suddenly, the Casbah had no group -- George and Ken were willing to play, but neither was a lead singer -- and no decorators either. So George roped in John and Paul, who helped decorate the place, and with the addition of Ken Brown, the group returned to the Quarry Men name for their regular Saturday night gig at the Casbah. The group had no bass player or drummer, and they all kept pestering everyone they knew to get a bass or a drum kit, but nobody would bite. But then Stuart Sutcliffe got half a painting in an exhibition put on by John Moores, the millionaire owner of Littlewoods, who was a big patron of the arts in Liverpool. I say he got half a painting in the exhibition, because the painting was done on two large boards -- Stuart and his friends took the first half of the painting down to the gallery, went back to get the other half, and got distracted by the pub and never brought it. But Moores was impressed enough with the abstract painting that he bought it at the end of the exhibition's run, for ninety pounds -- about two thousand pounds in today's money. And so Stuart's friends gave him a choice -- he could either buy a bass or a drum kit, either would be fine. He chose the bass. But the same week that Stuart joined, Ken Brown was out, and they lost their gig at the Casbah. John, Paul, George and Ken had turned up one Saturday, and Ken hadn't felt well, so instead of performing he just worked on the door. At the end of the show, Mona Best insisted on giving Ken an equal share of the money, as agreed. John, Paul, and George wouldn't stand for that, and so Ken was out of the group, and they were no longer playing for Mona Best. Stuart joining the group caused tensions -- George was fine with him, thinking that a bass player who didn't yet know how to play was better than no bass player at all, but Paul was much less keen. Partly this was because he thought the group needed to get better, which would be hard with someone who couldn't play, but also he was getting jealous of Sutcliffe's closeness to Lennon, especially when the two became flatmates. But John wanted him in the group, and what John wanted, he got. There are recordings of the group around this time that circulate -- only one has been released officially, a McCartney instrumental called "Cayenne", but the others are out there if you look: [Excerpt: The Quarry Men, "Cayenne"] The gigs had dried up again, but they did have one new advantage -- they now had a name they actually liked. John and Stuart had come up with it, inspired by Buddy Holly's Crickets. They were going to be Beatles, with an a. Shortly after the Beatles' first appearance under that name, at the art school student union, came the Liverpool gig which was to have had Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent headlining, before Cochran died. A lot of Liverpool groups were booked to play on the bill there, but not the Beatles -- though Richy Starkey was going to play the gig, with his latest group Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. Allan Williams, the local promoter, added extra groups to fill out the bill, including Gerry and the Pacemakers, and suddenly everyone who loved rock and roll in Liverpool realised that there were others out there like them. Overnight, a scene had been born. And where there's a scene, there's money to be made. Larry Parnes, who had been the national promoter of the tour, was at the show and realised that there were a lot of quite proficient musicians in Liverpool. And it so happened that he needed backing bands for three of his artists who were going on tour, separately -- two minor stars, Duffy Power and Johnny Gentle, and one big star, Billy Fury. And both Gentle and Fury were from Liverpool themselves. So Parnes asked Allan Williams to set up auditions with some of the local groups. Williams invited several groups, and one he asked along was the Beatles, largely because Lennon and Sutcliffe begged him. He also found them a drummer, Tommy Moore, who was a decade older than the rest of them -- though Moore didn't turn up to the audition because he had to work, and so Johnny "Hutch" Hutchinson of Cass and the Cassanovas sat in with them, much to Hutch's disgust -- he hated the Beatles, and especially Lennon.  Cass of the Cassanovas also insisted that "the Beatles" was a stupid name, and that the group needed to be Something and the Somethings, and he suggested Long John and the Silver Beatles, and that stuck for a couple of shows before they reverted to their proper name. The Beatles weren't chosen for any of the main tours that were being booked, but then Parnes phoned Williams up -- there were some extra dates on the Johnny Gentle tour that he hadn't yet booked a group for. Could Williams find him a band who could be in Scotland that Friday night for a nine-day tour? Williams tried Cass and the Cassanovas, Rory Storm and the Hurricanes, and Gerry and the Pacemakers, but none of them could go on tour at such short notice. They all had gigs booked, or day jobs they had to book time off with. The Beatles had no gigs booked, and only George had a day job, and he didn't mind just quitting that. They were off to Scotland. They were so inspired by being on tour with a Larry Parnes artist that most of them took on new names just like those big stars -- George became Carl Harrison, after Carl Perkins, Stuart became Stuart de Staël, after his favourite painter, and Paul became Paul Ramon, which he thought sounded mysterious and French. There's some question about whether John took on a new name -- some sources have him becoming "Long John", while others say he was "Johnny" Lennon rather than John. Tommy Moore, meanwhile, was just Thomas Moore. It was on this tour, of course, that Lennon helped Johnny Gentle write "I've Just Fallen For Someone", which we talked about last week: [Excerpt: Darren Young, "I've Just Fallen For Someone"] The tour was apparently fairly miserable, with horrible accommodation, poor musicianship from the group, and everyone getting on everyone's nerves -- George and Stuart got into fistfights, John bullied Stuart a bit because of his poor playing, and John particularly didn't get on well with Moore -- a man who was a decade older, didn't share their taste in music, and worked in a factory rather than having the intellectual aspirations of the group. The two hated each other by the end of the tour. But the tour did also give the group the experience of signing autographs, and of feeling like stars in at least a minor way. When they got back to Liverpool, George moved in with John and Stuart, to get away from his mum telling him to get a proper job, and they got a few more bookings thanks to Williams, but they soon became drummerless -- they turned up to a gig one time to find that Tommy Moore wasn't there. They went round to his house, and his wife shouted from an upstairs window, "Yez can piss off, he's had enough of yez and gone back to work at the bottle factory". The now four-piece group carried on, however, and recordings exist of them in this period, sounding much more professional than only a few months before, including performances of some of their own songs. The most entertaining of these is probably "You'll Be Mine", an Ink Spots parody with some absurd wordplay from Lennon: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "You'll Be Mine"] Soon enough the group found another drummer, Norm Chapman, and carried on as before, getting regular bookings thanks to Williams. There was soon a temporary guest at the flat John, Stuart, and George shared with several other people -- Royston Ellis, the Beat poet and friend of the Shadows, had turned up in Liverpool and latched on to the group, partly because he fancied George. He performed with them a couple of times, crashed at the flat, and provided them with two formative experiences -- he gave them their first national press, talking in Record and Show Mirror about how he wanted them to be his full-time group, and he gave them their first drug experience, showing them how to get amphetamines out of inhalers. While the group's first national press was positive, there was soon some very negative press indeed associated with them. A tabloid newspaper wanted to do a smear story about the dangerous Beatnik menace. The article talked about how "they revel in filth", and how beatniks were "a dangerous menace to our young people… a corrupting influence of drug addicts and peddlers, degenerates who specialise in obscene orgies". And for some reason -- it's never been made clear exactly how -- the beatnik "pad" they chose to photograph for this story was the one that John, Stuart, and George lived in, though they weren't there at the time -- several of their friends and associates are in the pictures though. They were all kicked out of their flat, and moved back in with their families, and around this time they lost Chapman from the group too -- he was called up to do his National Service, one of the last people to be conscripted before conscription ended for good. They were back to a four-piece again, and for a while Paul was drumming. But then, as seems to have happened so often with this group, a bizarre coincidence happened. A while earlier, Allan Williams had travelled to Hamburg, with the idea of trying to get Liverpool groups booked there. He'd met up with Bruno Koschmider, the owner of a club called the Kaiserkeller. Koschmider had liked the idea, but nothing had come of it, partly because neither could speak the other's language well. A little while later, Koschmider had remembered the idea and come over to the UK to find musicians. He didn't remember where Williams was from, so of course he went to London, to the 2is, and there he found a group of musicians including Tony Sheridan, who we talked about back in the episode on "Brand New Cadillac", the man who'd been Vince Taylor's lead guitarist and had a minor solo career: [Excerpt: Tony Sheridan, "Why?"] Sheridan was one of the most impressive musicians in Britain, but he also wanted to skip the country -- he'd just bought a guitar on credit in someone else's name, and he also had a wife and six-month-old baby he wanted rid of. He eagerly went off with Koschmider, and a scratch group called the Jets soon took up residence at the Kaiserkeller. Meanwhile, in Liverpool, Derry and the Seniors were annoyed. Larry Parnes had booked them for a tour, but then he'd got annoyed at the unprofessionalism of the Liverpool bands he was booking and cancelled the booking, severing his relationship with Williams. The Seniors wanted to know what Williams was going to do about it.  There was no way to get them enough gigs in Liverpool, so Williams, being a thoroughly decent man who had a sense of obligation, offered to drive the group down to London to see if they could get work there. He took them to the 2is, and they were allowed to get up and play there, since Williams was a friend of the owner. And Bruno Koschmider was there. The Jets hadn't liked playing at Williams' club, and they'd scarpered to another one with better working conditions, which they helped get off the ground and renamed the Top Ten, after Vince Taylor's club in London. So Bruno had come back to find another group, and there in the same club at the same time was the man who'd given him the idea in the first place, with a group. Koschmider immediately signed up Derry and the Seniors to play at the Kaiserkeller.  Meanwhile, the best gig the Beatles could get, also through Williams, was backing a stripper, where they played whatever instrumentals they knew, no matter how inappropriate, things like the theme from The Third Man: [Excerpt: Anton Karas, "Theme from The Third Man"] A tune guaranteed to get the audience into a sexy mood, I'm sure you'll agree. But then Allan Williams got a call from Koschmider. Derry and the Seniors were doing great business, and he'd decided to convert another of his clubs to be a rock and roll club. Could Williams have a group for him by next Friday? Oh, and it needed to be five people. Williams tried Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. They were busy. He tried Cass and the Cassanovas. They were busy. He tried Gerry and the Pacemakers. They were busy. Finally, he tried the Beatles. They weren't busy, and said yes they could go to Hamburg that week. There were a few minor issues, like there not being five of them, none of them having passports, and them not having a drummer. The passports could be sorted quickly -- there's a passport office in Liverpool -- but the lack of a fifth Beatle was more of a problem. In desperation, they turned eventually to Pete Best, Mrs. Best's son, because they knew he had a drum kit. He agreed.  Allan Williams drove the group to Hamburg, and they started playing six-hour sets every night at the Indra, not finishing til three in the morning, at which point they'd make their way to their lodgings -- the back of a filthy cinema.  By this time, the Beatles had already got good -- Howie Casey, of Derry and the Seniors, who'd remembered the Beatles as being awful at the Johnny Gentle audition, came over to see them and make fun of them, but found that they were far better than they had been. But playing six hours a night got them *very* good *very* quickly -- especially as they decided that they weren't going to play the same song twice in a night, meaning they soon built up a vast repertoire. But right from the start, there was a disconnect between Pete Best and the other four -- they socialised together, and he went off on his own. He was also a weak player -- he was only just starting to learn -- and so the rest of the group would stamp their feet to keep him in time. That, though, also gave them a bit more of a stage act than they might otherwise have had. There are lots of legendary stories about the group's time in Hamburg, and it's impossible to sort fact from fiction, and the bits we can sort out would get this podcast categorised as adult content, but they were teenagers, away from home for a long period for the first time, living in a squalid back room in the red light district of a city with a reputation for vice. I'm sure whatever you imagine is probably about right. After a relatively short time, they were moved from the Indra, which had to stop putting on rock and roll shows, to the Kaiserkeller, where they shared the bill with Rory Storm & the Hurricanes, up to that point considered Liverpool's best band. There's a live recording of the Hurricanes from 1960, which shows that they were certainly powerful: [Excerpt: Rory Storm and the Hurricanes, "Brand New Cadillac"] That recording doesn't have the Hurricanes' normal drummer on, who was sick for that show. But compared to what the Beatles had become -- a stomping powerhouse with John Lennon, whose sense of humour was both cruel and pointed, doing everything he could to get a rise out of the audience -- they were left in the dust. A letter home that George Harrison wrote sums it up -- "Rory Storm & the Hurricanes came out here the other week, and they are crumby. He does a bit of dancing around but it still doesn’t make up for his phoney group. The only person who is any good in the group is the drummer." That drummer was Richy Starkey from the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group, now performing as Ringo Starr. They struck up a friendship, and even performed together at least once -- John, Paul, George, and Ringo acting as the backing group for Lu Walters of the Hurricanes on a demo, which is frustratingly missing and hasn't been heard since. They were making other friends, too. There was Tony Sheridan, who they'd seen on TV, but who would now sometimes jam with them as equals. And there was a trio of arty bohemian types who had stumbled across the club, where they were very out of place -- Astrid Kirscherr, Klaus Voormann, and Jurgen Vollmer. They all latched on to the Beatles, and especially to Stuart, who soon started dating Astrid, despite her speaking no English and him speaking no German. But relations between Koschmider and the Beatles had worsened, and he reported to the police that George, at only seventeen, was under-age. George got deported. The rest of the group decided to move over to the Top Ten Club, and as a parting gift, Paul and Pete nailed some condoms to their bedroom wall and set fire to them. Koschmider decided to report this to the police as attempted arson, and those two were deported as well. John followed a week later, while Stuart stayed in Hamburg for a while, to spend more time with Astrid, who he planned to marry. The other four regrouped, getting in a friend, Chas Newby, as a temporary bass player while Stuart was away. And on the twenty-seventh of December, 1960, when they played Litherland Town Hall, they changed the Liverpool music scene. They were like nothing anyone had ever seen, and the audience didn't dance -- they just rushed to the stage, to be as close to the performance as possible. The Beatles had become the best band in Liverpool. Mark Lewisohn goes further, and suggests that the three months of long nights playing different songs in Hamburg had turned them into the single most experienced rock band *in the world* -- which seems vanishingly unlikely to me, but Lewisohn is not a man given to exaggeration. By this time, Mona Best had largely taken over the group's bookings, and there were a lot of them, as well as a regular spot at the Casbah. Neil Aspinall, a friend of Pete's, started driving them to gigs, while they also had a regular MC, Bob Wooler, who ran many local gigs, and who gave the Beatles their own theme music -- he'd introduce them with the fanfare from Rossini's William Tell Overture: [Excerpt: Rossini, "William Tell Overture"] Stuart came over from Hamburg in early January, and once again the Beatles were a five-piece -- and by now, he could play quite well, well enough, at any rate, that it didn't destroy the momentum the group had gathered. The group were getting more and more bookings, including the venue that would become synonymous with them, the Cavern, a tiny little warehouse cellar that had started as a jazz club, and that the Quarry Men had played once a couple of years earlier, but had been banned from for playing too much rock and roll. Now, the Beatles were getting bookings at the Cavern's lunchtime sessions, and that meant more than it seemed. Most of the gigs they played otherwise were on the outskirts of the city, but the Cavern was in the city centre. And that meant that for the lunchtime sessions, commuters from outside the city were coming to see them -- which meant that the group got fans from anywhere within commuting distance, fans who wanted them to play in their towns. Meanwhile, the group were branching out musically -- they were particularly becoming fascinated by the new R&B, soul, and girl-group records that were coming out in the US. After already having loved "Money" by Barrett Strong, John was also obsessed with the Miracles, and would soon become a fervent fan of anything Motown, and the group were all big fans of the Shirelles. As they weren't playing original material live, and as every group would soon learn every other group's best songs, there was an arms race on to find the most exciting songs to cover. As well as Elvis and Buddy and Eddie, they were now covering the Shirelles and Ray Charles and Gary US Bonds. The group returned to Hamburg in April, Paul and Pete's immigration status having been resolved and George now having turned eighteen, and started playing at the Top Ten club, where they played even longer sets, and more of them, than they had at the Kaiserkeller and the Indra. Tony Sheridan started regularly joining them on stage at this time, and Paul switched to piano while Sheridan added the third guitar. This was also when they started using Preludin, a stimulant related to amphetamines which was prescribed as a diet drug -- Paul would take one pill a night, George a couple, and John would gobble them down. But Pete didn't take them -- one more way in which he was different from the others -- and he started having occasional micro-sleeps in the middle of songs as the long nights got to him, much to the annoyance of the rest of the group. But despite Pete's less than stellar playing they were good enough that Sheridan -- the single most experienced musician in the British rock and roll scene -- described them as the best R&B band he'd ever heard. Once they were there, they severed their relationship with Allan Williams, refusing to pay him his share of the money, and just cutting him out of their careers.  Meanwhile, Stuart was starting to get ill. He was having headaches all the time, and had to miss shows on occasion. He was also the only Beatle with a passion for anything else, and he managed to get a scholarship to study art with the famous sculptor Eduardo Paolozzi, who was now working in Hamburg. Paul subbed for Stuart on bass, and eventually Stuart left the group, though on good terms with everyone other than Paul. So it was John, Paul, George and Pete who ended up making the Beatles' first records. Bert Kaempfert, the most important man in the German music industry, had been to see them all at the Top Ten and liked what he saw. Outside Germany, Kaempfert was probably best known for co-writing Elvis' "Wooden Heart", which the Beatles had in their sets at this time: [Excerpt: Elvis Presley, "Wooden Heart"] Kaempfert had signed Tony Sheridan to a contract, and he wanted the Beatles to back him in the studio -- and he was also interested in recording a couple of tracks with them on their own. The group eagerly agreed, and their first session started at eight in the morning on the twenty-second of June 1961, after they had finished playing all night at the club, and all of them but Pete were on Preludin for the session. Stuart came along for moral support, but didn't play. Pete was a problem, though. He wasn't keeping time properly, and Kaempfert eventually insisted on removing his bass drum and toms, leaving only a snare, hi-hat, and ride cymbal for Pete to play. They recorded seven songs at that session in total. Two of them were just by the Beatles. One was a version of "Ain't She Sweet", an old standard which Gene Vincent had recorded fairly recently, but the other was the only track ever credited to Lennon and Harrison as cowriters. On their first trip to Hamburg, they'd wanted to learn "Man of Mystery" by the Shadows: [Excerpt: The Shadows, "Man of Mystery"] But there was a slight problem in that they didn't have a copy of the record, and had never heard it -- it came out in the UK while they were in Germany. So they asked Rory Storm to hum it for them. He hummed a few notes, and Lennon and Harrison wrote a parody of what Storm had sung, which they named "Beatle Bop" but by this point they'd renamed "Cry For a Shadow": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Cry For a Shadow"] The other five songs at the session were given over to Tony Sheridan, with the Beatles backing him, and the song that Kaempfert was most interested in recording was one the group had been performing on stage -- a rocked-up version of the old folk song "My Bonnie": [Excerpt: Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers, "My Bonnie"] That was the record chosen as the single, but it was released not as by Tony Sheridan and the Beatles, but by Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers -- "Beatles", to German ears, sounded a little like "piedels", a childish slang term for penises. The Beatles had made their first record, but it wasn't one they thought much of. They knew they could do better. The next week, the now four-piece Beatles returned to Liverpool, with much crying at Stuart staying behind -- even Paul, now Stuart was no longer a threat for John's attention, was contrite and tried to make amends to him.  On their return to Liverpool, they picked up where they had left off, playing almost every night, and spending the days trying to find new records -- often listening to the latest releases at NEMS, a department store with an extensive record selection. Brian Epstein, the shop's manager, prided himself on being able to get any record a customer wanted, and whenever anyone requested anything he'd buy a second copy for the shelves. As a result, you could find records there that you wouldn't get anywhere else in Liverpool, and the Beatles were soon adding more songs by the Shirelles and Gary US Bonds to their sets, as well as more songs by the Coasters and Ben E. King's "Stand By Me". They were playing gigs further afield, and Neil Aspinall was now driving them everywhere. Aspinall was Pete Best's closest friend -- and was having an affair with Pete's mother -- but unlike Pete himself he also became close to the other Beatles, and would remain so for the rest of his life.  By this point, the group were so obviously the best band on the Liverpool scene that they were starting to get bored -- there was no competition. And by this point it really was a proper scene -- John's old art school friend Bill Harry had started up a magazine, Mersey Beat, which may be the first magazine anywhere in the world to focus on one area's local music scene. Brian Epstein from NEMS had a column, as did Bob Wooler, and often John's humorous writing would appear as well. The Beatles were featured in most issues -- although Paul McCartney's name was misspelled almost every time it appeared -- and not just because Lennon and Harry were friends. By this point there were the Beatles, and there were all the other groups in the area. For several months this continued -- they learned new songs, they played almost every day, and they continued to be the best. They started to find it boring. The one big change that came at this point was when John and Paul went on holiday to Paris, saw Vince Taylor, bumped into their friend Jurgen from Hamburg, and got Jurgen to do their hair like his -- the story we told in the episode on "Brand New Cadillac". They now had the Beatles haircut, though they were still wearing leather. When they got back, George copied their new style straight away, but Pete decided to leave his hair in a quiff. There was nowhere else to go without a manager to look after them. They needed management -- and they found it because of "My Bonnie": [Excerpt: Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers, "My Bonnie"] "My Bonnie" was far from a great record, but it was what led to everything that followed. The Beatles had mentioned from the stage at the Cavern that they had a record out, and a young man named Raymond Jones walked into NEMS and asked for a copy of it. Brian Epstein couldn't find it in the record company catalogues, and asked Jones for more information -- Jones explained that they were a Liverpool group, but the record had come out in Germany. A couple of days later, two young girls came into the shop asking for the same record, and now Epstein was properly intrigued -- in his view, if *two* people asked for a record, that probably meant a lot more than just two people wanted it. He decided to check these Beatles out for himself. Epstein was instantly struck by the group, and this has led to a lot of speculation over the years, because his tastes ran more to Sibelius than to Little Richard. As Epstein was also gay, many people have assumed that the attraction was purely physical. And it might well have been, at least in part, but the suggestion that everything that followed was just because of that seems unlikely -- Epstein was also someone who had a long interest in the arts, and had trained as an actor at RADA, the most prestigious actors' college in the UK, before taking up his job at the family store. Given that the Beatles were soon to become the most popular musicians in the history of the world, and were already the most popular musicians in the Liverpool area, the most reasonable assumption must be that Epstein was impressed by the same things that impressed roughly a billion other people over the next sixty years. Epstein started going to the Cavern regularly, to watch the Beatles and to make plans -- the immaculately dressed, public-school-educated, older rich man stood out among the crowd, and the Beatles already knew his face from his record shop, and so they knew something was going on. By late November, Brian had managed to obtain a box of twenty-five copies of "My Bonnie", and they'd sold out within hours. He set up a meeting with the Beatles, and even before he got them signed to a management contract he was using his contacts with the record industry in London to push the Beatles at record companies. Those companies listened to Brian, because NEMS was one of their biggest customers. December 1961, the month they signed with Brian Epstein, was also the month that they finally started including Lennon/McCartney songs in their sets.  And within a couple of weeks of becoming their manager, even before he'd signed them to a contract, Brian had managed to persuade Mike Smith, an A&R man from Decca, to come to the Cavern to see the group in person. He was impressed, and booked them in for a studio session. December 61 was also the first time that John, Paul, George, and Ringo played together in that lineup, without any other musicians, when on the twenty-seventh of December Pete called in sick for a show, and the others got in their friend to cover for him. It wouldn't be the last time they would play together. On New Year's Day 1962, the Beatles made the trek down to London to record fifteen songs at the Decca studios. The session was intended for two purposes -- to see if they sounded as good on tape as they did in the Cavern, and if they did to produce their first single. Those recordings included the core of their Cavern repertoire, songs like "Money": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Money (Decca version)"] They also recorded three Lennon/McCartney songs, two by Paul -- "Love of the Loved" and "Like Dreamers Do": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Like Dreamers Do"] And one by Lennon -- "Hello Little Girl": [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Hello Little Girl"] And they were Lennon/McCartney songs, even though they were written separately -- the two agreed that they were going to split the credit on anything either of them wrote. The session didn't go well -- the group's equipment wasn't up to standard and they had to use studio amps, and they're all audibly nervous -- but Mike Smith was still fairly confident that they'd be releasing something through Decca -- he just had to work out the details with his boss, Dick Rowe. Meanwhile, the group were making other changes. Brian suggested that they could get more money if they wore suits, and so they agreed -- though they didn't want just any suits, they wanted stylish mohair suits, like the black American groups they loved so much.  The Beatles were now a proper professional group -- but unfortunately, Decca turned them down. Dick Rowe, Mike Smith's boss, didn't think that electric guitars were going to become a big thing -- he was very tuned in to the American trends, and nothing with guitars was charting at the time. Smith was considering two groups -- the Beatles, and Brian Poole and the Tremeloes, and wanted to sign both. Rowe told him that he could sign one, but only one, of them. The Tremeloes had been better in the studio, and they lived round the corner from Smith and were friendly with him. There was no contest -- much as Smith wanted to sign both groups, the Tremeloes were the better prospect. Rowe did make an offer to Epstein: if Epstein would pay a hundred pounds (a *lot* of money in those days), Tony Meehan, formerly of the Shadows, would produce the group in another session, and Decca would release that. Brian wasn't interested -- if the Beatles were going to make a record, they were going to make it with people who they weren't having to pay for the privilege. John, Paul, and George were devastated, but for their own reasons they didn't bother to tell Pete they'd been turned down. But they did have a tape of themselves, at least -- a professional-quality recording that they could use to attract other labels. And their career was going forward in other ways. The same day Brian had his second meeting with Decca, they had an audition with the BBC in Manchester, where they were accepted to perform on Teenager's Turn, a radio programme hosted by the Northern Dance Orchestra. A few weeks later, on the seventh of March, they went to Manchester to record four songs in front of an audience, of which three would be broadcast: [Excerpt: The Beatles, "Please Mr. Postman (Teenager's Turn)"] That recording of John singing "Please Mr. Postman" is historic for another reason, which shows just how on the cutting edge of musical taste the Beatles actually were -- it was the first time ever that a Motown song was played on the BBC. Now we get to the part of the story that, before Mark Lewisohn's work in his book a few years back, had always been shrouded in mystery. What Lewisohn shows is that George Martin was in fact forced to sign the Beatles, against his will, and that this may have been as a punishment. The Beatles had already been turned down by Parlophone once, based on "My Bonnie", when Brian Epstein walked into the HMV store on Oxford Street in London in mid-February. HMV is now mostly known as a retail chain, Britain's biggest chain of physical media stores, but at the time it was owned by EMI, and was associated with their label of the same name -- HMV stood for "His Master's Voice", and its logo was the same one as America's RCA, with whom it had a mutual distribution deal for many years. As a record retailer, Epstein naturally had a professional interest in other record shops, and he had a friend at HMV, who suggested to him that they could use a disc-cutting machine that the shop had to turn his copy of the Decca tapes into acetate discs, which would be much more convenient for taking round and playing to record labels. That disc-cutter was actually in a studio that musicians used for making records for themselves, much as the Quarry Men had years earlier -- it was in fact the studio where Cliff Richard had cut *his* first private demo, the one he'd used to get signed to EMI.  Jim Foy, the man who worked the lathe cutter, liked what he heard, and he talked with Brian about the group. Brian mentioned that some of the songs were originals, and Foy told him that EMI also owned a publishing company, Ardmore & Beechwood, and the office was upstairs -- would Brian like to meet with them to discuss publishing? Brian said he would like that. Ardmore & Beechwood wanted the original songs on the demo. They were convinced that Lennon and McCartney had potential as songwriters, and that songs like "Like Dreamers Do" could become hits in the right hands. And Brian Epstein agreed with them -- but he also knew that the Beatles had no interest in becoming professional songwriters. They wanted to make records, not write songs for other people to record.  Brian took his new discs round to George Martin at EMI -- who wasn't very impressed, and basically said "Don't call us, we'll call you". Brian went back to Liverpool, and got on with the rest of the group's career, including setting up another Hamburg residency for them, this time at a new club called the Star Club. That Star Club residency, in April, would be devastating for the group -- on Tuesday the tenth of April, the same day John, Paul, and Pete got to Hamburg (George was ill and flew over the next day), Stuart Sutcliffe, who'd been having headaches and feeling ill for months, collapsed and died, aged only twenty-one. The group found out the next day -- they got to the airport to meet George, and bumped into Klaus and Astrid, who were there to meet Stuart's mother from the same flight. They asked where Stuart was, and heard the news from Astrid.  John basically went

tv mystery new york chicago los angeles style overnight american america americans german detroit man washington dc english french fringe uk money wood england british david bowie cd hamburg germany anthology klaus northwest irish bbc elvis voice scotland midwestern beatles chapman john lennon stuart shadows foy loved hole silicon valley mrs record latin teenagers shortly ray charles wales rock and roll sheridan jurgen miracles seniors paul mccartney elvis presley ivy league epstein all over britain tilt hutch suddenly playhouse jets halfway manchester keith richards cochran danger somethings motown beatle i love you indra hurricanes buddy mccartney bryan ferry emi liverpool lowe byzantine pete townshend rossini oxford street crickets gentle rada allan williams rca postman walley fury top ten decca ringo george harrison levis hippodrome syd barrett derry cliff richard ancoats buddy holly george martin cavern beechwood astonishingly partly hmv thomas moore ray davies sibelius coasters pete best b7 in spite dick dale roy brown be mine stand by me raunchy ringo starr carl perkins sutcliffe little richard vipers andy white sta mike smith wooden heart bert kaempfert tommy moore shakin klaus voormann graham nash misirlou merseybeat tremeloes puttin little girls casbah pacemakers aspinall beatniks cayenne shirelles speke jacaranda brian epstein eddie cochran nems his master ink spots soldier boy ken brown mary smith managing directors mark lewisohn ian dury ardmore lonnie donegan love me do kim bennett lennon mccartney how do you do it national service on new year tilt araiza help it lewisohn bruce channel barrett strong raymond jones ron richards quarrymen jasper carrott liverpool institute parlophone gene vincent both john martin martin vince taylor stuart sutcliffe parnes gary us bonds long john star club little woods past masters kaempfert mitch murray besame mucho girl can brand new cadillac cry for john moores searchin tony sheridan come go with me baby let brian poole allan clarke les stewart
A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 100: “Love Me Do” by the Beatles

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2020


This week there are two episiodes of the podcast going up, both of them longer than normal. This one, episode one hundred, is the hundredth-episode special and is an hour and a half long. It looks at the early career of the Beatles, and at the three recordings of “Love Me Do”. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode.   Patreon backers also have a ten-minute bonus episode available, on “Misirlou” by Dick Dale and the Deltones. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt’s irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ —-more—- Resources No Mixclouds this week, as both episodes have far too many songs by one artist. The mixclouds will be back with episode 101. While there are many books on the Beatles, and I have read dozens of them, only one needs to be mentioned as a reference for this episode (others will be used for others). All These Years Vol 1: Tune In by Mark Lewisohn is simply the *only* book worth reading on the Beatles’ career up to the end of 1962. It is the most detailed, most accurate, biography imaginable, and the gold standard by which all other biographies of musicians should be measured. I only wish volumes two and three were available already so I could not expect my future episodes on the Beatles to be obsolete when they do come out. There are two versions of the book — a nine-hundred page mass-market version and a 1700-page expanded edition. I recommend the latter. The information in this podcast is almost all from Lewisohn’s book, but I must emphasise that the opinions are mine, and so are any errors — Lewisohn’s book only has one error that I’m aware of (a joke attributed to the comedian Jasper Carrott in a footnote that has since been traced to an earlier radio show). I am only mortal, and so have doubtless misunderstood or oversimplified things and introduced errors where he had none.   The single version of “Love Me Do” can be found on Past Masters, a 2-CD compilation of the Beatles’ non-album tracks that includes the majority of their singles and B-sides. The version with Andy White playing on can be found on Please Please Me. The version with Pete Best, and many of the other early tracks used here, is on Anthology 1.   Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Errata I pronounce the name of Lewisohn’s book as “All Those Years” instead of “All These Years”. I say ” The Jets hadn’t liked playing at Williams’ club” at one point. I meant “at Koschmider’s club”   Transcript   The Beatles came closer than most people realise to never making a record. Until the publication of Mark Lewisohn’s seminal biography All These Years vol 1: Tune In, in 2013 everyone thought they knew the true story — John met Paul at Woolton Village Fete in 1957, and Paul joined the Quarrymen, who later became the Beatles. They played Hamburg and made a demo, and after the Beatles’ demo was turned down by Decca, their manager Brian Epstein shopped it around every record label without success, until finally George Martin heard the potential in it and signed them to Parlophone, a label which was otherwise known for comedy records. Martin was, luckily, the one producer in the whole of the UK who could appreciate the Beatles’ music, and he signed them up, and the rest was history. The problem is, as Lewisohn showed, that’s not what happened. Today I’m going to tell, as best I can the story of how the Beatles actually became the band that they became, and how they got signed to EMI records. I’m going to tell you the story of “Love Me Do”: [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Love Me Do (single version)”] As I mentioned at the beginning, this episode owes a *huge* debt to Mark Lewisohn’s book. I like to acknowledge my sources, anyway, but I’ve actually had difficulty with this episode because Lewisohn’s book is *so* detailed, *so* full, and written *so* well that much of the effort in writing this episode came from paring down the information, rather than finding more, and from reworking things so I was not just paraphrasing bits of his writing. Normally I rely on many sources, and integrate the material myself, but Lewisohn has done all that work far better than any other biographer of any other musician. Were the Beatles not such an important part of music history, I would just skip this episode because there is nothing for me to add. As it is, I *obviously* have to cover this, but I almost feel like I’m cheating in doing so. If you find this episode interesting at all, please do yourself a favour and buy that book.  This episode is going to be a long one — much longer than normal. I won’t know the precise length until after I’ve recorded and edited it, of course, but I’m guessing it’s going to be about ninety minutes. This is the hundredth episode, the end of the second year of the podcast, the end of the second book based on the podcast, and the introduction of the single most important band in the whole story, so I’m going to stretch out a bit. I should also mention that there are a couple of discussions of sudden, traumatic, deaths in this episode. With all that said, settle in, this is going to take a while. Every British act we’ve looked at so far — and many of those we’re going to look at in the next year or two — was based in London. Either they grew up there, or they moved there before their musical career really took off. The Beatles, during the time we’re covering in this episode, were based in Liverpool. While they did eventually move to London, it wasn’t until after they’d started having hits. And what listeners from outside the UK might not realise is what that means in terms of attitudes and perceptions. Liverpool is a large city — it currently has a population of around half a million, and the wider Liverpool metropolitan area is closer to two million — but like all British cities other than London, it was regarded largely as a joke in the British media, and so in return the people of Liverpool had a healthy contempt for London. To give Americans some idea of how London dominates in Britain, and thus how it’s thought of outside London, imagine that New York, Washington DC, and Los Angeles were all the same city — that the financial, media, and political centres of the country were all the same place. Now further imagine that Silicon Valley and all the Ivy League universities were half an hour’s drive from that city. Now, imagine how much worse the attitudes that that city would have about so-called “flyover states” would be, and imagine in return how people in large Midwestern cities like Detroit or Chicago would think about that big city.  In this analogy, Liverpool is Detroit, and like Detroit, it was very poor and had produced a few famous musicians, most notably Billy Fury, who was from an impoverished area of Liverpool called the Dingle: [Excerpt: Billy Fury, “Halfway to Paradise”] But Fury had, of course, moved to London to have his career. That’s what you did. But in general, Liverpool, if people in London thought of it at all, was thought of as a provincial backwater full of poor people, many of them Irish, and all of them talking with a ridiculous accent. Liverpool was ignored by London, and that meant that things could develop there out of sight. The story of the Beatles starts in the 1950s, with two young men in their mid-teens. John Winston Lennon was born in 1940, and had had a rather troubled childhood. His father had been a merchant seaman who had been away in the war, and his parents’ relationship had deteriorated for that and other reasons. As a result, Lennon had barely known his father, and when his mother met another man, Lennon’s aunt, Mary Smith, who he always called Mimi, had taken him in, believing that his mother “living in sin” would be a bad influence on the young boy. The Smith family were the kind of lower middle class family that seemed extremely rich to the impoverished families in Liverpool, but were not well off by any absolute standard. Mimi, in particular, was torn between two very different urges. On one hand, she had strongly bohemian, artistic, urges — as did all of her sisters. She was a voracious reader, and a lover of art history, and encouraged these tendencies in John. But at the same time, she was of that class which has a little status, but not much security, and so she was extremely wary of the need to appear respectable. This tension between respectability and rebellion was something that would appear in many of the people who Lennon later worked with, such as Brian Epstein and George Martin, and it was something that Lennon would always respond to — those people would be the only ones who Lennon would ever view as authority figures he could respect, though he would also resent them at times. And it might be that combination of rebellion and respectability that Lennon saw in Paul McCartney. McCartney was from a family who, in the Byzantine world of the British class system of the time, were a notch or so lower than the Smith family who raised Lennon, but he was academically bright, and his family had big plans for him — they thought that it might even be possible that he might become a teacher if he worked very hard at school. McCartney was a far less openly rebellious person than Lennon was, but he was still just as caught up in the music and fashions of the mid-fifties that his father associated with street gangs and hooliganism. Lennon, like many teenagers in Britain at the time, had had his life changed when he first heard Elvis Presley, and he had soon become a rock and roll obsessive — Elvis was always his absolute favourite, but he also loved Little Richard, who he thought was almost as good, and he admired Buddy Holly, who had a special place in Lennon’s heart as Holly wore glasses on stage, something that Lennon, who was extremely short-sighted, could never bring himself to do, but which at least showed him that it was a possibility. Lennon was, by his mid-teens, recreating a relationship with his mother, and one of the things they bonded over was music — she taught him how to play the banjo, and together they worked out the chords to “That’ll Be the Day”, and Lennon later switched to the guitar, playing banjo chords on five of the six strings.  Like many, many, teenagers of the time, Lennon also formed a skiffle group, which he called the Quarrymen, after a line in his school song. The group tended to have a rotating lineup, but Lennon was the unquestioned leader. The group had a repertoire consisting of the same Lonnie Donegan songs that every other skiffle group was playing, plus any Elvis and Buddy Holly songs that could sound reasonable with a lineup of guitars, teachest bass, and washboard. The moment that changed the history of the music, though, came on July the sixth, 1957, when Ivan Vaughan, a friend of Lennon’s, invited his friend Paul McCartney to go and see the Quarry Men perform at Woolton Village Fete. That day has gone down in history as “the day John met Paul”, although Mark Lewisohn has since discovered that Lennon and McCartney had briefly met once before. It is, though, the day on which Lennon and McCartney first impressed each other musically. McCartney talks about being particularly impressed that the Quarry Men’s lead singer was changing the lyrics to the songs he was performing, making up new words when he forgot the originals — he says in particular that he remembers Lennon singing “Come Go With Me” by the Del-Vikings: [Excerpt: The Del-Vikings, “Come Go With Me”] McCartney remembers Lennon as changing the lyrics to “come go with me, right down to the penitentiary”, and thinking that was clever. Astonishingly, some audio recording actually exists of the Quarry Men’s second performance that day — they did two sets, and this second one comes just after Lennon met McCartney rather than just before. The recording only seems to exist in a very fragmentary form, which has snatches of Lennon singing “Baby Let’s Play House” and Lonnie Donegan’s hit “Puttin’ on the Style”, which was number one on the charts at the time, but that even those fragments have survived, given how historic a day this was, is almost miraculous: [Excerpt: The Quarrymen, “Puttin’ on the Style”] After the first set, Lennon met McCartney, who was nearly two years younger, but a more accomplished musician — for a start, he knew how to tune the guitar with all six strings, and to proper guitar tuning, rather than tuning five strings like a banjo. Lennon and his friends were a little nonplussed by McCartney holding his guitar upside-down at first — McCartney is left-handed — but despite having an upside-down guitar with the wrong tuning, McCartney managed to bash out a version of Eddie Cochran’s “Twenty-Flight Rock”, a song he would often perform in later decades when reminding people of this story: [Excerpt: Paul McCartney, “Twenty-Flight Rock”] This was impressive to Lennon for three reasons. The first was that McCartney was already a strong, confident performer — he perhaps seemed a little more confident than he really was, showing off in front of the bigger boys like this. The second was that “Twenty-Flight Rock” was a moderately obscure song — it hadn’t charted, but it *had* appeared in The Girl Can’t Help It, a film which every rock and roll lover in Britain had watched at the cinema over and over. Choosing that song rather than, say, “Be-Bop-A-Lula”, was a way of announcing a kind of group affiliation — “I am one of you, I am a real rock and roll fan, not just a casual listener to what’s in the charts”. I stress that second point because it’s something that’s very important in the history of the Beatles generally — they were *music fans*, and often fans of relatively obscure records. That’s something that bound Lennon and McCartney, and later the other members, together from the start, and something they always noted about other musicians. They weren’t the kind of systematic scholars who track down rare pressings and memorise every session musician’s name, but they were constantly drawn to find the best new music, and to seek it out wherever they could. But the most impressive thing for Lennon — and one that seems a little calculated on McCartney’s part, though he’s never said that he thought about this that I’m aware of — was that this was an extremely wordy song, and McCartney *knew all the words*. Remember that McCartney had noticed Lennon forgetting the words to a song with lyrics as simple as “come, come, come, come, come into my heart/Tell me darling we will never part”, and here’s McCartney singing this fast-paced, almost patter song, and getting the words right.  From the beginning, McCartney was showing how he could complement Lennon — if Lennon could impress McCartney by improvising new lyrics when he forgot the old ones, then McCartney could impress Lennon by remembering the lyrics that Lennon couldn’t — and by writing them down for Lennon, sharing his knowledge freely. McCartney went on to show off more, and in particular impressed Lennon by going to a piano and showing off his Little Richard imitation. Little Richard was the only serious rival to Elvis in Lennon’s affections, and McCartney could do a very decent imitation of him. This was someone special, clearly. But this put Lennon in a quandary. McCartney was clearly far, far, better than any of the Quarry Men — at least Lennon’s equal, and light years ahead of the rest of them. Lennon had a choice — invite this young freak of nature into his band, and improve the band dramatically, but no longer be the unquestioned centre of the group, or remain in absolute control but not have someone in the group who *knew the words* and *knew how to tune a guitar*, and other such magical abilities that no mere mortals had. Those who only know of Lennon from his later reputation as a massive egoist would be surprised, but he decided fairly quickly that he had to make the group better at his own expense. He invited McCartney to join the group, and McCartney said yes. Over the next few months the membership of the Quarry Men changed. They’d been formed while they were all at Quarry Bank Grammar School, but that summer Lennon moved on to art school. I’m going to have to talk about the art school system, and the British education system of the fifties and early sixties a lot over the next few months, but here’s an extremely abbreviated and inaccurate version that’s good enough for now. Between the ages of eleven and sixteen, people in Britain — at least those without extremely rich parents, who had a different system — went to two kinds of school depending on the result of an exam they took aged eleven, which was based on some since-discredited eugenic research about children’s potential. If you passed the exam, you were considered academically apt, and went to a grammar school, which was designed to filter you through to university and the professions. If you failed the exam, you went to a secondary modern, which was designed to give you the skills to get a trade and make a living working with your hands. And for the most part, people followed the pipeline that was set up for them. You go to grammar school, go to university, become a lawyer or a doctor or a teacher. You go to secondary modern, leave school at fourteen, become a plumber or a builder or a factory worker. But there are always those people who don’t properly fit into the neat categories that the world tries to put them in. And for people in their late teens and early twenties, people who’d been through the school system but not been shaped properly by it, there was another option at this time. If you were bright and creative, but weren’t suited for university because you’d failed your exams, you could go to art school. The supposed purpose of the art schools was to teach people to do commercial art, and they would learn skills like lettering and basic draughtsmanship. But what the art schools really did was give creative people space to explore ideas, to find out about areas of art and culture that would otherwise have been closed to them. Keith Richards, Pete Townshend, Ian Dury, Ray Davies, Bryan Ferry, Syd Barrett, and many more people we’ll be seeing over the course of this story went to art school, and as David Bowie would put it later, the joke at the time was that you went to art school to learn to play blues guitar. With Lennon and his friends all moving on from the school that had drawn them together, the group stabilised for a time on a lineup of Lennon, McCartney, Colin Hanton, Len Garry, and Eric Griffiths. But the first time this version of the group played live, while McCartney sang well, he totally fluffed his lead guitar lines on stage. While there were three guitarists in the band at this point, they needed someone who could play lead fluently and confidently on stage. Enter George Harrison, who had suddenly become a close friend of McCartney. Harrison went to the same school as McCartney — a grammar school called the Liverpool Institute, but was in the year below McCartney, and so the two had always been a bit distant. However, at the same time as Lennon was moving on to art school after failing his exams, McCartney was being kept back a year for failing Latin — which his father always thought was deliberate, so he wouldn’t have to go to university. Now he was in the same year at school as Harrison, and they started hanging out together. The two bonded strongly over music, and would do things like take a bus journey to another part of town, where someone lived who they heard owned a copy of “Searchin'” by the Coasters: [Excerpt: The Coasters, “Searchin'”] The two knocked on this stranger’s door, asked if he’d play them this prized record, and he agreed — and then they stole it from him as they left his house. Another time they took the bus to another part of town again, because they’d heard that someone in that part of town knew how to play a B7 chord on his guitar, and sat there as he showed them. So now the Quarrymen needed a lead guitarist, McCartney volunteered his young mate. There are a couple of stories about how Harrison came to join the band — apparently he auditioned for Lennon at least twice, because Lennon was very unsure about having such a young kid in his band — but the story I like best is that Harrison took his guitar to a Quarry Men gig at Wilson Hall — he’d apparently often take his guitar to gigs and just see if he could sit in with the bands. On the bill with the Quarry Men was another group, the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group, who were generally regarded as the best skiffle band in Liverpool. Lennon told Harrison that he could join the band if he could play as well as Clayton, and Harrison took out his guitar and played “Raunchy”: [Excerpt: Bill Justis, “Raunchy”] I like this story rather than the other story that the members would tell later — that Harrison played “Raunchy” on a bus for Lennon — for one reason. The drummer in the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group was one Richy Starkey, and if it happened that way, the day that George joined the Quarry Men was also the day that John, Paul, George, and Ringo were all in the same place for the first time. George looked up to John and essentially idolised him, though Lennon thought of him as a little annoying at times — he’d follow John everywhere, and not take a hint when he wasn’t wanted sometimes, just eager to be with his big cool new mate. But despite this tiny bit of tension, John, Paul, and George quickly became a solid unit — helped by the fact that the school that Paul and George went to was part of the same complex of buildings as Lennon’s art college, so they’d all get the bus there and back together.  George was not only younger, he was a notch or two further down the social class ladder than John or Paul, and he spoke more slowly, which made him seem less intelligent. He came from Speke, which was a rougher area, and he would dress even more like a juvenile delinquent than the others. Meanwhile, Len Garry and Eric Griffiths left the group — Len Garry because he became ill and had to spend time in hospital, and anyway they didn’t really need a teachest bass. What they did need was an electric bass, and since they had four guitars now they tried to persuade Eric to get one, but he didn’t want to pay that much money, and he was always a little on the outside of the main three members, as he didn’t share their sense of humour. So the group got Nigel Walley, who was acting as the group’s manager, to fire him. The group was now John, Paul, and George all on guitars, and Colin Hanton on drums. Sometimes, if they played a venue that had a piano, they’d also bring along a schoolfriend of Paul’s, John “Duff” Lowe, to play piano. Meanwhile, the group were growing in other ways. Both John and Paul had started writing songs, together and apart. McCartney seems to have been the first, writing a song called “I Lost My Little Girl” which he would eventually record more than thirty years later: [Excerpt: Paul McCartney, “I Lost My Little Girl”] Lennon’s first song likewise sang about a little girl, this time being “Hello, Little Girl”. By the middle of 1958, this five-piece group was ready to cut their first record — at a local studio that would cut a single copy of a disc for you. They went into this studio at some time around July 1958, and recorded two songs. The first was their version of “That’ll Be the Day”: [Excerpt: The Quarry Men, “That’ll be the Day”] The B-side was a song that McCartney had written, with a guitar solo that George had come up with, so the label credit read “McCartney/Harrison”. “In Spite of All the Danger” seems to have been inspired by Elvis’ “Trying to Get to You”: [Excerpt: Elvis Presley, “Trying to Get to You”] It’s a rough song, but a good attempt for a teenager who had only just started writing songs: [Excerpt: The Quarry Men, “In Spite of All the Danger”] Apparently Lowe and Hanton hadn’t heard the song before they started playing, but they make a decent enough fist of it in the circumstances. Lennon took the lead even though it was McCartney’s song — he said later “I was such a bully in those days I didn’t even let Paul sing his own song.” That was about the last time that this lineup of Quarry Men played together. In July, the month that seems likely for the recording, Lowe finished at the Liverpool Institute, and so he drifted away from McCartney and Harrison. Meanwhile Hanton had a huge row with the others after a show, and they fell out and never spoke again. The Quarry Men were reduced to a trio of Lennon, McCartney, and Harrison. But — possibly the very day after that recording if an unreliable plaque at the studio where they recorded it is to be believed — something happened which was to have far more impact on the group than the drummer leaving. John Lennon’s mother, with whom he’d slowly been repairing his relationship, had called round to visit Mimi. She left the house, and bumped into Nigel Walley, who was calling round to see John. She told him he wasn’t there, and that he could walk with her to the bus stop. They walked a little while, then went off in different directions. Walley heard a thump and turned round — Julia Lennon had been hit by a car and killed instantly. As you can imagine, John’s mother dying caused him a huge amount of distress, but it also gave him a bond with McCartney, whose own mother had died of cancer shortly before they met. Neither really spoke about it to each other, and to the extent they did it was with ultra-cynical humour — but the two now shared something deeper than just the music, even though the music itself was deep enough. Lennon became a much harder, nastier, person after this, at least for a time, his natural wit taking on a dark edge, and he would often drink too much and get aggressive. But life still went on, and John, Paul, and George kept trying to perform — though the gigs dried up, and they didn’t have a drummer any more. They’d just say “the rhythm’s in the guitars” when asked why they didn’t have one. They were also no longer the Quarry Men — they didn’t have a name. At one point late in the year, they also only had two guitars between the three of them — Lennon seems to have smashed his in a fit of fury after his mother’s death. But he stole one backstage at a talent contest, and soon they were back to having three. That talent show was one run by Carroll Levis, who we talked about before in the episode on “Shakin’ All Over”. The three boys went on Levis’ show, this time performing as Johnny & The Moondogs —  in Manchester, at the Hippodrome in Ancoats, singing Buddy Holly’s “Think it Over”: [Excerpt: The Crickets, “Think it Over”] Lennon sang lead with his arms draped over the shoulders of Paul and George, who sang backing vocals and played guitar. They apparently did quite well, but had to leave before the show finished to get the last train back to Liverpool, and so never found out whether the audience would have made them the winner, with the possibility of a TV appearance. They did well enough, though, to impress a couple of other young lads on the bill, two Manchester singers named Allan Clarke and Graham Nash. But in general, the Japage Three, a portmanteau of their names that they settled on as their most usual group name at this point, played very little in 1959 — indeed, George spent much of the early part of the year moonlighting in the Les Stewart Quartet, another group, though he still thought of Lennon and McCartney as his musical soulmates; the Les Stewart Quartet were just a gig.  The three of them would spend much of their time at the Jacaranda, a coffee bar opened by a Liverpool entrepreneur, Allan Williams, in imitation of the 2is, which was owned by a friend of his. Lennon was also spending a lot of time with an older student at his art school, Stuart Sutcliffe, one of the few people in the world that Lennon himself looked up to. The Les Stewart Quartet would end up indirectly being key to the Beatles’ development, because after one of their shows at a local youth club they were approached by a woman named Mona Best. Mona’s son Pete liked to go to the youth club, but she was fairly protective of him, and also wanted him to have more friends — he was a quiet boy who didn’t make friends easily. So she’d hit upon a plan — she’d open her own club in her cellar, since the Best family were rich enough to have a big house. If there was a club *in Pete’s house* he’d definitely make lots of friends. They needed a band, and she asked the Les Stewart Quartet if they’d like to be the resident band at this new club, the Casbah, and also if they’d like to help decorate it.  They said yes, but then Paul and George went on a hitch-hiking holiday around Wales for a few days, and George didn’t get back in time to play a gig the quartet had booked. Ken Brown, the other guitarist, didn’t turn up either, and Les Stewart got into a rage and split the group. Suddenly, the Casbah had no group — George and Ken were willing to play, but neither was a lead singer — and no decorators either. So George roped in John and Paul, who helped decorate the place, and with the addition of Ken Brown, the group returned to the Quarry Men name for their regular Saturday night gig at the Casbah. The group had no bass player or drummer, and they all kept pestering everyone they knew to get a bass or a drum kit, but nobody would bite. But then Stuart Sutcliffe got half a painting in an exhibition put on by John Moores, the millionaire owner of Littlewoods, who was a big patron of the arts in Liverpool. I say he got half a painting in the exhibition, because the painting was done on two large boards — Stuart and his friends took the first half of the painting down to the gallery, went back to get the other half, and got distracted by the pub and never brought it. But Moores was impressed enough with the abstract painting that he bought it at the end of the exhibition’s run, for ninety pounds — about two thousand pounds in today’s money. And so Stuart’s friends gave him a choice — he could either buy a bass or a drum kit, either would be fine. He chose the bass. But the same week that Stuart joined, Ken Brown was out, and they lost their gig at the Casbah. John, Paul, George and Ken had turned up one Saturday, and Ken hadn’t felt well, so instead of performing he just worked on the door. At the end of the show, Mona Best insisted on giving Ken an equal share of the money, as agreed. John, Paul, and George wouldn’t stand for that, and so Ken was out of the group, and they were no longer playing for Mona Best. Stuart joining the group caused tensions — George was fine with him, thinking that a bass player who didn’t yet know how to play was better than no bass player at all, but Paul was much less keen. Partly this was because he thought the group needed to get better, which would be hard with someone who couldn’t play, but also he was getting jealous of Sutcliffe’s closeness to Lennon, especially when the two became flatmates. But John wanted him in the group, and what John wanted, he got. There are recordings of the group around this time that circulate — only one has been released officially, a McCartney instrumental called “Cayenne”, but the others are out there if you look: [Excerpt: The Quarry Men, “Cayenne”] The gigs had dried up again, but they did have one new advantage — they now had a name they actually liked. John and Stuart had come up with it, inspired by Buddy Holly’s Crickets. They were going to be Beatles, with an a. Shortly after the Beatles’ first appearance under that name, at the art school student union, came the Liverpool gig which was to have had Eddie Cochran and Gene Vincent headlining, before Cochran died. A lot of Liverpool groups were booked to play on the bill there, but not the Beatles — though Richy Starkey was going to play the gig, with his latest group Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. Allan Williams, the local promoter, added extra groups to fill out the bill, including Gerry and the Pacemakers, and suddenly everyone who loved rock and roll in Liverpool realised that there were others out there like them. Overnight, a scene had been born. And where there’s a scene, there’s money to be made. Larry Parnes, who had been the national promoter of the tour, was at the show and realised that there were a lot of quite proficient musicians in Liverpool. And it so happened that he needed backing bands for three of his artists who were going on tour, separately — two minor stars, Duffy Power and Johnny Gentle, and one big star, Billy Fury. And both Gentle and Fury were from Liverpool themselves. So Parnes asked Allan Williams to set up auditions with some of the local groups. Williams invited several groups, and one he asked along was the Beatles, largely because Lennon and Sutcliffe begged him. He also found them a drummer, Tommy Moore, who was a decade older than the rest of them — though Moore didn’t turn up to the audition because he had to work, and so Johnny “Hutch” Hutchinson of Cass and the Cassanovas sat in with them, much to Hutch’s disgust — he hated the Beatles, and especially Lennon.  Cass of the Cassanovas also insisted that “the Beatles” was a stupid name, and that the group needed to be Something and the Somethings, and he suggested Long John and the Silver Beatles, and that stuck for a couple of shows before they reverted to their proper name. The Beatles weren’t chosen for any of the main tours that were being booked, but then Parnes phoned Williams up — there were some extra dates on the Johnny Gentle tour that he hadn’t yet booked a group for. Could Williams find him a band who could be in Scotland that Friday night for a nine-day tour? Williams tried Cass and the Cassanovas, Rory Storm and the Hurricanes, and Gerry and the Pacemakers, but none of them could go on tour at such short notice. They all had gigs booked, or day jobs they had to book time off with. The Beatles had no gigs booked, and only George had a day job, and he didn’t mind just quitting that. They were off to Scotland. They were so inspired by being on tour with a Larry Parnes artist that most of them took on new names just like those big stars — George became Carl Harrison, after Carl Perkins, Stuart became Stuart de Staël, after his favourite painter, and Paul became Paul Ramon, which he thought sounded mysterious and French. There’s some question about whether John took on a new name — some sources have him becoming “Long John”, while others say he was “Johnny” Lennon rather than John. Tommy Moore, meanwhile, was just Thomas Moore. It was on this tour, of course, that Lennon helped Johnny Gentle write “I’ve Just Fallen For Someone”, which we talked about last week: [Excerpt: Darren Young, “I’ve Just Fallen For Someone”] The tour was apparently fairly miserable, with horrible accommodation, poor musicianship from the group, and everyone getting on everyone’s nerves — George and Stuart got into fistfights, John bullied Stuart a bit because of his poor playing, and John particularly didn’t get on well with Moore — a man who was a decade older, didn’t share their taste in music, and worked in a factory rather than having the intellectual aspirations of the group. The two hated each other by the end of the tour. But the tour did also give the group the experience of signing autographs, and of feeling like stars in at least a minor way. When they got back to Liverpool, George moved in with John and Stuart, to get away from his mum telling him to get a proper job, and they got a few more bookings thanks to Williams, but they soon became drummerless — they turned up to a gig one time to find that Tommy Moore wasn’t there. They went round to his house, and his wife shouted from an upstairs window, “Yez can piss off, he’s had enough of yez and gone back to work at the bottle factory”. The now four-piece group carried on, however, and recordings exist of them in this period, sounding much more professional than only a few months before, including performances of some of their own songs. The most entertaining of these is probably “You’ll Be Mine”, an Ink Spots parody with some absurd wordplay from Lennon: [Excerpt: The Beatles, “You’ll Be Mine”] Soon enough the group found another drummer, Norm Chapman, and carried on as before, getting regular bookings thanks to Williams. There was soon a temporary guest at the flat John, Stuart, and George shared with several other people — Royston Ellis, the Beat poet and friend of the Shadows, had turned up in Liverpool and latched on to the group, partly because he fancied George. He performed with them a couple of times, crashed at the flat, and provided them with two formative experiences — he gave them their first national press, talking in Record and Show Mirror about how he wanted them to be his full-time group, and he gave them their first drug experience, showing them how to get amphetamines out of inhalers. While the group’s first national press was positive, there was soon some very negative press indeed associated with them. A tabloid newspaper wanted to do a smear story about the dangerous Beatnik menace. The article talked about how “they revel in filth”, and how beatniks were “a dangerous menace to our young people… a corrupting influence of drug addicts and peddlers, degenerates who specialise in obscene orgies”. And for some reason — it’s never been made clear exactly how — the beatnik “pad” they chose to photograph for this story was the one that John, Stuart, and George lived in, though they weren’t there at the time — several of their friends and associates are in the pictures though. They were all kicked out of their flat, and moved back in with their families, and around this time they lost Chapman from the group too — he was called up to do his National Service, one of the last people to be conscripted before conscription ended for good. They were back to a four-piece again, and for a while Paul was drumming. But then, as seems to have happened so often with this group, a bizarre coincidence happened. A while earlier, Allan Williams had travelled to Hamburg, with the idea of trying to get Liverpool groups booked there. He’d met up with Bruno Koschmider, the owner of a club called the Kaiserkeller. Koschmider had liked the idea, but nothing had come of it, partly because neither could speak the other’s language well. A little while later, Koschmider had remembered the idea and come over to the UK to find musicians. He didn’t remember where Williams was from, so of course he went to London, to the 2is, and there he found a group of musicians including Tony Sheridan, who we talked about back in the episode on “Brand New Cadillac”, the man who’d been Vince Taylor’s lead guitarist and had a minor solo career: [Excerpt: Tony Sheridan, “Why?”] Sheridan was one of the most impressive musicians in Britain, but he also wanted to skip the country — he’d just bought a guitar on credit in someone else’s name, and he also had a wife and six-month-old baby he wanted rid of. He eagerly went off with Koschmider, and a scratch group called the Jets soon took up residence at the Kaiserkeller. Meanwhile, in Liverpool, Derry and the Seniors were annoyed. Larry Parnes had booked them for a tour, but then he’d got annoyed at the unprofessionalism of the Liverpool bands he was booking and cancelled the booking, severing his relationship with Williams. The Seniors wanted to know what Williams was going to do about it.  There was no way to get them enough gigs in Liverpool, so Williams, being a thoroughly decent man who had a sense of obligation, offered to drive the group down to London to see if they could get work there. He took them to the 2is, and they were allowed to get up and play there, since Williams was a friend of the owner. And Bruno Koschmider was there. The Jets hadn’t liked playing at Williams’ club, and they’d scarpered to another one with better working conditions, which they helped get off the ground and renamed the Top Ten, after Vince Taylor’s club in London. So Bruno had come back to find another group, and there in the same club at the same time was the man who’d given him the idea in the first place, with a group. Koschmider immediately signed up Derry and the Seniors to play at the Kaiserkeller.  Meanwhile, the best gig the Beatles could get, also through Williams, was backing a stripper, where they played whatever instrumentals they knew, no matter how inappropriate, things like the theme from The Third Man: [Excerpt: Anton Karas, “Theme from The Third Man”] A tune guaranteed to get the audience into a sexy mood, I’m sure you’ll agree. But then Allan Williams got a call from Koschmider. Derry and the Seniors were doing great business, and he’d decided to convert another of his clubs to be a rock and roll club. Could Williams have a group for him by next Friday? Oh, and it needed to be five people. Williams tried Rory Storm and the Hurricanes. They were busy. He tried Cass and the Cassanovas. They were busy. He tried Gerry and the Pacemakers. They were busy. Finally, he tried the Beatles. They weren’t busy, and said yes they could go to Hamburg that week. There were a few minor issues, like there not being five of them, none of them having passports, and them not having a drummer. The passports could be sorted quickly — there’s a passport office in Liverpool — but the lack of a fifth Beatle was more of a problem. In desperation, they turned eventually to Pete Best, Mrs. Best’s son, because they knew he had a drum kit. He agreed.  Allan Williams drove the group to Hamburg, and they started playing six-hour sets every night at the Indra, not finishing til three in the morning, at which point they’d make their way to their lodgings — the back of a filthy cinema.  By this time, the Beatles had already got good — Howie Casey, of Derry and the Seniors, who’d remembered the Beatles as being awful at the Johnny Gentle audition, came over to see them and make fun of them, but found that they were far better than they had been. But playing six hours a night got them *very* good *very* quickly — especially as they decided that they weren’t going to play the same song twice in a night, meaning they soon built up a vast repertoire. But right from the start, there was a disconnect between Pete Best and the other four — they socialised together, and he went off on his own. He was also a weak player — he was only just starting to learn — and so the rest of the group would stamp their feet to keep him in time. That, though, also gave them a bit more of a stage act than they might otherwise have had. There are lots of legendary stories about the group’s time in Hamburg, and it’s impossible to sort fact from fiction, and the bits we can sort out would get this podcast categorised as adult content, but they were teenagers, away from home for a long period for the first time, living in a squalid back room in the red light district of a city with a reputation for vice. I’m sure whatever you imagine is probably about right. After a relatively short time, they were moved from the Indra, which had to stop putting on rock and roll shows, to the Kaiserkeller, where they shared the bill with Rory Storm & the Hurricanes, up to that point considered Liverpool’s best band. There’s a live recording of the Hurricanes from 1960, which shows that they were certainly powerful: [Excerpt: Rory Storm and the Hurricanes, “Brand New Cadillac”] That recording doesn’t have the Hurricanes’ normal drummer on, who was sick for that show. But compared to what the Beatles had become — a stomping powerhouse with John Lennon, whose sense of humour was both cruel and pointed, doing everything he could to get a rise out of the audience — they were left in the dust. A letter home that George Harrison wrote sums it up — “Rory Storm & the Hurricanes came out here the other week, and they are crumby. He does a bit of dancing around but it still doesn’t make up for his phoney group. The only person who is any good in the group is the drummer.” That drummer was Richy Starkey from the Eddie Clayton Skiffle Group, now performing as Ringo Starr. They struck up a friendship, and even performed together at least once — John, Paul, George, and Ringo acting as the backing group for Lu Walters of the Hurricanes on a demo, which is frustratingly missing and hasn’t been heard since. They were making other friends, too. There was Tony Sheridan, who they’d seen on TV, but who would now sometimes jam with them as equals. And there was a trio of arty bohemian types who had stumbled across the club, where they were very out of place — Astrid Kirscherr, Klaus Voormann, and Jurgen Vollmer. They all latched on to the Beatles, and especially to Stuart, who soon started dating Astrid, despite her speaking no English and him speaking no German. But relations between Koschmider and the Beatles had worsened, and he reported to the police that George, at only seventeen, was under-age. George got deported. The rest of the group decided to move over to the Top Ten Club, and as a parting gift, Paul and Pete nailed some condoms to their bedroom wall and set fire to them. Koschmider decided to report this to the police as attempted arson, and those two were deported as well. John followed a week later, while Stuart stayed in Hamburg for a while, to spend more time with Astrid, who he planned to marry. The other four regrouped, getting in a friend, Chas Newby, as a temporary bass player while Stuart was away. And on the twenty-seventh of December, 1960, when they played Litherland Town Hall, they changed the Liverpool music scene. They were like nothing anyone had ever seen, and the audience didn’t dance — they just rushed to the stage, to be as close to the performance as possible. The Beatles had become the best band in Liverpool. Mark Lewisohn goes further, and suggests that the three months of long nights playing different songs in Hamburg had turned them into the single most experienced rock band *in the world* — which seems vanishingly unlikely to me, but Lewisohn is not a man given to exaggeration. By this time, Mona Best had largely taken over the group’s bookings, and there were a lot of them, as well as a regular spot at the Casbah. Neil Aspinall, a friend of Pete’s, started driving them to gigs, while they also had a regular MC, Bob Wooler, who ran many local gigs, and who gave the Beatles their own theme music — he’d introduce them with the fanfare from Rossini’s William Tell Overture: [Excerpt: Rossini, “William Tell Overture”] Stuart came over from Hamburg in early January, and once again the Beatles were a five-piece — and by now, he could play quite well, well enough, at any rate, that it didn’t destroy the momentum the group had gathered. The group were getting more and more bookings, including the venue that would become synonymous with them, the Cavern, a tiny little warehouse cellar that had started as a jazz club, and that the Quarry Men had played once a couple of years earlier, but had been banned from for playing too much rock and roll. Now, the Beatles were getting bookings at the Cavern’s lunchtime sessions, and that meant more than it seemed. Most of the gigs they played otherwise were on the outskirts of the city, but the Cavern was in the city centre. And that meant that for the lunchtime sessions, commuters from outside the city were coming to see them — which meant that the group got fans from anywhere within commuting distance, fans who wanted them to play in their towns. Meanwhile, the group were branching out musically — they were particularly becoming fascinated by the new R&B, soul, and girl-group records that were coming out in the US. After already having loved “Money” by Barrett Strong, John was also obsessed with the Miracles, and would soon become a fervent fan of anything Motown, and the group were all big fans of the Shirelles. As they weren’t playing original material live, and as every group would soon learn every other group’s best songs, there was an arms race on to find the most exciting songs to cover. As well as Elvis and Buddy and Eddie, they were now covering the Shirelles and Ray Charles and Gary US Bonds. The group returned to Hamburg in April, Paul and Pete’s immigration status having been resolved and George now having turned eighteen, and started playing at the Top Ten club, where they played even longer sets, and more of them, than they had at the Kaiserkeller and the Indra. Tony Sheridan started regularly joining them on stage at this time, and Paul switched to piano while Sheridan added the third guitar. This was also when they started using Preludin, a stimulant related to amphetamines which was prescribed as a diet drug — Paul would take one pill a night, George a couple, and John would gobble them down. But Pete didn’t take them — one more way in which he was different from the others — and he started having occasional micro-sleeps in the middle of songs as the long nights got to him, much to the annoyance of the rest of the group. But despite Pete’s less than stellar playing they were good enough that Sheridan — the single most experienced musician in the British rock and roll scene — described them as the best R&B band he’d ever heard. Once they were there, they severed their relationship with Allan Williams, refusing to pay him his share of the money, and just cutting him out of their careers.  Meanwhile, Stuart was starting to get ill. He was having headaches all the time, and had to miss shows on occasion. He was also the only Beatle with a passion for anything else, and he managed to get a scholarship to study art with the famous sculptor Eduardo Paolozzi, who was now working in Hamburg. Paul subbed for Stuart on bass, and eventually Stuart left the group, though on good terms with everyone other than Paul. So it was John, Paul, George and Pete who ended up making the Beatles’ first records. Bert Kaempfert, the most important man in the German music industry, had been to see them all at the Top Ten and liked what he saw. Outside Germany, Kaempfert was probably best known for co-writing Elvis’ “Wooden Heart”, which the Beatles had in their sets at this time: [Excerpt: Elvis Presley, “Wooden Heart”] Kaempfert had signed Tony Sheridan to a contract, and he wanted the Beatles to back him in the studio — and he was also interested in recording a couple of tracks with them on their own. The group eagerly agreed, and their first session started at eight in the morning on the twenty-second of June 1961, after they had finished playing all night at the club, and all of them but Pete were on Preludin for the session. Stuart came along for moral support, but didn’t play. Pete was a problem, though. He wasn’t keeping time properly, and Kaempfert eventually insisted on removing his bass drum and toms, leaving only a snare, hi-hat, and ride cymbal for Pete to play. They recorded seven songs at that session in total. Two of them were just by the Beatles. One was a version of “Ain’t She Sweet”, an old standard which Gene Vincent had recorded fairly recently, but the other was the only track ever credited to Lennon and Harrison as cowriters. On their first trip to Hamburg, they’d wanted to learn “Man of Mystery” by the Shadows: [Excerpt: The Shadows, “Man of Mystery”] But there was a slight problem in that they didn’t have a copy of the record, and had never heard it — it came out in the UK while they were in Germany. So they asked Rory Storm to hum it for them. He hummed a few notes, and Lennon and Harrison wrote a parody of what Storm had sung, which they named “Beatle Bop” but by this point they’d renamed “Cry For a Shadow”: [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Cry For a Shadow”] The other five songs at the session were given over to Tony Sheridan, with the Beatles backing him, and the song that Kaempfert was most interested in recording was one the group had been performing on stage — a rocked-up version of the old folk song “My Bonnie”: [Excerpt: Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers, “My Bonnie”] That was the record chosen as the single, but it was released not as by Tony Sheridan and the Beatles, but by Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers — “Beatles”, to German ears, sounded a little like “piedels”, a childish slang term for penises. The Beatles had made their first record, but it wasn’t one they thought much of. They knew they could do better. The next week, the now four-piece Beatles returned to Liverpool, with much crying at Stuart staying behind — even Paul, now Stuart was no longer a threat for John’s attention, was contrite and tried to make amends to him.  On their return to Liverpool, they picked up where they had left off, playing almost every night, and spending the days trying to find new records — often listening to the latest releases at NEMS, a department store with an extensive record selection. Brian Epstein, the shop’s manager, prided himself on being able to get any record a customer wanted, and whenever anyone requested anything he’d buy a second copy for the shelves. As a result, you could find records there that you wouldn’t get anywhere else in Liverpool, and the Beatles were soon adding more songs by the Shirelles and Gary US Bonds to their sets, as well as more songs by the Coasters and Ben E. King’s “Stand By Me”. They were playing gigs further afield, and Neil Aspinall was now driving them everywhere. Aspinall was Pete Best’s closest friend — and was having an affair with Pete’s mother — but unlike Pete himself he also became close to the other Beatles, and would remain so for the rest of his life.  By this point, the group were so obviously the best band on the Liverpool scene that they were starting to get bored — there was no competition. And by this point it really was a proper scene — John’s old art school friend Bill Harry had started up a magazine, Mersey Beat, which may be the first magazine anywhere in the world to focus on one area’s local music scene. Brian Epstein from NEMS had a column, as did Bob Wooler, and often John’s humorous writing would appear as well. The Beatles were featured in most issues — although Paul McCartney’s name was misspelled almost every time it appeared — and not just because Lennon and Harry were friends. By this point there were the Beatles, and there were all the other groups in the area. For several months this continued — they learned new songs, they played almost every day, and they continued to be the best. They started to find it boring. The one big change that came at this point was when John and Paul went on holiday to Paris, saw Vince Taylor, bumped into their friend Jurgen from Hamburg, and got Jurgen to do their hair like his — the story we told in the episode on “Brand New Cadillac”. They now had the Beatles haircut, though they were still wearing leather. When they got back, George copied their new style straight away, but Pete decided to leave his hair in a quiff. There was nowhere else to go without a manager to look after them. They needed management — and they found it because of “My Bonnie”: [Excerpt: Tony Sheridan and the Beat Brothers, “My Bonnie”] “My Bonnie” was far from a great record, but it was what led to everything that followed. The Beatles had mentioned from the stage at the Cavern that they had a record out, and a young man named Raymond Jones walked into NEMS and asked for a copy of it. Brian Epstein couldn’t find it in the record company catalogues, and asked Jones for more information — Jones explained that they were a Liverpool group, but the record had come out in Germany. A couple of days later, two young girls came into the shop asking for the same record, and now Epstein was properly intrigued — in his view, if *two* people asked for a record, that probably meant a lot more than just two people wanted it. He decided to check these Beatles out for himself. Epstein was instantly struck by the group, and this has led to a lot of speculation over the years, because his tastes ran more to Sibelius than to Little Richard. As Epstein was also gay, many people have assumed that the attraction was purely physical. And it might well have been, at least in part, but the suggestion that everything that followed was just because of that seems unlikely — Epstein was also someone who had a long interest in the arts, and had trained as an actor at RADA, the most prestigious actors’ college in the UK, before taking up his job at the family store. Given that the Beatles were soon to become the most popular musicians in the history of the world, and were already the most popular musicians in the Liverpool area, the most reasonable assumption must be that Epstein was impressed by the same things that impressed roughly a billion other people over the next sixty years. Epstein started going to the Cavern regularly, to watch the Beatles and to make plans — the immaculately dressed, public-school-educated, older rich man stood out among the crowd, and the Beatles already knew his face from his record shop, and so they knew something was going on. By late November, Brian had managed to obtain a box of twenty-five copies of “My Bonnie”, and they’d sold out within hours. He set up a meeting with the Beatles, and even before he got them signed to a management contract he was using his contacts with the record industry in London to push the Beatles at record companies. Those companies listened to Brian, because NEMS was one of their biggest customers. December 1961, the month they signed with Brian Epstein, was also the month that they finally started including Lennon/McCartney songs in their sets.  And within a couple of weeks of becoming their manager, even before he’d signed them to a contract, Brian had managed to persuade Mike Smith, an A&R man from Decca, to come to the Cavern to see the group in person. He was impressed, and booked them in for a studio session. December 61 was also the first time that John, Paul, George, and Ringo played together in that lineup, without any other musicians, when on the twenty-seventh of December Pete called in sick for a show, and the others got in their friend to cover for him. It wouldn’t be the last time they would play together. On New Year’s Day 1962, the Beatles made the trek down to London to record fifteen songs at the Decca studios. The session was intended for two purposes — to see if they sounded as good on tape as they did in the Cavern, and if they did to produce their first single. Those recordings included the core of their Cavern repertoire, songs like “Money”: [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Money (Decca version)”] They also recorded three Lennon/McCartney songs, two by Paul — “Love of the Loved” and “Like Dreamers Do”: [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Like Dreamers Do”] And one by Lennon — “Hello Little Girl”: [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Hello Little Girl”] And they were Lennon/McCartney songs, even though they were written separately — the two agreed that they were going to split the credit on anything either of them wrote. The session didn’t go well — the group’s equipment wasn’t up to standard and they had to use studio amps, and they’re all audibly nervous — but Mike Smith was still fairly confident that they’d be releasing something through Decca — he just had to work out the details with his boss, Dick Rowe. Meanwhile, the group were making other changes. Brian suggested that they could get more money if they wore suits, and so they agreed — though they didn’t want just any suits, they wanted stylish mohair suits, like the black American groups they loved so much.  The Beatles were now a proper professional group — but unfortunately, Decca turned them down. Dick Rowe, Mike Smith’s boss, didn’t think that electric guitars were going to become a big thing — he was very tuned in to the American trends, and nothing with guitars was charting at the time. Smith was considering two groups — the Beatles, and Brian Poole and the Tremeloes, and wanted to sign both. Rowe told him that he could sign one, but only one, of them. The Tremeloes had been better in the studio, and they lived round the corner from Smith and were friendly with him. There was no contest — much as Smith wanted to sign both groups, the Tremeloes were the better prospect. Rowe did make an offer to Epstein: if Epstein would pay a hundred pounds (a *lot* of money in those days), Tony Meehan, formerly of the Shadows, would produce the group in another session, and Decca would release that. Brian wasn’t interested — if the Beatles were going to make a record, they were going to make it with people who they weren’t having to pay for the privilege. John, Paul, and George were devastated, but for their own reasons they didn’t bother to tell Pete they’d been turned down. But they did have a tape of themselves, at least — a professional-quality recording that they could use to attract other labels. And their career was going forward in other ways. The same day Brian had his second meeting with Decca, they had an audition with the BBC in Manchester, where they were accepted to perform on Teenager’s Turn, a radio programme hosted by the Northern Dance Orchestra. A few weeks later, on the seventh of March, they went to Manchester to record four songs in front of an audience, of which three would be broadcast: [Excerpt: The Beatles, “Please Mr. Postman (Teenager’s Turn)”] That recording of John singing “Please Mr. Postman” is historic for another reason, which shows just how on the cutting edge of musical taste the Beatles actually were — it was the first time ever that a Motown song was played on the BBC. Now we get to the part of the story that, before Mark Lewisohn’s work in his book a few years back, had always been shrouded in mystery. What Lewisohn shows is that George Ma

tv mystery new york chicago los angeles style overnight american america americans german detroit man washington dc english french love fringe uk money wood england british david bowie cd shadow hamburg germany anthology klaus northwest irish paradise bbc ground elvis voice scotland midwestern beatles chapman john lennon stuart shadows foy loved hole silicon valley mrs record latin teenagers shortly ray charles wales rock and roll sheridan jurgen miracles seniors peter sellers paul mccartney elvis presley ivy league epstein all over britain tilt hutch suddenly playhouse jets halfway manchester keith richards cochran danger somethings motown duff beatle i love you indra hurricanes buddy mccartney bryan ferry emi liverpool lowe byzantine pete townshend rossini oxford street crickets gentle rada allan williams rca postman walley flanders fury top ten decca ringo george harrison levis hippodrome gnu syd barrett sweet georgia brown derry cliff richard ancoats buddy holly george martin cavern beechwood astonishingly partly hmv thomas moore ray davies hutchinson swann sibelius coasters pete best b7 in spite dick dale roy brown be mine stand by me raunchy ringo starr carl perkins sutcliffe third man little richard vipers andy white sta mike smith wooden heart bert kaempfert tommy moore shakin klaus voormann graham nash misirlou merseybeat tremeloes puttin little girls casbah pacemakers aspinall beatniks cayenne shirelles moondogs speke jacaranda brian epstein eddie cochran nems his master ink spots soldier boy ken brown william tell overture mary smith managing directors mark lewisohn ian dury ardmore lonnie donegan love me do kim bennett lennon mccartney how do you do it national service on new year tilt araiza help it lewisohn bruce channel barrett strong raymond jones ron richards quarrymen jasper carrott liverpool institute parlophone gene vincent driving me crazy both john vince taylor stuart sutcliffe parnes gary us bonds long john star club little woods past masters kaempfert mitch murray besame mucho girl can brand new cadillac cry for john moores searchin tony sheridan come go with me baby let brian poole allan clarke les stewart
Rod Arquette Show
Rod Arquette Show: Will You Get the Covid Vaccine Once It's Available? Many Say They Won't!

Rod Arquette Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2020 102:10


Rod Arquette Show Daily Rundown – Wednesday, September 16, 20204:20 pm: Author and historian Victor Davis Hanson joins Rod for a conversation about how efforts from the left to derail President Trump are now becoming comical4:35 pm: Buck Sexton, host of the Buck Sexton Show, which debuts on Talk Radio 1059 KNRS on Monday at 7:00 pm, joins Rod to discuss his new program5:05 pm: Brian Poole, an Associate Professor in Microbiology and Molecular Biology at BYU joins Rod to discuss the results of his study that shows 68% of people would get vaccinated for Covid 19 once the medication is available, while a new Deseret News/Hinckley Institute poll shows that nearly half of respondents either wouldn’t, or weren’t sure, if they would get the vaccine6:05 pm: Former Utah Speaker of the House Greg Hughes joins Rod for their weekly conversation about the world of politics6:20 pm: Brian Cottam, Director of the Utah Division of Forestry, Fire and State Lands joins Rod for a conversation about what has turned out to be the worst wildfire season in Utah history and how Covid 19 has inadvertently contributed to the problem6:35 pm: Representative Lee Perry joins Rod to discuss the decision of a Utah Legislative Committee to explore the possibility of increasing penalties for protestors that break the law

Teen Jets
Progress or Regress S1E2

Teen Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2020 6:13


In this week’s podcast I will discuss slot cornerback Brian Poole and how I think he will do this year. Is there a player you would want me to talk about next week? If so, don’t forget to leave a voice message and come back next Saturday to see who I will talk about next. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/teenjets/message

D-Sides, Orphans, and Oddities
Gary S Paxton. Self-righteous Rock and Roll Weirdo. One of many.

D-Sides, Orphans, and Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2020 120:00


Bob Seger - Turn The Page (1972)  Chuck Berry - My Tambourine (1968) Original version of "My Ding-a-Ling", sort of.  Serge Gainsbourg - Melody (1971)  Gary S. Paxton - Fat, Fat Christians (1978) Gary S. Paxton - The Clone Affair (1978) Gary S. Paxton - The Big A = The Big M (1978)  The Archies - The Jughead (1969) Steve Lawrence - The Lady Wants To Twist (1962)  Barbara Acklin - Am I The Same Girl (1969) Wayne Newton - Love of the Common People (1967)  Gary Glitter - Rock and Roll Part 1 (1972) The hit was the b-side, "Rock and Roll Part 2". The 70s were strange. DJs could just flip the record over. DJs had power. Well, MORE power. Now they have zero.  Sonny and Cher - It's Gonna Rain (1965)  Steve Clayton - (Girls Are Imitating) Twiggy  (1967) Genesis - Can-Utility and the Coastliners (1972)  Arlen Kearce - Sandy, The Go-Go Girl (?) Bobby Peterson Quintet - Mama Get Your Hammer (1961) The Brothers Two - Boogaloo (Soul) Party (1968) Dee Dee Warwick - You're No Good (1963) Dick Kent - Gretchen's New Dish (?) Song-poem.  Dick Kent - Hot Pants Plus (?) Song-poem. Frabjoy and Runcible Spoon ‎– I'm Beside Myself (1969) Godley and Creme under an alias.  Howlin' Wolf - Pop It To Me (1969) J Geils Band - Wreckage (1977) Jerry Reed - Guitar Man (1967) Jet Harris - Real Wild Child - (1962) Cyril Davies on harmonica, Big Jim Sullivan on guitar, Brian Poole on backing vocal. The song written and released originally in 1958 by Johnny O'Keefe but titled 'Wild One'. Also released in 1958 in the USA by Ivan (Jerry Ivan Allison) of The Crickets. You might know the Iggy Pop version.  Jimmy Dawson - Cricket In Your Ear (1956) Lee Dorsey - Yes We Can (1970)  Liberace - Liberace Twist (1962?)  Tammy Baker - The Ballad of Jim and Tammy (1987) To the tune of "Harper Valley PTA".  Beach Boys - Hey Little Tomboy (1978) "Clean" version?        

Constant Wonder
Front-Line Fight Against the Virus

Constant Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2020 50:38


Filmmaker Zack Taylor interviews front-line workers in NYC, who provide a surprising message of hope. BYU's Brian Poole explains how COVID-19 is different from other viruses, and why that's a good thing. Ben Abbott of BYU introduces us to microbes that fight pollution.

KickerRadio
KickerTalk26 - 专访 Official 创始人 Jason

KickerRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 16, 2020 21:26


上周 Vagabond 滑板创始人赖科陪 Official headwear 创始人 Jason 来到上海在 The Hub 上展示他们最新一季的产品。我们去他们的展位聊了聊关于他们在美国即将开始批发 Habitat 滑板,品牌如何与滑板结缘,中国市场计划以及... 波仔穿上 Vans 这件事... 背景音乐: 1. The Main Ingredient--- 2. Deee-Lite----- 3. Duft Punk--- 4. Cover Girls--- 5. Brian Poole & The Tremeloes---- KickerRadio是 KickerClub.com制作播出的滑板网络电台。 栏目包括: 飞说不可 - 滑板名嘴袁飞主持的滑板脱口秀,点评滑板热点 KickerTalk - KickerClub.com 创始人管牧的采访录音 ​微博 @kickerclub / 微信公众账号 kcskate

Constant Wonder
Vicious Viruses

Constant Wonder

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2020 49:14


Laura Spinney takes us back to the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918 and the lessons history can teach us. BYU's Brian Poole explains where viruses come from and how they spread.

The Official Jets Podcast
Jets GM Joe Douglas (4/7)

The Official Jets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2020 24:53


Exclusive 1-on-1 with GM Joe Douglas and Olivia Landis is joined by Brian Billick. Douglas (2:03): How COVID-19 has impacted his job (2:03), free agency approach (3:00). traits he's looking for in O-Linemen (4:30), thoughts on WR Breshad Perriman (6:10), thoughts on WR Josh Doctson (7:38), bringing Brian Poole and Jordan Jenkins back (8:58), bringing in Pierre Desir (10:41), approach to the NFL Draft (11:57) and communication with his staff working from home (14:50). Billick (19:57): What he remembers about Joe Douglas from BAL (19:57), Ozzie Newsome's impact on Joe Douglas (20:56), thoughts on Jets' free agency (21:37) and what's next for the Jets (22:49).

Mark & Mark Talk Sports
Sports Banter

Mark & Mark Talk Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2020 50:55


NFL, Cam Newton, Jameis Winston, Cam Rush, Jason Peters, Mike Daniels, Derek Watt, T.J. Watt, J.J. Watt, Texans, Brady, Brees, Bulaga Ebron, Nickell Robey - Coleman, Ndamukong Su, Brian Poole, Tiger King, cats, lions, wolves, 30 for 30, A Football Life, John Riggins, Redskins, Al Davis, Raiders, Archie Manning, Peyton, Eli, ALbert Pujols, Bonds, Aaron, Ruth, Rodriquez, Justin Verlander, Migeul Cabrera, Zack Greinke, World Series, Las Vegas, Tony Ferguson, Khabib Nurmagomedov, Scott Kingery

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Gaming the System?: Another Offseason Q&A - 3/31/20

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2020 44:32


Aaron answers listener questions about the Atlanta Falcons offseason, compensatory picks, recent coaching hires and hypothetical trades. Are the Falcons now starting to "game" the comp pick formula? Why did the Falcons hire Dirk Koetter over other candidates a year ago? Does Dan Quinn even care about the offense? Did they mess up letting Brian Poole go or will Kendall Sheffield pay off their faith in him this year? Is the "upside" of Laquon Treadwell legit? Should the Falcons try to fleece the Houston Texans again by trading for J.J. Watt? Aaron answers these questions and more on today's podcast. Part of the Locked On Podcast Network Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Gaming the System?: Another Offseason Q&A - 3/31/20

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2020 44:32


Aaron answers listener questions about the Atlanta Falcons offseason, compensatory picks, recent coaching hires and hypothetical trades. Are the Falcons now starting to "game" the comp pick formula? Why did the Falcons hire Dirk Koetter over other candidates a year ago? Does Dan Quinn even care about the offense? Did they mess up letting Brian Poole go or will Kendall Sheffield pay off their faith in him this year? Is the "upside" of Laquon Treadwell legit? Should the Falcons try to fleece the Houston Texans again by trading for J.J. Watt? Aaron answers these questions and more on today's podcast. Part of the Locked On Podcast Network Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Gang’s All Here: A NY Jets Football Podcast from New York Post Sports
Episode 27: Inside The Jets' Free Agency Plans

Gang’s All Here: A NY Jets Football Podcast from New York Post Sports

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 31:10


Brian Costello and Jake Brown open the show addressing the moves made by Joe Douglas in free agency. Coz breaks down the signings of George Fant and Conor McGovern and the re-signing of Alex Lewis and Brian Poole. They also discuss the future of Robby Anderson, what else the Jets still need to do, how much cap space they have left and Tom Brady going to the Bucs. NY Post sports columnist Mike Vaccaro then drops by the podcast. Vaccaro discusses the job Douglas has done, where Anderson may end up, how weird it will be to see Brady in a Bucs uniform and other sports greats who ended their careers in unusual places. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Official Jets Podcast
Jets Free Agency Update - Ep. 3 (3/19)

The Official Jets Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 47:27


Team reporters Ethan Greenberg and Eric Allen discuss the NFL landscape and Olivia Landis is joined by ESPN's Dan Graca: Trumaine Johnson's release (3:45), reportedly re-signing Brian Poole (5:19), Jets' RFA Tenders (James Burgess, Arthur Maulet and Bennett Jackson) (11:52), interview with Dan Graca on the Jets' FA moves (16:11), Robby Anderson (25:36), Day 1 of free agency around the NFL (32:46) , AFC East new faces (37:27).

Locked On Jets - Daily Podcast On The New York Jets
Recapping a Free Agency Wednesday Episode 828 3/19/20

Locked On Jets - Daily Podcast On The New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 23:00


The new league year officially began on Wednesday. In this day and age that seems like a bit of a misnomer. Since teams are able to speak with free agents before the official start of the new league year, the day has less significance than in the past. Players cannot officially sign before the start of the new league year, but outside of the occasional Anthony Barr situation, it is mainly a formality. Today we discuss what the Jets did on Wednesday. Their most notable move was bringing back slot cornerback Brian Poole. Poole will return on a one year deal. He was an excellent slot corner for the Jets in 2019. More than retaining Poole, a pattern is emerging for the Jets in their approach to free agency. We will discuss. The Jets also said goodbye to Trumaine Johnson and Brandon Shell. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Interception – Der Football-Talk – meinsportpodcast.de

Am Mittwoch ist die NFL in ihre neue Saison gestartet, womit nun alle Trades und Spielerverpflichtungen offiziell werden. Doch nach zwei Tagen voller News sind die größten Free Agents bereits unter Vertrag, weswegen es am dritten Tag noch kaum große Signings gab. Die größte Nachricht war dabei der Trade von Nick Foles zu den Chicago Bears, die dafür einen Viertrundenpick nach Jacksonville geschickt haben. Während das wohl kein Ende der Quarterback-Probleme für die Bears bedeutet, scheinen die Jaguars einen Rebuild zu machen. Oder auch nicht? Sebastian Mühlenhof (@Seppmaster56) redet mit Florian Schmitt (@Flosch1006) und Moritz May (Touchdown24) auch über den Trade der Tennessee Titans, der für reichlich Verwunderung sorgt. Am dritten Tag der Free Agency waren besonders die Los Angeles Rams, die Detroit Lions, die Dallas Cowboys und die Los Angeles Chargers. Euch gefällt dieser Podcast oder ihr habt Kritik, Fragen oder Anregungen? Dann freuen wir uns, wenn wir von euch hören. Lasst uns gerne bei iTunes eine Rezension und ein bisschen Feedback da. Schreibt uns, was ihr gut oder auch schlecht findet, oder welche Themen wir eurer Meinung nach mal in einer Send...

NFL – meinsportpodcast.de
Entspannter Tag 3

NFL – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2020 29:47


Am Mittwoch ist die NFL in ihre neue Saison gestartet, womit nun alle Trades und Spielerverpflichtungen offiziell werden. Doch nach zwei Tagen voller News sind die größten Free Agents bereits unter Vertrag, weswegen es am dritten Tag noch kaum große Signings gab. Die größte Nachricht war dabei der Trade von Nick Foles zu den Chicago Bears, die dafür einen Viertrundenpick nach Jacksonville geschickt haben. Während das wohl kein Ende der Quarterback-Probleme für die Bears bedeutet, scheinen die Jaguars einen Rebuild zu machen. Oder auch nicht? Sebastian Mühlenhof (@Seppmaster56) redet mit Florian Schmitt (@Flosch1006) und Moritz May (Touchdown24) auch über den Trade der Tennessee Titans, der für reichlich Verwunderung sorgt. Am dritten Tag der Free Agency waren besonders die Los Angeles Rams, die Detroit Lions, die Dallas Cowboys und die Los Angeles Chargers. Euch gefällt dieser Podcast oder ihr habt Kritik, Fragen oder Anregungen? Dann freuen wir uns, wenn wir von euch hören. Lasst uns gerne bei iTunes eine Rezension und ein bisschen Feedback da. Schreibt uns, was ihr gut oder auch schlecht findet, oder welche Themen wir eurer Meinung nach mal in einer Send...

American Football – meinsportpodcast.de

Am Mittwoch ist die NFL in ihre neue Saison gestartet, womit nun alle Trades und Spielerverpflichtungen offiziell werden. Doch nach zwei Tagen voller News sind die größten Free Agents bereits unter Vertrag, weswegen es am dritten Tag noch kaum große Signings gab. Die größte Nachricht war dabei der Trade von Nick Foles zu den Chicago Bears, die dafür einen Viertrundenpick nach Jacksonville geschickt haben. Während das wohl kein Ende der Quarterback-Probleme für die Bears bedeutet, scheinen die Jaguars einen Rebuild zu machen. Oder auch nicht? Sebastian Mühlenhof (@Seppmaster56) redet mit Florian Schmitt (@Flosch1006) und Moritz May (Touchdown24) auch über den Trade der Tennessee Titans, der für reichlich Verwunderung sorgt. Am dritten Tag der Free Agency waren besonders die Los Angeles Rams, die Detroit Lions, die Dallas Cowboys und die Los Angeles Chargers. Euch gefällt dieser Podcast oder ihr habt Kritik, Fragen oder Anregungen? Dann freuen wir uns, wenn wir von euch hören. Lasst uns gerne bei iTunes eine Rezension und ein bisschen Feedback da. Schreibt uns, was ihr gut oder auch schlecht findet, oder welche Themen wir eurer Meinung nach mal in einer Send...

JetNation Radio - New York Jets Talk.
Free Agency Round-up and Rumors With Plenty of Draft Talk

JetNation Radio - New York Jets Talk.

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2020 71:00


On this week's episode, Alex and Glenn cover the Jets recent free agent signings, who else might they pursue, and how can free agency impact their approach in the draft.  Speaking of the draft, Emory Hunt from Football Game Plan calls in to share his thoughts on some potential Jets targets along with some notes from the combine.   JetNation Radio would like to thank our sponsor, MILE Social.  For help with managing any and all of your business-related social media platforms, contact Mile Social.  Instagram, twitter, facebook, tiktok, you name it, they'll manage it.  Just go to MILESocial.com.

Turn On The Jets: New York Jets
New York Jets Early Free Agency Reaction - TOJ Roundtable

Turn On The Jets: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 18, 2020 37:30


Joe Caporoso, Dalbin Osorio, Greg Armstong and Daniel Essien discuss the New York jets first wave of free agency acquisitions including George Fant, Connor McGovern and the return of both Brian Poole and Alex Lewis. They also break down what to expect next.... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 620 - Day #1 of the Legal Tampering Period w/Chris Nimbley

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2020 54:06


Scott Mason talks with Chris Nimbley of Jetsinsider.com to review Day #1 of the NFL's 2020 Legal Tampering Period! Topics discussed include: -What happened with Jack Conklin, Joe Thuney, and Graham Glassgow and where the Jets go from here -The Jets' signing of George Fant and what it means -Latest on internal free agents such as Robby Anderson, Brian Poole, Jordan Jenkins, and Kelvin Beachum  -News from around the NFL including the huge trades that sent DeAndre Hopkins to Arizona and DeForest Buckner to Indianapolis, big bucks for Byron Jones, Bradbury on the move, a whole host of other signings and franchise tags And more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network...… “Keep Coming Back” is a series of one-on-one interviews focused around the paths to sobriety and recovery. Each episode explores an individual’s unique story, their relationship with drugs and alcohol, and explains how each navigates life today without a drink, a powder, or a pill. Find the podcast here; http://keepcomingbackpodcast.com/   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 619 - Final 2020 Free Agency Preview w/Chris Nimbley & Michael Nania

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2020 74:30


Scott Mason talks with Chris Nimbley of Jetsinsider.com and Michael Nania of JetXfactor.com for a final preview of the NFL's 2020 free agency period! Topics discussed include: -News from around the NFL including the collective bargaining agreement passing, Ryan Tannehill staying in TN, Calais Campbell getting traded to Baltimore, Brandon Scherff being franchise tagged, where Tom Brady may end up, who could be the consolation prize for the loser of the Tom Brady sweepstakes, and more.... -The Jack Conklin buzz and what it all means as well as where the Jets sit in terms of other offensive linemen like Joe Thuney, Graham Glassgow, and Connor McGovern -Defensive playmakers the chase likely will and won't be in on -Latest on where internal free agents such as Robby Anderson, Brian Poole, Jordan Jenkins, and Kelvin Beachum could end up And more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network...... “Keep Coming Back” is a series of one-on-one interviews focused around the paths to sobriety and recovery. Each episode explores an individual’s unique story, their relationship with drugs and alcohol, and explains how each navigates life today without a drink, a powder, or a pill. Find the podcast here; http://keepcomingbackpodcast.com/   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Rock Hall Charge
Passion: Trial and Denial

Rock Hall Charge

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2020 35:16


Being Remembered for the wrong thing.... for a mistake. In 1962, Brian Epstein, record label Decca were looking to sign an up and coming band. They auditioned two young bands at their studios in London, deciding to sign Brian Poole and the Tremeloes. The one they rejected? A four-piece outfit from Liverpool…

Interception – Der Football-Talk – meinsportpodcast.de

Die New England Patriots haben mal wieder die AFC East gewonnen. Dabei konnten sie jedoch offensiv zu selten überzeugen, weswegen sie früh in den Playoffs scheiterten. Dabei müssen sie nicht nur bessere Anspielstationen organisieren, sondern auch die Zukunft von Tom Brady ist noch nicht gesichert. Den besten Record seit 20 Jahren schafften die Buffalo Bills. Der Hauptgrund für den Erfolg lag dabei neben dem starken Coaching von Sean McDermott bei der überragenden Defense, die zu den Top 5 in der NFL zählte. Dennoch muss auch dort die Offense um Quarterback Josh Allen einen Schritt nach vorne machen. Sebastian Mühlenhof (@Seppmaster56) redet mit Florian Schmitt (@Flosch1006) auch über die New York Jets und die Miami Dolphins. Beide Teams haben dabei noch einige Baustellen, bevor sie den anderen beiden Teams gefährlich werden können. Euch gefällt dieser Podcast oder ihr habt Kritik, Fragen oder Anregungen? Dann freuen wir uns, wenn wir von euch hören. Lasst uns gerne bei iTunes eine Rezension und ein bisschen Feedback da. Schreibt uns, was ihr gut oder auch schlecht findet, oder welche Themen wir eurer Meinung nach mal in einer Sendung behandeln sollten. Oder...

Gang Green Germany (New York Jets Fans Deutschland)
Cap Space, Jets Free Agents und Resignings

Gang Green Germany (New York Jets Fans Deutschland)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2020 55:40


Per (@GermanDraftNerd93) und Basti (@GGGBasti) beschäftigen sich mit dem Cap Space, Verträgen und den Jets, die mit der auslaufenden Saison Free Agents werden. Insbesondere die "großen Namen" Robby Anderson, Brian Poole, Kelvin Beachum und Jordan Jenkins sind Thema. Sollen sie reigned werden? Und was kostet das? Auserdem: Was passiert mit Le'Veon Bell?

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 527 - Midweek with Manish: Jets vs Ravens Pre-Game Report & News/Notes/Injury Updates

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2019 42:21


Scott Mason talks to Manish Mehta of the New York Daily News for a midweek look at everything going on surrounding the New York Jets as they prepare for their matchup later tonight on national television against the Baltimore Ravens at M & T Bank Stadium! Manish discusses: -Everything surrounding Le'Veon Bell from bowling to illness to being underutilized -Adam Gase's bizarre handling of the bowling story and why it may be a tell as to the coach's true feelings about his star running back -News involving banged up Jets including Jamal Adams, Brian Poole, Bilal Powell, Ryan Griffin, Quinnen Williams, and Arthur Maulet. -The seemingly unstoppable Lamar Jackson and why he may embarrass the Jets tonight on national television -Predictions for tonight's game against the Ravens and keys to the game for Gang Green and more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network...… Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 520 - Midweek with Manish: Latest on Jamal Adams' Injury & For Whom The (Lev) Bell Tolls

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2019 59:20


Scott Mason talks to Manish Mehta of the New York Daily News for a midweek look at everything going on surrounding the New York Jets as they prepare for their upcoming rematch against the Miami Dolphins at MetLife Stadium on Sunday! Manish discusses: -The latest on the injury to Jamal Adams -News involving other banged up Jets including Sam Darnold, Brian Poole, & Arthur Maulet -The frustrations of Le'Veon Bell and whether or not he has a future with the Jets -Did Adam Gase play right into Cincinnati's hands? -More offensive line woes -What the Jets can do to turn things around the final month of the season -Predictions for Sunday's game against the Dolphins and more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network...… Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 514 - Midweek w/Manish: Darnold's Growth/Poole's Search/Griffin Extension/Adams' Twitter War

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2019 55:58


Scott Mason talks to Manish Mehta of the New York Daily News for a midweek look at everything going on surrounding the New York Jets as they prepare for their upcoming matchup against the Cincinnati Bengals at Paul Brown Stadium on Sunday! Manish discusses: -Ryan Griffin’s contract extension with the Jets -An important aspect of Sam Darnold’s game that has improved leaps and bounds -The emergence of Le’Veon Bell as a weapon in the passing game -More injury woes including Chuma Edoga and Kelvin Beachum -The search for Brian Poole’s pick-six ball -The hilarious Twitter war between Jamal Adams and the 3rd Carr brother -Predictions for Sunday's game against the Bengals and more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network...… Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ENN with Peter Rosenberg
Evening Nightly News with Peter Rosenberg

ENN with Peter Rosenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2019 17:47


On Monday's ENN, the guys analyze Richard Jefferson's shot at the Knicks and the Knicks very official response. Plus, Brian Poole wants his ball back and Derek Carr will not concede that he was benched.

Top of Mind with Julie Rose
Hong Kong, Carnival Safety, Vaccine Hesitancy

Top of Mind with Julie Rose

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2019 100:25


Robert Daly of the Wilson Center Kissinger Institute on Hong Kong protests. Ken Martin of KRM Consulting on carnival ride safety. Brian Poole of BYU on vaccines. Scott Haskins of Fine Art Conservation Laboratories on mural restoration. Tara Powell of the University of Illinois on social workers. Edwin Lephart of BYU on a plant-based compound revitalizing skin and hair.

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 415 - Training Camp Day #10/Kalil Appears w/Matt Stypulkoski

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2019 46:44


Scott Mason talks to Matt Stypulkoski of NJ Advance Media to discuss Day #10 of New York Jets training camp at Florham Park! Matt talks about the absence of Kelvin Beachum, the ball distribution of Sam Darnold, a bounce back for Trumaine Johnson, the never-ending struggles of the Catman, the near murder of Tevor Siemian, Brian Poole with another in a long line of strong performances, two young players who had struggled beginning to turn it around, everything you need to know about the play of the rookies on day #10, Ryan Kalil's first appearance since signing with the Jets and quotes from inside the locker room including an all-time classic line by Quinnen Williams, and more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network...... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 410 - Training Camp Day #5 w/Chris Nimbley

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2019 35:20


Scott Mason talks to Chris Nimbley of Jetsinsider.com to recap day #5 of Jets training camp! Chris discusses the injury to Qvale and the brief scare involving Le'Veon Bell, an unheralded receiver beginning to state his case for playing time, a better day for the Jets' defense including a certain CB, Steve McClendon showing off his Hulk-like power, Brian Poole forgetting the words "non-full contact practice" exist, Gregg Williams putting on a show for the fans, the tight ends having a nice showing, plus we talk about the potential availability of Trent Williams, and more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network...... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

TOJ Film Room
Brian Poole, Ty Montgomery and the Jets| TOJ FILM ROOM, Episode 49

TOJ Film Room

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2019 129:47


On episode forty-nine of the TOJ Film Room Joe runs solo to break down plays of TWO new Jets in new slot CB Brian Poole and new RB Ty Montgomery! What are they’re  strengths and weaknesses? How will they fit in? What should you expect from them? All of these questions and many more are answered on this episode.   COMMENT with what YOU think about the New York Jets signing Brian Poole and Ty Montgomery!   SUBSCRIBE here:  https://bit.ly/XeeC0Y   Patreon- https://www.patreon.com/JoeBlewett   FOLLOW JOE on TWITTER here: https://twitter.com/Joerb31   FOLLOW MARCUS on TWITTER here: https://twitter.com/Patchmc42   CHECK OUT EPISODE 46 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hcvyXBS9ehQ   CHECK OUT EPISODE 47 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ocYSeR_EVxY&t=17s   CHECK OUT EPISODE 48 here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFyQK09B0cU&t=480s Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 276 - Week 1 FA Mailbag & Latest News w/Chris Nimbley

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 16, 2019 61:56


Scott Mason talks to Chris Nimbley of Jetsinsider.com to discuss the latest news and notes surrounding free agency and answer YOUR questions. Chris talks about the Jets re-signing Neville Hewitt, Ronald Darby and Bryce Callahan going elsewhere, the contract structuring of Brian Poole and Darryl Roberts, and Ryan Tannehill leaving the AFC East. Then we take YOUR questions about Quinnen Williams vs Josh Allen, what's happening with Justin Houston, whether or not Frank Clar should be a trade target, other depth players the Jets could add, who might be the starting corner opposite Trumaine Johnson, if bringing Bilal Powell back could be an option, the trade value of Darron Lee, and more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network...... Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 275 - Le'Veon Bell Conference Call & FA News w/Chris Nimbley

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2019 45:46


Scott Mason talks to Chris Nimbley of Jetsinsider.com to discuss the the media conference call with Le'Veon Bell and the third official day of NFL free agency! Chris goes in detail about the highlights of the Bell conference call, the signings of Brian Poole and Chandler Catazaro, the latest of the Jets' search for a center, Mike Pennel and Terrence Brooks heading to New England, rumors of Trae Waynes' availability, and Rex Ryan taking a swipe at Darron Lee!  Then we go around the league to discuss what the hell is up with the Giants, Kareem Hunt not appealing his suspension, fun stories about the newest Cleveland Brown Sheldon Richardson, Teddy Bridgewater making up his mind to definitely stay with the Saints, and more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network......  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Jets - Daily Podcast On The New York Jets
Locked on Jets 3/15/19 Episode 591: Second Wave of Free Agency Kicks Into Gear

Locked On Jets - Daily Podcast On The New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 15, 2019 23:45


Although things aren't as exciting as they were a few days ago, the Jets remain active in free agency. We are starting the second wave, and it probably is as important as the first wave. The team still has a lot of hole to fill. The players signed from this point forward generally won't be big names or make big money. A team that knows what it's doing can fill holes on the cheap this time of year. The Jets made some moves on Thursday within this phase of free agency. The team retained nose tackle Steve McLendon. If you have followed my work, you probably know my thoughts on McLendon and how keeping him around pleases me. The team also signed slot corner Brian Poole from Atlanta and cut Isaiah Crowell after just one season. In other news, a couple of former Jets ended up in New England. We will discuss all of this on today's podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Bengals - Daily Podcast On The Cincinnati Bengals
Locked On Bengals - 3/15/2019 Free Agency Weekend Mailbag #1, and 3 free agents visit the Bengals

Locked On Bengals - Daily Podcast On The Cincinnati Bengals

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2019 75:28


The Bengals are hosted free agent visits from Shaquil Barrett, John Miller, and Brian Poole, and you sent us a bunch of questions. Jake and Joe talk about the free agent fits and then take your many, many questions for the weekend mailbag. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets
Episode 274: The Le'Veon Bell Contract & Latest FA News w/Chris Nimbley

Play Like A Jet: New York Jets

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2019 43:19


Episode 274 of "Play Like A Jet" is here! Subscribe on iTunes or check out the audio below. Scott Mason talks to Chris Nimbley of Jetsinsider.com to discuss the parameters of the Le'Veon Bell contract and the second official day of NFL free agency! Chris goes in detail about the specifics of the Le'veon Bell contract, Andre Roberts and Jason Myers leaving, Darryl Roberts getting paid more than expected, Steve McClendon staying, Isaiah Crowell being released, Brian Poole visiting, what's up with Justin Houston, and more! Then we go around the league to discuss the latest news and notes including Earl Thomas to Baltimore, Tevin Coleman and Mark Ingram finding homes, Tyrell Williams getting the most money of any FA receiver, the release of Blake Bortles, Emmanuel Ogbah on the trade block, Teddy Bridgewater possibly Anthony Barring the Saints, and more! Play Like A Jet is part of the Turn On The Jets Digital Podcast network......  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Bow Tie Chronicles – Atlanta Falcons
Fans not impressed with Sambrailo's extension

The Bow Tie Chronicles – Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 20, 2019 25:09


The Falcons have been active in the offseason. So far, linebacker Bruce Carter, defensive end Steven Means and offensive tackle Ty Sambrailo have been retained, while the team has cut ties with kicker Matt Bryant, cornerback Robert Alford, defensive end Brooks Reed and nickel back Brian Poole.

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 2/13/19 - Cornerbacks: 2018 Review

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2019 34:07


Aaron reviews the Falcons cornerback play from 2018. He discusses how Desmond Trufant still doesn't get enough love from some corners of the fanbase, whether Isaiah Oliver is ready to start in 2019 off limited reps in 2018, Brian Poole's rebound season and whether we'll see more of Damontae Kazee in the slot next season.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 2/13/19 - Cornerbacks: 2018 Review

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2019 34:07


Aaron reviews the Falcons cornerback play from 2018. He discusses how Desmond Trufant still doesn't get enough love from some corners of the fanbase, whether Isaiah Oliver is ready to start in 2019 off limited reps in 2018, Brian Poole's rebound season and whether we'll see more of Damontae Kazee in the slot next season.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 10/4/18 - Week 5 Q&A

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2018 30:42


Aaron answers listener questions dealing with the Falcons in Weeks 4 and 5. He breaks down a shift in Takk McKinley's role and his potential production this season, evaluates Brian Poole and several of the Falcons 2018 rookie class, discusses how to fix the defense in terms of whether or not the team should dial up more man coverage and blitzes. Check out MyBookie online today! Hit up Lokai.com for your amazing gameday bracelet! Check out all the great deals at Swap.com! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 10/4/18 - Week 5 Q&A

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2018 30:42


Aaron answers listener questions dealing with the Falcons in Weeks 4 and 5. He breaks down a shift in Takk McKinley's role and his potential production this season, evaluates Brian Poole and several of the Falcons 2018 rookie class, discusses how to fix the defense in terms of whether or not the team should dial up more man coverage and blitzes. Check out MyBookie online today! Hit up Lokai.com for your amazing gameday bracelet! Check out all the great deals at Swap.com! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 4/26/18 - Draft Day Q&A With Kevin Knight

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2018 51:57


Aaron is joined by The Falcoholic’s Kevin Knight to discuss the #Falcons first-round plans tonight as well as answer listeners’ draft-related queries. They discuss whether Taven Bryan is the front-runner to be the team’s top pick, whether Maurice Hurst’s medical red flags are a concern to the team and whether one of the top defensive tackles will be available at pick No. 26. They also answer listener questions pertaining to drafting a running back, mock drafts, Damontae Kazee competing with Brian Poole at cornerback and whether the team will “triple dip” at defensive tackle. Kevin is on twitter: @FalcoholicKevin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 4/26/18 - Draft Day Q&A With Kevin Knight

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2018 51:57


Aaron is joined by The Falcoholic’s Kevin Knight to discuss the #Falcons first-round plans tonight as well as answer listeners’ draft-related queries. They discuss whether Taven Bryan is the front-runner to be the team’s top pick, whether Maurice Hurst’s medical red flags are a concern to the team and whether one of the top defensive tackles will be available at pick No. 26. They also answer listener questions pertaining to drafting a running back, mock drafts, Damontae Kazee competing with Brian Poole at cornerback and whether the team will “triple dip” at defensive tackle. Kevin is on twitter: @FalcoholicKevin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 1/29/18 - 2017 Roster Review: Cornerbacks and Special Teams

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2018 55:34


Aaron is wrapping his six-part roster review series by breaking down the #Falcons cornerbacks and special teams units. Aaron discusses why cornerbacks have it harder than most, but despite that Robert Alford and Desmond Trufant have proven to be among the premier cornerback duos in the league. He also discusses how the Falcons can improve a strong secondary by attempting to upgrade the nickel cornerback beyond Brian Poole. He also discusses special teams and why the Falcons should retain Matt Bryant and how they can upgrade their return and coverage units this offseason. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 1/29/18 - 2017 Roster Review: Cornerbacks and Special Teams

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2018 55:34


Aaron is wrapping his six-part roster review series by breaking down the #Falcons cornerbacks and special teams units. Aaron discusses why cornerbacks have it harder than most, but despite that Robert Alford and Desmond Trufant have proven to be among the premier cornerback duos in the league. He also discusses how the Falcons can improve a strong secondary by attempting to upgrade the nickel cornerback beyond Brian Poole. He also discusses special teams and why the Falcons should retain Matt Bryant and how they can upgrade their return and coverage units this offseason. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 1/11/18 - Wildcard All-22 Review With Q&A

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2018 55:09


Aaron answers listener questions stemming from the #Falcons wildcard win over the #Rams. This week's queries pertain to the lack of respect the Falcons get nationally, Desmond Trufant's performance in coverage and comparison his performance to Robert Alford, Brian Poole's performance and whether a position switch is in his future before Aaron finally breaks down his perception of Vic Beasley's issues as a pass-rusher and how he can improve. He then wraps up by expressing "concerns" about any potential NFC Championship Game matchups. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
Locked on Falcons - 1/11/18 - Wildcard All-22 Review With Q&A

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2018 55:09


Aaron answers listener questions stemming from the #Falcons wildcard win over the #Rams. This week's queries pertain to the lack of respect the Falcons get nationally, Desmond Trufant's performance in coverage and comparison his performance to Robert Alford, Brian Poole's performance and whether a position switch is in his future before Aaron finally breaks down his perception of Vic Beasley's issues as a pass-rusher and how he can improve. He then wraps up by expressing "concerns" about any potential NFC Championship Game matchups. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

On Target
On Target: It's What's In The Grooves That Count #148

On Target

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2017 60:25


On Target is back! Still displaced due to rennovations but we WILL broadcast come Hell or high water. You cannot stop the signal. Enjoy this brand new show! Please like the Facebook page here: facebook.com/ontargetpodcast/ ------------------------------------------------- The Playlist Is: "Do It One More Time (The Twine)" Alvin Cash & The Crawlers - Mar-V-Lus "Monkey Talk" Little Stevie Wonder - Tamla "Go Go Shoes" Lonnie Youngblood - Fairmount "Something Right Here" The Paper Dolls - Pye "A Little Bit For Sandy" Paul Peterson - Tamla-Motown "Driving Wheel" Roy Head - Back Beat "Leavin' Here" Jimmy Hanna with The Dynamics - Seafare Bolo "Lover Lover" The Quid - Eagle "Understanding" The Small Faces - Decca "She Won't Come Back" The Hesitations - Kapp "Gone With The Wind Is My Love" Rita & The Tiaras - Kent Select "You Didn't Say A Word" Yvonne Baker - Parkway "Are You Sure" The Staple Singers - Epic "Don't Say Maybe Baby" The Capitols - Karen "Can You Jerk Like Me" The Contours - Gordy "Do You Love Me" Brian Poole & The Tremeloes - Decca "The Tracker" The Sir Douglas Quintet - Tribe "You Look Good Together" The Bats - Parrot "Why Worry" Aaron Neville - Par Lo "Ready, Steady Go" Prince & Princess - Bell "Sister James" Nino Tempo & The 5th Ave. Sax - A&M

On Target
On Target: It's What's In The Grooves That Counts #147

On Target

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2017 61:19


Here it is people!! This week is a full overview of all kinds of Mod Beats from Northern Soul to Latin Jazz. Be the first kid on your block to listen to the latest thing! Get down with it! Please like the Facebook page here: facebook.com/ontargetpodcast/ ------------------------------------------------- The Playlist Is: "20-75" Willie Mitchell - Hi "The Drive" The Adorables - Peacock "The Barracuda" Alvin Cash & The Crawlers - Mar-V-Lus "Security" Etta James - Cadet "Don't Let Her Be Your Baby" The Contours - Tamla "My Sugar Baby" Connie Clark - Joker "Magic Bus" The Who - Brunswick "Hang Up" Five By Five - Paula "We'll Be Together" The Pretty Things - Fontana "Why Can't You Love Me" Brian Poole & The Tremeloes - Decca "If This Is Love" The Precisions - Drew "In A Moment" The Intrigues - Yew "How Could It Be" The Esquires - Bunky "Dance Dance Dance" Liquid Smoke - Roulette "Call Me" Chris Motez - Quality "Hi-Heel Sneakers" Jose Feliciano - RCA-Victor "House Of Bamboo" Andy Williams - Apex "I Need Love" Little Richard - Okeh "Hitch It To The Horse" Fantastic Johnny C. - Phil-L.A. of Soul "Hook It To The Mule" Fred Towels & The Jacksonians - Way Out "Do What? (Twist!)" Dave Parker - Mala

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
LOCKED ON FALCONS - Mar. 21, 2017 - Back-Logged Listener Q&A

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2017 49:20


Allen and Aaron are Locked on #Falcons, answering listener questions dating from February about the offseason and expectations for 2017. They answer questions about Brian Poole’s move to safety, Devonta Freeman’s contract, the value of seventh-round picks, Dontari Poe’s role and playing time, Ra’Shede Hageman’s role, cheating wives, expensive diets, fullbacks, Nick Williams’ contract, top 10 defenses and the NCAA Tournament. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
LOCKED ON FALCONS - Mar. 21, 2017 - Back-Logged Listener Q&A

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 20, 2017 49:20


Allen and Aaron are Locked on #Falcons, answering listener questions dating from February about the offseason and expectations for 2017. They answer questions about Brian Poole’s move to safety, Devonta Freeman’s contract, the value of seventh-round picks, Dontari Poe’s role and playing time, Ra’Shede Hageman’s role, cheating wives, expensive diets, fullbacks, Nick Williams’ contract, top 10 defenses and the NCAA Tournament. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Big 3 Roll Up
The Brian and Britt Episode Ft. Brian Poole and Britt McHenry

Big 3 Roll Up

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2017 59:52


This week Silkk, Kev, and Newberg welcome Atlanta Falcons starting Corner Back, Brian Poole to the podcast. He talks about the journey from undrafted Free Agent to starting in the Super Bowl. Then, ESPN Reporter Britt McHenry comes on to chat about her favorite school of the Big 3, a sit down with Jameis Winston, and her Northwestern Wildcats.

INDUSTRY TACTICS with FRIENDLY RICH
EP. 24 - RENALDO and THE LOAF (Part 1)

INDUSTRY TACTICS with FRIENDLY RICH

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2017 73:31


Friendly Rich sits down with English avant garde masters, Renaldo and The Loaf to catch a glimpse into their wonderful world. So many artists are influenced by this subtle duo from Portsmouth, England, from Spike Jones, and The Locust, to Friendly Rich himself, this two-part episode is a great treat to share with you all! Since the early 70's Brian Poole (aka 'Renaldo Malpractice') and David Janssen (aka 'Ted the Loaf') have released some of the strangest music ever made! One an architect, the other a biomedical scientist, Renaldo and The Loaf's friendship began when they were teenagers, and has bloomed into a truly inspiring story, the biproduct...this incredible body of work. If you are new to the world of RATL, you're in for a real treat today. If you're a fan, we dig deep into some of the elbow crevasses, shuffles and rodcods!

Single Fat Football Fan
Ep. 19 - Four Under-the-Radar Players to Watch in the Super Bowl.

Single Fat Football Fan

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2017 29:11


In this episode, Chee and Matt each discuss four under the radar players (one offensive & one defensive for each team) and why they could make a big difference in the biggest game of the year. 02:30 - Honorable mention; Brian Poole CB Atlanta Falcons. Why every team needs players like undrafted rookie Brian Poole for consistent success. 06:20 - Ra’shede Hageman; DT Atlanta Falcons. 09:10 - Dwight Freeney; DE Atlanta Falcons 11:40 - Joe Thuney; LG New England Patriots. 13:25 - James Develin; FB New England Patriots. 17:40 - Malcom Brown; DT New England Patriots. 19:05 - Trey Flowers; DE New England Patriots. 21:30 - Taylor Gabriel; WR Atlanta Falcons. 24:00 - Austin Hooper; TE Atlanta Falcons.

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
LOCKED ON FALCONS - Jan. 4, 2017 - Breaking Down Week 17’s All-22 and Answering Listener Questions

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2017 37:00


Allen and Aaron are Locked on #Falcons film, looking at the All-22 from the team’s Week 17 win over the #Saints. On this episode they weigh in on the MVP debate, compare Matt Bryant vs. Morten Andersen, Brian Poole’s role in the playoffs, and discuss Levine Toilolo in depth. They also read through some listener iTunes reviews. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons
LOCKED ON FALCONS - Jan. 4, 2017 - Breaking Down Week 17’s All-22 and Answering Listener Questions

Locked On Falcons - Daily Podcast On The Atlanta Falcons

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2017 37:00


Allen and Aaron are Locked on #Falcons film, looking at the All-22 from the team’s Week 17 win over the #Saints. On this episode they weigh in on the MVP debate, compare Matt Bryant vs. Morten Andersen, Brian Poole’s role in the playoffs, and discuss Levine Toilolo in depth. They also read through some listener iTunes reviews. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Manuel Guerrero
Cumple de Brian Poole

Manuel Guerrero

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2016 1:52


Brian Poole, Londres 1941, cumple 75 años de edad, la voz del grupo: "The Tremeloes".

Manuel Guerrero
Cumple de Brian Poole

Manuel Guerrero

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2016 1:52


Brian Poole, Londres 1941, cumple 75 años de edad, la voz del grupo: "The Tremeloes".

汽车玩家:说车 玩车 试车 购车 爱车必听
KickerTalk26 - 专访 Official 创始人 Jason

汽车玩家:说车 玩车 试车 购车 爱车必听

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2016 21:26


上周 Vagabond 滑板创始人赖科陪 Official headwear 创始人 Jason 来到上海在 The Hub 上展示他们最新一季的产品。我们去他们的展位聊了聊关于他们在美国即将开始批发 Habitat 滑板,品牌如何与滑板结缘,中国市场计划以及... 波仔穿上 Vans 这件事... 背景音乐: 1. The Main Ingredient--- 2. Deee-Lite----- 3. Duft Punk--- 4. Cover Girls--- 5. Brian Poole & The Tremeloes---- KickerRadio是 KickerClub.com制作播出的滑板网络电台。 栏目包括: 飞说不可 - 滑板名嘴袁飞主持的滑板脱口秀,点评滑板热点 KickerTalk - KickerClub.com 创始人管牧的采访录音 微博 @kickerclub / 微信公众账号 kcskate

KickerRadio 管不住嘴滑板广播
KickerTalk26 - 专访 Official 创始人 Jason

KickerRadio 管不住嘴滑板广播

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2016 21:26


上周 Vagabond 滑板创始人赖科陪 Official headwear 创始人 Jason 来到上海在 The Hub 上展示他们最新一季的产品。我们去他们的展位聊了聊关于他们在美国即将开始批发 Habitat 滑板,品牌如何与滑板结缘,中国市场计划以及... 波仔穿上 Vans 这件事... 背景音乐: 1. The Main Ingredient--- 2. Deee-Lite----- 3. Duft Punk--- 4. Cover Girls--- 5. Brian Poole & The Tremeloes---- KickerRadio是 KickerClub.com制作播出的滑板网络电台。 栏目包括: 飞说不可 - 滑板名嘴袁飞主持的滑板脱口秀,点评滑板热点 KickerTalk - KickerClub.com 创始人管牧的采访录音 微博 @kickerclub / 微信公众账号 kcskate

Gary Jackson Interview Archive
Brian Poole 7 Sept 2015

Gary Jackson Interview Archive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2015 10:17


Signed by Decca in preference to The Beatles Brian talks about the good old days!

Draftvice- News/Analysis surrounding Fantasy Football and the NFL Draft
2020 Offseason Plans- New York Jets & Dan Snyder's Washington team

Draftvice- News/Analysis surrounding Fantasy Football and the NFL Draft

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 1969 41:17


Draftvice- Looking Forward! 2020 - New York Jets & Dan Snyder's Washington TeamIt's 2020 folks, and while the playoffs are underway and the conference championships are this weekend- some teams need to get a head start on the 2020 season. We bring back Harry Van Ness (@Harryvanness) as he joins Walter (@Brojodeathpunch) to dicuss the Washington Redskins and the New York Jets. We break down the cap situation of each team, potential free agents, some players who can be cap casualties and their draft selections in 2020. #Blackmonday #HeadCoachingFired #NYGiants #RonRivera #Washingtonfootball #CarolinaPanthers #DallasCowboys #NewEnglandPatriots #Cowboys #NFLNews #NFLUpdates #NFLDraft Follow the podcast on twitter: @draftviceon Instagram: @draftvice_footballFollow Harry: @HarryVanNesshttps://www.facebook.com/Draftvice/Walter (instagram/snapchat/twitter): @BrojodeathpunchWebsite: www.draftvice.comNow that the coaching carousel has come to a close- we break down what assets the Jets and Redskins have. Jets have some money to spend with $65,319,472 in free cap. They can clear up some cap with some of the following cuts Trumaine johnson ($12,000,000 dead cap) 3 million savings, Avery Williamson (6.5 million in savings), Quincy enunwa (5.4 mill dead cap, 2 million savings), Brian winters (7.2 million) and Josh Bellamy (1.3 million savings). Jets also ave some potential players leaving in free agency- including Alex lewis, Brian Poole, Robby Anderson and Kelvin Beachum. Are these players worth resigning? Some free agents to look at Connor McGovern, Matt Skurra, Branden Scherff, joe thuney, stefan wisnewski, joe haeg, Ted karrad, Rt marvus gilbert, Rt jack conklin, matt fieler. One thing is clear the jets need to fix the offensive line, gets some offensive weapons for Sam Darnold, they need some cornerback depth and maybe some pashrush? Its a mess with the JetsThe Washington Redskins have a new coach in Ron Rivera and an Est. 39.7 million in free cap. That's not alot. They can clear some cap by moving some of the following playersTrent Williams (12.5 million savings), Josh Norman (12.5 million savings), Jordan Reed (8.5 million in savings) and Adrian Peterson (2.25 million). Some guys potentially leaving for free agency- Guard Brandon Scherff, TE Vernon Davis, RB Chris Thompson and Tackle Donald Penn. They do have the second pick in the draft (probably, to be used on Ohio State Passrusher Chase Young)- but they are missing a second rounder. Biggest needs? Defensive backs, fix the o-line (either get Trent to come back or trade him) and get Haskins or Alex Smith some weapons outside of Terry McLaurin.