Podcasts about Brown Eyed Girl

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  • Dec 23, 2021LATEST
Brown Eyed Girl

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Best podcasts about Brown Eyed Girl

Latest podcast episodes about Brown Eyed Girl

Blitzalytics Podcasts
The Heated Exchange: A Fantasy Football Podcast (Ep.19)

Blitzalytics Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 49:10


Episode 19, St. Brown Eyed Girl. Welcome back to "The Heated Exchange." For the first time, the guys have a guest on the show. David Connors, a fellow contributor of Blitzalytics.com joins the show to preview the highly anticipated matchup between David and Jett in the Blitz league. In addition, the guys talk about some QB and defensive streams that could make all the difference in the fantasy playoffs. Finally, which guys are bound to ball out and lead some fantasy teams to the championship round? If you cannot handle the heat, get out of the kitchen!

Your Brain on Facts
Best Served Loud (do-over, ep. 172))

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 35:48


A microphone is a good enough platform for getting back at people, but an entire recording studio is even better.  Popular music is littered with songs getting back at an ex lover, from Waylon Jennings to Taylor Swift, but a fair number of the tracks you know by heart are actually clap-backs to the people in the mixing booth or the record label offices. YBOF Book; Audiobook (basically everywhere but Audible); Merch! Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs  .Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram. Support the show Music by Kevin MacLeod, Steve Oxen, David Fesliyan.   Links to all the research resources are on our website.   I love this podcast and am so happy Moxie is so prolific! A very compelling mix of the obscure to the commonplace, and a riveting listen no matter what.

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Nightside With Dan Rea
Van Morrison's Anti Mandate Dance (10 p.m.)

Nightside With Dan Rea

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 39:48


Singer-songwriter Van Morrison (Moondance and Brown Eyed Girl) is being sued for defamation by Northern Ireland's health minister Robin Swann who says criticisms of coronavirus policies have endangered the public and harmed the Minister's reputation. Morrison has vocally opposed lockdowns that have canceled concerts, criticized social distancing at live performances, and called Swann a “fraud.” Has the pandemic destroyed the ideal of free speech?

Vaccine 4 1 1 - News on the search for a Covid 19 Coronavirus Vaccine
Coronavirus vaccine and Delta variant updates for 11-09-2021

Vaccine 4 1 1 - News on the search for a Covid 19 Coronavirus Vaccine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 4:47


This is Vaccine 411, the latest coronavirus vaccine information for November 9th, 2021. Citizens in Russia went back to work yesterday after a mandated, nine-day break to help cope with the surge of cases there. But they're doing so as the record-breaking surge of infections and deaths continue. In fact, statistics show the work stoppage had no effect on easing cases. Meanwhile Japan reported no daily deaths from COVID Sunday for the first time in 15 months, and infections are rapidly declining there. Japan was hit by several waves, including delta last summer. Cases started falling in September. Experts attribute it to vaccinations, widespread mask wearing, and disinfectant use. Also, Britain had a decline in cases reported between November 2nd and 8th of 16.6% compared with the previous seven days. 57 more people died, meaning that seven-day total was up 8.2%. But declines in the number of deaths usually lag behind declines in cases. Get ready for schools to teach reading, writing, and vaccination. The White House wants local school districts to host clinics that teach parents the benefits of vaccination, then vaccinate the kids. Federal officials are reminding school districts they can tap into billions of dollars in federal coronavirus relief money to stand up these efforts. Yesterday we told you about the great Big Bird controversy. Today another story in the utter silliness column as Northern Ireland's health minister is suing Van Morrison for singing songs critical of the handling of the pandemic there. The “Brown Eyed Girl” singer's lawyer says “the words used by him related to a matter of public interest and constituted fair comment.” In the United States cases were flat, deaths are down 19%, and hospitalizations are down 13% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending flat since October 25. The five states that have the most deaths per million are Mississippi, Alabama, New Jersey, Louisiana, and New York. There are 9,166,601 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Utah 38%, New Mexico 20%, Colorado 15%, Nebraska 14%, and Arizona 12%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Lincoln, WV. Bethel Census Area, AK. Park, MT. Wadena, MN. Grant, NM. Carbon, UT. San Juan, NM. Rolette, ND. And Coos, NH. There have been at least 755,624 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 71.7%, Rhode Island unchanged at 71.3%, and Connecticut at 71.1%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 41.1%, Wyoming unchanged at 44.4%, and Alabama at 45.1%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 58.4%. Globally, cases were up 7% and deaths were flat over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 18,652,346 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 50,809. Russia 39,400. The U.K. 32,322. Turkey 27,824. And Germany 20,580. There have been at least 5,055,359 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Vaccine 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Vaccine 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Coronavirus 4 1 1  podcast
Coronavirus, COVID-19, coronavirus variants, and vaccine updates for 11-09-2021

Coronavirus 4 1 1 podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 4:49


This is Coronavirus 411, the latest COVID-19 info and new hotspots for November 9th, 2021. Citizens in Russia went back to work yesterday after a mandated, nine-day break to help cope with the surge of cases there. But they're doing so as the record-breaking surge of infections and deaths continue. In fact, statistics show the work stoppage had no effect on easing cases. Meanwhile Japan reported no daily deaths from COVID Sunday for the first time in 15 months, and infections are rapidly declining there. Japan was hit by several waves, including delta last summer. Cases started falling in September. Experts attribute it to vaccinations, widespread mask wearing, and disinfectant use. Also, Britain had a decline in cases reported between November 2nd and 8th of 16.6% compared with the previous seven days. 57 more people died, meaning that seven-day total was up 8.2%. But declines in the number of deaths usually lag behind declines in cases. Get ready for schools to teach reading, writing, and vaccination. The White House wants local school districts to host clinics that teach parents the benefits of vaccination, then vaccinate the kids. Federal officials are reminding school districts they can tap into billions of dollars in federal coronavirus relief money to stand up these efforts. Yesterday we told you about the great Big Bird controversy. Today another story in the utter silliness column as Northern Ireland's health minister is suing Van Morrison for singing songs critical of the handling of the pandemic there. The “Brown Eyed Girl” singer's lawyer says “the words used by him related to a matter of public interest and constituted fair comment.” In the United States cases were flat, deaths are down 19%, and hospitalizations are down 13% over 14 days. The 7-day average of new cases has been trending flat since October 25. The five states that have the most deaths per million are Mississippi, Alabama, New Jersey, Louisiana, and New York. There are 9,166,601 active cases in the United States. The five states with the greatest increase in hospitalizations per capita: Utah 38%, New Mexico 20%, Colorado 15%, Nebraska 14%, and Arizona 12%. The top 10 counties with the highest number of recent cases per capita according to The New York Times: Nome Census Area, AK. Lincoln, WV. Bethel Census Area, AK. Park, MT. Wadena, MN. Grant, NM. Carbon, UT. San Juan, NM. Rolette, ND. And Coos, NH. There have been at least 755,624 deaths in the U.S. recorded as Covid-related. The top 3 vaccinating states by percentage of population that's been fully vaccinated: Vermont at 71.7%, Rhode Island unchanged at 71.3%, and Connecticut at 71.1%. The bottom 3 vaccinating states are West Virginia unchanged at 41.1%, Wyoming unchanged at 44.4%, and Alabama at 45.1%. The percentage of the U.S. that's been fully vaccinated is 58.4%. Globally, cases were up 7% and deaths were flat over 14 days, with the 7-day average trending up since October 15. There are 18,652,346 active cases around the world. The five countries with the most new cases: The United States 50,809. Russia 39,400. The U.K. 32,322. Turkey 27,824. And Germany 20,580. There have been at least 5,055,359 deaths reported as Covid-related worldwide. For the latest updates, subscribe for free to Coronavirus 411 on your podcast app or ask your smart speaker to play the Coronavirus 411 podcast. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Songs & Stories
Talking Story with Josh Tatofi

Songs & Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 19:29


Although Josh Tatofi's show last Saturday was livestreamed, the real excitement was being a part of the energetic crowd that attended his concert at the Mauna Kea Beach Resort. Fans spontaneously busted out with “cheehoo!”, swayed their cellphone flashlights to “Danny's Song,” and participated in an a capella version of “Brown Eyed Girl”, while Tatofi schooled them on the proper way to sing the “Sha-la-la, la-la, la-la, la-la, la-la tee-da” chorus. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bigislandmusicmagazine/message

Beck Did It Better
60. Van Morrison: Astral Weeks (1968)

Beck Did It Better

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 76:51


Listen to our shock as Brown Eyed Girl is NOT on this album and it still blows our mind with how good it is. This is one of the few albums that could be top 10 but we are lucky enough to get to it this week. Aaron gets existentially sad this week over something, Matt is partying like it is 1999, and our instrument expert Russ goes to a concert and audibly asks if he needs to clap for a bad song. Rob gets advice for going to bed late and talks about some physical therapy adventures.  Russ breaks out another top 5 instrument list and we get the pleasure of talking Van Morrison and his revenge album before this one. This is a legit banger of an episode.   Reach out at call us at the beck line at 802-277-BECK and follow us on Instagram, Twitter, and tik tok at @beckdiditbetter. You can also email us at beckdiditbetter@gmail.com  NEXT WEEK:  We become the best Eric B. and Rakim podcast when we become a Paid in Full podcast. 

Wrestling With Reality
TNA Wrestling: Episode 2 Watch Along

Wrestling With Reality

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 122:34


On this episode, we are checking out NWA TNA Episode 2. The following are the matches for this show: * Scott Hall (w/ Jackie Fargo & Toby Keith) vs Jeff Jarrett (7:01) * Cheex (w/ The Brown-Eyed Girl) vs Frank Parker * Brian Christopher (w/ Hermie Sadler and Sterling Marlin) vs K-Krush * Taylor Vaughn d Alexis Laree, Elektra, Erin, Francine, Joanie, Miss Sasha, Shannon & Tyler in a Miss TNA Lingerie Battle Royal * Gran Apolo vs David Young (w/ Bobcat) * America's Most Wanted (Chris Harris & James Storm) vs The Rainbow Express (Bruce & Lenny) (w/ Joel Gertner) for the pin. * AJ Styles Jerry Lynn, Low-Ki & Psicosis in a Four Way Elimination Match for the vacant NWA TNA X Championship (with Ricky Steamboat as Special guest referee) Please make sure to like and follow our Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/rwrevivalpodcast/ #prowrestling #wrestling #wwe #aew #nxt #smackdown #raw #wweraw #njpw #indywrestling #wwf #prowrestler #wrestlemania #wrestler #wwenxt #wwenetwork #professionalwrestling #wweuniverse #impactwrestling #WCWNitro #WCW #wwesmackdown #wcw #womenswrestling #aewdynamite #ecw #allelitewrestling Our shows are also available in audio on all major podcast outlets!

The Tom Flip Key West Podcast

Festa makes a living playing music to people in bars. We discuss moving to Key West after living a real adult life in Pittsburg, no Brown Eyed Girl, summer gigs, the addiction problems of Key West, embarassing music of your youth, "Barry", up keys quietness, the Irma experience, the importance of free speech and more.Thanks to my sponsors@www.keyscoffee.co @www.22andco.com@www.pokeintherear.com@www.generalhorseplay.com

Not Overthinking
Guitars, WeWork & The Curse of Knowledge

Not Overthinking

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 67:54


After a couple of weeks away, we’re back with updates on what we’ve been up to since our last recorded episode. From Taimur’s live rendition of Brown Eyed Girl to Ali’s discovery of WeWork to a conversation on the value of business coaches, we cover a lot of ground in this typically wide-ranging episode. Enjoy :)Join our Membership Community ThingIf you'd like to potentially join the Not Overthinking membership community thing (we discuss it halfway through this episode), please fill out your info here - https://airtable.com/shr1UZc8sWnhAEwJgLeave us a ReviewIf you enjoy listening to the podcast, we'd love for you to leave us a review on iTunes / Apple Podcasts. Here's a link that works even if you're not on an iPhone :) Send us an Audio MessageWe really want to include more listener comments and questions in our episodes. If you've got any thoughts on this episode, or if you've got a conundrum or question you'd like us to discuss, send an audio file / voice note to hi@notoverthinking.com. For any non-audio comments, drop us a tweet or DM on Twitter - https://twitter.com/noverthinking

Flights, Football & Anything Else
Ep 72 "My Brown Eyed Girl"

Flights, Football & Anything Else

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2021 78:06


Mike and Dave have 2 of the 3 tastings that are up there with the most interesting so far in the pod. The first segment recaps the NFL draft and some of their earlier predictions, along with the demise of the "miracle band-aide"! Then the What'da Watching segment with Dave and Mike's viewing picks of Suits, City On A Hill, and Billions. Followed by the What'da Think Dave segment where Mike talks about some interesting new rules in the Pioneer League and some suggestions of his own. The fan favorite F.U. segment followed by the Random Question of "dumbest products / ideas to actually take off and have success".....don't wear a mask & sing, cause Mike will let you know how he feels about that one. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

EL GUATEQUE
EL GUATEQUE T07C017 El 19 de abril de 1968 se publicó en el Reino Unido 'Odessey & Oracle', del grupo británico The Zombies (18/04/2021)

EL GUATEQUE

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2021 54:20


En El Guateque (orm.es; domingos, 22,05h) rescatamos olvidadas melodías del ayer. Recordamos a Junior, que se marchó hace siete años. El 19 de abril de 1968 se publicó en el Reino Unido, 'Odessey & Oracle' , segundo album del grupo británico The Zombies. UN 23 de abril de 1936 nació en Vernon (Texas) el compositor y cantante norteamericano Roy Orbison, uno de los auténticos pioneros del rock and roll.Con Enrique Lozano ya fuera de la formación, Los Íberos editan en 1970 dos sencillos con temas extraídos de su único LP, editado el año anterior. Los Mitos en la época de Fernando Brosed como voz líder del grupo, produjo canciones sin igual, la mayoría son alegres y otras muy sublimes. Tony Ronald produjo a unos catalanes llamados Siglo XX. Rosalía cantó una versión de la victoriosa eurovisiva “Muñeca de cera”, con la que France Gall ganó el concurso en 1965.Enrique Guzmán se convirtió en cantante de moda en España a comienzo de 1963. Hilda Aguirre, la actriz mexicana, protagonizó filmes como Sor ye-yé .En aquel periodo, bajo la influencia del rock and roll que invadía Italia, Mina grabó en inglés los sencillos "Be Bop A Lula" y "When" con el nombre artístico de Baby Gate, El primer gran éxito de Adriano Celentano fue 24000 Baci con la que quedó segundo en la edición de Festival de San Remo de 1961. Brown Eyed Girl', con su ritmo pegadizo y su letra nostálgica, supuso el debut en solitario de Van Morrison después de su paso por Them. La chica de los ojos marrones de la que trata la canción primero fue una chica de piel morena, ya que ‘Brown Skinned Girl' era el título original que, según la leyenda, el cantante se vio obligado a cambiar debido a la presión de su discográfica. A principios de 1967 Los Ángeles graban un primer single "Escápate / ¿Has Amado Alguna Vez?" con el que entren en el top 10 nacional y su nombre empieza a escucharse por doquier. Al margen del Merseybeat, y con líricas que festejaban o penaban el amor, la amistad o las ansias de libertad, Los Brincos, el grupo de Arbex estaba influenciado también por la energía y voces de unos Who o Yardbirds; y de las iniciales pautas R&B de los Rolling Stones del 64, que configuraron un vibrante sonido garage rock. Se fue joven Karen Carpenter, víctima de una enfermedad que en ese entonces, nadie había escuchado mencionar: anorexia nerviosa. La voz armoniosa de Karen parecía un regalo enviado del cielo y algo que distinguía a "Sing" era la participación de un coro de niños que le daba elegancia a la canción. Gelu recurrió en este EP de 1966 a dos temas sacados directamente de las listas de éxito de Gran Bretaña para ser traducidos al español de urgencias. Le ha fallado el éxito. El reconocimiento no ha estado a la altura de su talento. José María Guzmán, una leyenda del pop, La trayectoria de Guzmán resulta menos sorprendente si se tiene en cuenta que compuso Calles del viejo París a los 14 años.

The CoverUp
169 - Brown Eyed Girl - The CoverUp

The CoverUp

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2021 24:29


An artist's most beloved work, that he kinda' hates because of a terrible business deal made at a desperate time, radar-evading maneuvers, and a bouncy castle full of trumpets. This week is Brown Eyed Girl, originally by Van Morrison, covered by Jimmy Buffett, and by Reel Big Fish. Outro music is Talk Dirty To Me, by Poison.

Mighty Blue On The Appalachian Trail: The Ultimate Mid-Life Crisis
Episode #253 - Reid Marshall and Marina Santiago (Wombat and Brown-Eyed Girl)

Mighty Blue On The Appalachian Trail: The Ultimate Mid-Life Crisis

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2021 71:43


This week, we feature a couple who met on the trail in 2019 and have been a couple ever since. Reid Marshall and Marina Santiago are, however, locationally challenged, as Reid is in Australia and Marina is in Denver. I was fortunate enough to have met Reid on my thru-hike and was impressed with his calm and thoughtful demeanor. When we met, near the VT / NH border, Reid was on his own and didn't meet Marina until many miles later. Such is the serendipity of the trail. They share the story of their respective and joint hikes, as well as their adventures together since the AT. You can connect and find out more about them at their Challenge & Beauty website, https://challengeandbeauty.com/, find them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/challengeandbeauty, on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/challenge_and_beauty/. Their first book, Trail Running Utah, is available on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Trail-Running-Utah-Challenge-Beauty/dp/1661352820/ref=sr_1_1 Their second set of books, Trail Running Tasmania and Day Hikes Tasmania, are available in the US via special order on their website: https://challengeandbeauty.com/order-now/ Their illustrated book about their AT experience, Filthy and Free, is in the works and will be available later this year. I'll let you know when that comes out. This week on the Know Before You Go ATC part of the show, Laurie Potteiger suggests that we "Explore Locally." She tells us about alternative trails to explore, some of which are listed here. www.appalachiantrail.org/explore/plan-and-prepare/hiker-resource-library/alternate-trails/ A link to the Alternate Trails page, as well as ATC's Day-hiking and Overnight Hiking checklists updated for hiking during COVID-19, and many other useful pages, can be found in the Hiker Resource Library at www.appalachiantrail.org/hiker-resources. Don't forget, if you are going to get on the AT, make sure you register at www.ATCamp.org. In our book reading of Larry Luxenburg's Walking the Appalachian Trail, Larry talks about everybody's favorite subject; food and the exquisite possibility of eating guiltlessly. If you like what we're doing on the Hiking Radio Network, and want to see our shows continue, please consider supporting us with either a one-off or monthly donation. You'll find the donate button on each Hiking Radio Network page at https://www.hikingradionetwork.com Any support is gratefully received.

American Ground Radio
American Ground Radio's Complete Broadcast 12-1-2020

American Ground Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2020 38:57


Louis Avallone explains the volume of information about the corruption of the Presidential election is so huge, involves so many different people at so many different levels of the election process, and impacts the outcomes of so many different states. People have been signing affidavits (sworn to be true under penalty of law) and are now talking to the FBI about what they know and saw. Stephen Parr explains while this huge volume of information is becoming known, for some unexplainable reason, the Democrats are absolutely silent about this same information, as if ignoring it will make it just disappear.According to testimony, a truck driver drove a full truck load of already completed absentee ballots from New York to Pennsylvania prior to Nov. 3. It is reasonable for a few people to be in New York voting absentee in Pennsylvania, but hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvanian residents and all their ballots end up on the same truck? Is anyone asking the Democrats to explain that? Another USPS worker also testified that they were ordered to backdate absentee ballots that were received after the deadline. Not only is that illegal for election law, it is also mail fraud. Our American Mamas, Teri Netterville and Denise Arthur, talk about how there are so many reasons families may be deciding to do Christmas celebrations differently this year.Stephen Parr shares information about how we handled the Coronavirus and the way the data has been evaluated and reported. Bottom line is we quarantined the healthy, destroyed our economy and our schools, and did not save the sick. In a New Jersey study of COVID deaths showed about half of the hospitalized patients died. What is never reported related to these deaths is that 89% of them already had DNR (Do Not Resuscitate) instructions before they got COVID. That is because they already had a terminal medical condition.Van Morrison, an Irish musician who first started performing in the 1960s (“Brown Eyed Girl”), is releasing new songs which are anti-lockdown, protest songs. The income from these songs will go to aid musicians who have not been able to perform and make a living because of the shutdowns. The current releases are "Born to Be Free," "As I Walked Out”, and "No More Lockdowns”. Eric Clapton is joining Morrison with “Stand And Deliver”, due out this month. Both Clapton and Morrison are members of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame.

R.O.A.R: The '90s Rave Podcast
Force & Styles, Part 2 – MC Junior’s brown eyed girl & Dougal’s first bee‪r‬

R.O.A.R: The '90s Rave Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2020 85:27


In the second and final part of our exclusive rare joint interview with Force & Styles, ROAR talks to the […]

R.O.A.R: The '90s Rave Podcast
Force & Styles, Part 2 – MC Junior’s brown eyed girl & Dougal’s first bee‪r‬

R.O.A.R: The '90s Rave Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2020 85:27


In the second and final part of our exclusive rare joint interview with Force & Styles, ROAR talks to the […]

R.O.A.R: The '90s Rave Podcast
10: Ep10: Force & Styles, Part 2 - MC Junior's brown eyed girl & Dougal's first beer

R.O.A.R: The '90s Rave Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2020 85:27


In the second and final part of our exclusive rare joint interview with Force & Styles, ROAR: The '90s Rave Podcast talks to the renowned happy hardcore about their much-loved MC Junior's incarceration, passing and unique recording style - including a surprising revelation about one of their biggest hits - and how they came to work with esteemed vocalist Jenna. Plus we hear about a drug-induced 1995 Happy Hardcore DJ holiday to Ibiza...which saw DJ Dougal try his first beer! If this has made you want to have a dance to Force & Styles, the lads have kindly put together this exclusive mix for you - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxVty... (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxVty6mQRTE) ** Help us fund future episodes and get goodies in return by donating to our crowdfunder: www.gofundme.com/f/the90sravepodcast ** #jungle (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23jungle) #jungletechno (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23jungletechno) #breakbeat (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23breakbeat) #drumandbass (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23drumandbass) #dnb (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23dnb) #oldschoolhardcore (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23oldschoolhardcore) #oldschool (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23oldschool) #rave (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23rave) #90smusic (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%2390smusic) #raving (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23raving) #music (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23music) #techno (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23techno) #happyhardcore (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23happyhardcore) #hardcorebreakbeat (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23hardcorebreakbeat) #housemusic (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23housemusic) #breakbeat (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23breakbeat) #breakbeathardcore (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23breakbeathardcore) #the90s (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23the90s) #1990s (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%231990s) #90s (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%2390s) #the1990s (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23the1990s) #acidhouse (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23acidhouse) #hardcoretechno (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23hardcoretechno) #hardtrance (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23hardtrance) #dj (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23dj) #producer (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23producer) #covid (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23covid) #racism (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23racism) #vrecordings (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23vrecordings) #bryangee (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23bryangee) #junglemassive (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23junglemassive) #junglemassive (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23junglemassive) #kniteforce (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23kniteforce) #kfa (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23kfa) #slipmatt (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23slipmatt) #sl2 (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23sl2) #lunac (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23lunac) #fabioandgrooverider (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23fabioandgrooverider) #fabioandgroove (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23fabioandgroove) #forceandstyles (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23forceandstyles) #ukdance (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23ukdance) #darrenstyles (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23darrenstyles) #edm (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23edm) #djforce (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23djforce) #raykeith (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23raykeith) #dreadrecordings (https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%23dreadrecordings)

Mulligan Stew
EP 125 | Bang! The Bert Berns Story

Mulligan Stew

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2020 23:26


Don’t know Bert Berns? Maybe you’ve heard some of the songs he wrote and gave the World. Twist and Shout.  Piece of my Heart. Here comes the Night. Hang on Sloopy. Brown Eyed Girl. Under the Boardwalk. Cry To me. He produced Solomon Burke. The Drifters. Ben E King. Wilson Pickett, LaVern Baker,  Isley Bros, and  Van Morrison. Bert was the first American Producer to record British bands in London. One was Them, featuring Van Morrison.  Led Zeppelin recorded Baby Come on Home for their first album. Was released later in a box set. He started his own label BANG. It featured artists like McCoys, Strangeloves, Neil Diamond. Van Morrison recorded his first solo album with Bang Records. It featured Brown Eyed Girl, the great TB Sheets, and the first-ever version of Madame George.  Van has said “Bert Berns was a genius” Berns was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He died in 1967 of childhood rheumatic fever at age 38.  A lot of songs died with him. This is an interview I did with his son Brett who was one of the directors and producers of Bang!  The Bert Berns Story, a documentary on his father’s life. The film is narrated by Miami Steve van Zant from the E Street Band. It’s an inspired choice as Steve is known for playing a mob gangster, which is exactly what Bert  Berns was known for. Hanging around mafia guys when he wasn’t working. Enjoy the story.  I believe you can find this documentary on Netflix.

420 Day Fiance
Dip the Nips - Episode 51

420 Day Fiance

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 20, 2020 51:16


Deavan and Jihoon are stuck in the same old pattern, Ari refuses to christen dem titties, Sumit brings home some Brown Eyed Girl house paint, and Brittany and Yazan exhaust us with their pointless stay of execution. Learn more about your ad-choices at https://news.iheart.com/podcast-advertisers

G in The Comeback
Brown-Eyed Girl

G in The Comeback

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2020 39:58


Join Queen G in this second episode as she talks about where her journey all began, as a Brown-Eyed Girl. Growing up as a “niña prieta” in a family of migratory agricultural workers had its challenges. Agriculture is one of the top three most dangerous industries to work in. This at-risk population continues to encounter many injustices and inequality in today’s world even if they are considered “essential workers” right now. Queen G is joined by special guests who have first hand information about her upbringing, and who also share their experiences in belonging to this vulnerable population that often faces racism and discrimination as people of color. They discuss how they overcame childhood obstacles encountered because of the color of their skin.

What lYric
What lYric Da Ba Figure Ocho

What lYric

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2020 32:35


Today's theme is colors. The deep dive is Blue Da Ba Dee. I used a new audio technique for the music portion, let me know if you think it sounds better than the previous episodes. Hope everyone is doing well. Share with friends and enjoy. Music credits for this episode: Bohemien Rhaphsody by Queen, Brown Eyed Girl by Van Morrison, Black and Yellow by Wiz Khalifa, Back in Black by AC/DC, Red Lights by Tiesto, Blue Da Ba Dee DJ Ponte Ice Pop Mix by Eiffel 65, and the outro Midsummer Madness instrumental by Prko. From Broadcast to Podcast, I Jonathan Hudson bring you a fun music Podcast. The podcast about music, but not the beat or the bass drop. This podcast is all about the lyrics. The words that come together to elevate the beat. Lyrics are fun, funny, and inquisitive. I'm Jonathan Hudson and am glad to bring you today's podcast.

Mainely Stoopid
S1EP53 - Hugh's Brown eyed girl, is in fact Blue Eyed....

Mainely Stoopid

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2020 110:39


This episode starts with some good laughs, minimal corona talks, the Jordan Documentary, are you excited about korean baseball, what if they are all juicing for the MLB, NFL draft talk, Would Hugh Rather comes back, keep up the good work do your thing and we will be here entertaining you the best we can, hope you all have a great week.  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/garrett-hutchins/message

Guitar Music Theory
Ep43 Using Perfect 4th Intervals on IV Chords

Guitar Music Theory

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 12, 2020 39:58


What do the songs “Brown Eyed Girl” by Van Morrison, “Hot Blooded” by Foreigner, and “Sweet Child O’ Mine” by Guns N’ Roses have in common?   They all make use of a perfect 4th interval over the IV chord.   Why do you need to know this? Because it's a common composition technique used in popular music and it helps you understand why songs often contain notes that are out of key.   I explain all the details and play through examples in today's podcast episode.    What do you specifically need to do in order to play guitar better? Visit the GuitarMusicTheory.com website and click on the answer that best describes you. Get FREE custom video instruction calibrated to your current level. 

Total Nonstop Impact | IMPACT Wrestling Podcast
TNI THROWBACK | NWA-TNA PPV #2 (June 26, 2002) REVIEW

Total Nonstop Impact | IMPACT Wrestling Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2019 74:27


TOTAL NONSTOP IMPACT - THROWBACK SERIES NWA-TNA EPISODE #2 Did someone say TNA? You heard it right everyone, the boys of Total Nonstop IMPACT have started a new series and it’s a throwback one where we revisit the old days and review the old NWA-TNA weekly ppvs! June 26, 2002. Jeff Jarrett tries to settle the score with Scott Hall and Toby Keith, and the first ever X Division Champion is determined in a four-way elimination bout between AJ Styles, Jerry Lynn, Low Ki and Psicosis. Also, Cheex. Join Trent and Jaybone as we take you down memory lane for one of the most historic episodes of NWA TNA Wrestling as we saw the crowning of the very first X-Division Champion! Results: Scott Hall (w/ Jackie Fargo & Toby Keith) defeated Jeff Jarrett (7:01) after Referee Brian Hebner went down and as Jarrett had Hall set up for The Stroke, Keith interfered and nailed Jarrett with a Low Blow, leading to Hall and Keith combining for a Double Team Stroke to Jarrett and Hall defeated, as the Referee came to. Cheex (w/ The Brown-Eyed Girl) defeated Frank Parker (2:07) following a Big Splash Brian Christopher (w/ Hermie Sadler and Sterling Marlin) defeated K-Krush (4:38) after Sadler and Marlin got involved and crotched Krush on the Middle Rope, allowing Christopher to nail a Stunner and follow with The Hip Hop Drop (Top Rope Guillotene Leg Drop) Taylor Vaughn defeated Alexis Laree, Elektra, Erin, Francine, Joanie, Miss Sasha, Shannon & Tyler in a Miss TNA Lingerie Battle Royal (4:46), last eliminating Elektra Gran Apolo defeated David Young (w/ Bobcat) (5:28) after Young, who was distracted by Bobcat hitting on Jeremy Borash at ring side, missed a Top Rope Moonsault, allowing Apolo to hit a TKO and pin. America's Most Wanted (Chris Harris & James Storm) defeated The Rainbow Express (Bruce & Lenny) (w/ Joel Gertner) (4:48) after Harris kicked Bruce into Lenny and then used a School Boy Rollup on Bruce for the pin. The Rainbow Express were originally intended to fight The Dupps, who refused to fight them because they were gay. Harris and Storm were recruited at the last second to take the bout. Ricky "The Dragon" Steamboat introduced TNA Heavyweight Champion Ken Shamrock, who was interrupted by Father James Mitchell. Mitchell introduced Slash as Shamrock's next opponent, only for a distraction as Malice slid into the ring behind Shamrock and attack. AJ Styles defeated Jerry Lynn, Low-Ki & Psicosis in a Four Way Elimination Match to win the vacant NWA TNA X Championship (with Ricky Steamboat as Special guest referee) (25:56) Social Media: Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/WETALKIMPACT Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/WETALKIMPACT Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/WETALKIMPACT Trent's Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/vanillajoke Jaybone's Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/jaybone5150 Kyle’s Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/kl_tni Streaming Audio: Apple iTunes - https://apple.co/2NpzbqF Stitcher Radio - https://bit.ly/2DjPznT Google Play - https://tinyurl.com/ybh29sfp TuneIn Radio - https://bit.ly/2NreA57 iHeart Radio: https://ihr.fm/2swvl1Z Spotify: https://spoti.fi/2B1zBeL Soundcloud - https://soundcloud.com/user-625858195 Music: Intro Music: Re/Vengeance by HEMI: https://youtu.be/VgJaXGhE3pw Listen to Avalon Averted (The Fixer Remix) by HEMI - The official theme song of IMPACT Wrestling Bound for Glory 2019 available on iTunes, Spotify, Amazon, and More! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ii3EQ... Listen to Decay by HEMI - The official theme song of IMPACT Wrestling Rebellion 2019 https://youtu.be/D1hRy6CVoSs #IMPACTonAXSTV #IMPACT #HARDTOKILL

Thoughts That Rock
Ep. 30: Steph Grant | Use Your Platform for Good

Thoughts That Rock

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2019 41:15


In this episode, we talk with STEPH GRANT, who is the owner of Steph Grant Studios, a digital agency operated by a powerhouse team of female creative, specializing in executive media shots and conferences and the Founder of the Promote Love Movement. THOUGHT #1With a large following comes great responsibility; use your platform for good.THOUGHT #2Give without expectation - Gary VaynerchukCONNECT:Website: www.stephgrantphotography.comInstagram: @imstephTwitter: @imstephdotcomEmail: steph@stephgrantstudios.comLinkedin: www.linkedin.com/in/stephgrantstudiosBRAND & RESOURCE MENTIONS:Black Friday - https://blackfriday.com/Cracker Barrel - www.crackerbarrel.comJason Derulo - www.jasonderulo.comGo Daddy - www.godaddy.comFossil - www.papermag.com/fossil-pride-alyssa-edwards-2638413167.htmlBurning Man - https://burningman.orgKPride - www.kelloggdiversityandinclusion.comJeffrey Shaw - www.jeffreyshaw.comImaging USA - https://imagingusa.org"Brown Eyed Girl" - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Eyed_GirlSummer Brand Camp (TDn2K) - https://tdn2k.comWFF (Women's Foodservice Forum) - https://wff.orgBrene Brown - https://brenebrown.comScott Stratten - www.unmarketing.comFlush Mob Dons - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zCAjqI_j18YMashable - https://mashable.comCosmopolitan - www.cosmopolitan.comThe Huffington Post - www.huffpost.comTumbler - www.tumblr.comTrevor Project - www.thetrevorproject.orgPromote Love Movement - http://promotelovemovement.comJoni Doolin - peoplereport.com Wally Doolin - www.nokidhungry.orgKat Cole - https://www.wsb.com/speakers/kat-coleAmanda Hite - https://str.com/team/amanda-hite#Elon Musk - www.tesla.com/elon-muskRichard Branson - www.virgin.com/richard-bransonAngelina Jolie - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelina_JolieWendy Davidson (Kellogg's) - linkedin.com/in/davidsonwendyGary Vaynerchuck - www.garyvaynerchuk.com/Paul Walker - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_WalkerThe Starfish Story - https://www.catalystscrubs.com/blogs/news/70248323-make-a-difference-monday-the-starfish-storySnidley Whiplash - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snidely_WhiplashTop Ramen - https://nissinfoods.com/products/top-ramen-noodlesEggo Waffles - www.leggomyeggo.comBig Kettle Drum - www.BigKettleDrum.comHard Rock International – www.HardRock.comRock ‘n Roll With It: Overcoming the Challenge of Change (Brant Menswar) – www.RocknRollWithIt.comCulture That Rocks: How to Revolutionize Your Company’s Culture (Jim Knight) – www.CultureThatRocks.comCannonball Kids’ cancer – www.CannonballKidscancer.orgKeppler Speakers - www.KepplerSpeakers.comCertified Rock Star - www.CertifiedRockStar.comThoughts That Rock – www.ThoughtsThatRock.comSpectacle Photography (Show/Website Photos) – www.spectaclephoto.comJeffrey Todd “JT” Keel (Show Music) - https://www.facebook.com/jtkeel STEPH GRANT’S BIO:Steph Grant is the owner of Steph Grant Studios, a digital agency operated by a powerhouse team of female creative, specializing in executive media shots and conferences and the Founder of the Promote Love Movement (a safe space for the LGBTQ+ community raised in a religious environment to connect and share their stories).Steph believes in the importance of being visible and vocal for those in our community who cannot.“Sharing our stories can change minds and softens hearts. I have experienced this firsthand through my work as a photographer and during my own coming out process. It’s so rewarding to have complete strangers say that they felt like they had a front row seat at the weddings that I have shot or that after seeing my images and stories they can no longer support their stance against the LGBTQ+ community.” As an out lesbian photographer, Steph’s primary focus is to make people feel comfortable so that their personalities and love are captured in every wedding photograph.“I love every second of my job. I have worked very hard to be exactly where I am…and that is right here in this moment with you. My goal is to get to know your love story & to tell it with my images.” Some highlights from Steph Grant’s amazing career:Known for being the first LGBTQ+ Wedding photographer in the industry and for photographing the first lesbian Indian wedding in the US which went viral in 2013 with 81K people on her website in 1 dayRecognized on the Senate floor in CA in 2018 for her work with the LGBTQ+ communitySpoke on behalf of the LGBTQ+ community at a Google event & Rebelution Resurge in NYC…where she was asked to share my story and engage in conversations surrounding inclusion and representation in the wedding industryWas the face of Fossil’s 2019 Pride Campaign and was asked to share her story for their social media campaign 

Riffs on Riffs
It’s All Over Now, Jack-Ass

Riffs on Riffs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2019 42:03


What we geek out over in this episode: Van Morrison & Them, Bob Dylan vs. Keith Sweat, Them! (1954) monster movie about nuclear ants, The Band’s “Up on Cripple Creek” (1969), Bert Berns - or, the guy who wrote “Hang on Sloopy” (1964) and “Brown Eyed Girl” (1967), Eric Gale - American jazz and session guitarist, “White Lines” (1983) by Melle Mel & Grandmaster Flash, and Beck’s rap/funk/soul/folk musical inspiration.

MS-podden
56. Mental fatigue/Neurologen Lars Rönnbäck och neuropsykologen Birgitta Johansson

MS-podden

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2019 85:54


Neurolog Lars Rönnbäck och neuropsykolog Birgitta Johansson från Sahlgrenska sjukhuset gästar podden i ett avsnitt om mental fatigue.   Musik: - Candi Staton, Young Hearts Run Free - Elvis Costello & The Attractions, (What's So Funny ´Bout) Peace, Love And Understanding - Siw Malmkvist, Snart så stiger solen upp igen - OMD, Walking On The Milky Way - Oasis, All Around the World - Adolpson & Falk, Bärande våg - Van McCoy, The Hustle - Family Four, Härliga sommardag - Van Morrison, Brown Eyed Girl

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
BONUS: Question and Answer Episode 2

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2019 30:17


This week's episode of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs is the second of two bonus episodes answering listener questions at the end of the first year of the podcast. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a bonus podcast, answering even more questions. ----more---- Resources As always, I've created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. This one also includes the songs from the Patreon bonus episode, as that's even more questions and answers. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to the second and final part of this year's question and answer bonus podcasts. This week I'm actually going to do two of these. The one that's going on the main podcast is going to consist of those questions that my backers asked that have to do primarily with the podcast and the music, while the one that's going only to backers consists mostly of questions that have been asked about me and my life and so forth -- stuff that might be less interesting to the casual listener, but that clearly someone is interested in. Next week I get back to the main story, with an episode about Carl Perkins, but right now we're going to jump straight into the questions.   Matthew Elmslie asks:   "It's not an issue you've had to confront yet, as you navigate the mid-'50s, but eventually you're going to come up against the clash between the concept of popular music where the basic unit is the song or single, and the one where the basic unit is the album. What are your thoughts on that and how do you plan to deal with it?" This is a question I had to give some consideration to when I was writing my book California Dreaming, which in many ways was sort of a trial run for the podcast, and which like the podcast told its story by looking at individual tracks. I think it can be a problem, but probably not in the way it first appears.   First, the period where the album was dominant was a fairly short one -- it's only roughly from 1967 through about 1974 that the bands who were getting the most critical respect were primarily thinking in terms of albums rather than singles. After that, once punk starts, the pendulum swings back again, so it's not a long period of time that I have to think of in those terms. But it is something that has to be considered during that period. On the other hand, even during that period, there were many acts who were still primarily singles acts -- the Monkees, Slade, the Move, T-Rex... many of whom, arguably, had more long-term influence than many of the album acts of the time.   I think for the most part, though, even the big album acts were still working mostly in ways that allow themselves to be looked at through the lens of single tracks. Like even on something like Dark Side of the Moon, which is about as concept-albumy as it gets, there's still "Money" and "Great Gig in the Sky" which are individual tracks people know even if they don't necessarily know the album, and which could be used as the focus of an episode on the album. Even with Led Zeppelin, who never released singles at all, there are tracks that might as well have been singles, like "Whole Lotta Love" or "Stairway to Heaven". So for the most part it's fairly easy to find a single track I can focus on.   The real problem only comes in for a handful of albums -- records, mostly from that period in the late sixties and early seventies, which absolutely deserve to be considered as part of the podcast, but which don't have standout tracks. It's hard to pick one track from, say, Trout Mask Replica by Captain Beefheart or Astral Weeks by Van Morrison -- those two albums really do need considering as albums rather than as individual tracks -- there's no reason to choose, say, "Frownland" over "The Dust Blows Forward 'n' the Dust Blows Back" or vice versa, or "Madame George" over "Slim Slow Slider".   What I'll do in those cases will probably vary from case to case. So with Trout Mask Replica I'd probably just pick one song as the title song for the episode but still talk about the whole album, while with Astral Weeks the most likely thing is for me to focus the episode on "Brown-Eyed Girl", which isn't on the album, but talk about the making of Astral Weeks after "Brown-Eyed Girl" was a success. That's assuming I cover both those albums at all, but I named them because I'm more likely to than not.   [Excerpt: Van Morrison, “Brown-Eyed Girl”]   Russell Stallings asks: "Andrew, in [the] 60s it seems rock guitar was dominated by Stratocasters and Les Pauls, what was the guitar of choice in the period we are currently covering (1957) ?"   Well, 1957 is just about the point where this becomes an interesting question. Before this point the guitar hasn't played much of a part in the proceedings -- we've seen guitarists, but there've been more piano players -- 1957 is really the point where the guitar becomes the primary rock and roll instrument.   Before I go any further, I just want to say that I've never been a particular gearhead. There are people out there who can tell the difference instantly between different types of guitars based on a note or two. I'm not one of them -- I can sort of make out the difference between a Fendery sound and a Gibsony one and a Rickenbackery one, but not at a tremendous level of precision. I tend to care more about the technique of the player than the sound of the instrument, so this isn't my area of expertise. But I'll give this a go.   Now, there wasn't a straightforward single most popular guitar at this point. It's true that from the late sixties on rock pretty much standardised around the Les Paul and the Stratocaster -- though it was from the late sixties, and you get a lot of people playing different guitars in the early and mid sixties -- but in the fifties people were still figuring things out as individuals. But at the same time, there is, sort of, an answer to this.   The Strat wasn't particularly popular in the 50s. The only first-rank 50s rocker who played a Strat was Buddy Holly, who always played one on stage, though he varied his guitars in the studio from what I've read. Buddy Holly is indirectly the reason the Strat later became so popular -- he inspired Hank Marvin of the Shadows to get one, and Marvin inspired pretty much every guitarist in Britain to copy him. But other than in surf music, the Strat wasn't really popular until around 1967. You'd occasionally get a Telecaster player in the 50s -- Buck Owens, who played on quite a few rockabilly sessions for people like Gene Vincent and Wanda Jackson before he became one of the greats of country music, played a Telecaster. And James Burton, who played in the fifties with Ricky Nelson and Dale Hawkins, among others, was another Telecaster player. But in general there weren't a lot of Fender players.   [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, “Hello, Mary Lou”, James Burton guitar solo]   Some people did play Gibsons -- most of the Chicago electric blues people seem to have been Gibson people, and so was Chuck Berry. Scotty Moore also played a Gibson. But rather than go for the Les Paul, they'd mostly go for hollow-body models like the L5, which could be played as either electric or acoustic. Scotty Moore also used a custom-built Echosonic amp, so he could get a similar guitar sound on stage to the one he'd got in the studio with Sam Phillips, and he used the L5 and Echosonic combination on all the Elvis hits of the fifties. Carl Perkins did play a Les Paul at first, including on "Blue Suede Shoes", but he switched to a Gibson ES-5 (and got himself an Echosonic from the same person who made Scotty Moore's) after that.   [Excerpt: Carl Perkins, “Matchbox”]   For acoustic guitar, people generally either used a Martin, like Elvis Presley or Ray Edenton, who was the session rhythm player who doubled Don Everly's guitar in the studio (Phil Everly would double it live, but he didn't play on the records), or they'd play a Gibson acoustic, as Don Everly and Buddy Holly did. But overwhelmingly the most popular guitar on rockabilly sessions -- which means in rock and roll for these purposes, since with the exception of Chuck Berry the R&B side of rock and roll remained dominated by piano and sax -- the most popular rockabilly guitar was a Gretsch. There were various popular models of Gretsch guitar, like the Duo Jet, but the most popular were the 6120, the Country Gentleman, and the Tennessean, all of which were variants on the same basic design, and all of which were endorsed by Chet Atkins, which is why they became the pre-eminent guitars among rockabilly musicians, all of whom idolised Atkins. You can hear how that guitar sounds when Atkins plays it here…   [Excerpt: Chet Atkins, “Mr. Sandman”]   Atkins himself played these guitars on sessions for Elvis (where he just played rhythm) and the Everly Brothers (for whom he played lead in the studio). Duane Eddy, Cliff Gallup of the Blue Caps, Eddie Cochran, and many more played Gretsch guitars in imitation of Atkins. Bo Diddley also played a Gretsch before he started playing his own custom-built guitar.   There was no default guitar choice in the 50s the way there was later, but the Gretsch seemed to be the choice of the guitarists who were most admired at the time, and so it also became the choice for anyone else who wanted that clean, country-style, rockabilly lead guitar sound. That sound went out of fashion in the later sixties, but George Harrison used a Gretsch for most of his early leads, and Michael Nesmith of the Monkees always played a Gretsch -- when they started doing twelve-strings, in 1966, they initially only made three, one for Chet Atkins, one for George Harrison, and one for Nesmith, though they later mass-produced them.   But anyway, yeah. No single answer, but Gretsch Country Gentleman, with a hollow-bodied Gibson in close second, is the closest you'll get.   William Maybury asks "About when does the History of Soul divorce from the History of Rock, in your eyes?" That's a difficult question, and it's something I'll be dealing with in a lot more detail when we get to the 1970s, over a whole series of episodes. This is the grotesquely oversimplified version. The short answer is -- when "soul" stopped being the label that was applied to cutting-edge black music that white people could rip off. The history of rock is, at least in part, a history of white musicians incorporating innovations that first appeared in black musicians' work. It's not *just* that, of course, but that's a big part of it.   Now, around 1970 or so, "rock" gets redefined specifically as music that is made by white men with guitars, and other people making identical music were something else. Like there's literally no difference, stylistically, between "Maggot Brain" by Funkadelic and things like Peter Green era Fleetwood Mac or "Watermelon in Easter Hay" by Frank Zappa, but people talk about P-Funk as a funk group rather than a rock group – I know the question was about soul, rather than funk, but in the early seventies there was a huge overlap between the two.   [Excerpt: Funkadelic, “Maggot Brain”]   But as long as soul music remained at the forefront of musical innovations, those innovations were incorporated by white "rock" acts, and any attempt to tell the story of rock music which ignores George Clinton or Stevie Wonder or Sly Stone or Marvin Gaye would be a fundamentally dishonest one.   But some time around the mid-seventies, "soul" stops being a label that's applied to innovative new music, and becomes a label for music that's consciously retro or conservative, people like, say, Luther Vandross. Not that there's anything wrong with retro music -- and there's some great soul music made in the 80s and 90s -- but the music that was at the cutting edge was first disco and then hip-hop, and that's the music that was spawning the innovations that the rock musicians would incorporate into their work.   And, indeed, after around 1980 rock itself becomes more consciously retro and less experimental, and so the rate of incorporation of new musical ideas slows down too, though never completely stops.   But there's always some fuzziness around genre labels. For example, if you consider Prince to be a soul musician, then obviously he's still part of the story. Same goes for Michael Jackson. I don't know if I'd consider either of them to be soul per se, but I could make a case for it, and obviously it's impossible to tell the story of rock in the eighties without those two, any more than you could tell it without, say, Bruce Springsteen.   So, really, there's a slow separation between the two genres over about a twenty-year period, starting in the mid-sixties and finishing in the mid-eighties. I *imagine* that Prince is probably the last new musician who might be described as soul who will be appearing in the podcast, but it really depends on where you draw the boundaries of what counts as soul. There'll be a few disco and hip-hop acts appearing over the last half of the series, and some of them might be considered soul by some people.   That's the best I can do at answering the question right now, but it's a vastly oversimplified version of the real answer, which is "listen to all the podcasts for the seventies when I get to them".   One from Jeff Stanzler:   "For me, the most surprising inclusion so far was the Janis Martin record. You did speak some about why you felt it warranted inclusion, but I'd love to hear more of your thinking on this, and maybe also on the larger philosophical question of including records that were more like significant signposts than records that had huge impact at the time."   [Excerpt: Janis Martin, “Drugstore Rock & Roll”]   Some of this goes back to some of the stuff I was talking about last week, about how there are multiple factors at play when it comes to any song I'm choosing, but the Janis Martin one makes a good example of how those factors play into each other.   First, everything I said in that episode is true -- it *is* an important signpost in the transition of rock and roll into a music specifically aimed at white teenagers, and it is the first record I've come across that deals with the 1950s of Happy Days and American Graffiti rather than the other things that were going on in the culture. Even though "Drugstore Rock and Roll" wasn't a massively successful record, I think that makes it worth including.   But there were other factors that warranted its inclusion too. The first of these was simply that I wanted to include at least one song by a woman at that point. If you don't count the Platters, who had one female member, it had been three months since the last song by a woman. I knew I was going to be doing Wanda Jackson a few weeks later, but it's important to me that I show how women were always part of the story of rock and roll. The podcast is going to be biased towards men, because it's telling the story of an industry that was massively biased towards men, but where women did have the opportunity to break through I want to give them credit. This is not including "token women" or anything like that -- rather it's saying "women have always been part of the story, their part of the story has been ignored, I want to do what I can to redress the balance a bit, so long as I don't move into actively misrepresenting history".   Then there's the fact that Janis Martin had what to my mind was a fascinating story, and one that allowed me to talk about a lot of social issues of the time, at least in brief.   And finally there's the way that her story ties in with those of other people I've covered. Her admiration of Ruth Brown allowed me to tie the story in with the episode on "Mama, He Treats Your Daughter Mean", and also gave me a way to neatly bookend the story, while showing the influence of one of the songs I'd already covered. Her working for RCA and with the same musicians as Elvis meant that I could talk a bit more about those musicians, and her being marketed as "the Female Elvis" meant that I could talk about Elvis' larger cultural impact on the world in 1956, something that needed to be discussed in the series, but which I hadn't found space for in an episode on Elvis himself at that point. (And in talking about the various Elvis-based novelty records I was also able to mention a few figures who will turn up in future episodes, planting seeds for later).   [Excerpt: Eddie Cochran and the Holly Twins, “I Want Elvis For Christmas”]   So that's the thinking there. Every episode has to serve a bunch of different purposes if I'm going to tell this story in only five hundred episodes, and the Janis Martin one, I think, did that better than many. As to the larger question of signposts versus impact at the time -- I am trying, for the most part, to tell the story from the point of view of the time we're looking at, and look at what mattered to listeners and other musicians at the time. But you also have to fill in the details of stuff that's going to affect things in the future. So for example you can't talk about REM without first having covered people like Big Star, so even though Big Star weren't huge at the time, they'll definitely be covered. On the other hand someone like, say, Nick Drake, who had little influence until he was rediscovered decades later, won't be covered, except maybe in passing when talking about other artists Joe Boyd produced, because he didn't really have an effect on the wider story.   In general, the prime consideration for any song that I include is -- does it advance the overall story I'm telling? There'll be stuff left out that would be in if the only criterion was how people reacted to it at the time, and there'll be stuff included which, on its own merits, just wouldn't make the list at all. There's one Adam Faith album track, for example, that I'm going to talk about in roughly nine months, which I think is almost certainly not even the best track that Adam Faith recorded that day, which is about as low a bar as it gets. But it'll be in there because it's an important link in a larger story, even though it's not a song that mattered at all at the time.   And a final question from Daniel Helton on whether I considered doing an episode on "Ain't Got No Home" by Clarence "Frogman" Henry.   [Excerpt: Clarence “Frogman” Henry, “Ain't Got No Home”]   It's a great record, but much of what I'd have to say about it would be stuff about the New Orleans scene and Cosimo Matassa's studio and so forth -- stuff that I'd probably already covered in the episodes on Fats Domino and Lloyd Price (including the episode on Price that's coming up later), so it'd be covering too much of the same ground for me to devote a full episode to it.   If I was going to cover Frogman in the main podcast, it would *probably* be with "I Don't Know Why (But I Do)" because that came out at a time when there were far fewer interesting records being made, and I'd then cover his history including "Ain't Got No Home" as part of that, but I don't think that's likely.   In fact, yeah, I'll pencil in "Ain't Got No Home" for next week's Patreon episode. Don't expect much, because those are only ten-minute ones, but it came out at around the same time as next week's proper episode was recorded, and it *is* a great record. I'll see what I can do for that one.   Anyway, between this and the Patreon bonus episode, I think that's all the questions covered. Thanks to everyone who asked one, and if I haven't answered your questions fully, please let me know and I'll try and reply in the comments to the Patreon post. We'll be doing this again next year, so sign up for the Patreon now if you want that. Next week we're back to the regular podcasts, with an episode on "Matchbox" by Carl Perkins. Also, I'm *hoping* -- though not completely guaranteeing yet -- that I'll have the book based on the first fifty episodes done and out by this time next week. These things always take longer than I expect, but here's hoping there'll be an announcement next week. See you then.  

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
BONUS: Question and Answer Episode 2

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2019


This week’s episode of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs is the second of two bonus episodes answering listener questions at the end of the first year of the podcast. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a bonus podcast, answering even more questions. —-more—- Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. This one also includes the songs from the Patreon bonus episode, as that’s even more questions and answers. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to the second and final part of this year’s question and answer bonus podcasts. This week I’m actually going to do two of these. The one that’s going on the main podcast is going to consist of those questions that my backers asked that have to do primarily with the podcast and the music, while the one that’s going only to backers consists mostly of questions that have been asked about me and my life and so forth — stuff that might be less interesting to the casual listener, but that clearly someone is interested in. Next week I get back to the main story, with an episode about Carl Perkins, but right now we’re going to jump straight into the questions.   Matthew Elmslie asks:   “It’s not an issue you’ve had to confront yet, as you navigate the mid-’50s, but eventually you’re going to come up against the clash between the concept of popular music where the basic unit is the song or single, and the one where the basic unit is the album. What are your thoughts on that and how do you plan to deal with it?” This is a question I had to give some consideration to when I was writing my book California Dreaming, which in many ways was sort of a trial run for the podcast, and which like the podcast told its story by looking at individual tracks. I think it can be a problem, but probably not in the way it first appears.   First, the period where the album was dominant was a fairly short one — it’s only roughly from 1967 through about 1974 that the bands who were getting the most critical respect were primarily thinking in terms of albums rather than singles. After that, once punk starts, the pendulum swings back again, so it’s not a long period of time that I have to think of in those terms. But it is something that has to be considered during that period. On the other hand, even during that period, there were many acts who were still primarily singles acts — the Monkees, Slade, the Move, T-Rex… many of whom, arguably, had more long-term influence than many of the album acts of the time.   I think for the most part, though, even the big album acts were still working mostly in ways that allow themselves to be looked at through the lens of single tracks. Like even on something like Dark Side of the Moon, which is about as concept-albumy as it gets, there’s still “Money” and “Great Gig in the Sky” which are individual tracks people know even if they don’t necessarily know the album, and which could be used as the focus of an episode on the album. Even with Led Zeppelin, who never released singles at all, there are tracks that might as well have been singles, like “Whole Lotta Love” or “Stairway to Heaven”. So for the most part it’s fairly easy to find a single track I can focus on.   The real problem only comes in for a handful of albums — records, mostly from that period in the late sixties and early seventies, which absolutely deserve to be considered as part of the podcast, but which don’t have standout tracks. It’s hard to pick one track from, say, Trout Mask Replica by Captain Beefheart or Astral Weeks by Van Morrison — those two albums really do need considering as albums rather than as individual tracks — there’s no reason to choose, say, “Frownland” over “The Dust Blows Forward ‘n’ the Dust Blows Back” or vice versa, or “Madame George” over “Slim Slow Slider”.   What I’ll do in those cases will probably vary from case to case. So with Trout Mask Replica I’d probably just pick one song as the title song for the episode but still talk about the whole album, while with Astral Weeks the most likely thing is for me to focus the episode on “Brown-Eyed Girl”, which isn’t on the album, but talk about the making of Astral Weeks after “Brown-Eyed Girl” was a success. That’s assuming I cover both those albums at all, but I named them because I’m more likely to than not.   [Excerpt: Van Morrison, “Brown-Eyed Girl”]   Russell Stallings asks: “Andrew, in [the] 60s it seems rock guitar was dominated by Stratocasters and Les Pauls, what was the guitar of choice in the period we are currently covering (1957) ?”   Well, 1957 is just about the point where this becomes an interesting question. Before this point the guitar hasn’t played much of a part in the proceedings — we’ve seen guitarists, but there’ve been more piano players — 1957 is really the point where the guitar becomes the primary rock and roll instrument.   Before I go any further, I just want to say that I’ve never been a particular gearhead. There are people out there who can tell the difference instantly between different types of guitars based on a note or two. I’m not one of them — I can sort of make out the difference between a Fendery sound and a Gibsony one and a Rickenbackery one, but not at a tremendous level of precision. I tend to care more about the technique of the player than the sound of the instrument, so this isn’t my area of expertise. But I’ll give this a go.   Now, there wasn’t a straightforward single most popular guitar at this point. It’s true that from the late sixties on rock pretty much standardised around the Les Paul and the Stratocaster — though it was from the late sixties, and you get a lot of people playing different guitars in the early and mid sixties — but in the fifties people were still figuring things out as individuals. But at the same time, there is, sort of, an answer to this.   The Strat wasn’t particularly popular in the 50s. The only first-rank 50s rocker who played a Strat was Buddy Holly, who always played one on stage, though he varied his guitars in the studio from what I’ve read. Buddy Holly is indirectly the reason the Strat later became so popular — he inspired Hank Marvin of the Shadows to get one, and Marvin inspired pretty much every guitarist in Britain to copy him. But other than in surf music, the Strat wasn’t really popular until around 1967. You’d occasionally get a Telecaster player in the 50s — Buck Owens, who played on quite a few rockabilly sessions for people like Gene Vincent and Wanda Jackson before he became one of the greats of country music, played a Telecaster. And James Burton, who played in the fifties with Ricky Nelson and Dale Hawkins, among others, was another Telecaster player. But in general there weren’t a lot of Fender players.   [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, “Hello, Mary Lou”, James Burton guitar solo]   Some people did play Gibsons — most of the Chicago electric blues people seem to have been Gibson people, and so was Chuck Berry. Scotty Moore also played a Gibson. But rather than go for the Les Paul, they’d mostly go for hollow-body models like the L5, which could be played as either electric or acoustic. Scotty Moore also used a custom-built Echosonic amp, so he could get a similar guitar sound on stage to the one he’d got in the studio with Sam Phillips, and he used the L5 and Echosonic combination on all the Elvis hits of the fifties. Carl Perkins did play a Les Paul at first, including on “Blue Suede Shoes”, but he switched to a Gibson ES-5 (and got himself an Echosonic from the same person who made Scotty Moore’s) after that.   [Excerpt: Carl Perkins, “Matchbox”]   For acoustic guitar, people generally either used a Martin, like Elvis Presley or Ray Edenton, who was the session rhythm player who doubled Don Everly’s guitar in the studio (Phil Everly would double it live, but he didn’t play on the records), or they’d play a Gibson acoustic, as Don Everly and Buddy Holly did. But overwhelmingly the most popular guitar on rockabilly sessions — which means in rock and roll for these purposes, since with the exception of Chuck Berry the R&B side of rock and roll remained dominated by piano and sax — the most popular rockabilly guitar was a Gretsch. There were various popular models of Gretsch guitar, like the Duo Jet, but the most popular were the 6120, the Country Gentleman, and the Tennessean, all of which were variants on the same basic design, and all of which were endorsed by Chet Atkins, which is why they became the pre-eminent guitars among rockabilly musicians, all of whom idolised Atkins. You can hear how that guitar sounds when Atkins plays it here…   [Excerpt: Chet Atkins, “Mr. Sandman”]   Atkins himself played these guitars on sessions for Elvis (where he just played rhythm) and the Everly Brothers (for whom he played lead in the studio). Duane Eddy, Cliff Gallup of the Blue Caps, Eddie Cochran, and many more played Gretsch guitars in imitation of Atkins. Bo Diddley also played a Gretsch before he started playing his own custom-built guitar.   There was no default guitar choice in the 50s the way there was later, but the Gretsch seemed to be the choice of the guitarists who were most admired at the time, and so it also became the choice for anyone else who wanted that clean, country-style, rockabilly lead guitar sound. That sound went out of fashion in the later sixties, but George Harrison used a Gretsch for most of his early leads, and Michael Nesmith of the Monkees always played a Gretsch — when they started doing twelve-strings, in 1966, they initially only made three, one for Chet Atkins, one for George Harrison, and one for Nesmith, though they later mass-produced them.   But anyway, yeah. No single answer, but Gretsch Country Gentleman, with a hollow-bodied Gibson in close second, is the closest you’ll get.   William Maybury asks “About when does the History of Soul divorce from the History of Rock, in your eyes?” That’s a difficult question, and it’s something I’ll be dealing with in a lot more detail when we get to the 1970s, over a whole series of episodes. This is the grotesquely oversimplified version. The short answer is — when “soul” stopped being the label that was applied to cutting-edge black music that white people could rip off. The history of rock is, at least in part, a history of white musicians incorporating innovations that first appeared in black musicians’ work. It’s not *just* that, of course, but that’s a big part of it.   Now, around 1970 or so, “rock” gets redefined specifically as music that is made by white men with guitars, and other people making identical music were something else. Like there’s literally no difference, stylistically, between “Maggot Brain” by Funkadelic and things like Peter Green era Fleetwood Mac or “Watermelon in Easter Hay” by Frank Zappa, but people talk about P-Funk as a funk group rather than a rock group – I know the question was about soul, rather than funk, but in the early seventies there was a huge overlap between the two.   [Excerpt: Funkadelic, “Maggot Brain”]   But as long as soul music remained at the forefront of musical innovations, those innovations were incorporated by white “rock” acts, and any attempt to tell the story of rock music which ignores George Clinton or Stevie Wonder or Sly Stone or Marvin Gaye would be a fundamentally dishonest one.   But some time around the mid-seventies, “soul” stops being a label that’s applied to innovative new music, and becomes a label for music that’s consciously retro or conservative, people like, say, Luther Vandross. Not that there’s anything wrong with retro music — and there’s some great soul music made in the 80s and 90s — but the music that was at the cutting edge was first disco and then hip-hop, and that’s the music that was spawning the innovations that the rock musicians would incorporate into their work.   And, indeed, after around 1980 rock itself becomes more consciously retro and less experimental, and so the rate of incorporation of new musical ideas slows down too, though never completely stops.   But there’s always some fuzziness around genre labels. For example, if you consider Prince to be a soul musician, then obviously he’s still part of the story. Same goes for Michael Jackson. I don’t know if I’d consider either of them to be soul per se, but I could make a case for it, and obviously it’s impossible to tell the story of rock in the eighties without those two, any more than you could tell it without, say, Bruce Springsteen.   So, really, there’s a slow separation between the two genres over about a twenty-year period, starting in the mid-sixties and finishing in the mid-eighties. I *imagine* that Prince is probably the last new musician who might be described as soul who will be appearing in the podcast, but it really depends on where you draw the boundaries of what counts as soul. There’ll be a few disco and hip-hop acts appearing over the last half of the series, and some of them might be considered soul by some people.   That’s the best I can do at answering the question right now, but it’s a vastly oversimplified version of the real answer, which is “listen to all the podcasts for the seventies when I get to them”.   One from Jeff Stanzler:   “For me, the most surprising inclusion so far was the Janis Martin record. You did speak some about why you felt it warranted inclusion, but I’d love to hear more of your thinking on this, and maybe also on the larger philosophical question of including records that were more like significant signposts than records that had huge impact at the time.”   [Excerpt: Janis Martin, “Drugstore Rock & Roll”]   Some of this goes back to some of the stuff I was talking about last week, about how there are multiple factors at play when it comes to any song I’m choosing, but the Janis Martin one makes a good example of how those factors play into each other.   First, everything I said in that episode is true — it *is* an important signpost in the transition of rock and roll into a music specifically aimed at white teenagers, and it is the first record I’ve come across that deals with the 1950s of Happy Days and American Graffiti rather than the other things that were going on in the culture. Even though “Drugstore Rock and Roll” wasn’t a massively successful record, I think that makes it worth including.   But there were other factors that warranted its inclusion too. The first of these was simply that I wanted to include at least one song by a woman at that point. If you don’t count the Platters, who had one female member, it had been three months since the last song by a woman. I knew I was going to be doing Wanda Jackson a few weeks later, but it’s important to me that I show how women were always part of the story of rock and roll. The podcast is going to be biased towards men, because it’s telling the story of an industry that was massively biased towards men, but where women did have the opportunity to break through I want to give them credit. This is not including “token women” or anything like that — rather it’s saying “women have always been part of the story, their part of the story has been ignored, I want to do what I can to redress the balance a bit, so long as I don’t move into actively misrepresenting history”.   Then there’s the fact that Janis Martin had what to my mind was a fascinating story, and one that allowed me to talk about a lot of social issues of the time, at least in brief.   And finally there’s the way that her story ties in with those of other people I’ve covered. Her admiration of Ruth Brown allowed me to tie the story in with the episode on “Mama, He Treats Your Daughter Mean”, and also gave me a way to neatly bookend the story, while showing the influence of one of the songs I’d already covered. Her working for RCA and with the same musicians as Elvis meant that I could talk a bit more about those musicians, and her being marketed as “the Female Elvis” meant that I could talk about Elvis’ larger cultural impact on the world in 1956, something that needed to be discussed in the series, but which I hadn’t found space for in an episode on Elvis himself at that point. (And in talking about the various Elvis-based novelty records I was also able to mention a few figures who will turn up in future episodes, planting seeds for later).   [Excerpt: Eddie Cochran and the Holly Twins, “I Want Elvis For Christmas”]   So that’s the thinking there. Every episode has to serve a bunch of different purposes if I’m going to tell this story in only five hundred episodes, and the Janis Martin one, I think, did that better than many. As to the larger question of signposts versus impact at the time — I am trying, for the most part, to tell the story from the point of view of the time we’re looking at, and look at what mattered to listeners and other musicians at the time. But you also have to fill in the details of stuff that’s going to affect things in the future. So for example you can’t talk about REM without first having covered people like Big Star, so even though Big Star weren’t huge at the time, they’ll definitely be covered. On the other hand someone like, say, Nick Drake, who had little influence until he was rediscovered decades later, won’t be covered, except maybe in passing when talking about other artists Joe Boyd produced, because he didn’t really have an effect on the wider story.   In general, the prime consideration for any song that I include is — does it advance the overall story I’m telling? There’ll be stuff left out that would be in if the only criterion was how people reacted to it at the time, and there’ll be stuff included which, on its own merits, just wouldn’t make the list at all. There’s one Adam Faith album track, for example, that I’m going to talk about in roughly nine months, which I think is almost certainly not even the best track that Adam Faith recorded that day, which is about as low a bar as it gets. But it’ll be in there because it’s an important link in a larger story, even though it’s not a song that mattered at all at the time.   And a final question from Daniel Helton on whether I considered doing an episode on “Ain’t Got No Home” by Clarence “Frogman” Henry.   [Excerpt: Clarence “Frogman” Henry, “Ain’t Got No Home”]   It’s a great record, but much of what I’d have to say about it would be stuff about the New Orleans scene and Cosimo Matassa’s studio and so forth — stuff that I’d probably already covered in the episodes on Fats Domino and Lloyd Price (including the episode on Price that’s coming up later), so it’d be covering too much of the same ground for me to devote a full episode to it.   If I was going to cover Frogman in the main podcast, it would *probably* be with “I Don’t Know Why (But I Do)” because that came out at a time when there were far fewer interesting records being made, and I’d then cover his history including “Ain’t Got No Home” as part of that, but I don’t think that’s likely.   In fact, yeah, I’ll pencil in “Ain’t Got No Home” for next week’s Patreon episode. Don’t expect much, because those are only ten-minute ones, but it came out at around the same time as next week’s proper episode was recorded, and it *is* a great record. I’ll see what I can do for that one.   Anyway, between this and the Patreon bonus episode, I think that’s all the questions covered. Thanks to everyone who asked one, and if I haven’t answered your questions fully, please let me know and I’ll try and reply in the comments to the Patreon post. We’ll be doing this again next year, so sign up for the Patreon now if you want that. Next week we’re back to the regular podcasts, with an episode on “Matchbox” by Carl Perkins. Also, I’m *hoping* — though not completely guaranteeing yet — that I’ll have the book based on the first fifty episodes done and out by this time next week. These things always take longer than I expect, but here’s hoping there’ll be an announcement next week. See you then.  

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
BONUS: Question and Answer Episode 2

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2019


This week’s episode of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs is the second of two bonus episodes answering listener questions at the end of the first year of the podcast. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a bonus podcast, answering even more questions. —-more—- Resources As always, I’ve created a Mixcloud streaming playlist with full versions of all the songs in the episode. This one also includes the songs from the Patreon bonus episode, as that’s even more questions and answers. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Welcome to the second and final part of this year’s question and answer bonus podcasts. This week I’m actually going to do two of these. The one that’s going on the main podcast is going to consist of those questions that my backers asked that have to do primarily with the podcast and the music, while the one that’s going only to backers consists mostly of questions that have been asked about me and my life and so forth — stuff that might be less interesting to the casual listener, but that clearly someone is interested in. Next week I get back to the main story, with an episode about Carl Perkins, but right now we’re going to jump straight into the questions.   Matthew Elmslie asks:   “It’s not an issue you’ve had to confront yet, as you navigate the mid-’50s, but eventually you’re going to come up against the clash between the concept of popular music where the basic unit is the song or single, and the one where the basic unit is the album. What are your thoughts on that and how do you plan to deal with it?” This is a question I had to give some consideration to when I was writing my book California Dreaming, which in many ways was sort of a trial run for the podcast, and which like the podcast told its story by looking at individual tracks. I think it can be a problem, but probably not in the way it first appears.   First, the period where the album was dominant was a fairly short one — it’s only roughly from 1967 through about 1974 that the bands who were getting the most critical respect were primarily thinking in terms of albums rather than singles. After that, once punk starts, the pendulum swings back again, so it’s not a long period of time that I have to think of in those terms. But it is something that has to be considered during that period. On the other hand, even during that period, there were many acts who were still primarily singles acts — the Monkees, Slade, the Move, T-Rex… many of whom, arguably, had more long-term influence than many of the album acts of the time.   I think for the most part, though, even the big album acts were still working mostly in ways that allow themselves to be looked at through the lens of single tracks. Like even on something like Dark Side of the Moon, which is about as concept-albumy as it gets, there’s still “Money” and “Great Gig in the Sky” which are individual tracks people know even if they don’t necessarily know the album, and which could be used as the focus of an episode on the album. Even with Led Zeppelin, who never released singles at all, there are tracks that might as well have been singles, like “Whole Lotta Love” or “Stairway to Heaven”. So for the most part it’s fairly easy to find a single track I can focus on.   The real problem only comes in for a handful of albums — records, mostly from that period in the late sixties and early seventies, which absolutely deserve to be considered as part of the podcast, but which don’t have standout tracks. It’s hard to pick one track from, say, Trout Mask Replica by Captain Beefheart or Astral Weeks by Van Morrison — those two albums really do need considering as albums rather than as individual tracks — there’s no reason to choose, say, “Frownland” over “The Dust Blows Forward ‘n’ the Dust Blows Back” or vice versa, or “Madame George” over “Slim Slow Slider”.   What I’ll do in those cases will probably vary from case to case. So with Trout Mask Replica I’d probably just pick one song as the title song for the episode but still talk about the whole album, while with Astral Weeks the most likely thing is for me to focus the episode on “Brown-Eyed Girl”, which isn’t on the album, but talk about the making of Astral Weeks after “Brown-Eyed Girl” was a success. That’s assuming I cover both those albums at all, but I named them because I’m more likely to than not.   [Excerpt: Van Morrison, “Brown-Eyed Girl”]   Russell Stallings asks: “Andrew, in [the] 60s it seems rock guitar was dominated by Stratocasters and Les Pauls, what was the guitar of choice in the period we are currently covering (1957) ?”   Well, 1957 is just about the point where this becomes an interesting question. Before this point the guitar hasn’t played much of a part in the proceedings — we’ve seen guitarists, but there’ve been more piano players — 1957 is really the point where the guitar becomes the primary rock and roll instrument.   Before I go any further, I just want to say that I’ve never been a particular gearhead. There are people out there who can tell the difference instantly between different types of guitars based on a note or two. I’m not one of them — I can sort of make out the difference between a Fendery sound and a Gibsony one and a Rickenbackery one, but not at a tremendous level of precision. I tend to care more about the technique of the player than the sound of the instrument, so this isn’t my area of expertise. But I’ll give this a go.   Now, there wasn’t a straightforward single most popular guitar at this point. It’s true that from the late sixties on rock pretty much standardised around the Les Paul and the Stratocaster — though it was from the late sixties, and you get a lot of people playing different guitars in the early and mid sixties — but in the fifties people were still figuring things out as individuals. But at the same time, there is, sort of, an answer to this.   The Strat wasn’t particularly popular in the 50s. The only first-rank 50s rocker who played a Strat was Buddy Holly, who always played one on stage, though he varied his guitars in the studio from what I’ve read. Buddy Holly is indirectly the reason the Strat later became so popular — he inspired Hank Marvin of the Shadows to get one, and Marvin inspired pretty much every guitarist in Britain to copy him. But other than in surf music, the Strat wasn’t really popular until around 1967. You’d occasionally get a Telecaster player in the 50s — Buck Owens, who played on quite a few rockabilly sessions for people like Gene Vincent and Wanda Jackson before he became one of the greats of country music, played a Telecaster. And James Burton, who played in the fifties with Ricky Nelson and Dale Hawkins, among others, was another Telecaster player. But in general there weren’t a lot of Fender players.   [Excerpt: Ricky Nelson, “Hello, Mary Lou”, James Burton guitar solo]   Some people did play Gibsons — most of the Chicago electric blues people seem to have been Gibson people, and so was Chuck Berry. Scotty Moore also played a Gibson. But rather than go for the Les Paul, they’d mostly go for hollow-body models like the L5, which could be played as either electric or acoustic. Scotty Moore also used a custom-built Echosonic amp, so he could get a similar guitar sound on stage to the one he’d got in the studio with Sam Phillips, and he used the L5 and Echosonic combination on all the Elvis hits of the fifties. Carl Perkins did play a Les Paul at first, including on “Blue Suede Shoes”, but he switched to a Gibson ES-5 (and got himself an Echosonic from the same person who made Scotty Moore’s) after that.   [Excerpt: Carl Perkins, “Matchbox”]   For acoustic guitar, people generally either used a Martin, like Elvis Presley or Ray Edenton, who was the session rhythm player who doubled Don Everly’s guitar in the studio (Phil Everly would double it live, but he didn’t play on the records), or they’d play a Gibson acoustic, as Don Everly and Buddy Holly did. But overwhelmingly the most popular guitar on rockabilly sessions — which means in rock and roll for these purposes, since with the exception of Chuck Berry the R&B side of rock and roll remained dominated by piano and sax — the most popular rockabilly guitar was a Gretsch. There were various popular models of Gretsch guitar, like the Duo Jet, but the most popular were the 6120, the Country Gentleman, and the Tennessean, all of which were variants on the same basic design, and all of which were endorsed by Chet Atkins, which is why they became the pre-eminent guitars among rockabilly musicians, all of whom idolised Atkins. You can hear how that guitar sounds when Atkins plays it here…   [Excerpt: Chet Atkins, “Mr. Sandman”]   Atkins himself played these guitars on sessions for Elvis (where he just played rhythm) and the Everly Brothers (for whom he played lead in the studio). Duane Eddy, Cliff Gallup of the Blue Caps, Eddie Cochran, and many more played Gretsch guitars in imitation of Atkins. Bo Diddley also played a Gretsch before he started playing his own custom-built guitar.   There was no default guitar choice in the 50s the way there was later, but the Gretsch seemed to be the choice of the guitarists who were most admired at the time, and so it also became the choice for anyone else who wanted that clean, country-style, rockabilly lead guitar sound. That sound went out of fashion in the later sixties, but George Harrison used a Gretsch for most of his early leads, and Michael Nesmith of the Monkees always played a Gretsch — when they started doing twelve-strings, in 1966, they initially only made three, one for Chet Atkins, one for George Harrison, and one for Nesmith, though they later mass-produced them.   But anyway, yeah. No single answer, but Gretsch Country Gentleman, with a hollow-bodied Gibson in close second, is the closest you’ll get.   William Maybury asks “About when does the History of Soul divorce from the History of Rock, in your eyes?” That’s a difficult question, and it’s something I’ll be dealing with in a lot more detail when we get to the 1970s, over a whole series of episodes. This is the grotesquely oversimplified version. The short answer is — when “soul” stopped being the label that was applied to cutting-edge black music that white people could rip off. The history of rock is, at least in part, a history of white musicians incorporating innovations that first appeared in black musicians’ work. It’s not *just* that, of course, but that’s a big part of it.   Now, around 1970 or so, “rock” gets redefined specifically as music that is made by white men with guitars, and other people making identical music were something else. Like there’s literally no difference, stylistically, between “Maggot Brain” by Funkadelic and things like Peter Green era Fleetwood Mac or “Watermelon in Easter Hay” by Frank Zappa, but people talk about P-Funk as a funk group rather than a rock group – I know the question was about soul, rather than funk, but in the early seventies there was a huge overlap between the two.   [Excerpt: Funkadelic, “Maggot Brain”]   But as long as soul music remained at the forefront of musical innovations, those innovations were incorporated by white “rock” acts, and any attempt to tell the story of rock music which ignores George Clinton or Stevie Wonder or Sly Stone or Marvin Gaye would be a fundamentally dishonest one.   But some time around the mid-seventies, “soul” stops being a label that’s applied to innovative new music, and becomes a label for music that’s consciously retro or conservative, people like, say, Luther Vandross. Not that there’s anything wrong with retro music — and there’s some great soul music made in the 80s and 90s — but the music that was at the cutting edge was first disco and then hip-hop, and that’s the music that was spawning the innovations that the rock musicians would incorporate into their work.   And, indeed, after around 1980 rock itself becomes more consciously retro and less experimental, and so the rate of incorporation of new musical ideas slows down too, though never completely stops.   But there’s always some fuzziness around genre labels. For example, if you consider Prince to be a soul musician, then obviously he’s still part of the story. Same goes for Michael Jackson. I don’t know if I’d consider either of them to be soul per se, but I could make a case for it, and obviously it’s impossible to tell the story of rock in the eighties without those two, any more than you could tell it without, say, Bruce Springsteen.   So, really, there’s a slow separation between the two genres over about a twenty-year period, starting in the mid-sixties and finishing in the mid-eighties. I *imagine* that Prince is probably the last new musician who might be described as soul who will be appearing in the podcast, but it really depends on where you draw the boundaries of what counts as soul. There’ll be a few disco and hip-hop acts appearing over the last half of the series, and some of them might be considered soul by some people.   That’s the best I can do at answering the question right now, but it’s a vastly oversimplified version of the real answer, which is “listen to all the podcasts for the seventies when I get to them”.   One from Jeff Stanzler:   “For me, the most surprising inclusion so far was the Janis Martin record. You did speak some about why you felt it warranted inclusion, but I’d love to hear more of your thinking on this, and maybe also on the larger philosophical question of including records that were more like significant signposts than records that had huge impact at the time.”   [Excerpt: Janis Martin, “Drugstore Rock & Roll”]   Some of this goes back to some of the stuff I was talking about last week, about how there are multiple factors at play when it comes to any song I’m choosing, but the Janis Martin one makes a good example of how those factors play into each other.   First, everything I said in that episode is true — it *is* an important signpost in the transition of rock and roll into a music specifically aimed at white teenagers, and it is the first record I’ve come across that deals with the 1950s of Happy Days and American Graffiti rather than the other things that were going on in the culture. Even though “Drugstore Rock and Roll” wasn’t a massively successful record, I think that makes it worth including.   But there were other factors that warranted its inclusion too. The first of these was simply that I wanted to include at least one song by a woman at that point. If you don’t count the Platters, who had one female member, it had been three months since the last song by a woman. I knew I was going to be doing Wanda Jackson a few weeks later, but it’s important to me that I show how women were always part of the story of rock and roll. The podcast is going to be biased towards men, because it’s telling the story of an industry that was massively biased towards men, but where women did have the opportunity to break through I want to give them credit. This is not including “token women” or anything like that — rather it’s saying “women have always been part of the story, their part of the story has been ignored, I want to do what I can to redress the balance a bit, so long as I don’t move into actively misrepresenting history”.   Then there’s the fact that Janis Martin had what to my mind was a fascinating story, and one that allowed me to talk about a lot of social issues of the time, at least in brief.   And finally there’s the way that her story ties in with those of other people I’ve covered. Her admiration of Ruth Brown allowed me to tie the story in with the episode on “Mama, He Treats Your Daughter Mean”, and also gave me a way to neatly bookend the story, while showing the influence of one of the songs I’d already covered. Her working for RCA and with the same musicians as Elvis meant that I could talk a bit more about those musicians, and her being marketed as “the Female Elvis” meant that I could talk about Elvis’ larger cultural impact on the world in 1956, something that needed to be discussed in the series, but which I hadn’t found space for in an episode on Elvis himself at that point. (And in talking about the various Elvis-based novelty records I was also able to mention a few figures who will turn up in future episodes, planting seeds for later).   [Excerpt: Eddie Cochran and the Holly Twins, “I Want Elvis For Christmas”]   So that’s the thinking there. Every episode has to serve a bunch of different purposes if I’m going to tell this story in only five hundred episodes, and the Janis Martin one, I think, did that better than many. As to the larger question of signposts versus impact at the time — I am trying, for the most part, to tell the story from the point of view of the time we’re looking at, and look at what mattered to listeners and other musicians at the time. But you also have to fill in the details of stuff that’s going to affect things in the future. So for example you can’t talk about REM without first having covered people like Big Star, so even though Big Star weren’t huge at the time, they’ll definitely be covered. On the other hand someone like, say, Nick Drake, who had little influence until he was rediscovered decades later, won’t be covered, except maybe in passing when talking about other artists Joe Boyd produced, because he didn’t really have an effect on the wider story.   In general, the prime consideration for any song that I include is — does it advance the overall story I’m telling? There’ll be stuff left out that would be in if the only criterion was how people reacted to it at the time, and there’ll be stuff included which, on its own merits, just wouldn’t make the list at all. There’s one Adam Faith album track, for example, that I’m going to talk about in roughly nine months, which I think is almost certainly not even the best track that Adam Faith recorded that day, which is about as low a bar as it gets. But it’ll be in there because it’s an important link in a larger story, even though it’s not a song that mattered at all at the time.   And a final question from Daniel Helton on whether I considered doing an episode on “Ain’t Got No Home” by Clarence “Frogman” Henry.   [Excerpt: Clarence “Frogman” Henry, “Ain’t Got No Home”]   It’s a great record, but much of what I’d have to say about it would be stuff about the New Orleans scene and Cosimo Matassa’s studio and so forth — stuff that I’d probably already covered in the episodes on Fats Domino and Lloyd Price (including the episode on Price that’s coming up later), so it’d be covering too much of the same ground for me to devote a full episode to it.   If I was going to cover Frogman in the main podcast, it would *probably* be with “I Don’t Know Why (But I Do)” because that came out at a time when there were far fewer interesting records being made, and I’d then cover his history including “Ain’t Got No Home” as part of that, but I don’t think that’s likely.   In fact, yeah, I’ll pencil in “Ain’t Got No Home” for next week’s Patreon episode. Don’t expect much, because those are only ten-minute ones, but it came out at around the same time as next week’s proper episode was recorded, and it *is* a great record. I’ll see what I can do for that one.   Anyway, between this and the Patreon bonus episode, I think that’s all the questions covered. Thanks to everyone who asked one, and if I haven’t answered your questions fully, please let me know and I’ll try and reply in the comments to the Patreon post. We’ll be doing this again next year, so sign up for the Patreon now if you want that. Next week we’re back to the regular podcasts, with an episode on “Matchbox” by Carl Perkins. Also, I’m *hoping* — though not completely guaranteeing yet — that I’ll have the book based on the first fifty episodes done and out by this time next week. These things always take longer than I expect, but here’s hoping there’ll be an announcement next week. See you then.  

The Parrothead Podcast: All Things Jimmy Buffett
Best of Live: Jimmy Buffett (Spotify Playlist)

The Parrothead Podcast: All Things Jimmy Buffett

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2019 58:19


This week on the Parrothead Podcast, Patrick and Ryan are taking a deep-dive into one of the stranger Jimmy Buffett playlists on Spotify - Best of Live: Jimmy Buffett. Why is Brown Eyed Girl on here twice? Why was Dreamsicle added three weeks after the playlist was published? Why does this exist in the first place? Listen to find out! -- EPISODE LINKS Best of Live: Jimmy Buffett (Spotify) Watch Gods of Food (College Humor) Ryan's "Good. New." Playlist (Spotify) -- SHOW INFORMATION Twitter: @ParrotheadPod Email: ParrotheadPodcast@gmail.com Subscribe: Apple Podcasts Subscribe: Spotify

Out of Curiosity with kt mather
CB4 - Bill Tanner - Lester Bangs on Astral Weeks

Out of Curiosity with kt mather

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2019 98:22


BT and I chat about kitsch, Midnight Oil, a masculinity that draws us closer to humanity, Julia Roberts dancing to Brown Eyed Girl, using dark humor to cope with suffering, death, and Lester Bangs on Van Morrison's Astral Weeks.

Ocho the Owl Radio
Brown eyed Girl/Yours LIVE @ Swamis Beach Drum Circle

Ocho the Owl Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2019 10:49


Thank you, as always, for your support of Ocho the Owl Radio. Your support of this content and other content like it is absolutely critical to making positivity and self empowerment louder. To rate review and subscribe creates momentum in the alleviation of suffering and the growth of peace and happiness for all beings in all worlds. Thank you for helping, I would love to rate review and subscribe to any of your passions right now! Let me see the comments and be supported! “When you establish a destination by defining what you want, then take physical action by making choices that move you towards that destination, the possibility for success is limitless and arrival at the destination is inevitable.” -Steve Maraboli --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ochotheowlradio/support

Rockhistorier
Van Morrison (1964 – 1974): Den mutte irers kunstnerisk mest givende periode

Rockhistorier

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2019 121:38


Hvad Van Morrison i denne periode angår, er ‘Rockhistorier’ de rene fanboys og tager i aftenens program den mutte irers kunstnerisk mest givende periode under kærlig behandling.Fra og med den 19-årige nordirer Van Morrison som forsanger i gruppen Them i det herrens år 1964 pladedebuterede med en frenetisk udgave af ‘Baby Please Don’t Go’ og frem til han 10 år senere udsendte soloalbummet ‘Veedon Fleece’, skilte han sig markant ud fra flokken med sine originale kompositioner og unikke vokal. Derefter forlod han show-biz og smækkede døren i efter sig!! For dog så at komme luntende tilbage tre år senere, men det er en anden historie. Som kunstner var Morrison i denne periode både generøs, særegen og transcendent, mens han som person fremstod excentrisk, kontrær og paranoid, især hvad angik pladebranchen og musikpressen. Men han skar i processen en håndfuld af periodens allerbedste lp’er, Astral Weeks (1968), Moondance (1970), Saint Dominic’s Preview (1972) og førnævnte Veedon Fleece (1974).Trackliste: Them: Baby Please Don’t Go (1964) Them: Gloria (1964)Them: Here Comes the Night (1965)Them: Mystic Eyes (1965)Them: It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue (1966)Brown-Eyed Girl (1967)T.B. Sheets (1967)The Way Young Lovers Do (1968)Madame George (1968)Moondance (1970)Tupelo Honey (1971) Jackie Wilson Said (I’m in Heaven When You Smile) (1972) Listen to the Lion (1972) Hard Nose the Highway (1973)Streets of Arklow (1974)

Rockhistorier
‘Rockhistorier': Den unge Van Morrison 1964-1974

Rockhistorier

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2019 121:38


Fra og med den 19-årige nordirer Van Morrison som forsanger i gruppen Them i det herrens år 1964 pladedebuterede med en frenetisk udgave af ‘Baby Please Don’t Go' og frem til han 10 år senere udsendte soloalbummet ‘Veedon Fleece', skilte han sig markant ud fra flokken med sine originale kompositioner og unikke vokal. Derefter forlod han show-biz og smækkede døren i efter sig!! For dog så at komme luntende tilbage tre år senere, men det er en anden historie. Som kunstner var Morrison i denne periode både generøs, særegen og transcendent, mens han som person fremstod excentrisk, kontrær og paranoid, især hvad angik pladebranchen og musikpressen. Men han skar i processen en håndfuld af periodens allerbedste lp’er, Astral Weeks (1968), Moondance (1970), Saint Dominic’s Preview (1972) og førnævnte Veedon Fleece (1974).Playliste:Them: Baby Please Don’t Go (1964) Them: Gloria (1964)Them: Here Comes the Night (1965)Them: Mystic Eyes (1965)Them: It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue (1966)Brown-Eyed Girl (1967)T.B. Sheets (1967)The Way Young Lovers Do (1968)Madame George (1968)Moondance (1970)Tupelo Honey (1971) Jackie Wilson Said (I'm in Heaven When You Smile) (1972) Listen to the Lion (1972) Hard Nose the Highway (1973)Streets of Arklow (1974)

Famous Lost Words
Episode 214 - Bruno Mars, Van Morrison, Phil Collins

Famous Lost Words

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2018 39:24


This week, an early-career interview with one of the biggest stars of the decade, Bruno Mars. Tom & Christopher debate whether Bruno is an “artist” or “just an entertainer”.    Tom stumbles across a classic interview with Van Morrison, who talks about creating classics like “Domino” and “Brown Eyed Girl”.    And an entertaining 1996 chat with Phil Collins just as he is leaving Genesis. Phil is happy and optimistic in this interview – not knowing of the personal and career struggles

It's All Relative
The One Where Eden's a Psychopath

It's All Relative

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2018 49:08


Eden undergoes a bizarre (to her) 24 hours as a result of going unrecognized all weekend. Eden and Dawn retell the events while also testing to see if Dawn passes the psychopath test that Eden, previously, aced.

Plane Talking UK's Podcast
Episode 220 - She's a Brown Eyed Girl!

Plane Talking UK's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2018 121:49


Join Carlos, Armando and Matt from the Kitchen Studio as they take their trek through the big aviation related stories of the week. In today's episode we discuss a duty free ban of alcohol on-board, windowless aircraft are being considered with a UAE carrier and an abandoned airport is making heads turn. There's also an incredible sale on thanks to on of the big middle-eastern carriers. In the military we're talking F35's and a near miss involving a C130 and a microlight. Pip talks us through his week from 40,000 feet and it's the first of our Bruntingthorpe interviews - This week with Neil Lanwarne and the Super Guppy. Get in touch with the show by email us on podcast@planetalkinguk.com.

Guitar Lessons with Tune in, Tone up!
Guitar Lesson 31: Double stops, intervallic playing, chord embellishments and making it pretty

Guitar Lessons with Tune in, Tone up!

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2018 62:41


https://tunein-toneup.com/ In guitar lesson 31, Dan reminds me about some of the approaches you can use when embellishing chords, including the use of double stops and different intervallic sounds. You will hear Hendrixisms, discussion on how to connect major scales, chords and intervals in your thinking and some interesting approaches to help make your rhythm playing more interesting. Finally we look at the different flavours created by a variety of intervals. We hope you enjoy this lesson and use it as a springboard to improve your own rhythm playing. 1:25 Our introduction and initial questions 1:58 Story about music course at Canterbury University with Big Jim Sullivan 3:04 Dan raises the issue of how there is a slight disconnect between lead and rhythm playing 4:40 Can you see how the two -chords and melody - link together? 5:34 Double stops are somewhere in between chords and melody 7:41 Look at chords in a key and write out the chords and notes 9:10 The chords and notes in any key go in a cycle 9:34 Relative minor and see the chords as part of a minor key 11:21 I pick a chord progression - Am Dm F and C 14:30 Build notes into chords as embellishments 15:11 Am chord embellishments 17:03 Dm chord embellishments at 10th fret 19:00 Dm chord embellishments at 5th fret 20:30 F major chord embellishments at 8th fret 22:06 C major chord embellishments 24:40 Analysing the added notes used in embellishments 28:11 Hendrix type playing - who's used this embellishment style 30:17 Discussion of old amps including the MAJOR 200W 32:35 Little Wing as a prime example of this emellishment style 34:04 Hendrix - Little Wing 35:07 E shape Hendrix type embellishments 36:00 Hendrix - Hey Joe 36:24 Double stop ideas in open chords which becomes Chris Rea's Road to Hell 37:54 Chris Rea - Road to Hell 40:00 rolling the fingers of the picking hand 42:06 Guthrie Trapp - Commodity 43:00 Demonstration of open chords with chord extensions 45:00 Using the notes of the chord to end your melodic runs 46:33 Me using this idea and creating a melody over some of Dan's rhythm playing 47:41 Double stops being used in thirds like in Brown Eyed Girl 48:40 Van Morrison - Brown Eyed Girl 50:00 Learn the scales not just as single notes but as intervals and double stops 51:25 Harmonising using 6ths 52:09 Integrating what we have learnt so far and using more than one tactic 52:52 Harmonising parts of a melodic solo as 5ths and utilising octaves to recreate phrases 56:23 Different styles and using this type of technique 56:39 Using 5ths to create a heavy rock or metal sound 58:23 flicking off to open strings for a split second to create a jagged rock sound 60:00 7ths for a jazzy or dominant 7ths for a bluesy feel

[BRACKET!]
Episode #159 - Best Eye

[BRACKET!]

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2017 75:33


Sound.wav's Nell Bailey makes a terrible mistake and joins us for a no-good very bad episode all about everyone's favorite organ: eyes! John summons a Blue Eyes White Dragon while placing a Trap Card face-down. Cullen changes the lyrics, title, and really the whole meaning of Brown-Eyed Girl. Jesse gives Sauron new powers. Dan has regrets. Sound.Wav - Nell & Greg's Transformer's podcast Join our Facebook Group Donate to our Patreon Subscribe via RSS Review us in iTunes Follow us on Twitter Suggest a Topic View the completed bracket

School of Podcasting
What Podcasters Can Learn From Chuck Berry

School of Podcasting

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2017 55:50


Chuck Berry died last month at the age of 90. I saw him four years ago at a special event that honored him with tons of musicians (Merle Haggard, Ronnie Hawkins, Darryl "DMC" McDaniels, Joe Bonamassa and Lemmy Kilmister) coming to play his music and honor him. At the end of the night, Berry accepted the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame's American Masters of Music Award, wrapping the Hall of Fame's weeklong celebration of Berry's life.  In the end, they brought Chuck out with a band consisting of a lot of his children who knew how to follow their father's (at times) unpredictable behavior (Chuck got confused in the middle of song two, and restarted it). Chuck got us smiling from the very first moment. He said, "It's great to be here. Then again, I'm 86; I'm glad to be anywhere." So here are some things, on Episode 560, that podcasters can learn from Chuck Berry. Now as a guitar player myself, you start playing the guitar hoping to play Stairway to Heaven, Iron Man, Smoke on the Water, you want to be Van Halen, but you don't start there. You start with Chuck Berry, and you start with Johnny B Goode. In the same way that every band has to learn Mustang Sally and Brown Eyed Girl, every guitar player has to learn how to play Johnny B Good. I am no exception. It's not about the tech. Keep it Simple Other musicians had pedalboard were made of technology on top of technology. They could do the river dance as they changed the tone of their guitar with each tap of their foot. Chuck came out with his trusty guitar and plugged into a single amplifier. He hit the opening riff of Roll Over Beethoven, and you could not help but smile. Chuck had one tone, it was Chuck Berry. This was not a drill, this was not a test, right there in front of my was Chuck Berry. He had a smile on his face, and by the third beat, the whole place was clapping along to the music, dancing, or both. 2. Give the People What They Want. Chuck Berry had many styles. Some of his songs had remnants of country music. He played slow blues., You probably don't know most of those songs. If you wanted airplay, you had to play something kids (teenagers) wanted, and could dance to.  One other thing, the teenagers were the ones buying the music. Rock and Roll music was new. It was a great way for being rebellious, and the fact that this was Rock and Roll from a BLACK MAN, made it even more revolutionary (this was the 1950s). You will notice that Roll Over Beethoven, Johnny B Goode, Rock and Roll Music and many other Berry titles are pretty much the same song. When he appeared on the Johnny Carson show, he said to the band leader, "It's the same as the last song" as they prepared to play another song.  However, those songs like Sweet Little Sixteen, School Days, and others were instantly relatable to his audience. He also had suggestive lyrics which probably made parents offended. Here is a verse from Roll Over Beethoven: Well, if you feel and like it Go get your lover, then reel and rock it Roll it over and move on up just A trifle further and reel and rock with one another, Roll over Beethoven dig these rhythm and blues. 3. Chuck Was Engaging Chuck made sure you were looking at him. in the early days of his career he usually wore black or white suits, but his eyes, mouth, and hands, and especially his legs demanded attention. He would strum his guitar in a way that has hand moved from the back to guitar toward to top. As a guitar player, I can tell you it makes almost no difference where you strum an electric guitar, but it looks cool (and yes, I've borrowed that move). His "Duck Walk" he said in a CBS interview was a mistake. He had slipped and fallen and the "Duck Walk" happened as he was trying to get back up. He noticed the ovation and worked it into his act. Chuck paid attention to what made the audience go wild. 4. Charge What Your Worth There is only one Chuck Berry. Sure everyone from the Beatles, Stones, Elvis, Duan Alman, The Kinks, John Lennon, Simon and Garfunkle, Bruce Springsteen, and David Bowie, they all have covered his music. There is only ONE Chuck Berry. Consequently, Chuck knew this and after being ripped off in the early part of his career, he started demanding that he get paid up front, in cash. 5. Chuck Got the Audience Involved Most of his big hits made it super easy to make them "sing-alongs." All Chuck had to say was "Go!" and put his hand up to his ear and the audience would sing "Go Johny Go, Go.." 6. A Little Planning Up Front Saves Some Editing Time Later Post-1970 Chuck didn't tour with a band. He brought his guitar and whoever was promoting his concert was in charge of putting together a band. On a tonight show appearance, he said, "well everybody knows my music." This was true, but they all sounded the same. While they are not obvious, when you see Chuck perform with these acts, the intros are a little sloppy, and the endings were often train wrecks as the band didn't know that when Chuck kicks his leg up that meant stop. 7. Don't Break The Law Chuck had issues with the law about every 15-20 years. One involved him putting cameras in the women's bathroom. While he was never convicted of wrongdoing, he did settle out of court, and it cost him 1.2 million dollars. 8. Take Care of Your Team / Get Things in Writing One of the reasons Chuck insisted on being paid in cash is he had been swindled out of money by promoters and clubs in the past. One key player in Berry's band was Johnnie Johnson (his piano player). In November 2000, Johnson sued Berry, alleging he deserved co-composer credits (and royalties) for dozens of songs, including "No Particular Place to Go," "Sweet Little Sixteen," and "Roll Over Beethoven," which credit Berry alone. The case was dismissed in less than a year because too many years had passed since the songs in dispute were written. 9. Don't Spend all Your Money on Gear A recent report estimated Chuck's estate is worth 50 million. While some of this is from record royalties, Chuck invested in Real Estate. When you start making money with your podcast (if that is something you choose to do) spend some on your family, put some in the bank (and avoid the stress of worrying about money). 10. While You Can Give Them Something Similar, it Still Has to Be Good Did you know there was a sequel to Johnny B Good? Me neither. According to Wikipedia it never charted in any country. So in the same what that creating a song about Johnny B Good isn't going to equal chart success, creating a podcast with the phrase "On Fire" (or whatever is hot at the moment ) does not mean you will get chart success. Why People Remember Chuck Berry There is a famous quote by Maya Angelou, “I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.” Chuck Berry's music made people smile, it made them want to dance, and they lead to them having fun, and in some cases there was realin' and rockin'. Podhero Review What is Podheri.io? Podhero is described as a swiss army knife for podcasters with a goal of making podcast creation and promotion easier. Audio Processing The site describes it as "Automate the technical hurdles to make your vocals sound amazing." So I compared it to Auphonic.com as they both level out the volume, and remove noise (hiss and hum). If I were to judge the output, I would say it's very close (if not a tie). In looking at the wav forms, it appears auphonic might have an ever so slight edge, but keep in mind, my ears didn't' notice anything. The only true advantage (depending on your attitude) is Auphonic has more configuration options (so you can set loudness levels if you want to just level volume and not remove noise).  But I was impressed with the audio processing. This opinion is based upon testing one file. Podcast To Video If can take your audio podcast and send it to YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram. It also gives you a basic tool to create a custom artwork. You can do this if you are using Libsyn and Spreaker. Blubrry does some distribution (but they only do the first few minutes of your show).  The tool for creating an image is really basic and is better than nothing. When there are tools such as canva.com as a free option, I could see using Canva to create the image, and then use the "upload your own" option here to make your video. Is video worth it? My last episode from the School of Podcasting had 26 views, and I was surprised that the analytics show people were watching a majority. My advice would be to open this tool in a new window as the processing of audio to video is going to take some time.  Currently, you can have the tool automatically post to YouTube (with plan of Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Medium) Website Widget Review This tool will put a small pop-up on your website. You just copy and paste some code. For me, I find this tool "meh" because ratings in iTunes are great social proof, they don't help you advance up the charts (I thnk people put too much emphasis on them as a "must do"). My Podcast Reviews This tool brings you all of your reviews from all of the stores. This is a free tool. This does have a feature that I found interesting. It shows you your reviews across a period. I found that interesting. They attempt to show you (on a map) where the reviews come from, but besides getting the country correct, I wouldn't count it accurate from a geographic standpoint. iTunes Keyword Tracking This allows you to put in your (or your "Competition's") iTunes link and enter a keyword. So I can see where The Audacity to Podcast Ranks higher than my show, but I rank higher than the Podcast Report. That's interesting. There is no way to say "who is #1?" I'm just not sure what I'm supposed to with this information. Many moons ago I had a program called Webmaster Gold, and it would track your website and let you know where you ranked. This lead to people writing articles more for the Google Web crawler instead of the humans who were reading it. Also, when I was a teacher in the corporate world, I would do my best every day. Every day I got scored by my students. While I always feel there is room for improvement, I'm not sure there was anything I would change (in most cases) if someone gave me an average score. So for me, I see this as a set of interesting statistics, that people can obsess over, but in the end, may not lead to any value being delivered to your audience. Episode Media Kits If you do a lot of interviews, this could be your favorite feature. Here you upload promotional images, create messages to go to Twitter, Facebook Google+, and LinkedIn. You upload pictures, create your tweets, and copy and link and send that to your guest. They can send a message with a single click. For me, this is the most useful tool (again, if you're doing interviews, but don't limit your thinking, why not put the link in your post and give your audience access to promote your episode. Do You Need This? Much of this you can get for free for example: Canva.com - free image creation tool Podcast Rankings - have them emailed to you see Regan Star If you're using Libsyn, you can automatically have your show syndicated to Twitter, Facebook, YouTube (with video, and you can add a custom image), iHeart Radio, LinkedIn, Tumblr, Blogger, and more. Podcast Reviews - You can get this feature free in Podhero, as well as My Podcast Reviews Audio Processing - You can get 2 hours free each month at auphonic. Things Unique To Podhero If you're not using Libsyn or Spreaker, it will create a video for you It shows you your podcast reviews over time. The podcast review widget. The podcast media kit. How Much Does it Cost? There is a free version that includes: Worldwide iTunes Review Tracking (2 podcasts) iTunes Keyword Tracker (1 keyword) Measures how visible your podcast is on iTunes for any search term over time. iTunes Review Website Widget (1 website) The paid version is $20/month Audio Enhancer Tool Social Video Creator Episode Media Kits Podcast to Youtube iTunes Keyword Researcher iTunes Keyword Tracker (15 keywords) Measures how visible your podcast is on iTunes for any search term over time. Worldwide iTunes Review Tracking (5 podcasts) When you get a new review on iTunes, from any country, you will be notified. New & NoteworthyAlerts iTunes Review Website Widget (unlimited) Mentioned In This Podcast What is the smallest amount you would take for advertising? (POLL) Chuck Berry on the Johnny Carson Show (YouTube Video) Podhero.io Libsyn.com (Liberated Syndication) Use the coupon code sopfree to get a free month Canva.com - free image creation tool Podcast Rankings - have them emailed to you see Regan Star Dave's Patreon Accounts  see http://supportthisshow.com/ Start your podcast by joining the School of Podcasting go to www.schoolofpodcasting.com/start

Questionable Love Song Dedications
SPECIAL Ep. 102 Brown-Eyed Girl by Van Morrison

Questionable Love Song Dedications

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 10, 2017 8:46


Part 2/6. In this very special edition of Questionable Love Song Dedications we cast our minds back to late 2016, when this show first started. After nearly 5 months of pure procrastination, Paul decided to overcome his laziness and republish the long-forgotten original pilot of the show. Now for your hearing pleasure, Ayden, Molly, Maria and Paul discuss 5 of the most popular love songs and why they have many questionable moments in them. 

Do Me A Solid
ADAM GORGONI

Do Me A Solid

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2016 51:28


This week we have Composer & A Capella Singer Adam Gorgoni. We discuss singing the National Anthem at MSG & Staples, and we talk about what it's like writing score for a variety of projects, and how his dad worked on Brown Eyed Girl! As always we get side-tracked but managed to talk about many an interesting topic!

Fontibell Radio
Show 6: Ireland (St. Patrick's Day)

Fontibell Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2015 125:41


In this Saint Patrick's Day celebration, listen to Jillian and Hailey talk about the Geldof family and fumble with the phone system. Then go eat dumplings. Playlist Opening: "(I Don't Want to Go to) Chelsea"/Elvis Costello & the Attractions Set 1: "I'm Gonna Be (500 Miles)"/The Proclaimers "The Unicorn"/The Irish Rovers "Irish Blood, English Heart"/Morrissey "The Irish Heart Beat (ft. Don Henley)"/Jerry Lee Lewis "Patty Melts"/Candypants Set 2: "Diamond Smiles"/Boomtown Rats "C'est la Vie"/B*Witched "Peking Saint"/Cat Power "My Darling Irish Girl"/Sean Connery "Bad Penny"/Rory Gallagher "If I Should Fall from Grace with God"/The Pogues Set 3: "Ireland"/Tori Amos "Speed of Darkness"/Flogging Molly "Jonah"/Wussy "Travelin' Band"/Creedence Clearwater Revival "Quiet"/Smashing Pumpkins "Linger"/The Cranberries "Foreigner's God"/Hozier Set 4: "Brown Eyed Girl"/Van Morrison "All Saints"/David Bowie "The Scotsman"/Bryan Bowers "Old Lady"/Sinead O'Connor "When Irish Eyes Are Smiling"/Frank Zappa "Death to My Hometown"/Bruce Springsteen "Sunday Bloody Sunday"/U2 Closing: "Molly Malone"/The Dubliners

Life on the Swingset - The Swinging & Polyamory Podcast
SS 081: Open SF Debrief III - Learning to Speak Up, Browsing SF, and a Farewell Lunch

Life on the Swingset - The Swinging & Polyamory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2012 53:15


We finish our debrief from our experience at Open SF Non-Monogamy Conference. We discuss seminars we attended, Dylan laments falling asleep, Cooper explains how The Brown Eyed Girl took them all out for a spin around town and how he learned to ask for what he wants, we break in the middle for a little discussion on companies who take public stances on issues, and we end with a farewell lunch on Monday with Pepper Mint.

Life on the Swingset - The Swinging & Polyamory Podcast
SS 080: Open SF Debrief II - Magic Brownies, Presentations, Hot Tubs, Flirting, & Sex

Life on the Swingset - The Swinging & Polyamory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2012 64:25


We continue our debrief from our experience at Open SF Non-Monogamy Conference. We discuss seminars we attended, including Charlie Glickman, Tristan Taormino, and the presentation we gave. Cooper gets a magic brownie and tries to pick up a Brown-Eyed Girl, and talks about how incredibly charming The Professor is. The gang goes on a San Francisco odyssey to find a hot-tub in the hills, and Dylan gets a girl.  

Crosstawk
Discover Music Project: Episode 28

Crosstawk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2011 75:41


Another friend makes his podcast debut: Taylor Hill, Jonny's former college roommate and travel companion, joins DMP to share his love of Van Morrison. After hearing these songs, you too will be a fan of the legendary Northern Irish troubadour. Van's music is mysterious, magnetic, and almost always catchy. His skill at arranging strings and horns for pop music is perhaps rivaled only by Stevie Wonder. If you've only heard "Brown-Eyed Girl", prepare to be blown away! Here's the set list: 1. Gloria (Them) 2. Baby Please Don't Go (Them) 3. Astral Weeks (Astral Weeks) 4. Cry For Home feat. Tom Jones (The Best of Van Morrison, Vol. 3) 5. Days Like This (Days Like This) 6. Caravan (Moondance) 7. St. Dominic's Preview (St. Dominic's Preview) 8. Redwood Tree (St. Dominic's Preview) 9. Bright Side of the Road (Into the Music) 10. Sweet Thing (Astral Weeks) 11. Wild Night (Tupelo Honey) Encore: Patti Smith - ??? (You'll have to listen to find out!)   As always, we'd love to hear your feedback and show ideas -- just email crosstawk@gmail.com or leave a comment on the Crosstawk.com website.

DJ Bill Coleman & Peace Bisquit Podcast
Episode 14: DJ BILL COLEMAN: Whipped Cream - Lounge Sessions Vol. 1

DJ Bill Coleman & Peace Bisquit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2009 69:07


The DJ BILL COLEMAN Podcast - Episode 14: "Whipped Cream: Lounge Sessions vol. 1" 1. "Freddie Freeloader" - Miles Davis 2. "Why Don't You Do Right?" - Peggy Lee 3. "Between The Devil and The Deep Blue Sea" - Ella Fitzgerald 4. "Bring Down The Birds" - Herbie Hancock 5. "Whipped Cream" - Herb Alpert 6. "Watermelon Man" - Mongo Santamaria 7. "Bang Bang" - Joe Cuba Sextet 8. "Sunshine Of Your Love" - Sparky Wilson 9. "Brown Eyed Girl" - Van Morrison 10. "Sweet Caroline" - Neil Diamond 11. "Soul Bossa Nova" - Quincy Jones 12. "Draggin' The Line" - Tommy James 13. "Green Onions" - Booker T. & The MG's 14. "She's A Woman" - The Beatles 15. "Sympathy For The Devil" - The Rolling Stones 16. "I'm A Man" - Jeffrey Wright 17. "I Got A Woman" - Ray Charles 18. "Chain Of Fools" - Aretha Franklin 19. "Knock On Wood" - Eddie Floyd 20. "The Boy From New York City" - The Ad-Libs 21. "Is You Is or Is You Ain't My Baby?" - Dinah Washington peacebisquit.com myspace.com/peacebisquit myspace.com/djbillcoleman facebook.com/djbillcoleman facebook.com/peacebisquit

Knitmoregirls's Podcast
Do the Twist! - Episode 40 - The Knitmore Girls

Knitmoregirls's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 16, 2009 59:44


This week's episode has been sponsored by: This week, we are joined by Tika (host of Gives Good Knit) and Andrew. Events: (00:58) Stitches West meetup- Saturday, February 28th from 2-4 PM in the Purlescence Yarns booth. If you haven't bought your market passes yet, go to the Knitting Universe Website, and the online promo code (for $2 off admission) is: MPCW. Come meet us and get some sweet swag! On the Needles: (2:51) Gigi finished her second blue Regia Saturn sock. She has also found another two balls of duplicate Regia in her stash. She has finished her pair of vanilla Brown Eyed Girl handspun socks. She has finished a dark red stocking cap (out of Cascade 220 Superwash). Jasmin has started weaving in her own ends, inspired by Tika duplicate stitching in her ends. Jasmin, after a lack of knitting mojo on Monday, started her Twist in Apple Green Malabrigo worsted on Tuesday. By Sunday, the body was done and blocked. Jasmin is obsessed with this sweater. Also, the entire sweater will be knit in 4 skeins. Jasmin talks about her WIP storage/"organization"/green room system. Jasmin's changes to Twist: - The pattern is written to knit the body in 3 pieces, Jasmin knit it in one piece. - The pattern is written to knit the sleeves flat; Jasmin knit them in the round. - The pattern calls for US 6/7 needles; Jasmin is knitting them on US 5/6. Jasmin waxes poetic about Twist, and wanders around hollering "My kingdom for a bag of Cadmium!" (Malabrigo) Tika's Coraline gloves make Lime and Violet's Daily Chum AND Neil Gaiman's blog! Jasmin talks about Valentine's Day. Andrew bought her a pair of yarn ball earrings and a matching pendant from Rosemary Hill. He also found the perfect buttons for Jasmin's Twist cardigan. Gigi talks about the Mini Mochi sock, and noticed that knitting it center-pull untwists the yarn. Mother Knows Best: (26:45) Stitches West tips, part III, courtesy of Andrew. Andrew's theory of yarn quality: when buying a yarn for the first time, buy one skein (or one project's worth) in order to determine knots per skein, colorfastness, washability, etc.  He also talks about the importance of swatching right away. (If you hate swatching, knit an Elizabeth Zimmermann Swatch Cap!) Also, swatches can be saved for future blanket projects. Alternatively, you could use them as decor in a curio coffee table. When Knitting Attacks: (39:11) Tika and Bree are doing a virtual KAL. Tika forgot to mark where on the chart she was, rips out, and starts over. Jasmin attempts to be smarter than the Twist pattern. She discovers that she CAN follow directions! Tika suggests using a highlighter to highlight the "AT THE SAME TIME" in the patterns. Reviews: (48:08) SWTC Tofutsies sock yarn. Jasmin doesn't like it because she finds it splitty, Tika does like it, but isn't sure yet if she would purchase more.

Knitmoregirls's Podcast
Warming up for Stitches! - Episode 38 - The Knitmore Girls

Knitmoregirls's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2009 53:29


This week's episode has been sponsored by:On the Needles: (00:32)Gigi has a bunch of vanilla socks on the needles. Gigi wasn't happy with her progress on her "On the Vine" scarf, so she has been sitting and doing a repeat every day after lunch, which is working well for her.Jasmin has started Ene's Scarf (which she isn't sure of the pronunciation of) from Scarf Style out of Artyarns Cashmere 1. (This was part of her half-off cashmere haul.) She has knit the first eight rows so far. This project has taught her that the rubber Bryson Stitch markers and the Addi lace needles do not mix.Gigi is still working with the Brown Eyed Girl handspun socks. They're not dyeing this color anymore, but if you call Klaus (at Crown Mountain Farms) and ask him for a color that is close, he'll help you out. (Tell him we sent you!)Jasmin has finished spinning 1 oz of Merry Meadows cormo and silk (in spring green). She has spun it very fine, so she's working on Black Magic Woman from Crown Mountain Farms.Gigi has started the Bulky Boot Socks from the Little Box of Socks. Gigi has also started the Scandanavian Sock pattern (also from the LBoS). They discuss the two-handed fair isle technique that Ann and Eugene Bourgeois (of Philosopher's Wool) teach.Jasmin has finished knitting the Santa Fe Wrap. Gigi unearthed an UFO made of Rowan Ribbon Twist (in black/pink), which is now becoming a sweater for Jasmin.While listening to Cast-On, Jasmin was inspired to knit a Modern Quilt Wrap in Noro Kureyon Sock. (Jasmin is knitting hers in color S188.) Jasmin is knitting hers on size 4 US/3.5mm needles. Jasmin is knitting it at a tighter gauge and will block it to size for aesthetic reasons. (Jasmin downloaded it from knittingdaily.com .)Mother Knows Best: (26:55)Stitches West tips!1- Determine your budget.2- Stick to your budget.Strategies: (A note to Dr. Gemma from CogKNITive- our strategies are less helpful than yours for real life.)- Make your wishlist. (Jasmin's includes one of Lisa Souza's batts, some wensleydale, and some polwarth. The polwarth is Meghan's, of Stitch-it fame, fault.)- Gigi will be buying some sock yarn.- Jasmin encourages you to take your list on a post-it.- Go through your stash so you don't replicate colors that you have a lot of in your stash.- Always buy more yarn, rather than less.Tips for shopping the market:- Gigi walks through the market the first time with the vendor catalog. If she sees something she likes, she makes a note. She does zero purchasing on the first round. (Jasmin is the same, but will purchase if she comes across something on her wishlist.)- On Gigi's second walkthrough, she eliminates items that she's not in love with.- On Gigi's third walkthrough, she starts making purchases. If it was meant to be, it will still be there.- First time attendees: Go with someone who has gone before.- Eat a good breakfast.- Wear good shoes.- Pack a healthy lunch and bring a bottle of water. (Jasmin recommends getting a BPA-free Nalgene bottle and clipping it to your bag with a carabiner.)- Make sure to sit. And socialize!- Shop from vendors who are out of your normal area.- Don't buy yarns that you have access to at your LYS. Hold off on those purchases until the month AFTER Stitches.Holidays with the Knitmores: (43:28)Valentine's Day gift suggestions for knitters/spinners:- A Netflix subscription and/or a Roku box- A bouquet of handpainted sock yarns.- Beautiful knitting/spinning tools- Unusual/beautiful drop spindles. (Jasmin is especially fond of the Golding drop spindles.)- Fiber!- A class- A gift certificate for time to knit, uninterrupted.- Really good quality chocolate.- A lovely mug, and possibly a mug warmer.- A trip to an out-of-town fiber festival.When Knitting Attacks! (49:01)Gigi installs an enclosed zipper BEAUTIFULLY. And backwards.The Crown Mountain Superwash Merino (in Black Magic Woman) is so lovely, even Hana (the Akita puppy) wanted some. (Public Service Announcement: Do not leave fiber or yarn out where your pets can get to it. Ingested yarn or roving can cause obstructions which can be fatal to your pet.)Events: (51:47)Go give Tika's podcast, Gives Good Knit, a listen!Come meet us at Stitches West on Saturday, February 28th from 2-4PM in the Purlescence booth!

Knitmoregirls's Podcast
Picture This - Episode 36 - The Knitmore Girls

Knitmoregirls's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2009 54:17


This week's episode has been sponsored by:On the Needles:Gigi has finished the second bright blue Regia Saturn sock, she's turned the heel on her first Franklin's Panopticon sock. She is working on a vanilla red and black (Regia) sock. Gigi has also started the Scandanavian sock (out of the Little Box of Socks) in a tan/cream Regia with black Regia as the contrast color. (Tika is using the same MC Regia to make Relatively Normal socks.)We also discuss our preemie hat knit-a-long. A pattern from Chloe Sparkle is pending.Jasmin continues to work on her Santa Fe Wrap, which is about 3/4 done. Jasmin has finished the first Bird of Paradise (color) sock in Lisa Souza's Sock! while playing a board game with Tika, ManCandy, and Andrew.Gigi is working on some socks out of Jasmin's Brown Eyed Girl handspun. Gigi will be doing a Lucy Neatby garter stitch short row heel on this toe-up sock. Tika suggests using a kitchen scaleto weigh yarn.Gigi has tripped a little on her resolution to weave in her ends. Gigi has gotten a birthday gift - a cone of Artfibers Kyoto in color #20 (Gigi's perfect red). (Jasmin meant for it to me a cone of Tsuki, but got a little distracted in the process.) Gigi is looking for ideas on what to knit with her birthday Kyoto.Jasmin is five seconds away from finishing sock #1 in the Lisa Souza Mahogany. Jasmin is almost done with the first Leyburn sock in the Lisa Souza Hardtwist (in Blackpurple).Countingsheep on Ravelry is doing a "Wrap Alison in Comfort" blanket. If you're interested in participating, please do so before January 31st.Jasmin got a new camera! We talk about photography and knitting. Some of our knitting photography idols include Jared Flood and Franklin Habit. Check out Flickr.com for ideas on how to punch up your knitting pictures (search "knitting" in the "search" box). You can sort by "relevant" or "interesting".Mother Knows Best:Gigi has been working on the Knitting Pure and Simple Neckdown Wrap Cardigan. Gigi isn't a fan of the i-cord finish, so she is going to use a silk ribbon for the closure.We talk about planning for Stitches West, specifically making a wish list.Start by going through your stash. Evaluate what you have, what you want, what you don't want, and the colors that your stash is flush with. (Knitter's Review had a great article about "slow stashing".) It's also a good time to organize your Ravlery queue. Last year, Jasmin's list included Colrain lace (from Webs), fiber from Lisa Souza Dyeworks, and glass needles from Michael and Sheila Ernst.Jasmin talks about the peril of putting down yarn you might want around rabid knitters at Stitches. Jasmin recommends buying handpainted yarns in personEvents:Meet and greet with the Knitmore Girls at Stitches West in the Purlescence booth from 2-4pm, Saturday, February 28, 2009.Details: The "Style a Knit to Suit you" workshop will be hosted Sunday, January 25, 2009 from 10:00 am - 4:00 pm at Purlescence. The fee is $60. Do you look through knitting magazines and wish that the finished pattern size was larger (or smaller), or that one had a different neckline, or was shorter, that you could use a different yarn? If you attend this workshop all those problems will disappear. Sharon will help you through the process of overcoming those things that have always prevented you from knitting the patterns you love. You will look at shape that suits you and come up with a standard measurement guide especially for you. You'll learn the use of gauge and stitches, shaping and necklines that will make that perfect sweater for you. This is a rare opportunity to learn from a knitting legend. The shop will remain open until 5 pm on January 25 for meet and greet and book signing with Sharon. Call Purlescence at (408) 735-9276 to register.

Phantom Tracks
#10 Brown Eyed Pretty Woman at a Garden Party

Phantom Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2007 56:40


Curious mix this week. There are three fake bands offered up. Two of the bands had some of the same people! Plus, what is Brown Eyed Girl really about? What pop song was based on the song "The Dying Man"? What song could be a tribute to 3 different women? and some of the story behind Rick Nelson's Garden Party. (talk about caustic!) Good stuff this week, enjoy! Archies Sugar Sugar Jigsaw Sky High Steam na na Hey Hey Goodbye Terry Jacks Seasons in the Sun Edison Lighthouse Nobody Knows Where My Rosemary Goes Player Baby Come Back Elton John Candle in the Wind Tony Orlando Knock Three Times Van Morrison Brown Eyed Girl Roy Oberson Pretty Woman Ricky Nelson Garden Party

D-11 Podcast
Brown Eyed Girl

D-11 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2006 3:22


Lessons From A Geek Fu Master
14. Alton Brown-Eyed Girl - Lessons From A Geek Fu Master

Lessons From A Geek Fu Master

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2005 5:51


-In this episode: Guest Star Jim Van Verth - Mur Attends AltonBrown Whores Anonymous - ABWA

Desert Island Discs: Archive 1991-1996

Sue Lawley's castaway is actor and comedian Hugh Laurie. Favourite track: Brown Eyed Girl by Van Morrison Book: A self-learn Italian book (slowly) Luxury: Family photo album