Podcast appearances and mentions of Rod Stewart

British singer and songwriter

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In the press
Tensions escalate as nine Palestinians killed by Israeli forces in raid

In the press

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 5:46


IN THE PRESS – Friday, January 27: We look at reactions in the Israeli press after nine Palestinians were killed during a raid in the West Bank. Also, singer-songwriter Rod Stewart calls for a change of government in the UK. Plus, one of the oldest mummies ever discovered is dug up in Egypt. Finally, a 45-year-old tech mogul spends millions of dollars a year to make himself young again!

GENTE EN AMBIENTE
GENTE/LO MEJOR DE NUESTRA VIDA": Segunda hora del sábado 28 de enero. Para disfrutar los mejores momentos de ese día en diferentes años y décadas

GENTE EN AMBIENTE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 55:52


De NANCY RAMOS ("LANZA PERFUME"), FRANCO DE VITA ("TE AMO") y BEE GEES ("TOO MUCH HEAVEN") a BILLO'S ("POR UN DEDO") y CELIA CRUZ ("BURUNDANGA"),... Y MUCHO MAS! MADONNA, CARLOS SANTANA, JULIO IGLESIAS, SUIPER COMBO LOS TROPICALES, OSCAR DE LEON, LOS PLATTERS, LOS CINCO LATINOS, MODUGNO, E. PRESLEY, ROD STEWART, CHIC,... "CHIPS", MARISOL ALFONZO, BLUES BROTHERS, PRINCE, TOMMY JAMES & THE SHONDELLS,... DE COLECCION! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/genteenambiente/support

This is Vinyl Tap
SE 3, EP 6: Memorial Podcast: Jeff Beck, Truth

This is Vinyl Tap

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 106:09


On this memorial episode of This Is Vinyl Tap, we discuss the life and legacy of one of rock's most unique and imaginative guitarists, Beck. We focus on his 1968 groundbreaking album Truth. After his very successful, but short-lived, stint in the Yardbirds, Beck began to work on his next project. Finding an amazing supporting cast in singer Rod Stewart, bassist Ron Wood, and drummer Mickey Waller, Beck recorded an album that used the foundation of the blues to build something that was unlike anything else at the time. Beck was often called a “guitar player's guitar player” and Truth, full of guitar wizardry, definitely backs that sentiment up. Truth was heavier, dirtier, and louder than anything that had come before it and remains an album whose impact and influence continues to be far reaching. 

The Working Songwriter
Holly Knight

The Working Songwriter

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2023 52:15


This legendary songwriter has been penned hits for Pat Benatar, Tina Turner, Aerosmith, Rod Stewart, Heart, Bon Jovi and many others.

Ear and Loathing
Episode 42: Bryan Adams, Sting & Rod Stewart, Jellyfish, Motley Crue

Ear and Loathing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 116:38


In this episode of Ear and Loathing, your hosts Aaron, Damon and George (The Gitmo Bros) talk about the hazards of being Jack Wagner, two tenors and a butthole, a posse of dipshits, and the Gitmos' professional legal advice on appropriate remorseful snacks post-uxoricide.  In the Torture Chamber segment, George and Damon compete for meaningless points by making Aaron listen to his most hated songs. Will Aaron survive the Torture Chamber long enough to play one of his favorite songs? Tune in and find out! Songs featured in this episode: "New Mistake" (Jellyfish), "All For Love" (Bryan Adams, Sting, Rod Stewart), "You're All I Need" (Motley Crue)

The Ugly American Werewolf in London Rock Podcast
UAWIL #112: Jeff Beck Tribute

The Ugly American Werewolf in London Rock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 77:30


Jeff Beck was one of the world's true originals. An innovator of guitar that couldn't be defined by one genre. To pay tribute to him, we examine his career from his time in The Yardbirds, The Jeff Beck Group (with Rod Stewart & Ronnie Wood), Beck, Bogert, & Appice, through the 70s & 80s until today. He eventually abandoned playing with a pick so he could better control the sound of the Stratocaster with his fingers and whammy bar to make sounds no one else could. The Wolf was fortunate enough to see Jeff Beck play 4 times over the years, including last year in Royal Albert Hall with Johnny Depp. We talk about how we came to know Jeff and his music, what it was like to see him live and the legacy he leaves. We also include an excerpt from our interview with Deborah Bonham and Peter Bullick (Episode #72) who toured with him on The Stars Align Tour on which Peter had the opportunity to play Jeff's tunes through his rig to the astonishment of anyone listening. There will never be another Jeff Beck! Ugly American Werewolf in London Website Twitter Instagram YouTube LInkTree www.pantheonpodcasts.com Visit RareVinyl.com and use the code PODCAST to save 10% off all orders!

Birdies Bourbon & Basketball
THAT'S WHAT FRIENDS ARE FOR....

Birdies Bourbon & Basketball

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 66:12


The great John Patrick Mullen and Coach Wags joins the guys to discuss lots of high school hoops action, the actions of fans and how its affecting officiating and of course what local podcast doesn't need a discussion on Rod Stewart.  Please see the Barr Reeve Media Facebook Page for the silent auction benefiting Hagen Knepp and Stephanie O'Brian.  To make sure you and your family are covered contact Travis Brett and Indiana Insurance.  ONE agent for all your insurance needs.  You'll never have a bad meal at Red Bones Bar and Grill where the Good Times Roll……. If  you have a future bride in the family, look no further than the Frock Bridal House in Bloomington. TheFrockBridal.com For more info on the Washington Community Concert Series go to www.washingtoncommunityconcerts.com See Todd Lancaster and his wise words in the Washington Times Herald Mike Decoursey as he broadcasts all Barr Reeve sports as the Voice of the Vikings Be a good sport and listen to Brian Emmons every weekday  morning on the WAMW and WRZR 

What the Riff?!?
1966 - December: Sam & Dave “Double Dynamite”

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 28:24


Sam Moore and Dave Prater were known as Sam & Dave, a huge soul act from the late 60's.  They were known as The Sultans of Sweat, The Dynamic Duo, and Double Dynamite.  This album is their second studio album out of Stax Records, also called Double Dynamite.Sam & Dave are considered one of the greatest live acts out of the 60's, and a lot of musicians cite their influence on their work, including some you would expect like Al Green and Michael Jackson.  There are also a lot of musicians who were influenced who were significantly removed from the R&B genre like Tom Petty, Elvis Costello, Bruce Springsteen, Billy Joel, and Steve Winwood.Sam & Dave got their start in church in gospel choirs.  They met on the gospel music circuit and sang together in small clubs where they developed their sound based on a call-and-response approach to music from the gospel tradition.  They were discovered at the King of Hearts nightclub in Miami in the early 60's, and signed to Marlin Records at first.  They eventually made it to Atlantic Records in 1964 from which they were loaned out to Memphis-based Stax Records.  Stax had a lot of offer Sam & Dave, including the Stax horn section called the Mar-Keys, and their house band, Booker T. and the M.G.'s.Bruce brings us this icon of soul, and friend of the show John Lynch joins us for this discussion. You Got Me Hummin'Leading off the album, this single was written by Isaac Hayes and David Porter.  Sam & Dave took this hit to number 8 on the R&B charts, and number 77 on the Billboard Hot 100.  A number of other groups would do this song, including Freddie Fender and the Pointer Sisters.  Its highest charting on the Billboard Hot 100 was number 52 by Cold Blood.Just Can't Get EnoughThis is a deeper cut, though I imagine just about any Sam & Dave song could be familiar with the number of covers or singers inspired by their songs.  This one has some lyrics that might be difficult to sing today - "The more I get the more I want.  It makes me feel good 'cause you never say don't.  I just cant get enough."  Sweet PainsThis track is another deep cut.  This one takes a description comparing love to pain, a path that would be echoed in John Cougar's "Hurts So Good," and Sade's "Sweetest Taboo."  "Sweet pains, feels good."When Something Is Wrong with My BabyThe big hit off the album was their only ballad single.  Hayes and Porter wrote it, and you have both Booker T and the MG's and the Mar-Keys horns playing on it.  A bunch of people have covered this song, including Jonny Gill, Charlie Rich, and in 1990 Linda Ronstadt and Aaron Neville did well with it. ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:Marching Theme to the motion picture "Follow Me, Boys!"This Boy Scout themed movie starring a young Kurt Russel was the last film Disney Studios released prior to Walt Disney's death.   STAFF PICKS:Mellow Yellow by DonovanRob kicks off the staff picks with a psychedelic hit.  Scottish singer-songwriter Donovan took this song to number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100.  Some thought the song was about a type of drug, but it was actually about a...well, let's just say it is an adult toy.Talk Talk by The Music MachineWayne's staff pick is a garage band one-hit wonder.  This song would use some techniques which were novel at the time, including the use of a fuzz box on the bass line, and tuning the instruments down a half step to produce a heavier sound.  If I Were a Carpenter by Bobby Darin Brian brings us a song written by Tim Hardin and popularized by Bobby Darin.  It hit number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100, Darin's first hit in three years.  The lyrics question whether an elegant woman would be satisfied with a man who was merely a carpenter.  Darin had passed on two songs, "Do You Believe In Magic" and "Summer in the City," both of which would be hits for the Lovin' Spoonful. You Keep Me Hangin' On by The SupremesFriend of the show John Lynch brings us a big hit for Diana Ross and the Supremes.  It would also be a hit for a long list of cover artists including Vanilla Fudge, Phil Collins, Kim Wilde, and Rod Stewart. NOVELTY TRACK:Winchester Cathedral by The New Vaudeville BandThis novelty song doubles up as Bruce's staff pick.  It was a number 1 hit in the United States and would win the Grammy for the best contemporary song in 1967, beating out singles from the Monkees, the Beach Boys, and the Beatles.

Pacific Street Blues and Americana
Episode 146: Jeff Beck -and- The Temptations of the Rolling Stones (January 15, 2023, Part 2)

Pacific Street Blues and Americana

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 97:13


16. Yardbirds / Train Kept a Rollin' (Aerosmith)17. Joe Bonamassa / Blues Deluxe (Micky Waller, Ronnie Wood, Rod Stewart) 18. Deanna Bogart / 'Cause We've Ended as Lovers19. Jeff Beck (feat Imelda May) / I'm a Fool to Care 20. Jeff Beck & Ronnie Wood / Unsung Heroes21. Jeff Beck / What Mama Said 22. Trombone Shorty (feat Jeff Beck) / Do to Me 23. Buddy Guy (feat Jeff Beck & Keith Richards) / Cognac 24. Bonnie Raitt / Living for the Ones 25. Rex Granite Band / Social Man 26. Kris Lager Band / Fly with the Stars 27. Dan Fuchs / Double Down on Wrong 28. Rolling Stones / My Girl 29. Ted Hawkins / Just My Imagination 30. Rolling Stones / Ain't Too Proud to Beg31. Peter Tosh (feat Mick Jagger) / Gotta Walk and Don't Look Back 32. Blue House & the Rent to Own Horns / Cigar Smokin' Woman 33. Bonerama (as in Trombones) / The Ocean 34. Albert Castiligia / Searching the Desert 35. Larkin Poe / She's a Self Made Man 

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"CAPTAIN BILLY'S MAGIC 8 BALL" - JEFF BECK- FEATURING THE ALBUM "TRUTH" IN HIGH DEFINITION - EPISODE 83- WITH THE CAPTAIN'S NARRATIVE -THE CAPTAIN EXPLORES HIS COVE OF 8 TRACK TREASURES FOR COOL INSIGHTS

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Play Episode Play 32 sec Highlight Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 43:10


F U DEATHTRUTH by Jeff Beck (Epic, 1968)Ok, I'm fuckin' sick of this parade of loss, Death. We just started 2023, and you take Jeff Beck without warning, while on tour with Johnny Depp - (as if he needs any more grief)?! Bacterial Meningitis…? I mean, WTF?!  Of the three guitar gods that descended from Mt. Yardbird - (Clapton, Page, Beck) - for my money, the best that ever bestrode the earth was Jeff Beck. Every lick was original, surprising, mind-blowing. And his growth towards mastery through the decades was breathtaking to hear. I had some trouble with the Jan Hammer jazz fusion stuff, but even those cuts had me on the edge of my seat. He kept expanding and growing his repertoire.  Eventually he hit upon this fluid, lyricism that brings tears to my eyes. Check out his versions of A Day In the Life, and People Get Ready. He arrived at that terra firma where every artist yearns to land: home. He found his truest voice… so relaxed and expressive, and was able to make his instrument sing with an iridescent humanity…. Becoming one with it. This 4-track (that's right, kids… predating the 8 track) is his first solo effort. And, what a legendary debut it is! Aided by Jimmy Page, Keith Moon, Ronnie Wood, and Rod Stewart on vocals, every cut (Shapes of Things, Morning Dew, You Shook Me, Beck's (fucking) BOLERO!!!) Is a game changer. This is one of those recordings by which I created my musical calendar; there was B.Truth, and A.Truth, and nothing was the same for me after experiencing this album. RIP Jeff.  Track listing: Shapes Of Things |  Let Me Love You | Morning Dew | You Shook Me |  Ol' Man River | Greensleeves | Rock My Plimsoul | Beck's Bolero | Blues De Luxe |  I Ain't Superstitious

Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews
*THIS DAY ROCKS* Fudge Sullivan

Vintage Rock Pod - Classic Rock Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2023 8:17


On this day in 1968 Vanilla Fudge gave a ground-breaking performance of their hit "You Keep Me Hanging On" on the Ed Sullivan Show. Flamboyance was the watchword as their energetic performance caught the populations attention. With me to talk about the choice of song and their live playing is the bands drummer, Carmine Appice! You can hear the full interview with Carmine where he tells stories about Led Zeppelin, Jeff Beck, Ozzy Osbourne and Rod Stewart on Episode 43 of Vintage Rock Pod! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Suburban Underground
Episode 350

Suburban Underground

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 61:13


This week, Steve picked a set of songs about comic strips.  You will hear a song about Calvin & Hobbs, one about Gasoline Alley and one about Peanuts.  And these artists will tickle your pickle: Royal Republic, Band of Skulls, Rialto, The Police, Pure Joy, Rod Stewart, The Style Council, The Beta Band, The Records, Two Door Cinema Club, Palaye Royale, Hazel English, Benjamin Orr, Shoes, The Soundtrack of Our Lives, The Hollywood Argyles. On the Air on Bedford 105.1 FM Radio      *** 5pm Friday ***      *** 10am Sunday ***      *** 8pm Monday *** Stream live at http://209.95.50.189:8178/stream Stream on-demand most recent episodes at https://wbnh1051.podbean.com/category/suburban-underground/ And available on demand on your favorite podcast app! Twitter: @SUBedford1051  ***    Facebook: SuburbanUndergroundRadio   ***    Instagram: SuburbanUnderground   ***    #newwave #altrock #alternativerock #punkrock #indierock

Drum Channel Podcast
S2 E40 - Holly Knight

Drum Channel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 56:02


Holly Knight is one of the most successful songwriters of all time. Her top-selling book, ”I AM THE WARRIOR; MY CRAZY LIFE, WRITING THE HITS AND ROCKING THE MTV EIGHTIES,” is a tell-all personal and professional story of her incredible life. She was inducted into the Song Writers Hall of Fame in 2013 and was voted in Rolling Stone's Readers Poll as one of the five best songwriters and at the time, the only woman on the list.  Holly and I talk about songwriting, programming, a handful of the hundreds of songs she's written for TV shows, movie soundtracks, and multiple Grammy winning hits for some of the world's biggest superstars. The conversation continues about her investment in the Tony Award-winning Broadway show “Tina” and her long-time collaboration with producer and co-songwriter Mike Chapman.  Knight and Chapman worked together on the top-five hits “Better Be Good To Me (Tina Turner) and “Love is a Battlefield” (Pat Benatar), both of which won a Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance. On her own and in collaboration with others, Knight's written with Heart, Aerosmith, John Waite, Rod Stewart, Hall & Oates, Animotion, Cheap Trick and Bon Jovi, to name a few.  Tina Turner, who Holly wrote the smash hit classics “Better Be Good To Me,” “The Best,” and numerous others, wrote the forward to Holly's book. Let's listen in. Enjoy! 

Rock N Roll Bedtime Stories
BONUS – RIP Jeff Beck

Rock N Roll Bedtime Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 21:39


The guys celebrate the life and guitar playing of Jeff Beck - one of the undisputed all-time guitar heroes. SHOW NOTES: Songs used in this episode: Jeff Beck "Train Kept A Rollin' (LIVE)" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Beck The 1992 Paris soundcheck with GNR - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xL21OIaQGfA https://www.loudersound.com/features/jeff-beck-group-the-story-of-truth https://www.nytimes.com/2023/01/12/us/lisa-marie-presley-dead.html

The Eddie Trunk Podcast
Holly Knight

The Eddie Trunk Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2023 62:23


On the latest episode of The Eddie Trunk Podcast, Eddie brings you his recent interview with Holly Knight discussing her new book, I Am The Warrior: My Crazy Life Writing the Hits and Rocking the MTV Eighties, which tells stories about her career, her writing process and so much more, plus, what it was like working with Rod Stewart, Pat Benatar, Ozzy and others.  Catch Eddie Trunk every M-F from 3:00-5:00pm ET on Trunk Nation on SiriusXM Faction Talk Channel 103.And don't forget to follow Eddie on Twitter  and Instagram!

The Pat Walsh Show
The Pat Walsh Show Jan 10th Hr 1

The Pat Walsh Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 35:26


Happy Birthday to Rod Stewart! And the man at the DMV on Broadway who looks like Rod Stewart! Pat talks about the age difference between Cher and her man. Happy Birthday to Pat Benetar! and Donald Fagen of Steely Dan… and Pat takes your calls!

The Weekly Wrap-Up with J Cleveland Payne
New York City Nurses, Dr. Dre & Rod Stewart: Things You Might Not Have Heard - 1/10/2023

The Weekly Wrap-Up with J Cleveland Payne

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 24:02


Today's Sponsor: Robinhoodhttp://thisistheconversationproject.com/robinhoodToday's Rundown:Virginia school shooting: 6-year-old brought gun in backpack, fired during instructionhttps://t.co/cZHcF7tws2New York City preps for 8,700 nurses to go on strike, impacting emergency triages at 3 major hospitalshttps://t.co/htsCb3Rj3zDr Dre rips into Congresswoman Marjorie Taylor Greene for using his music without permissionhttps://t.co/kIf8LEG1c7Classified documents from Biden's time as VP discovered in private office, source sayshttps://t.co/JhvuJwSEOeUK space launch: Historic Cornwall rocket launch ends in failurehttps://t.co/o3zCJ41nsFJulian Assange denied permission to attend Vivienne Westwood funeralhttps://t.co/PfPUY0cPniArkansas bill classifies drag show as adult-oriented business, adds location restrictionshttps://t.co/RZxJ1q6acwUK Town Cancels New Year Fireworks For Walrus Only For It To Masturbate And Leavehttps://t.co/cEn7PR8DlIWebsite: http://thisistheconversationproject.comFacebook: http://facebook.com/thisistheconversationprojectTwitter: http://twitter.com/th_conversationTikTok: http://tiktok.com/@theconversationprojectYouTube: http://thisistheconversationproject.com/youtubePodcast: http://thisistheconversationproject.com/podcasts#yournewssidepiece #coffeechat #morningnewsJanuary 10 BirthdaysRod Stewart (78)George Foreman is (74)Pat Benatar (70) Plus, Today We Celebrate: Houseplant Appreciation Day https://www.google.com/search?q=houseplant+appreciation+day&oq=Houseplant+Appreciation+Day&aqs=chrome.0.0i131i433i512l2j0i512j0i22i30l7.351j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

The Big Humble
1/10 - Tuesday the10th, Matt's Survivor Audition, and Bribe Money

The Big Humble

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 89:49


Matt and Morgan eat some queso, Matt tries to audition for Survivor, the boys talk about Rod Stewart's son and why college football sucks.

Chaz & AJ in the Morning
Monday, January 9: Connecticut Concert Announcement; How Walking Dogs Led To A Broken Finger; Dumb Ass News

Chaz & AJ in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 18:37


Live Nation's Jimmy Koplik was on live, to break news to the Tribe and Chaz and AJ before the rest of the world heard it. Rod Stewart and Cheap Trick are coming to the Hartford HealthCare Amphitheater in August! (0:00) Dave from Riverview Bistro was out walking his dogs, when a series of unfortunate events led to him breaking a finger. If you think you're having a bad day, just listen to this story. (8:20) Dumb Ass News - A man in Southbury seemed awfully proud about burning down a building. But, why? (12:11) Image Credit: REUTERS/Mike Blake FG

98.3 The Coast
Music News 1-9-23

98.3 The Coast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 1:47


Celine Dion protestors.  Rod Stewart loses another brother.  Billy Joel/Stevie Nicks teaming up for a concert tour this year.

Jim Florentine's 'Comedy Metal Midgets'
Awful 80's Songs 1/9/23

Jim Florentine's 'Comedy Metal Midgets'

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 42:54


Forever Young by Rod Stewart, Dancing On The Ceiling By Lionel Ritchie, Groovy Kind Of Love by Phil Collins, My Girl Lolipop by Bad Manners and more terrible songs played in stores are discussed this week. Join Jim's Patreon for 3 extra Podcasts a week for $5 a month at Patreon.com/jimflorentine.  Check Jim out on tour Jan. 12-14 Sidesplitters Wesley Chapel, FL and Jan. 27, 28 Comedy Connection Providence, RI.  This Podcast is sponsored by Draftkings. Support the show by downloading the DraftKings Sportsbook App and using the code Awful. Gambling Problem? Call 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/LA/MD/MI/NJ/PA/TN/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/KS/NH), 888-789-7777/visit ccpg.org (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), visit OPGR.org (OR), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA).   21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/KS/LA(select parishes)/MD/MI /NJ/ NY/PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. VOID IN OH/ONT. Eligibility restrictions apply. Free bets: Valid 1 per new customer. Min. $5 deposit. Min $5 bet. $200 issued as free bets that expire 7 days (168 hours) after being awarded.  See terms at sportsbook.draftkings.com/footballterms. No Sweat: Valid 1 offer per customer per day of NFL 2023 Wild Card Round. Opt in req each day. First bet must lose after opting in. NFL bets only. Paid as one (1) free bet based on amount of initial losing bet. Max $10 free bet awarded. Free bets expire 7 days (168 hours) after being awarded. See terms at sportsbook.draftkings.com/footballterm

Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures
Rod Stewart: ”Downtown Train” (with Rich Terfry)

Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 69:58 Transcription Available


We are thrilled to have Rich Terfry join us for this episode. Rich has been the host of CBC Radio 2's "Drive" since 2008. Besides his work for CBC Music, Rich is a published author who is also known as Buck 65 - a Juno-winning alternative hip hop artist. Today we examine Rod Stewart's glorious cover of Tom Waits' "Downtown Train." Links: Our Mixtape Tom Waits Original Rod Stewart Version Patty Smythe Version Bob Seeger Version Boy Meets Girl Version Buck 65 Bandcamp Page You can find us on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Masadon, and our website. You can email us at BandFGuiltFree@gmail.com, too. Here is our Spotify playlist featuring every song we've featured. Our theme music is by the incredibly talented Ian McGlynn.   Transcript (best read on our website)   Intro Music Frank: [0:22] So today on Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures, we have a Chicken or the Egg song. Was it Downtown Train that inspired Rod Stewart's love of model trains? Or was it his love of model trains that inspired him to cover this song? That's what we're kind of looking at a little bit. Well, not at all, but that's a it's a philosophical question that that I believe needs to be asked. And also today we're really excited to have a guest with us today, Rich Terfry who some of you may know from CBC Radio 1.  Rich Terfry: [0:59] Radio 2, CBC Music as we refer to it now. Frank: [1:07] Radio 2. Yes, sorry. Yeah. So Rich Terfry has been good enough to join us today and talk about this song. And I know that you're on the radio and everything, but I can tell you're a little bit intimidated with our $25 mic stands and our towels for soundproofing, but we encourage you just to be yourself here today. Rich Terfry: [1:23] Sorry, yeah. [1:23] I'll do my best. This is much nicer than my setup at work here, so. Frank: [1:27] I'm not saying a whole lot for CBC are we? So yeah today we're looking at Downtown Train by Rod Stewart but before we talk about Downtown Train by Rod Stewart, we need to talk about Downtown Train by Tom Waits, because he was the guy that wrote the song and originally recorded it back in 1985. Bill: [1:49] Right, and that was on his Rain Dogs album, which is his most popular album, at least until... It's hard to tell... Frank: [1:57] And at least until Scarlett Johansson did her cover album, right? Bill: [2:00] Right, right, right. Rich Terfry: [2:01] Certainly a classic. Yeah. And often when people talk, Tom Waits, one of if not the first album that tends to come up in conversation. Frank: [2:12] I think it's probably maybe the most accessible. Maybe so. Yeah. Rich Terfry: [2:15] Maybe so. Bill: [2:16] Our friend Eric Stewart, no relation to Rod, sent, I asked him, I sent him a text far too Bill: [2:24] late last night asking why he's a big Tom Waits fan and asked him to tell me why Downtown Train works so well on Rain Dogs and he said I think because in the first three quarters of the album he makes the listener work so hard to find the melody that when you finally get to something that's even close to a radio song it comes as a relief. Consonance is only pleasing in the presence of dissonance. Frank: [2:49] I understood 70% of those words. Rich Terfry: [2:52] Yeah, I think the simple way to put it is that Rain Dogs is kind of a weird record. And then in a strange way, Downtown Train is a sore thumb. Because all of a sudden, here's like a pretty straight up standard, you know, good old structured pop song in the midst of all this weirdness. Bill: [3:39] There's talk that this was sort of like rock star bait, that there's rumors that Tom Waits had finally got his publishing to himself, and that they said that this song was put out there to sort of um... Lure. Yes. Rich Terfry: [3:51] Lure a bigger artist to, you know, specifically for the purpose of covering it. Bill: [3:59] Yeah. And allowing him to take some time off. Apparently the cover, one version I read was that allowed Tom Waits to take a couple years off to raise his kids. Yeah. Rod Stewart's version is it put in a pool. That's about to be quite a pool if it's 1989 royalties, I would think. Frank: [4:10] Yeah, I just thought it was, yeah. Rich Terfry: [4:38] So I've read a few Tom Waits biographies, none of which he kind of participated in the writing of, because I don't think that's really what he does. But some people very close to him believe that, that he was really doing that, that he was specifically trying to create cover bait, basically, with this song, and maybe a few others that he's written. Just, you know, throw in the potential hits out there, just waiting for someone to take the bait and make them some money. Bill: [5:10] If Rod Stewart wants to cover one of our podcasts... Frank: [5:12] Hey, put on American songbook like 47 or whatever he's on right now. Rich Terfry: [5:19] But don't forget, you know, Tom Waits, so the first chapter, if you will, of his career was very different from where he ended up in the 80s with this trilogy of records. Really, right? People talk about rain dogs, Swordfish Trombones and Frank's Wild Years is sort of a trilogy where he really started to experiment, started to become the guy that ultimately he became and sort of is now. But before that in the 70s, although it was still a little different from you know kind of what might have been on the pop charts, he was more of a songsmith less the experimenter back then. So he had this in He knew how to write a song. Always did, I would say. Bill: [6:05] And so you have Bob Seeger hearing this and saying, this is my ticket. Frank: [6:11] Before that, Patty Smythe did a cover of it too. She covered and recorded and released it in 87. Bill: [6:14] Oh yeah, yeah you're right. Frank: [6:19] It made it on the charts, I think it charted at 93. Of all the covers that I've heard, I'm gonna say that hers is my favorite. Bill: [6:28] That's tough for you, because I know Rod Stewart means so much. Frank: [6:33] He has a big spot in my heart. [6:59] Then that brings up the whole Bob Seeger controversy, right? So the story that I read anyways was that Bob Seeger recorded the song and he was gonna record an entire album surrounding the song and that was his idea and he played it for Rod Stewart and then like a month after that Rod Stewart just recorded Downtown Train just as a one off to add on to a greatest hits compilation. Rich Terfry: [7:30] And managed to release it before Bob Seeger was able to. Frank: [7:34] Yeah, so Bob's like laboring on this entire album, which is built around Downtown Train. And Rod's just like, Here's a one off and I'm going to release it on my on my greatest hits here. So I don't know, like, so it caused a rift between the two them because they were friends and now they're foes. Rich Terfry: [7:54] Yeah, they say Bob Seeger was genuinely ticked, and kind of felt like Rod Stewart's move kind of ruined it for him. Frank: [8:02] Yeah, yeah. Bill: [8:03] And it was the end of Seeger's had this big run until around 87, 88, I think. He actually scored a number one, the song called Shakedown on the Beverly Hills Cop 2 soundtrack. Frank: [8:14] Oh, yeah, that's right. Bill: [8:15] And it looked like, how is that number one? I remember hearing, I thought it was one of those awful throw offs they put on movie soundtracks. Or like, okay, there's one song like Shakedown, who's that? You know, as a kid, but I guess it went to number one. I should probably re-listen to it. But he was seeing Downtown Train, I think, either as a transition or like as, a big move for him as an artist. The story I heard is he told Rod Stewart about the song but hadn't played it for him and get this he told to him on a train. Rich Terfry: [8:44] The plot thickens. Thanks for watching! Bill: [8:47] And then yeah now Rod Stewart's version and I I kind of believe him he's like oh I don't remember. Frank: [8:47] Layers upon layers. Bill: [8:53] That and it's believable to me that Bob Seeger might have been pouring out his heart and Rod Stewart at this stage of his life might not have been paying close attention, but he's got a lot of women coming in and out of different rooms and his autobiography sound like he was quite a wild man even at his age then. Frank: [9:12] Well, yeah. Bill: [9:13] Here's the tough part. Rod Stewart was 44 years old when he recorded this. Frank: [9:20] Okay. Bill: [9:20] We are 45. Frank: [9:23] I've missed my downtown train year. Bill: [9:26] You did, and  Rod Stewart, by the time he was doing Downton Train, had a whole entire career. Frank: [9:31] Yeah, I've had a career. I've had a number of careers. and just keep losing them because of gross incompetence. Bill: [9:32] Are we familiar with the story of how Rod Stewart claims that he heard the song for the first time? Rich Terfry: [9:38] I don't know if I am either. Bill: [9:49] Well, I got it from his autobiography and some mean-spirited writer online said "his autobiography"  or "whoever wrote his autobiography." He was just saying he didn't write his autobiography. Frank: [10:04] Well Rod Stewart doesn't write his own songs either so why would he write his autobiography? Bill: [10:09] Well, he did. He can write a song. Frank: [10:10] He can write his own songs. No, he can. Bill: [10:11] This is the great. I guess this this sort of marked a moment where he changed directions a bit. At least they talk about this. I'll just retell it. I was gonna read it, then I realized it's too long. So his manager came in, I think it was his manager, came in with a tape player. So this is 1989. Plays Tom Waits, Downtown Train for him. And he says to Rod Stewart, holds his hand up and says, don't speak. Plays it. Rod Stewart is listening. Plays the whole entire Downtown Train. Tom Waits stops it. And then he says, don't speak. And he plays it again. Third time. Don't speak. plays it again now Rod Stewart is singing along with it he's like I want this the song has become mine or I want to sing this song and I want to put it on the album but he's saying that's the first time he heard of the song so of, course Bob Seeger's like we talked about this on the train but Rod Stewart. Frank: [11:01] The train. That all makes sense now. Models, model trains, trains. There's a Venn diagram for Rod Stewart's life. Bill: [11:03] Might have been thinking model trains or models in general and so was yeah yeah. [11:11] Well this is the perfect song for him. Rod Stewart said his eight-year-old son Rich Terfry: [11:15] Yeah. Bill: [11:17] came into the room and says, what was that awful sound? Who is that guy singing? And Rod Stewart would say, well, Tom Wait's voice, although he loves Tom Wait's voice, this is an acquired taste. Frank: [11:28] Yeah. It's kind of, it's a pop voice. Bill: [11:28] Whereas Rod Stewart's is like a mild coffee. Rich Terfry: [11:35] Both got a bit of whether you'd call it gravel or gruff or scratchiness though, there is a quality to a degree, you know, Tom Waits is kind of cranked up to 11 but. Frank: [11:49] Yeah, yeah. Tom Waits is like a coal fire. Rich Terfry: [11:51] You're right. And you could argue that at least, you know, at times in his catalog that Bob Seeger dabbled in a little bit of that as well. and so I've wondered if I don't know the question popped into my to my head when you know Tom Waits is lay in this trap was he thinking specifically like you know I'll set this one out there for the gravelly voiced bros wait till they hear. Frank: [12:20] Yeah, because because at that, because at the time, like that would be 85. Right? So like Bruce Springsteen is a huge popularity. And then just follow the road down there was. Rich Terfry: [12:22] This. Frank: [12:31] Springsteen, Brian Adams, Rod Stewart, like they all have that, sort of gruffness in their voice. Rich Terfry: [12:38] They hear Tom Waits and think I can shine this up just enough. Frank: [12:41] Yeah, Tom Waits, the godfather of gravel. Rich Terfry: [12:44] Yeah. Yeah. Bill: [12:45] And the Destroyer of Friendships, I guess too. Because if he hadn't put that out, maybe Bob Seeger would still be buddies with Rod. Frank: [12:48] Oh, yeah. [12:52] They recorded an album Rod and Bob. Rich Terfry: [12:54] That was good. Yeah. Bill: [12:58] All right, so we got this. This is released on his Storytellers album, The Greatest Hits. So I thought I kept looking for it on an album. They released a demo of it, or an early version of this on his Vagabond album from 91, the Deluxe edition. It's actually surprisingly different in a way that it sounded a little closer to Tom, Waits. Yeah, Rodster's, yeah, his voice was like, he had a bit more rasp, but it was like phlegmy. Rich Terfry: [13:22] There's no way I can do that. Bill: [13:29] Rasp which really disgusted me. As I listened to it, I realized I do have issues. Clear that comes up. Yeah, yeah, I turn the taps on if someone's using a bathroom too close to me. So it's a. [14:12] So his early version actually sounded closer to Waits or at least it seemed like something that he would been used to the Tom Waits version And then maybe was still in that zone, but then I don't not sure how much Trevor Horn had to I mean, he's the producer, But he takes it and brings it into full rod or at least full late 80s rod. Yeah. Frank: [14:32] Yeah, okay. Yeah. Yeah, what's a Oh, that's right. Yeah, he was on we talked about what the do they know it's Christmas. Bill: [14:34] We've talked Trevor Horn before He's the guy in the bugles with the thick glasses? Frank: [14:44] Right? Yeah. So, and researching the song. Yeah, you're looking you're looking Rod Stewart does his version and the, guy playing the slide guitar is Jeff Beck on this version and I diving like back deeper as far as Wikipedia was gonna take me I didn't know that Rod Stewart played with Jeff Beck like post yard birds no is before faces let me find it here oh yeah Stewart he he joined the Jeff. Bill: [15:07] Was it in Faces? Were they in Faces? No. Frank: [15:17] Beck group which is a super original name as a vocalist and sometimes songwriter So yeah, I guess he did write songs. Bill: [15:25] ... You heard Every Picture Tells a Story? [15:27] It's off on the side here, but Every Picture Tells a Story by Rod Stewart is phenomenal. Like, as an album. Frank: [15:34] Okay, when was that album? That was... 71. Okay. Bill: [15:35] Like 1971. It's so good that it makes it tough to listen to his later stuff just, because of Rod Stewart's capability as a singer and what direction he could have gone in that he he picked a path that was easy money and an easy easy living, but he had he had a lot of grit and. Rich Terfry: [15:57] Chutzpah. Bill: [16:00] Yes, he had a lot of chutzpah. Rich Terfry: [16:02] You know, I don't know if this is the right moment to interject this, but I find that in the story of both of the versions of this song that we're looking at today, the guest, guitarist really comes up as a big part of the story on both. Because famously, Keith Richards contributed to the Rain Dogs album, but it was GE Smith, who was the Saturday Night Live band leader who played the guitar on Tom, Waits' Downtown Train, who as far as you know guitar slingers mid-80s you know kind of would have been one of the the top top guns out there and so I you know you got to think Rod Stewart's probably thinking we're gonna have to bring in a real hot guitar player on this one who you know when you're talking legendary, guitarists you don't you don't get too far down the list before before Jeff Beck's name pops up. Frank: [16:57] Okay, cool. I did not know that GE Smith because GE Smith I was always introduced like my only knowledge of him was honestly from the Saturday Night Live band And that was it. And I was just like, who's this long haired skeleton? Like, why is he in charge of the band? Rich Terfry: [17:10] Yeah yeah he was you know kind of a studio guy I think you know I'm sure he probably made some records as well but he was a kind of a studio guitarist played on a lot of records I wouldn't be able to rhyme off you know kind of the, discography here and now but I know he played on some records but yeah interesting that you know they both brought in some you know some big guns to play the solos on these songs. Bill: [17:37] When I think about those two songs, like the Downtown Train, Tom Waits version, I think about that guitar. Because that guitar really, it's kind of crying and it makes you feel that sort of longing. [17:59] And when I think of Rod Stewart's Downtown Train, I don't think anything about the guitar. I'd have to re-listen to think about that guitar again. I can just think of Rod Stewart, saying oh baby and and making sounds and I'd never think about the guitar but interesting, I wonder how Jeff Beck felt about it. Frank: [18:16] Oh, they're buds. I think he enjoyed it. Bill: [18:18] Yeah, that's true. Okay. Frank: [18:37] I know that growing up that I had heard Rod Stewart because my dad probably had an eight track back in the day or or like you know 81 in the back seat of the Oldsmobile or whatever and we're he's playing something by Rod Stewart but I remember my sister got Gasoline Alley which was, his second album she got the tape for Christmas and it was like 1990 1991 so it would have been in around the same time that Downtown Train comes out and I'm wondering if that kind of inspired her, to like look back at his catalog and start picking up some of his music and stuff like that. But, I remember her specifically getting the tape for Christmas and like my dad and my aunt is just like Rod Stewart's like who's listening to him still because he's been around since the mid-60s. Like he's been around for a good chunk of time. Rich Terfry: [19:31] Yeah, and I would think a little bit before my time, I suppose, but the peak of his solo pop stardom, I mean, I think, you know, the average person might think, you know, kind of "do you think I'm sexy" is maybe peak, you know, Rod Stewart, which at that point would have been the better part of 10 years in the rear view mirror sort of thing. Frank: [19:45] Yeah, that Maggie Mae and all that. Yeah. Rich Terfry: [19:53] Yeah. Yeah. All that, yeah. Bill: [19:54] Now you have right before it, so 89 for me, because I'm grade six then, and I grew up listening to a lot of Elvis and Amy Grant. That was kind of, those were our two big ones. So I wasn't, yeah it was. Frank: [20:08] Oh, I'm just, I'm just picturing the duet in my mind right now. Bill: [20:11] I know if only Elvis had lived long enough he'd be, he'd definitely be doing Christian rock. So. Rich Terfry: [20:17] Alright. Bill: [20:18] I know Rod Stewart through music videos and so Forever Young came out before this. Yes. And then this little heart of mine was like released before this and this was on the greatest hits. Frank: [20:23] Yes. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Bill: [20:28] And it was the second time he did this little heart of mine. I loved it. Frank: [20:32] Yeah. Yeah. Bill: [20:33] Yeah, and then this came out and it was like wow, this is amazing So I mean Canada loved it because it went to number one. I'm pretty sure in Canada. Frank: [20:40] Yeah, downtown train went to number one in Canada and three in the states. Bill: [20:44] And it also like I started looking at his previous songs and so in Canada They often went to number one up to downtown trains. So This Old Heart of Mine went to number one I think Forever Young did really well too. So we loved Rod Stewart even in the 80s periods. Rich Terfry: [20:59] I wish I could recall this specifically, but sometime around this time, as I recall, my mom went to see him live. Okay. Yeah, so she really, and I don't have memories of her being a big time, Rod Stewart fan earlier on. Funny enough, she was actually a big Elvis fan. And I can kind of, of remember some other stuff that she would have been into late 70s, early 80s. But I think, funny enough, this 80s era Rod is where it really grabbed her. She went to see him live. I remember her, coming home from the concert that night and telling the stories of him kicking soccer balls into the, into the crowd and, you know, loving that. So that would have been in Halifax. I wish I could remember specifically what year that would have been, but I'm thinking it was right around this time. Frank: [21:52] Yeah, because I think Out of Order and then The Vagabond Heart. I think there is a bit of a maybe a bit of a resurgence. Like maybe there's a little dip and then a little bounce back at the end of the 80s, right? Bill: [22:04] In his autobiography, he talked as though he had to prove himself with Downtown Train, but I don't get it at all because he already had Forever Young and a couple other songs in the, tank. So if it's proving yourself a year after a hit, it seems weird now in our era of 2023 where, I don't know, you could go years without doing something, you're still kind of an it. But yeah, he claimed it sort of gave new life to his career. In a lot of ways, this period pads his, his live performance career. As he goes through this, now he's becoming this touring thing that can make tons of money, I think. Frank: [22:42] What's crazy to me right now is like from the beginning of his career to like when he released this album, Storytellers, that's a smaller period of time than it is from the release of that album to now and he's still releasing music. Because it's been 30 years, well 33 years now. Bill: [23:01] Holy cow. Frank: [23:02] Since that album came out, since that first greatest hits package. Bill: [23:05] Right. And he was younger than us then, than we are now. You got that math right? I'm working through this, I got issues, it's okay. Frank: [23:12] Yes. I think so. You're the math teacher. Yeah. So listening to like Rod's version versus Tom's version and I'm gonna speak about them using just their first names. Bill: [23:17] And he changed it. Frank: [23:27] Because I feel like they're familiar to me right now and and even the the covers that like Patti Smythe did and then because eventually Bob Seeger did release a cover version I think in 2011. Bill: [23:40] He didn't like his version. So all the complaining, he's listened to it and said, I don't like it and then changed it and did a new vocal and put in backup singers. Frank: [24:18] So I found the Patty Smythe and the Bob Seeger version a little more faithful to the original in terms of the music that starts off with the guitar, warble, whale, whatever it is you want to call that. But Rod Stewart comes in, it's a little softer, a little more orchestral. And in, my mind, what he's trying to do is he he started it slow. And he's just he's going for that build because he knows how to write a pop song he knows how to do well maybe this is Trevor Horn right. Bill: [24:47] Right, but this is what his voice needs to climb that mountain. Frank: [24:52] But uh yeah yeah so it's it starts off slow and it's really soft and everything and then by the end it like he's full rod. Rich Terfry: [25:00] But yeah, the arrangement on Rod Stewart's version is the most, for lack of a better term, radio-friendly. Cut down on the intro, kind of get to it, get into it a little quicker, kind of sand off some of the edges a little bit. Although strangely, the long sort of coda at the end, which is unusual for a hit song. I'm guessing maybe when it was played on the radio, there might have been some fading going on, for that whole thing. Frank: [25:30] The DJ is talking over the end of the song. Yeah, it's almost uncomfortable. Rich Terfry: [25:32] Yeah, because that is a little unusual, I must say. That's the part of the song that surprises me. That's where this version gets almost a little bit experimental, because it goes on so long. We were listening earlier, it's like, this is almost weird how long this is going on for. Bill: [25:47] It was an awkward moment for all three of us. Rich Terfry: [25:50] But otherwise, it is a very, you know, polished and cleaned up arrangement of this song, as we discussed earlier. The spotlight is somewhat taken off the guitar. And Rod Stewart's very much the star of the show on this version of it. And it really does build in a way that Tom Waits version doesn't quite have that steady upward trajectory. Frank: [26:19] It doesn't have it doesn't seem like it has a peak. It just sort of it's that it's a slow burn. Yeah Rod Stewart's version like when you hit that musical bridge and I'm assuming it's a bridge right like you're a musician you can explain do you do you know what a bridge is can you explain what a bridge is to us. Rich Terfry: [26:24] Right. [26:32] Let's call it a bridge. [26:36] I usually just simply think of it as like, sort of an instrumental passage in a song that is kind of in the middle of the song rather than at the beginning or the end. And so it's usually bridging between, say, a verse and a chorus or a chorus and a next verse or something to that effect. But yeah, usually just like an instrumental passage in the middle of the song. Frank: [26:59] OK, so I think we were right. And every every time we were asking what a bridge was. we have an answer. Yeah, yeah. Or we just end the podcast. I think that was the whole idea. The podcast was determined what a bridge was. Bill: [27:04] We finally have a succinct answer that we will now be just hitting when you ask this question next time. We'll just hit play. Rich Terfry: [27:16] . . Frank: [27:20] Well, thank you, Rich, for being on the last episode of Bill of Frank's guilt free pleasures. But but that bridge because it's climbing, climbing, climbing the entire song. But that bridge. Rich Terfry: [27:24] . Frank: [27:31] Like it takes it up like a steep ramp at that point. And then it comes to that end where he goes full Stewart. Bill: [27:53] I've written down here about my misheard lyrics. I was reading the lyrics. I'm like, that's not what I heard when I would listen to the Rod Stewart version. And I think the reason is, the Tom Waits version, there's this loneliness, longing. I don't think it's creepy, but it's certainly about someone watching somebody else and waiting to see someone he's in love with, but is never going to talk to on a train. And he's a loner who sits on a train waiting for the same person to come on that train and he's there kind of following her and whatever life she leads. At, least that's what I had in my head and all the other people, the Brooklyn girls who are there, going off to go out to clubs or whatever was going on then. That's what I hear when I hear the Tom Waits version. Now the Rod Stewart version, I have no sense that this guy's a loner, or that there's any chance that she's not going to get together with him. So when I read the lyrics, I just hear it differently like there's a line so the beginning was outside another yellow moon, Has punched a hole in the nighttime mist I climbed through the window and down to the street. I'm shining like a new dime, That's Tom Waits, but when I was a kid, I don't know if you thought this but I'm like, oh Rod Stewart, He's shining like a new diamond because yeah, because Rod Stewart's a diamond. Frank: [29:11] That's what I heard too, yeah. Bill: [29:13] I keep listening back and I only hear diamond because it's Rod Stewart and he's worth a ton of money, But the dime is super depressing. So this is the Tom Waits who makes rings out of spoons, right, for somebody to get married, whereas Rod Stewart has big diamonds. Rich Terfry: [30:05] You know, and interestingly, although you could say that in the context of the Rain Dogs album that Tom Waits sort of, you know, cleans things up a little bit on Downtown Train, we talked about it being a bit of a sore thumb. And it's true, you see it in the lyrics as well as, you know, the instrumentation that's happening, the arrangement and everything else. But there, you know, just a few little, Tom Wait-isms in there, even the mere mention of a carnival in the lyrics and you know maybe this comes from you know knowing too much about these these two individuals. I can imagine Tom Waits hanging out at a carnival. I don't picture Rod Stewart kind. [30:47] Of roaming around a fairgrounds you know just soaking up the vibes and then although Tom Waits is a California guy he spent some years in New York you know recording these albums and exploring some new musical ideas. And so knowing that he was living in New York at the time, him mentioning the Brooklyn Girls and so on, like yeah, checks out. Somehow, I don't know, Rod Stewart in Brooklyn, kind of scrappy Rod Stewart, the performances is great and he delivers and so it's believable in that sense. But when you really kind of get in there and you take a close look at the lyrics, I don't I don't know if I'm buying. First of all, Rod Stewart, I'm always imagining a subway train rather than a commuter interstate train or whatever. Rod Stewart riding the F train or whatever in New York. I don't see it, let alone in Brooklyn. Frank: [31:51] Unless he like rent it out for himself and that's about it, right? Rich Terfry: [31:54] Yeah, right. Maybe. And then like I said, hanging out at the carnival grounds. Frank: [32:01] Yeah, right. Maybe. Rich Terfry: [32:01] You know, not so sure. But it is interesting. And to me, that's the one real Tom Waits tell in the lyrics, you know, because he had a thing for all things carnival. Frank: [32:09] Yeah. [32:13] Yeah. Well, and it comes through on that rain dogs album, too, because there's a lot of like carnival sounds on it right? Rich Terfry: [32:16] Yeah. [32:16] Oh, sure does. Yeah, absolutely. Bill: [32:19] And it's like the dark corners of a carnival, even though I imagine everything's circular in a carnival, but there's always darkness somewhere in a corner and there's Tom. Rich Terfry: [32:26] Oh, the sideshow is where that's where Tom's hanging out. Frank: [32:30] Yeah yeah yeah that's where the freak shows are yeah yeah yeah yeah. [32:40] The opening line is something that I really love. Outside of another yellow moon has punched a hole than a nighttime mist. And I like that. It's very similar to me to Bruce Coburn's Lovers in a Dangerous Time, where he says you got to kick at the darkness till it bleeds daylight. Like, it's very visceral, the lyric, and you can imagine it, you can see it happening, you can see an action actually happening, you can like see the moon punching through the miss or it's almost a violent act but there's beauty in that violence. Rich Terfry: [33:12] It's a beautiful line. I mean, there's real poetry in these lyrics, and I would say more so than your average pop song, even by 80s standards. And so I must say, for me, for as much as I admire Tom Waits as a pop song, to see a few times in his career, his songs being covered and being turned into hits, surprises me in a real pleasant way because you know often you don't get this level of poetry in a number one hit pop song. Maybe from a Bruce Coburn the odd person who's that kind of writer but and so maybe this really says something about you know Rod Stewart's talent that he's able to make something that you know might otherwise be utterly inaccessible for most people in Tom Wade's hands turns into as big a hit as it could possibly be in Rod Stewart's hands where everyone loves it. Yeah. Basically. Bill: [34:08] This is why I have no animosity to this song. Like I might make fun of Rod Stewart once in a while, but I will listen to this song the whole way through. And even those last 40 seconds. But there is something about him bringing Tom Waits to the masses. So for me as a kid, I didn't know Tom Waits. He was terrifying. There's a video with him on a tricycle and he had devil horns. Rich Terfry: [34:28] "I Don't Want To Grow Up." Bill: [34:30] It was on Much. Yeah, I did. I couldn't, I just turned the station. I couldn't watch that, but this I could. And then years later, when I grew up, sometime in my mid 30s, I finally was ready to listen to Rain Dogs. Like, oh wow, this is fantastic. But it really, if it wasn't for this, I wouldn't have got there. Rich Terfry: [34:48] Yeah. Maybe it's worth mentioning, I don't know about you, Frank, but I only, like you, I only became a Tom Waits fan later. I heard the Rod Stewart version first. I became familiar anyway with the Rod Stewart version before I did the Tom Waits version. Is that the same for you? Frank: [35:03] Oh, same here. Yeah, yeah. 100% I kind of knew who Tom weights was a little bit but really didn't get into understanding him. I don't still don't think I understand him. But but like, yeah, gaining an appreciation until our friend, Eric Stewart. Like, because he's such a big fan and like he plays stuff and he's just like, Oh, geez, this is good. And you listen to his like, Oh, geez, this is really good. So you start digging into it a little bit more. You were talking about that misheard lyric and there's another one. Rich Terfry: [35:17] But gaining some appreciation. Frank: [35:37] That in the Rod Stewart version, I always heard it as when I see you tonight on a downtown train. And that was a certainty. It's like when I see you because you're going to be there and I'm going to be there. But the line will I see you tonight? It just. Bill: [35:43] Yes. Frank: [35:52] Odd. It turns it right around on its head, right? And it just makes it even more sad I guess it's it's but it's so beautiful. Rich Terfry: [35:58] Right, more longing and... Bill: [36:10] Christmas night while I was listening to this song. I'm like, oh I kept hearing it seeing Will I'm like, no, it's gotta be when like you said I wrote down Rod Stewart's going to win the girl So when he sees her he's going to see her and they and they're going to be together if they're not already. Frank: [36:25] Yeah, it's a certainty. Rich Terfry: [36:26] Whereas with the Tom Waits version I absolutely assume he won't. Frank: [36:29] Yeah, well exactly. Bill: [36:31] Oh yeah, he's never talked to her. Rich Terfry: [36:32] Yeah, this is, there's much more distance. Bill: [36:45] So second verse, maybe second verse is short. The downtown trains are full, full of all them Brooklyn girls, trying so hard to break out of their little worlds. And then this line here kind of confuses me. You wave your hand and they scatter like crows. They have nothing that'll ever capture your heart. They're just thorns without the rose. Be careful of them in the dark. [37:39] Rod Stewart's pronunciation of dark really throws me off whenever I'm saying like he I kind of wish Trevor Horn's like no Could you say dark again? It's kind of a weird our thing going on, So who's scouring my crows? Are they the Brooklyn girls? Frank: [37:53] Yeah, I think so. Because they don't have anything to offer. That this is my take on it. Like, sorry, not that they don't have anything to offer. But there's nothing of interest to, him at that point, because he's, you know, looking for that girl that he's looking for on that downtown train. That's my take. I don't know, you guys? Rich Terfry: [38:15] I've always just loved the image and like you were saying with the first line of the song it just really conjures a strong image in my mind I've never really been able to get past that to even think about it too much I just love that image. Bill: [38:28] Rod Stewart said that Tom Waits can do imagery so well as a songwriter and then Rod Stewart's like, I have to work on that, which is classic Rod Stewart sort of like, I gotta work on that. Frank: [38:40] It's like I try. Bill: [38:40] And then he said, I just write from the heart. That's what I do. I'm like, you're such a... Frank: [38:44] This is why I love Rod Stewart so much because he's all feeling. That's all I am. Bill: [38:48] He's all feeling. But the thorns without the rose, it's such a great image. And I like what you say, that Rich is like, just the image being there is enough. Like I can't really pierce through it. There's a little bit of thorn imagery there, but I don't totally know, but that what he paints there, is something that's true. Frank: [39:09] Yeah. [39:09] Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Bill: [39:11] If that makes sense. And there's a little line before, if I was the one you chose to be your only one. [39:19] Oh baby, can you hear me now? Can you hear me now? Frank: [39:22] Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Bill: [39:23] So with Ron Rod Stewart saying, Oh baby, it's not like Tom White saying, Oh baby, where it's just, let's sort of the walk away from it, but his old baby is like, okay so you're getting you're getting you're getting with it. Frank: [39:34] You're getting the girl. [39:48] Well then then you jump into the the the course, which is, you, know, will I see you tonight on a downtown train? Every night every night is just the same on a downtown train. I like I like it. It's it's a good little course. It does its job and everything and that question of will will I see you tonight? I really like that reading through the lyrics as opposed to listening to the lyrics and understanding what the actual lyric was it like you said it just adds that longing. Rich Terfry: [40:38] It's, in my experience, rare touching on what you just mentioned, Frank, where reading the lyrics of a pop song gives you a whole other rewarding experience often. Otherwise, with a lot of pop songs, it really does nothing to heighten your experience of it. If anything, it might even drag it down. It's like, oh, these lyrics are terrible. Frank: [41:00] Yeah. Rich Terfry: [41:00] It's all just, a lot of songs are just carried by the melody. And the melody of this song is very, very strong as well. and I think that's what makes, I think you could argue anyhow, the chorus of this song memorable is the melody of it is so great. But it's true that there's a lot of people out there don't even really pay a lot of attention to lyrics, but if you're one such person and you do decide one day to look them up and, you read them, you're going to be floored. Whereas a lot of pop songs, they're not really going to give you a lot to sink your teeth but there's a lot going on here. Frank: [41:31] Well, I mean, you would have been similar to us like today, like with everything streaming and all of that. You just listen to songs. But when I was really getting into music in the 90s, you had CDs and you had CD cases. And that was my favorite thing to do was open up, check out the artwork and follow along with the lyrics, with the songs and then try and experience them that way. And you're absolutely right. you gain a better appreciation of the song. Rich Terfry: [41:58] And I think that, you know, I lament that a little bit for, you know, sort of younger generations today. Although it's easy enough, you know, everything's on online, it's easy enough to Google lyrics, but it's not always necessarily a part of the experience when you're streaming. It's not right there like it is if you're, you know, kind of, you know, playing a CD and you have the case in your hands or for that matter, you know, on an LP or something like that. There's that function if you're using Apple Music where if you, you know, tap a couple things and you can bring up the lyrics, but it's sort of a little bit of effort to do. But I sometimes wonder if young people are really, you know, spending time with lyrics of songs the way we used to automatically because the experience you described I think was a fairly universal one. I think everyone loved doing that. Frank: [42:46] Yeah, yeah, yeah. And there was always the because there are different types of CD cases to like there's the there's the book, then there's the ones that would just fold out lengthwise. Rich Terfry: [42:55] Fold. [42:55] Poster, sure. Never get it right. Frank: [42:56] And then there was the ones that folded out almost into a poster and then trying to fold those back where it was just terrible. Bill: [43:02] "Fully Completely." I remember looking like what? Oh, come on. That's not how you put lyrics on a sheet Don't be crazy and then REM would come out with like a booklet and then you just realize they're Michael Stipe pictures and that. Frank: [43:08] Yeah. Bill: [43:14] Made me so angry. We're like you could have put the lyrics on I still don't know what you're saying. Rich Terfry: [43:19] I don't think he wanted you to know what he was saying, But that's a whole other discussion right there. Bill: [43:22] Yeah, yeah. Frank: [43:24] Well, I bet the there's the third verse we can we can go we talked about it a little bit but it's like the I know your window and I know it's late. Bill: [43:26] Alright Frank, we hitting every single lyric on this song? Frank: [43:38] I know your stairs and your doorway, which I think could be taken as creepy. But again, there's, there's from Tom Waits, like from his perspective, it's like, I don't find it creepy. find it sad. [44:23] Yeah, he's because he's going there and he's. Bill: [44:25] It makes me think a little bit of Taxi Driver, a little bit, which is a little more creepy. But when Rod Stewart says it, I'm like, well, of course, because he's going there. to date her, yeah. Rich Terfry: [45:07] Now, in my mind, I see those lines, that verse. And it adds a little intrigue to the song, because I start to wonder, oh, is there actually a bit of an established relationship here? He's been to her house. Maybe there's more going on in this relationship than first meets the eye. Maybe. It's just, in my mind, raised as a question. Could go either way. Maybe there's more familiarity there there than we've been led to believe to this point or yeah there it is a little creepier than we first thought where he's you know the creepin' is going beyond the train and it's you know. Frank: [45:49] So we kind of talked about this a little bit before when we were listening to the song, but but what's your favorite part in the song? the Rod Stewart version. Rich Terfry: [46:00] Well I'll say something controversial okay and let me give you a little context before I say this, I'm dropping a bomb here. I know you know this, but I'm a Tom Waits fan. And I like a lot of his recent work. Although I would probably say my three favorite, Tom Waits albums is this trilogy that is sort of before us here today, Rain Dogs, Swordfishtrombones, and Frank's Wild Years. Frank: [46:32] Which I don't think he really captured all of my wild years in that album, but you know. Rich Terfry: [46:37] Who could? No, really. In one album. But I'm the type of guy, the weirder Tom Waits gets, the more I like him. And if I was listening to, I hate to say this, but if I'm listening to Rain Dogs in the car, there might be days where a downtown train comes on. I might skip it. Bill: [47:01] This is shocking. Rich Terfry: [47:03] So, where I'm going with this, my point is, me being the kind of music listener that I am, for as strange as it is, the unusual coda at the end of Rod Stewart's version is where it starts to get interesting for me. It's like, oh, what's going on here? He's got a little trick up his sleeve here. He's not the one trick pony that maybe you might, paint him as. It's like, oh, now wait a minute. And was he inspired by Tom Waits to, you know, kind of explore some more interesting terrain at the end of the song. And maybe it's safer to kind of put it at the end. But I get excited when something makes me raise an eyebrow a little bit. I like when someone's willing to go there a little bit or experiment a bit. So although I can appreciate what, he did with the song, where he took it, that he turned it into a hit, it's interesting to compare in contrast his voice, his vocal chops to Tom Waits. But I'm actually intrigued. If Rod Stewart walked in the door right now, and I could ask him one question about the song, I'd be like, what's the deal with the outro on the song? To me, that's super interesting. Frank: [48:11] Yeah, okay, cool. Bill: [48:39] Most controversial moment in our podcast history. I think there no one has ever picked the the final coda Yeah, my favorite part of the rod stewart song is the party's not singing. Rich Terfry: [48:50] Well, how do you like them apples? Bill: [48:51] Let's do that. Yeah. Frank: [48:53] Well, that's my favorite part, too, except it's that musical bridge. Bill: [48:56] Oh, wow. [48:56] Okay, oh, is it after the carnival and heart attacks? is that rhythm? Okay. Frank: [49:01] Yeah, yeah, yeah, because there's a like a 30 second bridge there and the guitars coming in and it's a little orchestral and cinematic. And like it was always climbing, climbing, climbing. but that's when it gets steep. Rich Terfry: [49:09] Yeah, sure, absolutely. [49:14] And I should also mention, I'm a big time Jeff Beck Yardbirds fan. In terms of pure riffage, I'd probably pick him over a lot of guys, if not everybody. And so his inclusion on the song, that's pretty cool to me as well. Yeah. Frank: [49:58] Bill, favorite part? Bill: [49:59] I gotta say, when he says, oh baby, can you hear me now? Can you hear me now? I think that really is it. I just assumed he said it over and over throughout the song. He must have. Yeah, I like the Rod Stewart-isms. Yeah. Frank: [50:12] Yeah, yeah, yeah. Well, it makes it his own. Rich Terfry: [50:13] And that's exactly what I was about to say. Yeah, that's that right there is where he... It's interesting the story you were telling when he was first listening to it and there a moment came where he felt that he was taking ownership of the the song and right there is where he sort of delivered on that promise. Frank: [50:33] So we usually jump into categories towards the towards the last third of the podcast. So I've prepared rich. Should we do our mixtapes? You have a mixtape? I'm gonna let you guys go first and then I'll finish things off I have about 12 songs that I potentially. Bill: [50:42] Oh, good. Yeah. [50:50] Oh, wow. Okay, I got a low list, but I like a guest going first. And we didn't mention this at the beginning, but Richard Fry's, AKA Buck65 for listeners, especially our Canadian listeners who will know. And so when I hear the word mixtape, I know, you know, not like I'm intimidated in a good way. Rich Terfry: [51:10] Well, and although I had a little known fact, I too covered a Tom Waits song once. I should say maybe more than once, but in 99 I released an album called Man Overboard and the original, it might be most fair to say demo version of that album, included a, cover of Singapore by Tom Waits, which didn't make the final cut of the album. And then live, I used to do a very deep cut Tom Wait song, called Tabletop Joe. But anyhow, yes, this is my whole thing, putting these mixed tapes together. And so I gave it some thought. Should we jump into it here? I find it, I bet you guys have found the same thing, is that this song, Rod Stewart's version of this song, routinely pops up on these lists, a bunch of them, on the internet of songs you didn't know were covers. Now to me, that's an interesting enough category. God knows I've talked about that sort of thing on my radio show plenty. But with this particular case, there's more to it than just that. I think it fits into an even smaller category. And I wish there was more of this, where you have here. [52:32] Big-time bonafide mainstream pop star bringing into you know the spotlight and the mainstream consciousness what at best we might call sort of a cult figure. [52:50] Right? Tom Waits I mean you know he's not nobody but in in particular when we're looking at an album like Rain Dogs you know you ask the next person that walks down the street hey ever heard Rain Dogs? I'll put 50 bucks on them saying no. So know he's he's not I don't know if you could call Tom Waits a household name. I think of him in, particular the parts of his catalog that I love the most. To me I almost think of him as an underground type character, certainly a cult figure, and if not in the strictest definition of it, if you look at his body of work and maybe what inspired him and what he was interested in he's He's certainly coming from the deeps, you know what I mean? So maybe at best you could argue that he was an experimenter and whatever else who had more success with it than a lot of others. But nevertheless, I think that here we have a case where sort of, I'm trying to think of the most fair word I can use, but maybe a slightly more fringy musician is being brought into the mainstream. because a lot of the other songs that you would find on those lists of songs you didn't know were covers aren't necessarily that. I'm trying to think of a good example, but if you look at. [54:12] I Love Rock and Roll by Joan Jett, the Arrows, who wrote and recorded the original version, were a fairly successful band in their own right. And you see a lot of that on those sorts of lists. So this situation got me thinking of other cases where this was the case. case and I really wish that there were more examples of it because to me it's super interesting and exciting and more often you see it the other way around where and hopefully this isn't too, flippant a way to put it but where like an indie band will do kind of an ironic cover of some big, pop it that happens all the time sometimes it makes me roll my eyes but this is much more interesting and and the stakes are a little higher where a big time pop star will take a more obscure fringy, culty, whatever, however you want to describe it, person and cover them. So I came up with a couple examples and I don't know if they're quite as strong as today's example but I'll throw out there and this one is very similar parallel I would say Eric Clapton's version of Cocaine by JJ Kale. [55:23] JJ Cale, if you're going to compare anyone to Tom Waits, you know, if you're going to put anyone else in a category, maybe it's a guy like JJ Cale and Rod Stewart and Eric Clapton. I mean, not that, far off, right? So it's a very, very close, you know, kind of thing. Now, I don't know if you, know that The Tide is High by Blondie is a cover, but the original version of that song was by a, relatively small, certainly on an international level. [55:58] It was a Jamaican band called the Paragons, and I don't think they really had any success outside of Jamaica at all. Bill: [56:03] Wow, okay, I didn't know this either. Rich Terfry: [56:05] Really super interesting to me that the guys in Blondie even knew this song. Someone would really have to know their stuff, to know the Paragons and maybe this song in particular. To my knowledge, and I could be wrong about this, have to look it up but I don't even know I have the out the Paragon's album I don't know if their version was even ever released as a single so to me it extra super interesting maybe a real classic and one that does turn up on these lists fairly often the birds version of turn turn turn or whatever by, Pete Seeger right so you're taking something from a you know I guess a slightly more fringy genre, you know, kind of deep folk music and turning it into a big pop hit. I got a couple other good ones. This one is another fairly well-known case, but Roberta Flax, Killing Me Softly, is a cover of an extremely little-known song. What's her name? Lori Lieberman, I think, who originally, you know, singer, LA singer-songwriter, kind of played at the Troubadour, it never really became famous. The story goes that Roberta Flack just heard it, kind of on a total fluke and loved it. And then of course there's the whole other wave, the Fugees, Yeah. covering it again decades later and making it a hit all over again. Frank: [57:29] Because I remember we did, I forget which song it was, but it was a cover song. And then I said, you know, famous cover songs, where the the cover is more popular than the original. And I said, Fuji is covering Roberta Flack. And then afterwards, finding out that it was Laura Lieberman or just, I was wrong on the podcast. And that never happens. I've never said anything that was infactual on the podcast. Rich Terfry: [57:53] Yeah, yeah, yeah, sure. Bill: [57:55] Yeah, we can insert it. Don't worry. No one will know. Rich Terfry: [57:59] I'll throw out one more for you and then I'll and then I'll pass the mic as you. [58:05] Will. No, no, no. But and this one is a little more obscure, but a great example of what I'm talking about, I suppose. But What a Man by Salt and Pepper is, basically a cover. You might argue that it's like an interpretation, but it's, pretty darn close to a cover of a sort of a soul song by a woman named Linda Lindell. Let me double check that. I did write it down because I want to be sure, but I'm pretty sure it's Linda Lindell. Yes, Linda Lindell. It was just released as a 45, just sort of a one-off single. I don't even know if Linda Lindell ever recorded a full-length album. So not well-known, pretty obscure figure, of course. and Salt and Pepper had a bunch of hits. That might have been their biggest one. That was a big old hit. So, and you know, certainly another case where songs you didn't know were covers. And super interesting that, you know, this one sort of turns the tables a little bit in that, you know, we're talking about what was like, you know, kind of a soul song. Fairly sort of, you know, mainstream in its presentation, but then here's a hip hop group doing it. That in itself is a bit of a rarity, a hip hop group kind of taking on a cover. [59:26] But nevertheless, at this point in their career, Sal and Pepper, they were big pop stars, very well established, and like I said, they turned that into a big hit. So that was the first thing that popped into mind for me was, again, I don't know if it's the exact right word, but fringier artists being brought into the mainstream with a cover, because that doesn't happen a lot. In fact, those were really the only examples of that that I could find. I'm sure there are more, and if anyone can think of more, I'd love to hear them, because this is the sort of thing that really excites me. Frank: [1:00:01] Right into the right please someone write us please someone tell us something yeah but it's really cool because there's all sorts of like musical gems out there that no one knows about. Rich Terfry: [1:00:04] Yes. Drop us a line. Frank: [1:00:16] Like or sorry I shouldn't say no one but there it's not as well known and then these pop stars are are bringing them out to the forefront. And sometimes these artists can gain a second life because of it. Rich Terfry: [1:00:29] Now in the early days of rock and roll, this happened all the time, of course, right? So you think like Elvis doing, well practically every song Elvis did the early days of his career was a cover of a song recorded by some lesser known, usually a blues artist or R&B artist or something like that. But I digress. Bill: [1:00:49] I gotta say this is a big moment for me just as a radio listener because Rich Terfry does the (is it called the drive?) from about (is it three to seven?) okay so three to seven on CBC Radio Two. Rich Terfry: [1:00:57] Yeah. Bill: [1:01:03] And i would listen to it around i think is it around six o'clock that you would do the deep dive like on a friday or is it okay last hour of the show and there'd be this deep dive and. Rich Terfry: [1:01:09] Yeah, right. last hour of the show. Bill: [1:01:14] And it was my favorite part. And so- Well, the stories. Oh, it is great. Frank: [1:01:15] Oh yeah. Well the stories. Bill: [1:01:18] And so even if it was having a bad day at work and I knew I had to be leaving at six to go home, but I knew I could get this. And that was like my favorite part of the show. So I always wanted to find these deep dives. Like, so the one day you did a deep dive, on a tragically hip album, because you did every album. That's right. And so it was on Phantom Power and I was, didn't want to come out of the car, because I knew I wouldn't be able to find it because I'm like, there's gotta be, so I go online, rich to fry deep dives, like they're not available, I want like, you know, maybe a box set, it would be great for me personally or for the world, but we just got our own personal deep dive. Frank: [1:01:54] Yeah, which is fantastic. Rich Terfry: [1:01:55] Yeah, man. Bill: [1:01:56] Yeah, so that leads to my couple songs. I may be jumping on Frank's toes here, maybe, but because we think similarly, and this was the easiest way to do this, was originally I was thinking of train songs, But then I thought of songs that were like the vibe in Tom Waits, but then were covered so that they were kind of cheesier, but I couldn't, it wasn't coming up for me. So I ended up thinking of a couple train songs that were so similar. Because we were 12, I only have like three. So the most obvious one for me is Downbound Train by Bruce Springsteen, because it sounds so similar, downbound and downtown. And there's that longing and depression within the song that is kind of in the Tom Waits song. Well, there's something more joyous, even in the Tom Waits version, compared to the Bruce Springsteen. [1:02:55] But thinking of Rod Stewart's cover as very Rod Stewart, this is almost like Bruce Springsteen going, more Bruce Springsteen than usual to me in the song. Like sometimes he mutters his lines in a way that Ben Stiller would imitate Bruce Springsteen. So I liked the song. And so that was one. There was another one called Downbound Train by Chuck Berry, which was about the devil taking a guy to hell. Okay. And then there was another one called Night Train. There's a Bruce Cockburn one, which I love, but I went with the James Brown version because it was a bit more upbeat. Frank: [1:03:28] So I went straight planes trains and automobiles. That's the theme of my of my uh, well, it's modes of transportation. Bicycle Race by Queen. This has nothing to do with any sort of feel. It's just this is the theme. Modes of transportation. Fast Car by Tracy Chapman. Oh, I know right. Rich Terfry: [1:03:47] Modes of transport. Bill: [1:03:48] So, I'm going to go ahead and do a little bit of a, That's okay. Frank: [1:03:54] Midnight train to Georgia, Gladys Knight in the Pips, Pink Cadillac, Bruce Springsteen. Bill: [1:04:00] Very good. Frank: [1:04:02] Runaway Train, Soul Asylum, Aeroplane by Bjork, Get Out of My Dreams Get Into My Car by Billy Ocean, and then we are going to finish it off with Hands by Jewel. Bill: [1:04:16] Oh, no, no. You don't, that's not funny. And no, you don't walk in your hands somewhere. No, not funny. No. Frank: [1:04:17] Okay, okay, we won't put jewel on we'll put Train In Vain by The Clash. Rich Terfry: [1:04:26] You. Bill: [1:04:33] That's a good call. We haven't talked about another iconic performer we bring up most episodes. Frank: [1:04:40] The patron saint of Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures. Yeah. Rich, your opinion. Could Michael Bolton sing this song? Rich Terfry: [1:04:48] Hmm oh downtown train yes I think so. Frank: [1:04:53] I think so, too. Rich Terfry: [1:04:54] I feel like I didn't even need to think about it long I can hear it in his voice almost immediately. Frank: [1:04:59] Especially at the end, like after that bridge that when when he's just repeating the chorus at the end, and he just sort of brings it up. That's when Michael Bolton destroys the world though, though, where he goes full Bolton and just ends the world. Bill: [1:05:11] Oh, yeah, and that Michael Bolton in 1989 is is a then is that when we got? Frank: [1:05:17] Oh, this is right in the that's right in the meat of the Michael Bolton sandwich. So I have in front of me here the the Grammys, for best male pop vocal performance, because Downtown Train was nominated in 1991. Lost to Roy Orbison's Pretty, woman. But Michael Bolton was on that list, Georgia on my mind. The year before Michael Bolton won for How Am I Supposed to Live Without You. The subsequent year, Michael Bolton wins 1992 for, When a Man Loves a Woman. But I'm looking at the list of the. Rich Terfry: [1:05:52] Right. How could he not? Frank: [1:05:56] Songs that were nominated in 91. Oh my goodness, how do you pick? So Roy Orbison wins for Pretty Woman. Another Day in Paradise, Phil Collins, Georgia on my mind, Michael Bolton. I Don't Have the heart James Ingram who's critically under appreciated in my mind Stormfront by Billy Joel and then Downtown Train by Rod Stewart 1991 I think was I think. Bill: [1:06:18] 1991? I thought this song came out in 89. Frank: [1:06:22] Was released in 90. Bill: [1:06:24] Oh right, because they would release it for so long. I got this all wrong. Rich Terfry: [1:06:27] Grammys are often, you know, a little behind. Bill: [1:06:29] Oh yeah, yeah sure. Yeah, that's right. So this comes out in 1990. Oh wow, I gotta to re- rethink about how I heard the song for the first time. I'm 14 then. That's a whole other world. Frank: [1:06:38] Yeah, that's a that's a different world. [1:06:40] Anyways, yeah, 100%. This could have been a Michael Bolton song. Could this be a Hallmark movie? Could easily become a creepy Hallmark movie. Bill: [1:06:51] Hallmark after dark. Rich Terfry: [1:06:52] Does Hallmark do creepy movies? Frank: [1:06:56] Yeah, I don't like them. Rich Terfry: [1:06:59] I mean, you know, there's some sort of romance, obviously, at the heart of this thing. So from that standpoint, like I said, if you went with the interpretation I've had where the third verse comes along, you think, oh, wait a minute, maybe these people, maybe these two know each other. Maybe it's the early days of a relationship or something, you know, in which case, maybe. But I'm with you in that, you know, it's more Scorsese, even, but Taxi Driver vibes, that hallmark. And if a hallmark movie set in New York, you know, it's like. Bill: [1:07:28] Yeah, I don't think that downtown train is taking them out to the country to like find themselves. Frank: [1:07:33] No, exactly. Rich Terfry: [1:07:38] Upper West Side, not Brooklyn. Frank: [1:07:40] Yeah, yeah. What other categories do we have? Bill: [1:07:44] You know. [1:07:44] I just thought out the top of my head when I was listening to the ending that you could do a pretty good floor routine To this song with that final moments. Yeah. Oh no with the with the thing with the. Rich Terfry: [1:07:54] Rhythmic gymnastics. [1:07:55] Yeah. Bill: [1:07:55] With the yeah yeah rhythmic gymnastics would work especially at the final moments where everyone's watching them the final sway. Rich Terfry: [1:08:01] And you're thinking just based on the gestures I'm seeing here, the ribbon. Bill: [1:08:04] Yeah it's all ribbon yeah yeah maybe some leaping it could be yeah I don't. Rich Terfry: [1:08:06] Yeah. It's all ribbon. Okay. [1:08:10] Maybe something like that. Thank you. Bill: [1:08:12] Know why I do this on a podcast but I'm I sometimes will talk with my hands yeah. Frank: [1:08:15] Can see if you can see Bill right now he's he's rhythmically flailing his arms about. Bill: [1:08:19] Yeah, yeah, yeah. Frank: [1:08:38] So we're bringing the the episode to a close and rich we just yeah thanks so much for bringing yourself and your knowledge and the insight not just to the song but musically in general and most especially telling us what a bridge is so that ended, over a year long debate in our minds. Rich Terfry: [1:08:58] I almost hate to ruin it for you, but this is fun. Have me by again sometime. I'd love to. Frank: [1:09:04] This would be fantastic. Yeah. And we want to thank the listeners for sticking it out right to the end. And, you know, we know you have it on your phones and on your computers and all that other sort of stuff. And you listen to it to the podcast wherever you are. And just wondering, will we see you tonight on a downtown train? Bill: [1:09:29] Thank you for listening to Bill and Frank's Guilt-Free Pleasures.  

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Ugly American Werewolf in London: 2022 in Review Part 2 - The Rockers, Legends & Artists

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2023 76:37


2022 was a great year for our show as we became a part of Pantheon Podcasts, gained an amazing sponsor in RareVinyl.com and welcomed artists and musicians who we have loved and admired for years.On Part 2 of our 2022 in Review shows, we talk about how excited we were to welcome folks we've been fans of for decades like Geoff Downes (Yes, Asia), Carl Palmer (Asia, ELP), Chris Slade (AC/DC, The Firm, David Gilmour), Steve Hackett (Genesis), Guy Pratt (Pink Floyd, David Gilmour) and Gary Kemp (Spandau Ballet, Nick Mason).  Hear our reactions to some of the stories from these great artists!But we also had the chance to speak with artists we've just come to know recently like Amanda Lehmann (Steve Hackett), Deobrah Bonham & Peter Bullick, Jim Cregan (Rod Stewart) and Autumn Hawk Percival.  We had a wonderful time learning about what they've been up to recently, talking about their music and what they're going to be up to in 2023.  We're proud of the artists/musicians/legends we hosted in 2022 and look forward to more in 2023!Ugly American Werewolf in London WebsiteTwitterInstagramYouTubeLInkTreewww.pantheonpodcasts.comVisit RareVinyl.com and use the code PODCAST to save 10% off all orders!

Bobby Owsinski's Inner Circle Podcast
Episode 454 – Songwriter Holly Knight, EV’s Killing AM Radio, And Jazz Chords For Nightmares

Bobby Owsinski's Inner Circle Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 35:12


My guest this week is Holly Knight, who's songs made up a good part of the soundtrack to the MTV eighties with mega-hits for Tina Turner (“The Best”), Pat Benatar (“Love Is A Battlefield”), and Patty Smyth (“The Warrior”). Holly has also worked with legends like Rod Stewart, Kiss, Heart and Aerosmith, has thirteen ASCAP Awards, her songs have won several Grammys, and in 2013 she was inducted into the songwriters Hall of Fame. Her songs have appeared in almost two dozen films and theater productions, as well as television shows like The Simpsons, 30 Rock, South Park, The Tonight Show Staring Jimmy Fallon, Stranger Things, The Voice and Saturday Night Live, among many others. Holly just released a new memoir about her life in music called “I Am The Warrior.” During the interview we spoke about getting into songwriting, the secret to song demos, how to know when a song is well-written, her view on collaborations, and much more. I spoke with Holly from her home studio in Los Angeles via zoom. On the intro I'll take a look electric vehicles are helping to kill AM radio, and how a simple jazz chord can be successfully used to treat nightmares. var podscribeEmbedVars = { epId: 84483155, backgroundColor: 'white', font: undefined, fontColor: undefined, speakerFontColor: undefined, height: '600px', showEditButton: false, showSpeakers: true, showTimestamps: true };

Never Not Funny: The Jimmy Pardo Podcast

Jimmy welcomes Hall of Fame songwriter Holly Knight into the studio to discuss her many hits with rock icons like Pat Benatar, Tina Turner, Rod Stewart and KISS. Holly has a new memoir out now titled "I Am the Warrior: My Crazy Life Writing the Hits and Rocking the MTV Eighties," available in print and audiobook.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Beck Did It Better
123. Led Zeppelin: II (1969)

Beck Did It Better

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 86:13


What podcast should you listen to if you want to hear 5,000 songs? Top 5 answers on the board. Survey says...the best podcast about Led Zeppelin and the 123rd greatest album of all time, Led Zeppelin II...aye aye captain.   But before we get to the album we talk about Rod Stewart and the benefits of stand-up desks. We also discuss how much you should pay for a Christmas tree, spending the holidays with the inlaws, and the worst experiences on a flight tonight. We also become the best animal podcast when we talk about raccoons and adopting cats.    Then at (39:00) we take you home when we cover Led Zeppelin's second studio album from 1969, nice. We talk about the songs and artists that influenced (and sued) Led Zeppelin, whether Led Zeppelin has the best opening tracks and the best songs with gongs.   In next week's episode, our mysterious ways will prove that Beck Did it Even Better than the real thing when we become the best U2 podcast and U2's 1991 album Achtung Baby.      

Garza
Sam Bankman Fried Love Ballads Ft. Fake Rod Stewart

Garza

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 6:26


Spotify Podcast https://open.spotify.com/show/6dBGAg9qohEoWba5VMPMP8 Rumble! Channel https://rumble.com/MichaelGarza The Michael Garza Show is not financial advice and is for entertainment and educational purposes only. I am not a financial advisor, so invest at your own risk. I am an entertainer at heart, and an experienced long-term investor. I do not teach day trading or any of those idiotic short term investing strategies. I believe buy and hold and diversification are the best strategies you can have in the markets. Capital One Quicksilver Card https://capital.one/3IqGDer Discover Credit Card https://refer.discover.com/s/MICHAEL6043675 Topics We Love to Discuss: investing stock market financial education stocks value investing passive income personal finance finance investment net worth dividend stocks early retirement index funds passive investing vanguard index funds Website: https://garzabrand.com The Robinhood Trading App https://join.robinhood.com/michaeg4251 Coinbase Crypto Trading App https://www.coinbase.com/join/garza_z2 Michael Garza: https://www.youtube.com/MichaelGarzaShow Strong Man Personal Finance: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYSWfPVcSFIIhKrnp7cAiXw Madridismo Duro https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIlkbPQsuQWm9cAD4H9PAzA Graham Stephan https://www.youtube.com/c/GrahamStephan The Rich Dad Channel (Robert Kiyosaki) https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRichDadChannel/ #SamBankmanFried #LoveBallads #FTXUS Sam Bankman Fried, ftx, news, money, cryptocurrency, stocks, crypto, cnbc, business, breaking news, stock market, p_cmsid=2494279, finance stock, news channel, news station, us news, world news, cable, cable news, finance news, money tips, financial news, stock market news, bankman-fried, sam, abc, finance, investing, politics, business news, fraud, fox news, sbf, sam bankman-fried, personal finance, abcnl, update, bond, sam bankman-fried arrest, sam bankman-fried girlfriend, ftx collapse --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/michaelgarza/support

Auf einen Espresso mit Lars Amend
146 Ein Brief von Paul McCartney

Auf einen Espresso mit Lars Amend

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 21:58


Man soll von den Großen lernen, so heißt es doch immer. Gesagt, getan! Lass uns aber direkt noch eine Stufe höher steigen und von den ganz Großen lernen. Wie wäre es mit Mel C. von den Spice Girls, Shania Twain, Mo Farah, Dionne Warwick, Ozzy Osbourne, Rod Stewart, John Cleese, Dave Grohl, Ewan McGregor, will.i.am von den Black Eyed Peas und Paul McCartney. All diese Menschen (und noch viele mehr) haben Briefe an ihr jüngeres Ich geschrieben. Die britische Journalistin Jane Graham, die u.a. für die BBC, den Guardian und The Big Issue arbeitet, hat all diese Briefe zusammengetragen und ein fantastisches Buch veröffentlicht mit dem schönen Titel: „Briefe an mein jüngeres Ich - Außergewöhnliche Menschen über das, was im Leben wirklich zählt“. Ich liebe dieses Buch, weil mich im Leben nichts so inspiriert wie echte Geschichten. In meiner heutigen Folge erzählt dir Paul McCartney, der letzte lebende Beatle seine Geschichte, wie er mit 16 Jahren gemeinsam mit seinem Kumpel John Lennon große Träume hatte. Sensationell. Mit dem Kauf dieses Buches unterstützt du sogar die Obdachlosenhilfe des Roten Kreuzes, denn ein Teil der Erlöse werden gespendet. Alle Autoren und Autorinnen des Buches haben auf ihr Honorar verzichtet. Ein Buch, das sich also aus vielen Gründen lohnt: https://amzn.to/3HRGC4V Übrigens, ich gehe 2023 auf große IMAGINE TOUR, was ziemlich aufregend wird: 18.10. Wien, 19.10. München, 22.10. Neu-Isenburg, 23.10. Stuttgart, 24.10. Hannover, 27.10. Hamburg, 02.11.Erfurt, 03.11. Magdeburg, 04.11. Leipzig, 11.11. Berlin, 12.11. Dresden, 14.11. Düsseldorf Bestell dir gleich dein Ticket: https://www.myticket.de/de/lars-amend-imagine-tour-23-der-soundtrack-deines-lebens-tickets oder https://www.eventim.de/artist/lars-amend/ One Love. One Dream. One Team. Dein Lars - Der kostenlose Magic Monday Newsletter: https://www.lars-amend.de/ - Lars auf Instagram: www.instagram.com/larsamend - Lars auf YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/larsamendcoaching - Zum Onlineshop: www.lars-amend-shop.de/

Tim Friedmann's 70's Rock Conversations
Tim Friedmann's 70s Rock Conversations Season 7 Highlights

Tim Friedmann's 70's Rock Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 64:00


We close out 2022 with a look back at our most recent season! Season 7 Highlights are up this week. Frank & I bring you some great stories and music from our Featured Artists, like the Temptations, Aerosmith, Boston, Rod Stewart and Blondie. Plus our fun segments like "2 Should Get In," "Great Start, Then...," "Guilty Pleasures" and of course, "1-Hit Wonders"! Here's to a terrific New Year--2023 is right around the corner!!

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!
Kenney Jones - Rock Drummer With Small Faces, Faces, The Who. Talks About The British Invasion, Steve Marriott, Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood, Pete Townshend, Keith Moon And Much More!

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 36:56


Kenney Jones is rock and roll royalty. He's played drums with the Small Faces, the Faces, The Who and many others. He's in the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. He talks about those bands, the British Invasion era, Steve Marriott, Rod Stewart, Ronnie Wood, Pete Townshend, Keith Moon and much more.My featured song is “I Can't Explain” the live version of my reimagined version of The Who's classic, from the album Greetings From Serbia by my band, Project Grand Slam. Spotify link here.“Dream With Robert Miller”. Click here.---------------------------------------------If you enjoyed the show, please Subscribe, Rate, and Review. Just Click Here.Kenney and I discuss the following:The British Invasion era“Itchycoo Park”Ogdens Nut Gone FlakeSmall Faces“Tin Soldier”FacesRonnie Wood / Rod Stewart“Stay With Me”The Who“You Better You Bet”PP Arnold - “If You Think You're Groovy” BOBBY M AND THE PAISLEY PARADE is Robert's forthcoming album. Featuring 10 new songs and guest appearances by John Helliwell (Supertramp), Tony Carey (Rainbow) and international sitar sensation Deobrat Mishra. "ALBUM OF THE YEAR!" (Indie Shark)"Catchy and engaging with great tunes!" Steve Hackett (Genesis)"This album has life and soul!" John Helliwell (Supertramp)"Bobby M rocks!" Gary Puckett (Union Gap)"Nice cool bluesy album!" Jim McCarty (The Yardbirds)"Robert really really really rocks!" Peter Yarrow (Peter Paul and Mary)"Great songs. Great performances. It's a smash!" David Libert (The Happenings) LIVE AT STEELSTACKS is the 5-song EP by Robert and his band, Project Grand Slam. The release captures the band at the top of their game and shows off the breadth, scope and sound of the band. The EP has been highly praised by musicians and reviewers alike. “Captivating!” Elliott Randall (Steely Dan) “PGS burns down the house!” Tony Carey (Rainbow)“Full of life!” Alan Hewitt (The Moody Blues) “Virtuoso musicians!” (Melody Maker) “Such a great band!” (Hollywood Digest) The album can be streamed on Spotify, Amazon, Apple and all the other streaming platforms, and can be downloaded at The PGS Store.ALL OF THE TIME is Robert's recent single by his band Project Grand Slam. It's a playful, whimsical love song that's light and airy and exudes the happiness and joy of being in love. “Pure bliss…An intimate sound with abundant melodic riches!” Melody Maker/5 Stars) “Ecstasy…One of the best all-around bands working today!” (Pop Icon/5 Stars) “Excellence…A band in full command of their powers!” (Mob York City)Watch the video here. You can stream “All Of The Time” on Spotify, Apple or any of the other streaming platforms. And you can download it here.THE SHAKESPEARE CONCERT is the album by Robert's band, Project Grand Slam, recorded "live" in the studio. It's been praised by Mark Farner (Grand Funk Railroad), Jim Peterik (Ides Of March), Joey Dee (Peppermint Twist), Elliott Randall (Steely Dan) and Sarah Class (British composer). Reviews: “Perfection!”, “5 Stars!”, “Thrilling!”, and “A Masterpiece!”. The album can be streamed on Spotify, Apple and all the other streaming services. You can watch the Highlight Reel HERE. And you can purchase a digital download or autographed CD of the album HERE. THE FALL OF WINTER is Robert's single in collaboration with legendary rocker Jim Peterik of the Ides Of March and formerly with Survivor. Also featuring renowned guitarist Elliott Randall (Steely Dan/Doobie Brothers) and keyboard ace Tony Carey (Joe Cocker/Eric Burden). “A triumph!” (The Indie Source). “Flexes Real Rock Muscle!” (Celebrity Zone). Stream it on Spotify or Apple. Watch the lyric video here. Download it here.FOLLOW YOUR DREAM HANDBOOK is Robert's Amazon #1 Bestseller. It's a combination memoir of his unique musical journey and a step by step how-to follow and succeed at your dream. Available on Amazon and wherever books are sold.  Audio production:Jimmy RavenscroftKymera Films Connect with Kenney at:www.kenneyjones.com Connect with the Follow Your Dream Podcast:Website - www.followyourdreampodcast.comFacebook - www.facebook.com/followyourdreampodcastEmail Robert - robert@followyourdreampodcast.comYouTubeLinkedIn Listen to the Follow Your Dream Podcast on these podcast platforms:CastBoxSpotifyApple Follow Robert's band, Project Grand Slam, and his music:Website - www.projectgrandslam.comInstagramPGS Store - www.thePGSstore.comYouTubeFacebook - www.facebook.com/projectgrandslamSpotify MusicApple MusicEmail - pgs@projectgrandslam.com   

Liz Jones's Diary
In which it's Christmas!

Liz Jones's Diary

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 39:23


Liz and Nic are full of the joys of the season in this special festive episode of the podcast - well, except when Liz has a run-in with the delivery man. The pair have been to see Rod Stewart in concert and Nic's decided he's ‘a pucker geezer'. Plus lots of readers' letters.  If you'd like to see Liz and Nic live in an evening of shocking confessions and hilarious anecdotes, you can find out more here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/in-conversation-with-liz-jones-tickets-491796936877?aff=ebdssbdestsearch  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rock N Roll Pantheon
Ugly American Werewolf in London: Rod Stewart collaborator Jim Cregan interview

Rock N Roll Pantheon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 72:27


Jim Cregan may not be a household name in the US but he has recorded over 50 gold and platinum records in his career.  Best known for his days as a guitarist and songwriter with Rod Stewart, Jim joined us to talk about his new charity single and to relive some moments from his stellar career.Jim works with AngelForce USA, a non-profit dedicating to serving US veterans who may be at risk of suicide.  He and his band, Cregan & Co., have reworked an old Johnny Mathis tune A Child is Born which is available to download with all the proceeds going to AngelForce USA.  We talk a bit about how he came to work with this noble cause and the tune itself.We then dive into crazy days & nights in the studio and on the road with Rod the Mod.  He first joined Stewart on the Foot Loose & Fancy Free album and was a part of his touring & recording band into the 90s, including the MTV Unplugged performance  that included Ronnie Wood.  Hear Jim recount stories about Hollywood A-list parties, speaking on the phone to Britt Ekland and working hard to avoid having your door kicked in by the Sex Police.  Jim has the gift of gab and some extraordinary stories to go with it!Ugly American Werewolf in London WebsiteTwitterInstagramYouTubeLInkTreewww.pantheonpodcasts.com

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!
CHRISTMAS SPECIAL - Featuring Sara Niemietz And Robby Robinson, Chris Amoo And The Real Thing, Giorgia Fumanti,  Robby Johnson, Jim Cregan, And Rock Choir!

Follow Your Dream - Music And Much More!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 21:09


Welcome to our first CHRISTMAS SPECIAL featuring six terrific artists performing wonderful seasonal songs! Here's the lineup:Sara Niemietz, a spectacular singer, together with Robby Robinson, keyboard player extraordinaire and Frankie Valli's longtime musical director, combine on “Sound Of Christmas”, a sentimental, fun, feel good holiday song.Chris Amoo and his group The Real Thing - Great Britain's best selling black group ever - offer up “Christmas Time”, a funky, groove filled song.Classical Crossover star Giorgia Fumanti presents a beautiful rendition of the classic “Joy To The World”.Country music star Robby Johnson sings a Nashville, Tenn. style song called “Oh! Santa Please” that has a good time feel.Jim Cregan of Cregan & Co., longtime musical director for Rod Stewart, presents his lovely version of the Johnny Mathis classic “When A Child Is Born”.Rock Choir, the UK's award winning choral group, sings the traditional Ukrainian folk song “Carol Of The Bells”, a perennial favorite. Their version is dedicated to the people of Ukraine.---------------------------------------------“Dream With Robert Miller”. Click here.If you enjoyed the show, please Subscribe, Rate, and Review. Just Click Here. BOBBY M AND THE PAISLEY PARADE is Robert's forthcoming album. Featuring 10 new songs and guest appearances by John Helliwell (Supertramp), Tony Carey (Rainbow) and international sitar sensation Deobrat Mishra. "ALBUM OF THE YEAR!" (Indie Shark)"Catchy and engaging with great tunes!" Steve Hackett (Genesis)"This album has life and soul!" John Helliwell (Supertramp)"Bobby M rocks!" Gary Puckett (Union Gap)"Nice cool bluesy album!" Jim McCarty (The Yardbirds)"Robert really really really rocks!" Peter Yarrow (Peter Paul and Mary)"Great songs. Great performances. It's a smash!" David Libert (The Happenings) LIVE AT STEELSTACKS is the 5-song EP by Robert and his band, Project Grand Slam. The release captures the band at the top of their game and shows off the breadth, scope and sound of the band. The EP has been highly praised by musicians and reviewers alike. “Captivating!” Elliott Randall (Steely Dan) “PGS burns down the house!” Tony Carey (Rainbow)“Full of life!” Alan Hewitt (The Moody Blues) “Virtuoso musicians!” (Melody Maker) “Such a great band!” (Hollywood Digest)  The album can be streamed on Spotify, Amazon, Apple and all the other streaming platforms, and can be downloaded at The PGS Store. ALL OF THE TIME is Robert's recent single by his band Project Grand Slam. It's a playful, whimsical love song that's light and airy and exudes the happiness and joy of being in love. “Pure bliss…An intimate sound with abundant melodic riches!” Melody Maker/5 Stars) “Ecstasy…One of the best all-around bands working today!” (Pop Icon/5 Stars)  “Excellence…A band in full command of their powers!” (Mob York City)Watch the video here. You can stream “All Of The Time” on Spotify, Apple or any of the other streaming platforms. And you can download it here.THE SHAKESPEARE CONCERT is the album by Robert's band, Project Grand Slam, recorded "live" in the studio. It's been praised by Mark Farner (Grand Funk Railroad), Jim Peterik (Ides Of March), Joey Dee (Peppermint Twist), Elliott Randall (Steely Dan) and Sarah Class (British composer). Reviews: “Perfection!”, “5 Stars!”, “Thrilling!”, and “A Masterpiece!”. The album can be streamed on Spotify, Apple and all the other streaming services. You can watch the Highlight Reel HERE. And you can purchase a digital download or autographed CD of the album HERE. THE FALL OF WINTER is Robert's single in collaboration with legendary rocker Jim Peterik of the Ides Of March and formerly with Survivor. Also featuring renowned guitarist Elliott Randall (Steely Dan/Doobie Brothers) and keyboard ace Tony Carey (Joe Cocker/Eric Burden). “A triumph!” (The Indie Source). “Flexes Real Rock Muscle!” (Celebrity Zone). Stream it on Spotify or Apple. Watch the lyric video here. Download it here.FOLLOW YOUR DREAM HANDBOOK is Robert's Amazon #1 Bestseller. It's a combination memoir of his unique musical journey and a step by step how-to follow and succeed at your dream. Available on Amazon and wherever books are sold.  Audio production:Jimmy RavenscroftKymera Films Connect with the Follow Your Dream Podcast:WebsiteFacebookLinkedInEmail RobertYouTube Listen to the Follow Your Dream Podcast on these podcast platforms:CastBoxSpotifyApple Follow Robert's band, Project Grand Slam, and his music:WebsiteInstagramPGS StoreYouTubeFacebookSpotify MusicApple MusicEmail

The Ugly American Werewolf in London Rock Podcast
UAWIL #108: Rod Stewart collaborator Jim Cregan interview

The Ugly American Werewolf in London Rock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 72:27


Jim Cregan may not be a household name in the US but he has recorded over 50 gold and platinum records in his career.  Best known for his days as a guitarist and songwriter with Rod Stewart, Jim joined us to talk about his new charity single and to relive some moments from his stellar career.Jim works with AngelForce USA, a non-profit dedicating to serving US veterans who may be at risk of suicide.  He and his band, Cregan & Co., have reworked an old Johnny Mathis tune A Child is Born which is available to download with all the proceeds going to AngelForce USA.  We talk a bit about how he came to work with this noble cause and the tune itself.We then dive into crazy days & nights in the studio and on the road with Rod the Mod.  He first joined Stewart on the Foot Loose & Fancy Free album and was a part of his touring & recording band into the 90s, including the MTV Unplugged performance  that included Ronnie Wood.  Hear Jim recount stories about Hollywood A-list parties, speaking on the phone to Britt Ekland and working hard to avoid having your door kicked in by the Sex Police.  Jim has the gift of gab and some extraordinary stories to go with it!Ugly American Werewolf in London WebsiteTwitterInstagramYouTubeLInkTreewww.pantheonpodcasts.com

Kaleidoscope of Possibilities
EP 64 – Soul Recovery with Ester Nicholson

Kaleidoscope of Possibilities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 40:13


To watch the video of this episode, please go to: https://youtu.be/qnRdvWe-VqU   What is Soul Recovery?   How can we reconnect with our essential, real, Higher Self?   What is spirituality and what is its role in recovery?   Learn a powerful path to more of you in a beautiful and truly inspiring episode of Kaleidoscope of Possibilities: Alternative Perspectives on Mental Health, in which Dr. Adriana Popescu is joined by speaker, author, recovery coach and creator of Soul Recovery, Ester Nicholson.    You will hear the incredible and powerful story of Ester's moment of clarity and choice that got her off of the path of addiction and into a life of recovery, living spiritual principles, teaching, and sharing this oneness with others.   In this episode: Ester's recovery journey The Twelve Steps as spiritual principles Soul Recovery Higher Power, Higher Self Tapping/EFT Beliefs Trauma Honoring and nurturing the inner child Power and empowerment Forgiveness Compassionate Accountability Healing Bias and Racism in Recovery   Resources mentioned in this episode: Ester's Website: http://soulrecovery.org/ 21 Days to Your Authentic Self Program: https://estermail.com/ Soul Recovery Book: http://soulrecovery.org/store.html   About Ester: Ester Nicholson, author of Soul Recovery - 12 Keys to Healing Dependence is a speaker, recovery coach, recording artist, and recovering addict who brings her incredible journey of transformation to a practical curriculum—addressing the root causes of dependence as they occur in contemporary living. Her Soul Recovery programs expand the traditional concept of 12 Step Recovery into spiritual practices that have served thousands. A gifted vocal artist, Nicholson's musical career includes worldwide tours with Rod Stewart and Bette Midler with appearances on such television shows as Oprah, The Tonight Show, The View, Good Morning America and The Ellen DeGeneres Show. Ester has inspired thousands with her keynotes at conference events including: The National FED-UP Rally in Washington DC, NCADD and She Recovers—in addition to alumni and featured events at Ashley Treatment Center, Gosnold Treatment Center, Renewal House and as a former host at InTheRooms.com. Ester is a trusted advisor on the She Recovers and NAATP DEI committees and is instrumental in shifting “the business as usual” practices of treatment providers with her workshop “Healing Bias and Racism in Recovery” for industry leaders. Ester's life-changing program, Soul Recovery - The Roadmap Home, bridges the gap between the 12 Steps of Recovery and fundamental “spiritual” practices and modalities: from mindfulness and meditation, to inner child/forgiveness processes and EFT “Tapping.”   “Your higher self only sees you as the beloved, only sees you as perfection.” – Ester   Would you like to continue this conversation and connect with other people who are interested in exploring these topics? Please join us on our Facebook group! (https://www.facebook.com/groups/kaleidoscopeofpossibilitiespodcast/)   About your host: Dr. Adriana Popescu is a clinical psychologist, addiction and trauma specialist, author, speaker and empowerment coach who is based in San Francisco, California and practices worldwide.   For more information on Dr. Adriana, her sessions and classes, please visit: https://adrianapopescu.org/   To learn about her new trauma treatment center Firebird Healing, please visit the website: https://www.firebird-healing.com/   You can also follow her on social media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrAdrianaPopescu/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dradrianapopescu/?hl=en Twitter: https://twitter.com/DrAdrianaP Linked In: https://www.linkedin.com/in/adriana-popescu-ph-d-03793 Soundcloud: https://soundcloud.com/dradrianapopescu Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCflL0zScRAZI3mEnzb6viVA Clubhouse: https://www.clubhouse.com/club/kaleidoscopepossibilities TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@dradrianapopescu?   Disclaimer: This podcast represents the opinions of Dr. Adriana Popescu and her guests. The content expressed therein should not be taken as psychological or medical advice. The content here is for informational or entertainment purposes only. Please consult your healthcare professional for any medical or treatment questions. This website or podcast is not to be used in any legal capacity whatsoever, including but not limited to establishing “standard of care” in any legal sense or as a basis for legal proceedings or expert witness testimony. Listening, reading, emailing, or interacting on social media with our content in no way establishes a client-therapist relationship.  

Dr. Bond’s Life Changing Wellness
EP 264 - I Am The Warrior - My Crazy Life Writing the Hits and Rocking the MTV Eighties

Dr. Bond’s Life Changing Wellness

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 55:37


“Love Is a Battlefield,” “Invincible,” “The Warrior,” “Better Be Good to Me,” “The Best” are songs, that if you were young, and living through “heartache to heartache,” during the ‘80s—or even if you weren't born until decades later—chances are you know the words to every song written by the Hall of Fame songstress Holly Knight.    In her book, “I AM THE WARRIOR: My Crazy Life Writing the Hits and Rocking the MTV Eighties” she offers a very juicy and provocative backdrop of her creative process of bringing her chart topping, mega-hits to life through the timeless vocals of Tina Turner, Pat Benatar, Patty Smyth, Rod Stewart, John Waite, Cheap Trick, Heart, KISS and the list just keeps going and going.        HOLLY KNIGHT's songs have appeared in movies from Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome, Thelma and Louise, Thirteen Going on Thirty, and one of my favorite movies, Dallas Buyers Club, and have been licensed for popular TV shows, including Schitt's Creek, Stranger Things, Saturday Night Live, and South Park. By now, you should get the picture that her songs have been in your ears for the last 40 years.    In 2013, Holly was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. At the time only one of 16 women to have that honor.    Ladies and gentlemen it's time to welcome the ICON, the LEGEND, the QUEEN of SONGWRITING, THE MISTRESS OF THE MELODY, the incomparable Holly Knight! 

Baffled: Amazing Facts That Are Complete Nonsense
Bitesize: Elton John has beef with Rod Stewart

Baffled: Amazing Facts That Are Complete Nonsense

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 4:06


Todays Bitesize Baffled goes in on why Elton John shot down Rod Stewarts face! disclaimer no-one got hurt apart from you poor listener for having to listen to Dan and Conor's Rod Stewart renditions! All on today's Bitesize Baffled!If you want to get involved then get in touch:Email us info@baffledpod.comFollow us on Instagram and TikTok @BaffledPodAnd see more of us on our YouTube---A Create Podcast Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Just Talkin Outloud
Episode 16 Menopause and Christmas

Just Talkin Outloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 65:37


Hello and welcome to our as we discuss 2 things that go together Menopause and Christmas I know they don't but we talk about it anyway. The Menopause is what Rod Stewart says his wife is going through and men need to understand and get information on what they are going through. Than we get into the Christmas spirit  with popular festive baby names and how much are you spending on your partner. Pre owned gifts might be the way to go and you don't want to be out gifted this year. Longer relationships mean less expensive gifts and gifts to avoid buying and much more. Thanks for listening and have a Merry Christmas!!Facebook https://www.facebook.com/justtalkinoutloudTwitter https://twitter.com/just_outloudWebsite https://justtalkinoutloud.buzzsprout.comEmail justtalkinoutloud@gmail.com https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1907869

Bureau of Lost Culture
La Rocka! The Life and Looks of Lloyd Johnson

Bureau of Lost Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2022 65:00


*Starting in 1966, LLOYD JOHNSON not only sold clothes to a multitude of street smart, cool kids, but contributed to the very look of rock 'n' roll fashion. In the decades since, he has helped style Keith Richards, Bob Dylan, Jack Nicholson, David Bailey, The Clash, Iggy Pop, Tom Waits, Barry Adamson, Johnny Marr, Nick Cave,The Stray Cats and The Pretenders. *On top of that, his designs have appeared on many record sleeves including albums by Rod Stewart and Madness, in videos like George Michael's" Faith”, in the films Quadrophenia and Jim Jarmusch's Down by Law and Mystery Train, and as stage costumes for David Bowie. *The Face said he is one of the crucial figures in the development of British style.  He just says: 'I created what I saw as stage-wear for the street. *Lloyd came into the Bureau to share some of his stories.  And we hear about growing up in Hastings, Kensington Market, the Kings Road, Mods vs Rockers, Fred Astaire, Freddy Mercury, model aeroplanes and much, more from a life lived in clothes for over 50 years.   *Thanks to Roger Burton for the intro   *Image: Lloyd outside Johnson The Modern Outfitters 1975 (sourced by Paul Gorman for the show he curated at Chelsea Space in 2012 https://www.chelseaspace.org/archive/johnson-pr.html)   *Join us to get our newsletter and hear more tales from the underground, the counterculture and the upside down.   www.bureauoflostculture.com #RodStewart #Madness #GeorgeMichael #Quadrophenia #JimJarmusch #DavidBowie #KeithRichards #BobDylan #JackNicholson #DavidBailey #TheClash #IggyPop #TomWaits #JohnnyMarr #NickCave #TheStrayCats #barryadamson #ThePretenders #lloydjohnson #larocka

Weed This Book
Cassettes, Boothville - December 29, 1977

Weed This Book

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2022 46:24


1977 December 29; Boothville, Helen Mae Wright Adolph, Sally Franicevich and Anthony Francovich, Ethel Franicevich; Judith Scarabin Willig, Leigh, Aunt Judy talks about her Charcoal Cadillac, Leigh and Roana both sing Christmas songs; Gail Portie stops by, discussion on religion, attending church; Quentin Evans whispers to Deron and Jason Scarabin; Radio Music (removed), MawMaw again, Rod Stewart song (removed), Rex Club burned down, Clarence and Helen Mae at the end. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/jason-scarabin/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jason-scarabin/support

The Bass Shed Podcast
EP 100- The Bass Shed Podcast Highlights

The Bass Shed Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 75:20


https://www.instagram.com/the_bass_shed/The Bass Shed Podcast hits 100! On this very special episode, I revisit some important conversations i've had with guests over the years. Interview clips from:EP 77 - Lance MorrisonComposer, touring and session bassist Lance Morrison has recorded/performed with Rod Stewart, Alanis Morissete, The New Radicals, Lee Ann Rhymes, Rick Springfield, Don Henley, Richard Marx, Volto, The Coors, Gavin DeGraw and more. Lance is a member of Mike Campbell's band “Dirty Knobs”. check out the full episode with Lance MorrisonEP 80 - Jeff BradetichJeff Bradetich is regarded as one of the leading performers and teachers of the double bass in the United States. He has won many major solo competitions, recorded six solo albums of music for double bass and piano and has been featured on radio and television throughout North and South America and Europe including CBS, CNN, BBC and NPR. He has taught on the faculties of the University of Michigan and Northwestern University prior to his 1994 appointment as director of the largest double bass program in the world at the University of North Texas College of Music. In addition to his performance and professional experience, Bradetich has also transcribed over 100 solo works. Jeff Bradetich was the Executive  Director of The International Association of Double Bassists from 1982 - 1990, is currently the President of the Bradetich Foundation and continues to give masterclasses and educate a new generation of Double Bassists.check out the full episode with Jeff BradetichEP 58 - Fred ThomasFred Thomas grew up in the US state of Georgia. He moved to New York City in 1965 and co-founded his own band with guitarist Hearlon "Cheese" Martin. He was the bassist as well as the lead vocalist of the group. In 1971 James Brown saw the band at Smalls Paradise club in Harlem. Brown was in search of new musicians for his own band. He did an impromptu performance with the band and decided to hire the whole group. Thomas said his band used to cover Brown's songs and that joining Brown was a smooth transition for them. He recorded on Brown's releases during 1970s. The first album titled Hot Pants was in 1971. He also recorded on releases by The J.B.'s. Many of these recordings were later sampled in hip hop music, such as "Pass the Peas", "Gimme Some More", and "Escape-ism".Thomas performed with Brown for more than thirty years, longer than other bassists in that position. He recorded on several R&B number one hits such as "Hot Pants", "Make It Funky", and "Papa Don't Take No Mess".check out the full episode with Fred ThomasEP 65 - Eri RevisVeteran Jazz Bassist Eric Revis speaks about his latest recording “Slipknots Through A Looking Glass” and composing and recording process. Revis also speaks about artistic concepts that influence his bass playing, the nature of jazz vocabulary, his time working and recording with Brandford Marsalis and more..check out the full episode with Eric RevisEP 44 - David HoodStudio legend! Member of “The Swampers” David Hood was the house bassist at Fame Studio an Muscle Shoals Sound. He played on countless hits with famous artists and recordings and was a major part of shaping American music.Instagram / Twitter / Youtube View More Episodes

The Danny Diess Show
Vinyl Mix Feat. The Police, Don McLean, Prince, Men Without Hats, Wham, M.A.R.R.S

The Danny Diess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 11, 2022 92:49


Danny mixes another eclectic set of vinyl featuring An Artist block of The Police and also featuring lost favs from Miami Sound Machine, Men Without Hats, Soho, and much more.

I Am Refocused Podcast Show
David Foster and Katharine McPhee with New Album - Christmas Songs

I Am Refocused Podcast Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 9:24


DAVID FOSTER AND KATHARINE MCPHEE WITH NEW CHRISTMAS ALBUM THIS SEASON'CHRISTMAS SONGS" OUT NOW ON LOMA VISTA RECORDINGSFIRST SINGLE, "JINGLE BELL ROCK" OUT NOWDavid Foster and Katharine McPhee have not recorded together in 17 years. What better excuse to get back into the studio than Christmas. The two will release their first Christmas album together this holiday season. Titled simply "Christmas Songs" the album unwrapped digitally on Black Friday, November 25th. (CD on December 2nd) The singles Jingle Bell Rock and Blue Christmas, are also available.The 16 time legendary Grammy winning producer has produced some of the greatest Christmas music of all time with artists such as Michael Bublé, Celine Dion, Josh Groban, Andrea Bocelli, Rod Stewart and Mary J Blige. It's only fitting he now produces one with his wife, one of the greatest vocalists of today.Says Foster about the recording, " We haven't recorded together in 17 years so we thought it might be time to do it again! Kat has the most beautiful voice and she doesn't know how to deliver less than a perfect vocal every time! When you make Christmas music, you literally get a free pass to do whatever you like-the freedom for me as a producer was so much fun - no pressure."Chimes in McPhee, "I haven't been focusing on being a recording artist, but then I married the best record producer and the deal was sealed! We started this process out in our living room for fun and then it turned into a full-fledged, "let's do this for real." David's history with Christmas albums is legendary - it became a labor of love for him."Look for David and Katharine on TV this holiday season in support of their new Christmas album, starting with their recent interviews on Entertainment Tonight and People Online.. The Fosters also plan a small 6 city east coast tour and will incorporate the new songs into the show. The tour starts December 1 in Stonybrook, NY and ends in Medford, MA on December 8. They will be back at the Wynn Hotel in Vegas on December 16 and 17.Katharine also has the launch of her KMF Jewelry line launching week of November 7th. She also has TV appearance planned to promote the line.Having produced albums that have sold over half a billion records globally, David Foster is one of the most successful commercial producers & composers of popular music. Having previously worked with artists like Natalie Cole, Amy Grant, & Michael Bublé, Josh Groban on their own Christmas albums, David is partnering up with his wife, singer-songwriter Katharine McPhee, to release their own rendition of their all time favorite Christmas tunes. A passion project, bringing joy & music to all these holidays.TRACK LIST1. Jingle Bell Rock2. Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer3. Grown-Up Christmas List4. Blue Christmas5. I'll Be Home For Christmas6. Santa Claus Is Coming to Town7. The Christmas Song Get the Album:https://music.apple.com/us/album/christmas-songs/1651691424SOCIALS:  David Foster:1.       Website: https://davidfoster.com/2.       Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/davidfostermusic3.       Twitter: https://twitter.com/officialdfoster4.       Instagram: http://instagram.com/davidfosterKatharine McPhee:1.       Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/katharinemcphee2.       Twitter: https://twitter.com/katharinemcphee3.       Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/katharinefoster

Queen of the Con: The Irish Heiress
Trailer: Queen of the Con: The Rich Girl

Queen of the Con: The Irish Heiress

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2022 1:00


Danielle Miller lived a privileged ‘Gossip Girl' lifestyle growing up in Manhattan and attending a fancy private school. Her mom was a Rockette; her dad was president of the New York Bar Association. But a cruel twist of fate and vengeance drastically and irrevocably altered her childhood, leading her to a life of scamming. Starting with her “Rod Stewart” con at the age of 16… she's now got a rap sheet longer than a CVS receipt and is awaiting federal trial for trying to scam nearly a million dollars from Uncle Sam.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 159: “Itchycoo Park”, by the Small Faces

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022


Episode 159 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at “Itchycoo Park” by the Small Faces, and their transition from Mod to psychedelia. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-five-minute bonus episode available, on "The First Cut is the Deepest" by P.P. Arnold. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Resources As so many of the episodes recently have had no Mixcloud due to the number of songs by one artist, I've decided to start splitting the mixes of the recordings excerpted in the podcasts into two parts. Here's part one and part two. I've used quite a few books in this episode. The Small Faces & Other Stories by Uli Twelker and Roland Schmit is definitely a fan-work with all that that implies, but has some useful quotes. Two books claim to be the authorised biography of Steve Marriott, and I've referred to both -- All Too Beautiful by Paolo Hewitt and John Hellier, and All Or Nothing by Simon Spence. Spence also wrote an excellent book on Immediate Records, which I referred to. Kenney Jones and Ian McLagan both wrote very readable autobiographies. I've also used Andrew Loog Oldham's autobiography Stoned, co-written by Spence, though be warned that it casually uses slurs. P.P. Arnold's autobiography is a sometimes distressing read covering her whole life, including her time at Immediate. There are many, many, collections of the Small Faces' work, ranging from cheap budget CDs full of outtakes to hundred-pound-plus box sets, also full of outtakes. This three-CD budget collection contains all the essential tracks, and is endorsed by Kenney Jones, the band's one surviving member. And if you're intrigued by the section on Immediate Records, this two-CD set contains a good selection of their releases. ERRATUM-ISH: I say Jimmy Winston was “a couple” of years older than the rest of the band. This does not mean exactly two, but is used in the vague vernacular sense equivalent to “a few”. Different sources I've seen put Winston as either two or four years older than his bandmates, though two seems to be the most commonly cited figure. Transcript For once there is little to warn about in this episode, but it does contain some mild discussions of organised crime, arson, and mental illness, and a quoted joke about capital punishment in questionable taste which may upset some. One name that came up time and again when we looked at the very early years of British rock and roll was Lionel Bart. If you don't remember the name, he was a left-wing Bohemian songwriter who lived in a communal house-share which at various times was also inhabited by people like Shirley Eaton, the woman who is painted gold at the beginning of Goldfinger, Mike Pratt, the star of Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), and Davey Graham, the most influential and innovative British guitarist of the fifties and early sixties. Bart and Pratt had co-written most of the hits of Britain's first real rock and roll star, Tommy Steele: [Excerpt: Tommy Steele, "Rock with the Caveman"] and then Bart had gone solo as a writer, and written hits like "Living Doll" for Britain's *biggest* rock and roll star, Cliff Richard: [Excerpt: Cliff Richard, "Living Doll"] But Bart's biggest contribution to rock music turned out not to be the songs he wrote for rock and roll stars, and not even his talent-spotting -- it was Bart who got Steele signed by Larry Parnes, and he also pointed Parnes in the direction of another of his biggest stars, Marty Wilde -- but the opportunity he gave to a lot of child stars in a very non-rock context. Bart's musical Oliver!, inspired by the novel Oliver Twist, was the biggest sensation on the West End stage in the early 1960s, breaking records for the longest-running musical, and also transferred to Broadway and later became an extremely successful film. As it happened, while Oliver! was extraordinarily lucrative, Bart didn't see much of the money from it -- he sold the rights to it, and his other musicals, to the comedian Max Bygraves in the mid-sixties for a tiny sum in order to finance a couple of other musicals, which then flopped horribly and bankrupted him. But by that time Oliver! had already been the first big break for three people who went on to major careers in music -- all of them playing the same role. Because many of the major roles in Oliver! were for young boys, the cast had to change frequently -- child labour laws meant that multiple kids had to play the same role in different performances, and people quickly grew out of the roles as teenagerhood hit. We've already heard about the career of one of the people who played the Artful Dodger in the original West End production -- Davy Jones, who transferred in the role to Broadway in 1963, and who we'll be seeing again in a few episodes' time -- and it's very likely that another of the people who played the Artful Dodger in that production, a young lad called Philip Collins, will be coming into the story in a few years' time. But the first of the artists to use the Artful Dodger as a springboard to a music career was the one who appeared in the role on the original cast album of 1960, though there's very little in that recording to suggest the sound of his later records: [Excerpt: Steve Marriott, "Consider Yourself"] Steve Marriott is the second little Stevie we've looked at in recent episodes to have been born prematurely. In his case, he was born a month premature, and jaundiced, and had to spend the first month of his life in hospital, the first few days of which were spent unsure if he was going to survive. Thankfully he did, but he was a bit of a sickly child as a result, and remained stick-thin and short into adulthood -- he never grew to be taller than five foot five. Young Steve loved music, and especially the music of Buddy Holly. He also loved skiffle, and managed to find out where Lonnie Donegan lived. He went round and knocked on Donegan's door, but was very disappointed to discover that his idol was just a normal man, with his hair uncombed and a shirt stained with egg yolk. He started playing the ukulele when he was ten, and graduated to guitar when he was twelve, forming a band which performed under a variety of different names. When on stage with them, he would go by the stage name Buddy Marriott, and would wear a pair of horn-rimmed glasses to look more like Buddy Holly. When he was twelve, his mother took him to an audition for Oliver! The show had been running for three months at the time, and was likely to run longer, and child labour laws meant that they had to have replacements for some of the cast -- every three months, any performing child had to have at least ten days off. At his audition, Steve played his guitar and sang "Who's Sorry Now?", the recent Connie Francis hit: [Excerpt: Connie Francis, "Who's Sorry Now?"] And then, ignoring the rule that performers could only do one song, immediately launched into Buddy Holly's "Oh Boy!" [Excerpt: Buddy Holly, "Oh Boy!"] His musical ability and attitude impressed the show's producers, and he was given a job which suited him perfectly -- rather than being cast in a single role, he would be swapped around, playing different small parts, in the chorus, and occasionally taking the larger role of the Artful Dodger. Steve Marriott was never able to do the same thing over and over, and got bored very quickly, but because he was moving between roles, he was able to keep interested in his performances for almost a year, and he was good enough that it was him chosen to sing the Dodger's role on the cast album when that was recorded: [Excerpt: Steve Marriott and Joyce Blair, "I'd Do Anything"] And he enjoyed performance enough that his parents pushed him to become an actor -- though there were other reasons for that, too. He was never the best-behaved child in the world, nor the most attentive student, and things came to a head when, shortly after leaving the Oliver! cast, he got so bored of his art classes he devised a plan to get out of them forever. Every art class, for several weeks, he'd sit in a different desk at the back of the classroom and stuff torn-up bits of paper under the floorboards. After a couple of months of this he then dropped a lit match in, which set fire to the paper and ended up burning down half the school. His schoolfriend Ken Hawes talked about it many decades later, saying "I suppose in a way I was impressed about how he had meticulously planned the whole thing months in advance, the sheer dogged determination to see it through. He could quite easily have been caught and would have had to face the consequences. There was no danger in anybody getting hurt because we were at the back of the room. We had to be at the back otherwise somebody would have noticed what he was doing. There was no malice against other pupils, he just wanted to burn the damn school down." Nobody could prove it was him who had done it, though his parents at least had a pretty good idea who it was, but it was clear that even when the school was rebuilt it wasn't a good idea to send him back there, so they sent him to the Italia Conti Drama School; the same school that Anthony Newley and Petula Clark, among many others, had attended. Marriott's parents couldn't afford the school's fees, but Marriott was so talented that the school waived the fees -- they said they'd get him work, and take a cut of his wages in lieu of the fees. And over the next few years they did get him a lot of work. Much of that work was for TV shows, which like almost all TV of the time no longer exist -- he was in an episode of the Sid James sitcom Citizen James, an episode of Mr. Pastry's Progress, an episode of the police drama Dixon of Dock Green, and an episode of a series based on the Just William books, none of which survive. He also did a voiceover for a carpet cleaner ad, appeared on the radio soap opera Mrs Dale's Diary playing a pop star, and had a regular spot reading listeners' letters out for the agony aunt Marje Proops on her radio show. Almost all of this early acting work wa s utterly ephemeral, but there are a handful of his performances that do survive, mostly in films. He has a small role in the comedy film Heavens Above!, a mistaken-identity comedy in which a radical left-wing priest played by Peter Sellers is given a parish intended for a more conservative priest of the same name, and upsets the well-off people of the parish by taking in a large family of travellers and appointing a Black man as his churchwarden. The film has some dated attitudes, in the way that things that were trying to be progressive and antiracist sixty years ago invariably do, but has a sparkling cast, with Sellers, Eric Sykes, William Hartnell, Brock Peters, Roy Kinnear, Irene Handl, and many more extremely recognisable faces from the period: [Excerpt: Heavens Above!] Marriott apparently enjoyed working on the film immensely, as he was a fan of the Goon Show, which Sellers had starred in and which Sykes had co-written several episodes of. There are reports of Marriott and Sellers jamming together on banjos during breaks in filming, though these are probably *slightly* inaccurate -- Sellers played the banjolele, a banjo-style instrument which is played like a ukulele. As Marriott had started on ukulele before switching to guitar, it was probably these they were playing, rather than banjoes. He also appeared in a more substantial role in a film called Live It Up!, a pop exploitation film starring David Hemmings in which he appears as a member of a pop group. Oddly, Marriott plays a drummer, even though he wasn't a drummer, while two people who *would* find fame as drummers, Mitch Mitchell and Dave Clark, appear in smaller, non-drumming, roles. He doesn't perform on the soundtrack, which is produced by Joe Meek and features Sounds Incorporated, The Outlaws, and Gene Vincent, but he does mime playing behind Heinz Burt, the former bass player of the Tornadoes who was then trying for solo stardom at Meek's instigation: [Excerpt: Heinz Burt, "Don't You Understand"] That film was successful enough that two years later, in 1965 Marriott came back for a sequel, Be My Guest, with The Niteshades, the Nashville Teens, and Jerry Lee Lewis, this time with music produced by Shel Talmy rather than Meek. But that was something of a one-off. After making Live It Up!, Marriott had largely retired from acting, because he was trying to become a pop star. The break finally came when he got an audition at the National Theatre, for a job touring with Laurence Olivier for a year. He came home and told his parents he hadn't got the job, but then a week later they were bemused by a phone call asking why Steve hadn't turned up for rehearsals. He *had* got the job, but he'd decided he couldn't face a year of doing the same thing over and over, and had pretended he hadn't. By this time he'd already released his first record. The work on Oliver! had got him a contract with Decca Records, and he'd recorded a Buddy Holly knock-off, "Give Her My Regards", written for him by Kenny Lynch, the actor, pop star, and all-round entertainer: [Excerpt: Steve Marriott, "Give Her My Regards"] That record wasn't a hit, but Marriott wasn't put off. He formed a band who were at first called the Moonlights, and then the Frantiks, and they got a management deal with Tony Calder, Andrew Oldham's junior partner in his management company. Calder got former Shadow Tony Meehan to produce a demo for the group, a version of Cliff Richard's hit "Move It", which was shopped round the