Podcasts about Audition

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  • 1,981PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Audition

Show all podcasts related to audition

Latest podcast episodes about Audition

Roblox forever
I passed the audition for choir !

Roblox forever

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 0:23


Random Number Generator Horror Podcast No. 9
111 - Audition (1999) w/Janina Matthewson

Random Number Generator Horror Podcast No. 9

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2022 91:21


The nail in the coffin of the 1990s Rom-com Special Guest: Janina Matthewson https://twitter.com/j9andif Approachability: 1/10 (It's a brilliant film, but it is brutal.) Content Warnings: Child abuse (potentially sexual); Graphic torture; Animal death; Blood/gore. Up Next: Nosferatu (1922) https://www.justwatch.com/us/movie/nosferatu RandomHorror9 T-Shirts now available! https://topatoco.com/collections/no9 Hosts: Jeffrey Cranor & Cecil Baldwin (Find more of their work on Welcome to Night Vale http://welcometonightvale.com/) Editing: Grant Stewart https://www.grant-stewart.com/ Logo: David Baldwin https://www.instagram.com/davidbaldwin55/ Patreon: http://patreon.com/randomhorror9 Twitter & Instagram: @RandomHorror9 We are part of Night Vale Presents http://nightvalepresents.com/

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown
Eric Bailey Jr. - Actor & Independent Filmmaker

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 29:16


Anne Johnstonbrown interviews actor and independent filmmaker Eric Bailey Jr.Host: Anne JohnstonbrownGuest: Eric Bailey Jr.Website: Bailey + Co ProductionsInstagram: EBJ (@ericbaileyjr) • Instagram photos and videos Bailey + Co (@baileyco.la) • Instagram photos and videosMovie: Hope Secured - Short Film - YouTube

AGT Time - America's Got Talent Fancast
America's Got Talent | Season 17 | Auditions 5

AGT Time - America's Got Talent Fancast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 123:45


Cody and Jay have their Bermudas on and are here to recap America's Got Talent Season 17 Audition 5. We tried to keep things short, but we ended up covering all of the acts and then packed in some extra cargo. Give this one a listen as you lounge around. Nicholas Ribs Mr. Pants Mia Morris Chiko Connor Johnson MPLUSPLUS The Dremeka Choir Lily Meola Jordan Conley Merissa Beddows Siegfried and Joy Keegan The Bicycle Comedian Willem Roelants Abbie and Ellie Smith Marcus Terell Contact Information Facebook | Twitter | Instagram  | Email About AGT Time Podcast AGT Time Podcast is a weekly podcast covering the hit NBC talent competition America's Got Talent. The hosts, Cody Patterson & Jay Bock recap each episode during the regular season. During the offseason, we do rewatches of older seasons, have guest interviews, or review movies. AGT Commenter makes a frequent appearance on the podcast and gives his deep insight into America's Got Talent.  The podcast is typically recorded on Thursday nights and released on Mondays. Riverside.fm We are in the affiliate program for Riverside.fm. If you sign up using this link, then we receive a percentage from your subscription. This really helps us support this podcast.  #AGT #AmericasGotTalent

Thanks For Coming In
Let's Rewind

Thanks For Coming In

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 14:32


Let's rewind and take a look back at five of my favorite audition stories featuring Julia Rehwald (episode 55), Warren Egypt Franklin (episode 59), Eric Nelsen (episode 83), Charlie Bushnell (episode 74), and Gina Naomi Baez (episode 86)!Follow the show on social media!                 Instagram: https://instagram.com/thanksforcominginpodcast/                 Twitter: https://twitter.com/tfci_podcast                  Facebook: http://facebook.com/thanksforcominginpodcast/                   Theme Music by Andrew Skrabutenas

Tuned to Yesterday
6/28/22 11pm Tuned to Yesterday

Tuned to Yesterday

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 51:59


Adventure: Safari “The Adventure of the Bull Elephant” later 1940's (Audition), Escape “Grove of Ashtaroff” 2/29/48 CBS.

Gleek, Please! With Emilee & Lauren

S2E1: It's a two for one deal! Emilee and Lauren kick off season two as they talk famiky memories, the mistreatment of Coach Beiste and Rachel's ability to make herself the victim in every situation. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/gleekplease/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/gleekplease/support

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown
Megan Heyn - Television, Film & Improvisational Actor

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 30:38


Anne Johnstonbrown interviews television, film and improvisational actor Megan Heyn: Megan was born in northern California, but her time there was brief. Her family ventured to several states during her youth, including: Nevada, Maryland, Arizona, and Colorado. The youngest of three kids, her flare for drama surfaced by age three when she told her parents she wanted to be an actress and refused to appear in public without her pink tutu.Growing up she was fascinated and inspired by classic films and their actors, especially MGM musicals. She was probably the only twelve year old who scouted the TV Guide every Sunday to see which movies from AMC she wanted to record and delight in throughout the week. She even asked for TCM for Christmas because she felt that they had a better choice of Judy Garland, Betty Grable, and Doris Day films. These movies motivated her to get serious about tap dancing and singing, and most of her after school hours were dedicated to lessons and practicing. Developing her talents turned her into a bonafide "Theatre Geek," and she graced her high school stage with pride and excitement!After high-school she left her family in Colorado and moved to Southern California to pursue her life-long love of acting. She attended University of CA, Irvine where she studied acting and musical theatre. It was there that she began doing improv and sketch comedy. Within 3 years she graduated and headed up to LA to start a TV/Film career.Once in LA, she began to perform at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre (UCB), mainly in their musical shows, specifically Matt Besser's show "The Freak Dance." "Freak Dance" has since become an indie feature film. She also wrote/produced her own web series "Hollywood Taffy." Once she became more seasoned she began appearing on TV in several Guest Starring roles. She is still performing at UCB and grateful to be living her dreams in LA.Host: Anne JohnstonbrownGuest: Megan HeynWebsite: Megan Heyn :: HomeIMDb: Megan Heyn - IMDb

Loathsome Things: A Horror Movie Podcast
32. Rose Glass' Saint Maud (2019)

Loathsome Things: A Horror Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 138:13


Technical difficulties and illness plagued our recording of this absolute masterpiece from Rose Glass. An emotionally unwell woman with idiosyncratic religious convictions works as an in-home nurse for a sin-loving woman dying of cancer. Can they get over their differences and personal challenges to solve the murder mystery before it's too late? No! Watch the movie before you listen to the most difficult episode of Loathsome Things: A Horror Movie Podcast! If you would like to recommend a movie, help Josh find those missing Rose Glass short movies, or ask us horror movie-related questions, you can do so by reaching out to us on Twitter: @LoathsomePod Instagram: @LoathsomePod Facebook: @LoathsomePodcast Email: LoathsomeThings@gmail.com The Loathsome Things Official Top 10 Greatest Horror Movies of All Time List (of those we've reviewed for an episode of Loathsome Things: A Horror Movie Podcast) (1) Rose Glass' Saint Maud (2019) (2) Bob Clark's Black Christmas (1974) (3) George A Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) (4) Miike Takashi's Audition (1999) (5) Bob Clark's Deathdream (1974) (6) David Prior's The Empty Man (2020) (7) Frank Henenlotter's Basket Case (1982) (8) Nicolas Roeg's Don't Look Now (1973) (9) José Mojica Marins' At Midnight I'll Take Your Soul (1964) (10) Ben Wheatley's In The Earth (2021)   Honorable Mentions: Beyond the Door III (1989) – Not a great horror movie, but so much fun to watch! The Pit (1981) – Watch this coming-of-age story about seeing boobs and feeding beasts!

Impromptunes - The Completely Improvised Musical Podcast

Title by Connor Morel Trainee philosopher Mediocrates is contemplating the big questions of life. But what is the big mystery he can't figure out? Love, of course! Song List: "Ancient Greece" "Who Am I" "Philosophy is You and Me" "You Talk About Love" "There Was a Time" "It's Our Philosophy" Wanna do what we do? Audition! https://www.starnow.com/casting/impromptunes-the-completely-improvised-musical-1334238/ Cast: Alexia Brinsley, Teresa Ewan, Jack O'riley and Jake Leaney on keys Teched by Hollie James Edited by Morgan Phillips

Law Lite Podcast
Law Lite Podcast: Episode 144 - Audition of A Lifetime

Law Lite Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 37:19


Travis & P.J. breakdown the audition process for his upcoming horror film & nail down the inevitable Cousin Contest. Great Law. Less Legal. Law Done Lite!

Laughing Vikings Podcast
#92: 3 AUDITION TECH TIPS

Laughing Vikings Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 57:40


ATTENTION ACTORS! Join Lars & Brandon LIVE every Wednesday at 6pm on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitch Our mission is to uplift, inspire and empower a global audience of ONE BILLION PEOPLE by helping actors share their stories via TV, Film & live performances. Step into your Dream role in 2022! Join our 3 Part Training Series (Audition Hero) www.laughingvikings.com/auditionhero Get Tickets for upcoming Live Comedy shows in Laughing Vikings own COMEDY ALLEY: https://www.laughingvikings.com/comedyalley Connect with us on Instagram: @actorsauditionclub @laughingvikings @larsclassington @brandonknox27 --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/laughing-vikings/message

Two Actors Walk Into a Bar
Two Actors Walk Into the Queen Vic (w Charlie Brooks)

Two Actors Walk Into a Bar

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 52:29


This week we are joined by Actor, Queen of the Jungle, and recipient of several "baddest bitch" awards: CHARLIE BROOKS!Charlie gained notoriety across the country for her iconic performance of Janine in the hit UK Soap Eastenders and she joins us to discuss her career, the ups-and-downs of soap star fame, and whether Barry fell...or was pushed.Charlie is also one of the founders of iampro, a new online drama school which offers a range of on-demand short courses, weekly live classes, and celebrity masterclasses. In addition to this, there are industry opportunities, such as their ‘get seen' event and regular Q&As with professionals and drama coaches. For more information, head to iampro.comThis episode is sponsored by WeAudition.com, the Video Chat Community to Audition, Rehearse, Self-Tape and Get Advice. Use our code 'TWOACTORS25' at checkout to get an exclusive 25% off your Pro-Membership.Soundtrack performed by Rotaries. Artwork designed and illustrated by Megan Siggers.Contact the show by emailing TwoActorsPodcast@outlook.com.FacebookTwitterInstagramWebsite See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jalen & Jacoby
Does L.A. stand for "LeBron's Audition?"

Jalen & Jacoby

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 25:47


Breaking news about the Pacers REJECTING a deal that would have sent Rusell Westbrook, Talen Horton Tucker & a 2026 1st round pick raises not only questions about the Lakers ability to retool this season, it forces us to ask, is LeBron ready to stick it out and re-sign when his deal is up NEXT summer? Plus free agency madness starts early, even if Bradley Beal wasn't totally aware, the Pistons draft plans from Jalen, new photos of a shredded Zion Williamson, Gronk re-retiring, and a little GOAT on GOAT action? Tap in with Jalen & Jacoby.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

ESPN Podcasts
Does L.A. stand for "LeBron's Audition?"

ESPN Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 25:47


Breaking news about the Pacers REJECTING a deal that would have sent Rusell Westbrook, Talen Horton Tucker & a 2026 1st round pick raises not only questions about the Lakers ability to retool this season, it forces us to ask, is LeBron ready to stick it out and re-sign when his deal is up NEXT summer? Plus free agency madness starts early, even if Bradley Beal wasn't totally aware, the Pistons draft plans from Jalen, new photos of a shredded Zion Williamson, Gronk re-retiring, and a little GOAT on GOAT action? Tap in with Jalen & Jacoby.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Our Miss Brooks
480623-Audition Eve Arden

Our Miss Brooks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 30:39


480623-Audition Eve Arden https://missbrooks.libsyn.com/missbrooks and http://oldtimeradiodvd.com

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown
Amy Vorpahl - Hollywood Actor, Songwriter & Dungeon Master

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 30:35


Anne Johnstonbrown interviews Hollywood actor, songwriter and dungeon master Amy Vorpahl:Amy Vorpahl (SAG-AFTRA) is a writer, actress, and singer-songwriter from the grand ol' state of Texas with a BFA in Acting from University of Oklahoma. She has worked in the digital space for several years as a writer, producer, host and gamer for several years at places like Nerdist, Geek and Sundry, Buzzfeed, and Dropout. Amy has spent over ten years performing improv and sketch at the comedy schools in LA including Groundlings Sunday Company, UCB, and iO West, and she has used all of that training in roles in movies as well as TV shows like "The Newsroom," "The Mindy Project," and "Super Fun Night!" Most recently, she played the lead in an animated digital series "Live from the 8th Dimension." She might be best known around the internet for streaming tabletop RPGs like 'Dungeons & Dragons' on big gaming twitch channels, and her album, 'Songs in the Key of D&D,' released at SXSW. She's passionate about using storytelling and fantasy to form community, and one of her favorite hobbies is Dungeon Mastering games for her friends.Host: Anne JohnstonbrownGuest: Amy VorpahlWebsite: Amy VorpahlIMDb: Amy Vorpahl - IMDbInstagram: Amy Vorpahl (@vorpahlsword) • Instagram photos and videosTikTok: Amy Vorpahl (@vorpahlsword) TikTok | Watch Amy Vorpahl's Newest TikTok VideosYouTube: Amy Vorpahl - YouTubeTwitter: Amy Vorpahl

Bizarre Buffet
S2E78: Tales Of Terror: The Black Cat Audition Scandal

Bizarre Buffet

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 25:25


Tales of Terror is a 1962 Horror trilogy starring Vincent Price, largely featuring adaptations of Edgar Allan Poe stories. " The Black Cat " being one of the featured stories in the trilogy. When the time came to cast the perfect black kitty cat, a wild audition ensued!    "More than 100 black cats lined up–as much as cats will line up–for an audition for a movie part in response to a newspaper ad seeking “a sagacious black cat.” Original Article Follow Bizarre Buffet Online Support Bizarre Buffet On Patreon Follow Bizarre Buffet On Instagram Like Bizarre Buffet On Facebook Subscribe To Bizarre Buffet On YouTube Bizarre Buffet Online Follow The Host's Of Bizarre Buffet Follow Marc Bluestein On Instagram Follow Jen Wilson On Instagram Follow Mark Tauriello On Instagram   If you're enjoying the content brought to you here at Bizarre Buffet, please consider leaving a positive review of the show on Apple Podcast's / iTunes. Listening on Spotify ? Give our show a " like " ! It helps a tremendous deal. Bizarre Buffet is an indépendant production.The support of our listener's keep's this show going. Thank you for listening !      Support the show!: https://patreon.com/bizarrebuffet See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

La Leçon, le podcast sur l'art d'échouer
Épisode 133 - Camille Razat "J'ai passé mon audition pour Emily in Paris avec 40 de fièvre"

La Leçon, le podcast sur l'art d'échouer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 27:50


Bienvenue dans La Leçon, le podcast sur l'art d'échouer ! Cette semaine, je suis ravie de recevoir Camille Razat. Actrice internationalement révélée dans la série Emily in Paris, Camille est aujourd'hui à l'affiche du film de genre Mastemah, un thriller qui frise avec le paranormal, avec une ambiance à la Conjuring… tout ce que j'adore. Sortie le 29 juin notez bien ! Entre deux films et autres tournages pour L'Oreal (Camille est ambassadrice internationale !) La voici donc devant mon micro ! Bonne écoute. ;)pssst : dans l'intro je dis 28 juin... c'est une erreur, réservez bien votre siège au cinéma pour le 29.

Grownish•B
Dance Audition Etiquette

Grownish•B

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 15:27


Many people know about the dance audition etiquettes but not many practice them. So I'm here to shine a light on a few of them that could help you out at your next dance audition. Also to give you Audition dates for a few NBA dance teams.

Two Actors Walk Into a Bar
Two Actors Walk Into a Bar and Deliver The Goods

Two Actors Walk Into a Bar

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 50:47


By popular demand, Two Actors Walk Into a Bar is BACK!The hotly anticipated 4 season of the show kicks off with our two actors back where they belong, behind the mics with drinks-a-plenty. Catch up with Scarlett and David and prepare yourselves for another jam packed and alcohol fuelled season!New Episodes - Thursdays at 5.30pm (UK Time)This episode is sponsored by WeAudition.com, the Video Chat Community to Audition, Rehearse, Self-Tape and Get Advice. Use our code 'TWOACTORS25' at checkout to get an exclusive 25% off your Pro-Membership.Soundtrack performed by Rotaries. Artwork designed and illustrated by Megan Siggers.Contact the show by emailing TwoActorsPodcast@outlook.com.FacebookTwitterInstagramWebsite See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bert Show
PT 3: How Did Moe's Big Audition Go?

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 9:50


A while back Moe got a call back after auditioning for a new role. After the first audition he was certain that he bombed until they called him. The second round was supposed to be yesterday so how'd it go? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

STAGES with Peter Eyers
"Gone Fishin'" - From Inspector Javert to Benjamin Stone; Phillip Quast - Part 2

STAGES with Peter Eyers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 65:09


Philip Quast graduated from the National Institute of Dramatic Art in 1979 and began his career with State Theatre Company of South Australia debuting as Adam in The Mystery Plays of Wakefield. He went on to appear in numerous productions with the company including On The Wallaby, A Hard God, No End of Blame and The Threepenny Opera. His first musical was in the title role of Nimrod Theatre Company's Candide. Philip also began appearing as a presenter on the Australian children's show Play School, a program he would continue to present for 17 years.He shot to prominence in 1987 when he appeared as Javert in the original Australian production of Les Misérables. This performance won him a Sydney Critic Award and in 1989, he travelled to London to play Javert on the West End and eventually in Les Misérables: The Dream Cast at The Royal Albert Hall.Philip's stage success continued as he won the coveted role of Georges Seurat in the original London production of Stephen Sondheim's Sunday in the Park with George at the National Theatre where he also performed in David Hare's Stuff Happens, A Funny Thing Happened On The Way to the Forum, South Pacific and most recently the award winning Follies (which screened live around the world.)He has won three Laurence Olivier Awards for Best Actor in a Musical; Sunday in the Park with George, South Pacific and The Fix.He has appeared with the Sydney Theatre Company in Coriolanus, Sondheim's Into the Woods,The Cherry Orchard, Democracy and the much-lauded production of Waiting For Godot. Most recently with Death of a Salesman.Philip has been a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company's seasons in London and Stratford Upon Avon with The White Devil, Macbeth, Troilus and Cressida and The Secret Garden.His other innumerable roles include Juan Peron in Andrew Lloyd Webber's 2006 production of Evita at the Adelphi Theatre, Judge Turpin in Sweeney Todd at London's Royal Festival Hall, The Lincoln Centre in New York and for The English National Opera. He played Georges in the Menier Chocolate Factory's production of Jerry Herman's La Cage aux Folles in the West End.His many film and television appearances include; Midsomer Murders, Morse, UltraViolet, Brides of Christ, The Damnation of Harvey McCue,Truth, Hacksaw Ridge,The Devil's Double and Picnic At Hanging Rock.Philip can be heard in over 15 cast recordings. He now devotes much of his time to directing, writing and teaching.Philip will be performing at this year's Adelaide Cabaret Festival with Moments In The Woods – Songs & Stories of Sondheim, directed by Mitchell Butel. Moments In The Woods also features Geraldine Turner, Queenie van de Zandt, Josie Lane and Mitchell Butel. The show plays June 23rd at Her Majesty's Theatre, Adelaide.The STAGES podcast is available to access and subscribe from Whooshkaa, Spotify and Apple podcasts. Or from wherever you access your favourite podcasts. A conversation with creatives about craft and career. Recipient of Best New Podcast at 2019 Australian Podcast Awards. Follow socials on instagram (stagespodcast) and facebook (Stages).www.stagespodcast.com.au

The Bert Show
Update: Moe Has A Major Audition This Weekend

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 7:02


The weekend is big deal for Moe, and he's kind of nervous. A while back, he got a call back after auditioning for a new role. After the first audition he was certain that he bombed until they called him. The second round is this weekend. So how is he feeling? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown
Jennifer Naimo - Broadway Actress, known for Les Mis, Jersey Boys & Grease

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 30:42


Anne Johnstonbrown interviews Broadway actress Jennifer Naimo, known on Broadway for Jersey Boys, Les Mis and Grease. Known on television for The Closer, Scrubs and Nip/Tuck.Host: Anne JohnstonbrownGuest: Jennifer NaimoWebsite: Jennifer NaimoIBDb: Jennifer Naimo – Broadway Cast & Staff | IBDBIMDb: Jennifer Naimo - IMDbVideo Links:Jennifer Naimo-How Blest We Are - YouTubeJennifer Naimo on Nip Tuck - YouTubeJennifer Naimo-Movin' On Up - YouTube

Loathsome Things: A Horror Movie Podcast
31. Gabriel Bartalos' Skinned Deep (2004)

Loathsome Things: A Horror Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 90:20


We've been alluding to this episode for a while, but now is the time! It's the Fangoria Gore Zone slashic that no one talks about. Gabriel Bartalos, Warwick Davis, and Karoline Brandt hold nothing back in this romantic horror comedy about love, forgiveness, high-effort methods of watching porn with your friends, and… consumerism, maybe? We're not really sure what to make of this movie, but it finally got Josh to watch The Texas Chain Saw Massacre for the first time, so we also get to talk about that on the latest episode of Loathsome Things: A Horror Movie Podcast! If you would like to recommend a movie, be Gabriel Bartalos on an upcoming episode of Loathsome Things, or ask us horror movie-related questions, you can do so by reaching out to us on Twitter: @LoathsomePod Instagram: @LoathsomePod Facebook: @LoathsomePodcast Email: LoathsomeThings@gmail.com The Loathsome Things Official Top 10 Greatest Horror Movies of All Time List (of those we've reviewed for an episode of Loathsome Things: A Horror Movie Podcast) (1) Bob Clark's Black Christmas (1974) (2) George A Romero's Night of the Living Dead (1968) (3) Miike Takashi's Audition (1999) (4) Bob Clark's Deathdream (1974) (5) David Prior's The Empty Man (2020) (6) Frank Henenlotter's Basket Case (1982) (7) Nicolas Roeg's Don't Look Now (1973) (8) José Mojica Marins' At Midnight I'll Take Your Soul (1964) (9) Ben Wheatley's In The Earth (2021) (10) David Bruckner's The Ritual (2014)   Honorable Mentions: Beyond the Door III (1989) – Not a great horror movie, but so much fun to watch! The Pit (1981) – Watch this coming-of-age story about seeing boobs and feeding beasts!

Grownish•B
Start of my Pro Career

Grownish•B

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 25:22


This episode gives you guys an inside look as to how I started my pro dance career as and MLB & NBA dancer. Audition tips and questions.

Locked On Magic - Daily Podcast On The Orlando Magic
Jabari Smith arrives for his audition

Locked On Magic - Daily Podcast On The Orlando Magic

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 31:59


On Thursday, the Orlando Magic hosted Jabari Smith Jr. as the betting favorite to be the top pick arrived for his sit down with the Magic. During the interview, the Magic surely learned more about Jabari Smith the person and what he sees for himself in the league as well as what that will mean fo the Magic moving forward. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! PrizePicks Check out PrizePicks.com and use promo code: “NBA” or go to your app store and download the app today. PrizePicks is daily fantasy made easy! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Sakara Sakara is a wellness company anchored in food as medicine, on a mission to nourish. Go to Sakara.com/LOCKEDON20 or Enter Code “LOCKEDON20” for 20% off at checkout. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Surviving Snyder
Survivor 42's Mike Turner on his epic audition video and unfortunate NY Giants love

Surviving Snyder

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 69:00


Oh, we've got a good one for you this week as Survivor 42 runner-up Mike Turner Zooms into the pod… and he's not alone. Find out which Survivor champion and which Micronesia star are with him. And all we can say is, there is a lot of kissing going on. Seriously! Mike talks about his love of the New York Giants (and Mets). Will he make like Ryan Ulrich and infuriate Brendan by claiming that Eli Manning is a Hall of Famer? Listen in to find out! Mike also shares the story behind his epic Survivor audition video and talks about what went wrong at his final Tribal Council. And that's not all as the fellas chat about the latest in Commanders mascot news and Jack Del Rio's social media “dust-up.” There's always something with this team and we've always got something to say about it. Time codes below!0:00 – Start of show5:40 – Commanders mascot talk12:00 – Jack Del Rio's dust-up27:40 – Mike Turner talks New York Giants & Mets46:50 – Mike Turner (and surprise guests) on Survivor and his epic audition videoKiss My MikeA podcast with a Gaysian flavor!Listen on: Apple Podcasts Spotify

The Bert Show
Moe Has A Major Audition This Weekend

The Bert Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 8:53


The weekend is big deal for Moe, and he's kind of nervous. A while back, he got a call back after auditioning for a new role. After the first audition he was certain that he bombed until they called him. The second round is this weekend. So how is he feeling? See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information. Become a member at https://plus.acast.com/s/the-bert-show.

Actor And Agent
Taylor Lam Wright - Child Actor

Actor And Agent

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 29:25


In Actor and Agent podcast, we talk the industry from both sides as well as being in two different countries.  We discuss stories, talk to guests and give tips from our experience.This week we are joined by an incredibly talented and inspiring young actor... Taylor Lam Wright! It's a mini-episode but such a refreshing listen to hear a child actor's perspective in the early stages of his career. He talks about training, his mindset, his process, and how his parents keep him sharp.Join the mailing list on our website at www.actor-agent.comYou can find our socials to follow us:Instagram: @actorandagentTwitter: @actor_agentFacebook: Search actorandagentpodcast

CIO Talk Network Podcast
Does your Leadership Pass the Audition?

CIO Talk Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 54:52


Every time you speak to your management or team, share your verdict on a challenging situation or admit that you don't know what to do, you audition for leadership. Others expect you to spark hope within them and help them become the best they can be, show confidence to stand alone and the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. So what are you doing to make sure you pass such auditions every time? Guest 1: Michael Cartoscelli, Chief Information Officer (PCF-49) / Technology Site Lead, BNY Mellon Ireland Guest Bio: https://www.ciotalknetwork.com/contributor/michael-cartoscelli/ Guest 2: Sarah Naqvi, Executive Vice President / Chief Information Officer, HMSHost Guest Bio: https://www.ciotalknetwork.com/contributor/sarah-naqvi/ More on this Episode: https://www.ciotalknetwork.com/does-your-leadership-pass-the-audition/ More on Leadership: https://www.ciotalknetwork.com/topics/leadership/ More on CXO: https://www.ciotalknetwork.com/topics/cxo/ Visit CIO Talk Network Website: https://www.ciotalknetwork.com/ Subscribe to our Newsletter: https://www.ciotalknetwork.com/subscribe/ Nominate Guests or Sponsor: https://www.ciotalknetwork.com/contact/

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown
Billy Cowart - Veteran Hollywood Actor & Teacher

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2022 30:08


Anne Johnstonbrown interviews veteran Hollywood actor and acting teacher Billy Cowart:Billy Cowart started acting in 1979 and has been continuously working and building a career ever since. Over 60 plays and numerous Film and T.V. credits fill out his resume (iCarly, Criminal Minds, Blackish) and is well known in the advertising community for his over 30 commercial campaigns. He has worked as a Supervising Producer for Storytellerz and 6 Reel Pictures (NICHE, HANK &EDGAR and CACTUS ) as well as a feature film writer for Emmet/Furla Films and Ross Bell (Producer of FIGHTCLUB and KILLBILL) and Fogleaf Media. He has worked as a casting associate with several casting directors, as a film development associate, as a director, and producer. He brings a passion, knowledge, and love to the craft that is contagious. These dynamic courses have been developed out of years of training, experience and exploration in all aspects of Theatre, Improv, Film, and Television production. Host: Anne JohnstonbrownGuest: Billy CowartIMDbWebsite

The VoiceOver Insider Podcast
Brad Shaw: Audition Director

The VoiceOver Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 25:15


U.K. voice artist and entrepreneur Brad Shaw talks with Gary about a brand new service, Audition Director, where talents can get coached on important upcoming auditions with top-flight VO coaches/casting directors in a variety of genres.

The VoiceOver Insider Podcast
Brad Shaw: Audition Director

The VoiceOver Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 25:15


U.K. voice artist and entrepreneur Brad Shaw talks with Gary about a brand new service, Audition Director, where talents can get coached on important upcoming auditions with top-flight VO coaches/casting directors in a variety of genres.

Positive Creativity Podcast
Erica S. Bream: Casting Director, Consultant and Audition Coach

Positive Creativity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 65:26


Le grand journal du soir - Matthieu Belliard
Audition du ministre de l'intérieur Gérald Darmanin au Sénat, très attendu !

Le grand journal du soir - Matthieu Belliard

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 8:42


Aujourd'hui dans "Punchline", Laurence Ferrari et ses invités débattent de l'audition du ministre de l'intérieur Gérald Darmanin au Sénat concernant les incidents du match de la Ligue des Champions. 

VO BOSS Podcast
Bilingual Audition Challenge Winners Interview

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 50:55


After holding the first ever #VOBOSS Bilingual Audition Challenge, Anne & Pilar welcome the winners onto the show. Joe Lewis, Milena Benefiel, and Ramesh Mahtani share the process behind their winning entry, what stood out to Anne & Pilar when judging the contest as well as what it means to be a bilingual voice talent in today's industry. Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Pilar: Hola, BOSS Voces. Bienvenidos al podcast con Anne Ganguzza y Pilar Uribe. Anne: Hey, hey. Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host Anne Ganguzza, and today we have a very, very special episode planned for you. Not only am I here with my awesome special guest co-host Pilar Uribe -- woohoo Pilar! Pilar: Hi, Anne. Anne: Thanks for being here. We are so honored to be here with our VO BOSS bilingual audition challenge winners. So a huge welcome to our English audition winner, Joe Lewis. Yay! Joe: Hello. Ramesh: Hello, Joe. Anne: And our Spanish audition winner -- Pilar: Milena Benefiel. Anne: Yay! Hey Milena. Milena: Hi. Anne: And then our best English and Spanish audition, Ramesh Mahtani. Yay! So first of all, congratulations, everybody, on your wins. Joe: Thank you. Milena: Thank you, gracias. Ramesh: Gracias. Anne: It's very exciting. For those BOSSes that are just joining us and have not joined us before now, Pilar and I ran a bilingual audition challenge contest, which featured a Toyota commercial in both English and Spanish. And this was about, I'm gonna say, three to four weeks ago, and we had a number of submissions. I think it was over what, Pilar, like 130 or something like that? Pilar: Yeah. Anne: Or close to 130. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: And so first of all, everybody did a wonderful job, but we are so, so incredibly excited to have the winners with us today to talk about being bilingual in the industry today and what it takes. So let's start with our English winner, Mr. Joe Lewis. Yay, Joe. Joe, tell us a little bit about yourself and then I wanna play your winning audition. Joe: Okay. Well thank you for having me here. First of all, it's great to be with you all. I am a bilingual voiceover and voice actor, born in the US, Spanish father, American mother. And basically I've been back and forth in the States to Spain and from Spain to the States at different points of my life. And it's been a trip or several trips. You learn to adapt where you are and you do as the Romans do. And you learn a lot of stuff because you have to leverage two cultures, two languages. It's a thing. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. So first of all, let's play your winning audition. And I wanna tell you a little bit about the specs. Our specs indicated that the voice should be confident, knowledgeable, optimistic, never take themselves too seriously, but at the same time, never come off as sarcastic either, warm human down to earth, playful spontaneous, conversational, relatable, and above all else, nothing that is typical commercial sounding, movie trailer, or announcery at all. So. Milena: All the things, all the things. Anne: All the things. Pilar: In other words, the kitchen sink. Anne: All the things. Totally. And I want to give a big shout out to the queen bee herself, Liz Atherton, and CastVoices for her sponsoring this contest and offering our winners a year pro membership to CastVoices. You guys, castvoices.com, go and get yourself an account. Liz is amazing and always has the voice talents' backs. I'll tell you what, she's amazing. So thank you Liz for that. So let's go ahead and play the warm, human, down to earth, playful, not typical commercial sounding, movie trailer or announcery English winning submission by Joe. Here we go. Joe: Beep. Beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know, you can trust Toyota and our all new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep. Oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Anne: I love it. Joe: Thank you. Anne: I think that that really took every single spec into consideration. Joe, did you have any particular strategy when you were doing this audition or what is it that you do to prepare for an audition? Because we had so many submissions, but yours just kind of really stood out from the get-go. Joe: Well, thank you so much for that. I really appreciate it. As far as strategy, if it's automotive, I take it extra seriously because it's a big genre. So no matter what it is, even if it's a dealership, you know, it could turn into a long-term gig. So you take it seriously. It's always a challenge, uh, to see if it's a soft sell or if it's a harder sell, more promotional. At the same time, as you say, there's lot to consider in the styles or the trends that we work with today, uh, which are very different from 10, 15, 20 years ago. And that's as far as in general or as far as English. As far as Spanish, obviously my origin is of Castilian Spanish, uh, from Spain. So knowing that this would be for the American market, I tried to modulate that and go to a more neutral read and, and taking the specs into consideration as much as I could and have fun, have fun with it. Anne: Yeah. I think that's so important that you have fun with it. Pilar, comments about why we love Joe so much. Pilar: Listening to it again, I think what, what I really liked about it, this is probably not the right word. It wasn't folksy, but I really felt like I was listening to you, and I was listening to a real person rather than somebody reading it. Anne: Yeah, I agree. Pilar: Like, and just the small pauses, the little giggle -- there were some amazing entries, but what I found so interesting about yours was that you had this attitude from the beginning. You weren't serious, and then you went to the punchline. You had this sort of upbeat throughout the entire read. That's what really stood out for me. Anne: Yeah. Really, really warm smile, I think overall. Joe: Thank you so much. Anne: I just felt like. Pilar: Yeah, yeah. Anne: I felt like we were just longtime friends, which we are, but listening to, I felt like we were, and it really, really stood out from the beginning. So congratulations, Joe, again -- Joe: Thank you so much. Anne: -- on that. Joe: I appreciate it. Anne: So onto our winner in the Spanish division, Milena. Milena: Hi. Anne: Tell us a little bit about yourself and where you're located and your VO journey so far. Milena: All right. Well Saludos, hola, hi. Milena Benefiel. I am currently located in Orlando, well, near Orlando, Florida. I am the first generation born here in the US. Both of my parents came over from Cartagena, Colombia, woohoo and they insisted that I learned Spanish as a child, and I never understood why. Why would I ever need this other language? And look at me now, right? My background was actually in television. I worked part-time as a TV host for a Telemundo affiliate in Spanish and did a lot of commercial acting while also being an ER nurse and ICU nurse. I came from entrepreneurial parents who had multiple careers, multiple jobs, 'cause they had to, right, coming from another country. So I don't know how to not have too much on my plate. So this was kind of my side hustle. And after COVID I, I took it from part-time to full-time. I, I was kind of burnt out in the hospital, and yeah, I had the ability to go from sounding very middle America English, as you can hear in my, in my accent to speaking [Spanish] speaking in Spanish that's very neutral. It kind of like people are like, are you Colombian or Cuban or from where? So I've been very fortunate in that that I've been able to provide both sides for my clients. So it's been a really fun journey. Ramesh: Super. Anne: Yeah. Let's have a listen to the winning entry. Here we go. Milena: Bip bip. Ese es el sonido que uso para señalar que este es un comercial de autos mientras que usted podría estar conduciendo en la carretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Bip bip bip bip bip. Vaya, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Yay! Ramesh: Super. Anne: Congratulations again, such a wonderful, warm sound. That's what I really got. And I love how, when we said have fun with this or somebody that doesn't take themselves too seriously, I really felt that in the places where you could -- it opened up to have fun, the more conversational like, "oops, I think my burrito's done." I love the way that you guys brought life to that and brought fun to that that wasn't even as expected. Pilar, your thoughts, Pilar: You had me from the beginning Milena. This was to me displayed so much warmth and reassurance. I felt like when I listen to it, you're taking me by the hand, and you're reassuring me as a consumer that it's gonna be okay. And it's like, oh yeah, I'll do whatever she says. Milena: Wow. PIlar: So that's what I got from this read. It was really, yeah, it was, it was really good read. You just, you got me. Milena: Oh my goodness. Thank you so much. I am so grateful for that feedback. That's kind of my MO when it comes to anything that I do in VO. I just, I, I wanna be warm and caring and reassuring. That's kind of my, my thing. So that you heard that feels so good because it makes me feel like, wow, okay. I'm, I'm doing what I'm supposed to do. So thank you so much. Anne: I wanna kind of tag on to what Pilar said. Like for me, I do not speak Spanish, but I could hear the story. If I listen, I could hear your story in there. And when we talk about trusting Toyota, I felt that, and I really felt that you took the words beyond just what was on the page, and really you were in the scene. And like I said, for me to not even speak Spanish but to listen and to be able to hear your storytelling, I thought that that was, that was just really wonderful. So yeah. Milena: Wow. Thank you so much. Such a huge compliment from two women that I admire very much. So this is a very surreal moment for me. So thank you so much. Anne: well deserved. Well deserved. Milena: Thank you. Anne: Okay. So onto our English Spanish combination winner. Ramesh Mahtani yay. Congratulations. Ramesh, tell us a little bit -- Ramesh: Well, thank you very much. Anne: Yeah. Tell us a little bit about yourself and your journey. Ramesh: Yeah, well, I suppose like most of us over here, very, very varied background. I mean, I was born in Karachi, Pakistan to Indian parents who perhaps were a bit disgruntled with the way things were going out over there, and they decided to move to the Canary Islands. Why, I have no idea, but that takes me back to when I was about four. So I came over here to the islands, speaking a combination of Sindi, of Hindi, of Urdu. Of course I had to learn Spanish rather quickly. And my parents always wanted me to speak English because they knew that English is the lingua franca, and you wouldn't get anywhere in the world without it. So I grew up in an American school over here in the canaries, and I was shipped off to a horrible concentration camp sort of boarding school in England, which was a nightmare. Um, I would spend four long miserable years there, which is I suppose, where I picked up the sort of vestige of an English accent. And then I went to America to do my university degree, which was a lot of fun. And I saw what the real world was like. And I didn't, I suppose, switch on to the American accent because wherever I spoke to were like, oh my God, your accent's so cool. Where are you from? Well, I'm originally from -- Oh my God. Keep on speaking. We just love your accent. So, um, no, I didn't pick up an American accent, I suppose. I just veered towards what, what I call international or neutral. So that's my story. And in voice, I I've always played around with my voice. I love switching accents between -- I speak to my parents with a bit of an -- well, my mom. My father passed away -- with an Indian accent. So it changes depending who I talk to, if it is very strong Indian community, well, it becomes Indian, otherwise it's what I speak now. And then of course, in Spanish and English and French and all these sort of, you know, weird voices going on in my head, it was but natural that I followed a voice over career. So that's what brings me here today, basically. Anne: Wow. Well now you did something interesting with your auditions. You did two takes for both English and Spanish. And so one of the things that stood out to Pilar and I were the fact that you did two different takes for each. And so let's go ahead and play now. Um, I'm gonna click on this one. I'm not sure if this is the English or the Spanish. So hang on one second because the name is, is long. So it's kind of running off my little table here. Ramesh: Sure. Anne: It could be either one. Let's put it that way. There we go. Ramesh: Beep. Beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know, you can trust Toyota and our all new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep. Oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Beep. Beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know, you can trust Toyota and our all new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep. Oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Anne: I love it. I wanna just make some comments before we played your Spanish entry. I thought, first of all, you had two completely different takes, and now I understand where the accent came from because you were living in the UK. So I get that now. I was not aware of that, but I really loved it because it really wasn't something that felt to me like it was obviously forced or something that wasn't natural to you. And the fact that you did completely different reads shows just some tremendous acting ability, which I think is any good casting director that can hear that knows immediately that they would be able to direct you to do anything really. And so that was, I thought was really strong about your English entry. And I also liked you had a different reaction and a different emotion about the burrito, which stood out to me, even though it was like a nuanced change. You're like, oh I think my burrito's done. Or Ooh, I think my burrito's done. It really lent a lot to the different reads and the different aspects and the showcasing of your acting abilities. Pilar. Pilar: Yeah. I felt like you were talking to two different people in the two different reads and that was really significant. And it's funny because I didn't realize it, but they were two different accents, and I was like, they sounds so different, and it's, it's like, oh yeah, duh, because he's so versatile. But that also colored the read because one was a little bit more business-like. The other one was a little bit sort of more off the cuff, more warm. And so it was really interesting to see them together, but they are very different reads, so yeah, that's great. Ramesh: Well, thank you. Thank you very much. I suppose one of the underlying elements is that I try and make sure that I'm not trying to sell in this case, sell the car, but just say, tell the story, uh, as something that we will often talk about in voiceover direction. As soon as it sounds sort of salesy, you know, you're going the wrong direction. So spice it up, you know, conjure up some magic, just make it sound as if as Pilar said, you know, you're just basically off the cuff having a conversation with someone, without sell, buy this car sort of thing, you know, which we definitely do not want to go there. Anne: And you know, I don't know if you guys noticed, but in the middle of that script, the sentences were a little bit long. You know how we always get a script and if it's a really lovely, wonderfully written script, we're like, oh yes, it's so easy to voice. We gave you something specifically that may not have been so easy to voice in navigating a long sentence. So. Ramesh: Ah, you did it purposely. Anne: Yeah. All of you handled that so well, so kudos on that. I mean, I'm used to doing that because you do a lot of long format narration and coaching my students, there's always unwieldy sentences. And to make it sound truly conversational and you know, as if you're talking to one person or talking to us, you gotta know your rhythm, you gotta kind of know, you gotta put yourself in the scene and understand where those pauses, where the commas are, even if they don't exist. Ramesh: Yeah. I realize, I thought, my gosh, who's written this, because it is, there was a part where it got really wordy and thought, you know, you have to navigate that. Pilar: Those were the traps and none of you fell into it. Anne: Yes. You know, we are teachers . Exactly. Yes. Always a teacher, just saying so, so congratulations. All right. So let's play, uh, the Spanish entry, which again, you did two reads, which were different. So here we go. Ramesh: Soy Ramesh Mahtani. Bip bip. Ese es el sonido que uso para señalar que este es un comercial de autos mientras que usted podría estar conduciendo en la carretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Bip bip bip bip bip. Vaya, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Bip bip. Ese es el sonido que uso para señalar que este es un comercial de autos mientras que usted podría estar conduciendo en la carretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Bip bip bip bip bip. Vaya, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Anne: Yay. Ramesh: I suppose I'll just caveat, uh, the accent there. I mean like Joe, I live in Spain and sometimes if my client's in mainland Spain, I would do a Castilian accent, but I put on a sort of neutral and general Latin American accent for those, which is similar to the Canarian accent. Anne: Yeah. I was gonna just ask you about that. And one thing that I wanted to point out, which I thought was super strategic, because you did the two takes, you immediately went into your second take to call the attention of like -- Pilar and I listened like, oh my gosh, I think it took us a weekend, right, at least, uh, one after the other one after the other. Pilar: Several times too. Anne: Exactly. And the fact that even though, I didn't know, you were having two takes immediately going into that second take was like brilliant because I didn't stop listening. You know, I was just getting ready. Okay. He's finished -- oh no, here he comes with the next one, which I thought was really strategic. And I think if I know you, Ramesh, that was on purpose Ramesh: Would it have been the alternative to have said, take one? Pilar: No. Most people leave a space. Anne: A lot of space. Yeah. Pilar: You don't let the listener down for a second. There's no lag time. Ramesh: Right. Pilar: And that is brilliant. I mean, I'm using that in my auditions now as well. Ramesh: Okay. I've I've always done it that way. Anne: That's smart. Ramesh: I, I seldom send off an audition unless I do two. Pilar: It's wonderful. Ramesh: I usually always do two takes. Anne: Yeah. Ramesh: And I just do them back to back. So as you said, so they don't have a chance to hit the next button. Yeah. Milena: I typically call it out in my slate if I'm going, do two takes, which -- Anne: And that's good too. Milena: -- for most auditions I would do two. Yeah. But I like this. You give them no choice. Give 'em no choice. Anne: Right, right. Just go right into it. I love it. And you went right into that second character too, which I thought was great for that. Now did you have a strategy English versus Spanish? I know you just mentioned that you did more of a neutral Spanish. What was your strategy for those two different reads? Ramesh: For the two Spanish reads? Anne: Mm-hmm, mm-hmm. Ramesh: Um, just, just variation really. Anne: Yeah. Ramesh: I mean, I just, I would loathe for them to sound similar so the director would've said, ah, you know, this guy's obviously reading the same thing twice in the same way. I, I just do not wanna fall in that trap. So whatever I could do to spice it up or color it to just make them sound different and believable, relatable and conversational, keeping away from the salesy. Anne: Sure. So then let me ask you what's happening in your brain? What's happening? What's the process? Are you putting yourself in a different scene maybe? Ramesh: I've got a different audience and I'm somebody else. Anne: Okay. Ramesh: So either I'm a young sort of rich, youthful sort of business dude, or I'm an older person just wanting to sort of have a nice car. So I, my whole persona changes, maybe it helps being a Gemini. I could switch from one, from one personality to the other, but yeah, definitely. I've gotta change the audience and change the speaker. Both of them. Anne: Oh good. That's a really good tip. I like that. I've always changed the scene, but not necessarily who I was, because I always wanna be conversational and, and tell this story and, and not be salesy as well, but I never thought about changing, let's say I'm a younger Anne, which that would be nice. I like that. Milena: Your voice can be as young as you wanna be. Anne: That's it. There you go. Yeah. I like that. Ramesh: I guess ever since I was a young kid and, and having been moved around so many different places, I perhaps, and this is for something very personal and intimate, and I, and now that it comes up in context, I don't mind sharing it, but I've, I've often struggled to have a proper identity as an -- sometimes I don't even know who I am because I've had to switch and I do often switch, you know, when I speak, as I said, I speak to my mom, I speak to in an Indian sort of way. I speak to the local Canarian dudes out in the street and become totalmente canario; it's a totally different accent. So I'm always switching, switching, switching, switching in the end, to think, you know, oh my gosh, existential crisis, you know, who am I? Anne: That's a, that's really an interesting point. Yeah. Joe: You're a chameleon, Ramesh. Ramesh: I'm a bit of a chameleon. Anne: Absolutely. Ramesh: I'm not Spanish and I'm not English, you know? So it's really weird. Anne: That's very interesting. I always equate that, and again, I'll get maybe a little into it, but I grew up with three brothers. And so being the only girl in the family, I didn't have to share necessarily, but I also didn't have like a sister to kind of like play dolls with or whatever I was gonna be doing. Milena: Same. Anne: So I got really good at my imagination. Ramesh: Yeah. Anne: And playing with my dolls and teaching and talking to them and really putting myself in different scenes with them. And I think that carries through the adulthood. Right, Milena, you mentioned the same thing? Milena: Oh yeah, absolutely. I didn't have a sister growing up. And I also just think like with my parents having the multiple jobs, they were both performers. My whole life has been a performance, and I kind of do the same in my two takes. I go into my lower register in that warm, buttery, soft, like my first take will be -- or exactly what the specs ask for, I'll give you in the first take, and then the next one, I'll kick it up to a little bit of a higher pitch, make myself a little bit younger and I'll be a little wackier, like a little more fun, a little more conversational, and just get a little more crazy with it. Just to add some adlibs and some different things too, just for range. Anne: I think that's great. Do you have more than two personas? I always have two in my pocket, but do you spend time developing, let's say, a third read or a third persona that can give you a different read? I think that's good for the artist in us. Joe: I mean, I, what captivated me about this piece was the invitation to do effects. You don't usually see that in copy, so I thought that was like, ooh, this is gonna be fun. Anne: Yeah. Joe: And then I tried to add layers, do several takes and sort of warm up and then listen to them and see if I can be sprinkling, uh, or adding something. But I do agree that when you kick into another language, it's another dimension of tools and, and tricks that you have. I wasn't privileged to have brothers or sisters. So being lucky enough to grow up with a, a parent of either side, you know, you, you kind of take it for granted when you're a kid, and then you, you grow up and you're like, wow, this is pretty powerful to switch on and off, switch the languages, you know, with all the cultural and the contextual things that come along with each particular one. Totally there with Ramesh on the strange dichotomy that happens and not really knowing who you are or when it's the, uh, what secret service did you say you worked for again? Pilar: No, comment. Milena: I love how he's silent. He's like -- Joe: He's a pro. Milena: If I tell you I'll have to kill you. Ramesh: Well, sorry. Did I, did I talk about a secret service? Joe: I was asking you what secret service you work for, my friend. Anne: I love it. Milena: Crickets, crickets. Anne: Crickets. Secret service. Pilar: Speaking of which, that was one of the things that really struck me about Ramesh's Spanish read is that I heard someone speaking in Spanish with the Spanish language rhythms rather than a translation. And that to me was so important because that not being your first language, and I think that that's really important because like Milena, I mean, I was born in this country, but my parents spoke to me for the first five years of my life in Spanish, but it's technically not the language that, you know, I speak English all the time. So there's something, there's always that strange sort of divide. Like who are you? Are you this? Are you that? And what I really liked about your read was that it was like, I was listening to a Spanish person speaking, not a translation. And that's so important. Everyone is always so concerned with the accent. That really kind of falls by the wayside. Because if you believe in what you're saying, and it has to do with acting, if you're really acting it, how well you speak or how much of an accent you have doesn't really matter. It all falls by the wayside. So that's what to me, what made a very successful bilingual audition. And that's why we picked you, one of the reasons why we picked you as the bilingual audition winner. Ramesh: Oh, thank you. I'm privileged. Thank you very much. Anne: And again, I'll just kind of tack onto what Pilar was saying is both of the Spanish versions of your audition, I could hear the story that you were telling. And again, I listened very carefully, especially in the unwieldy sentences, because that's what I do every day with my students. I'm working on these crazy, long format narration scripts that aren't always written well. And so I would really be listening carefully throughout all the entries for that navigation. And I still felt the story. I felt the rhythm, and I felt the words that needed to come be a little more present in my ear that were important, like the brand name, the fact that you trust Toyota on all of your reads. Believe it or not, listening to all of the entries, that was kind of a key I was listening for, to trust Toyota. And I wanna feel that trust as opposed to trust Toyota. And I really wanted to feel that little nuance of emotion or trust. And I think every single one of you in every one of your English and Spanish gave me that trust feeling and that warm feeling and that kind of having fun with it, especially at the end, and the beeps too. I mean, I like the fact that we gave this script out because of the beep beep and what people did with the beep beep was really telltale, especially in the beginning, if you did something that maybe wasn't a traditional beep beep or you had fun with it, or you just kind of smiled at yourself. I think Joe, you're, right off the bat, you're kind of chuckling a little bit and it just was so warm and I fell in love with that from the beginning and all of your interpretations of the beeping at the front end of that and the back end of that, I loved it. You know, you had fun with it like we asked in the specs. Joe: Well, I was just gonna say Road Runner, you know, I mean, it was irresistible to me. It was irresistible. Ramesh: Absolutely, absolutely. Milena: Yes, that's exactly what I pictured in my head too. Ramesh: Yeah. Milena: That's funny. Ramesh: I think after doing this for, I mean, you know, you're speaking to people who are super professionals. I have great respect for Joe and Milena and Pilar and yourself, Anne, of course. I mean, when you listen to somebody who's just started off and doesn't have much training, that's when you realize, oh my gosh, this is a poorly done audition. But after a while it just becomes intuitive, I think, plus the script lend itself, the beeps, the mic proximity that you can, the burrito whole thing. I mean, what does the burrito have to do with the car sale, for God's sake? So you can do so much with that. You know, you can just, as you said, have fun and the more imagination you have, and the more years of experience you have tucked under your belt, you can do crazy things within parameters, of course. I often don't overthink it because that's usually when it doesn't usually work. It's usually my first and my third take, which are good. Uh, the first one, because I'm just off the bat, I'm fresh and I'm just being really spontaneous. The second seems to be similar to the first ,and the third, usually I've had a bit more time to imagine nuances, and those come out quite magically. So, but yeah, the script was nice. It lent itself to, to having fun and being creative. Milena: I completely agree with that, the instincts, I know Anne, you had asked earlier, you know, what was your method? How did you attack this script? How did we look at the script? And I actually will do a read prior to even reading the specs, just to get my natural inclination of like, okay, I'm looking at the script without overthinking it. Let me just do a read. And then of course looking at the specs, and then kind of picking apart, you know, I listened back to my read and picking apart, what words do we wanna highlight? Like you said, trust, right? The brand, faster and safely, getting there fast and safely. Those are important things, right? Joe: Exactly. Milena: So then I go through with it, but I completely agree with Ramesh, it typically is my first read. And then maybe my third or my fourth. The second one always sounds like the first one, or it's like, so off the wall that it's like, why did I go totally left field on that one? But yeah. I completely agree with you, when you just go with those once you've been doing it for a while, when you try to be someone you're not, it's not authentic. Ramesh: Exactly. Milena: And you can hear it in your read. Joe: Yeah. By family tradition, my parents came from the academic and the publishing world. So script analysis, I put at the top of the list, you know, the top three, because the burrito for example was what invited me not to do it in Castilian. And that was my choice. I thought it was great that you did two takes of each, Ramesh. I, I shied away from the Castilian because I just wanted to have a burrito and, and that's Mexican, and I just -- and it's international by now., yes, but it's traditionally and originally Mexican. And I wanted, I wanted to go there. If you told any person in Spain, you know, burrito just stand alone, they might not get it. If it's contextual, they'll be, oh yeah, yeah, Taco Bell, you know, whatever, but, or Mexican restaurant, but that's, that's the reason I, I shied away from Castilian and I, I made an attempt at my best neutral Spanish. Milena: I had no choice. I don't do Castilian You don't wanna hear me trying to do Castilian accent. Anne: So that brings an interesting question, which I had asked of Pilar early on in our series, about when specs come in for Spanish, is there a strategy? Are specs clear? Do you sometimes have to say, well, is there a particular dialect that you're looking for? What do you guys do? Joe: First and foremost is the market. What market is it hitting? Because if it's a state, it's gonna be 99.9% neutral Spanish. It's very exceptional to do Castilian. I've spent many years living in Spain, and sometimes they call me to do Spanish and Catalan. And for many years they wanted an American accent, even though I don't really have one when I speak normally. So I, I had to kind of impose, impose an accent like this or something like that. You know, you know what I'm saying? Milena: I love it. Being in the US, I think it's kind of less of a question for me. I know Ramesh and Joe are overseas. For me here in the US, typically my specs are always gonna say either neutral Spanish or Latam Spanish, Latin American Spanish. That's 99%. I think I have gotten a couple auditions that have asked for Catalan or Castilian Spanish. And it's very rare, but I am pretty upfront with them that I'm like, you're not gonna be happy with my read, if you want me to try to pull one of those off. But yeah, I think for me over here in the States, it's almost always, it's gonna be neutral or, or Latin American Spanish, which is what I do. And I can put a little bit more of that Paisa, you know, Colombian accent on it, if they're asking specifically for Latin American, but yeah. Ramesh: I've had a very strange situation with many of my castings in Spanish. I've booked jobs. And then they come to me and say, you're not Spanish, are you? I said, they say, you sound very Spanish, but by your name, we had doubts. And a few times they're, they're brave enough to say that. Anne: Yeah. Ramesh: They're like, your name sounds Indian or Pakistani. I'm like, well, it is. What you want do about it? Milena: What you want? Ramesh: You bookedme. You, you booked me, you liked my audition, but are you just curious? You just wanna start a conversation over here? And, and I struggle with that. And the same thing with my English, like, oh, this guy's Indian. He probably, he doesn't have a proper English accent. I'm like, well, so I stopped trying to be very British at one point, and I said, well, I'm international English. I mean, what can I say? Yes, I'm Indian. I can't, I could change my name. And at one point I tried to go as Robert Martin, but I thought it just sucks. Joe: No, you should be Pepe Mahtani. Ramesh: Pepe Mahtani de las islas canarias... so, yeah. So that's another sort of strange one, but like Joe's, But I mean, I also do a lot of times they, they ask you to do a span with the English accent. So you have to do what they, what the client wants and you hope they're happy. Joe: You have to. You have to. Ramesh: You have to. Pilar: You have to. Ramesh: Yes. Milena: Oh my goodness. Ramesh: Without a doubt. Milena: Ramesh, that did strike me. Remember, our first conversation. That's what I said. I said, I'm completely blown away. As soon as I saw your name, I was like, well, he's not Spanish or American. [indistinct] Ramesh: No, I totally understandable, yeah. It's like, where are you from? [speaking Spanish] Milena: Cómo puede ser, pero no entiendo. [banter in Spanish] Joe: For me, it's the same, Joe Lewis. Right? You know, talking in Spanish, like, come on. This is -- Pilar: You could be José Luís. Joe: Ridiculous, ain't it? Milena: José Luís. Joe: José Luís, exacto. Ramesh: Whenever I speak to Joe, whenever I, the first thing I tell him, when we get on the phone is like, hello, Mr. Joe Lew-is. . Joe: I try to do my best Southeast Asian for Ramesh because I love him so much. Ramesh: Listen, all my white friends who try and do an Indian accent are just terrible at it. You guys suck big eggs because you cannot do an Indian accent. Even Mr. Peter Sellers, who I have great respect for in the movie "The Party," he also did not pull out a decent Indian accent. I'm sorry. It's crap. Joe: A thousand apologies. But I do -- I do this with, with love. I do this with love. I promise you. Ramesh: Joke around. Anne: Oh my goodness. Ramesh: You can joke around because we are good friends, but your Indian accent, I'm sorry, is not very convincing. Joe: Totally. Totally agreed. Anne: Oh my goodness. Well, you guys -- Milena: Friends don't let friends go around with terrible accents. Anne: There you go. There you go. Joe: Precisely. Anne: So I wanna ask each of you, what would be your best tip? Like how do you market yourself as -- like people that are coming in to the industry now, if they're bilingual, what best tips can you give us to market yourself as a bilingual voice talent? Joe: I've spent many years trying to equate both. I have them at the same level, both languages. It was a thing of responsibility. That's a big R word, responsibility. And this was instilled through my parents directly and indirectly. So I was very lucky with that. It all went astray when, uh, a number of years ago, I started to get requests from clients to do accents that are not my natural accents. Oh, I wait, are you sure? I'm like, yes, no, please. And then you do it and they love it. And like, Hmm, well, maybe there's something here. Maybe, maybe it's a thing. So you can never sleep in your laurels. You can never get too comfortable. You can never get too overconfident because it's like music. I come from music. It's ultimately unattainable. You're not gonna finish it. Just keep on pumping. That's what you can do. That's my best advice. Keep on pumping. Ramesh: 100%. Milena: I guess before this interview, we talked about this a little bit. I actually shied away from doing Spanish when I first started, despite me literally being on Telemundo, right? like having my own segment in Spanish. I always was a little bit insecure about my Spanish, and I would get requests to do things both English and Spanish, and producers kept telling me like, you've got something here. You've gotta do -- when you can offer both sides, it's more efficient. It's mutually beneficial for you and the client. You've really gotta push this. And I did. So I try to -- and I'm trying to get better at it -- I try to, when I'm posting things, say to social media, or, you know, whenever I'm doing things, I'm trying to do more showing the spots that I do in English and in Spanish so that people can see both sides, especially right now. There's this huge shift in the last few years here, that is this huge push for diversity, huge push for bilingualism, especially with Spanish in the US. And I don't know if you guys are seeing things over there too, or internationally, 'cause of course I just know here in the US, but there's this really big push. So I've been very, very fortunate in that everyone that I connect with, as soon as I mention that I'm bilingual, they then mention that to somebody else. So my biggest tip would be let people know. Don't do what I did for the first, you know, five years and shy away from that. Practice it. And if you don't feel as confident in that second language, which I didn't, start reading books out loud, watching movies, speaking -- I told my parents do not speak to me in English. We're speaking in Spanish, and I would read technical things so that it would be more difficult, you know, words that I didn't use in conversation, and just let people know, but plaster it everywhere and make sure everyone knows. Anytime I send an audition on say Voice 123, 'cause I do use that as a pay to play in addition to my agents and other things, anytime, even if it's an English audition only, I always, always, always write, hey, and if you ever think about hitting the Hispanic market, I also speak neutral Spanish. Please go to my website and here's my stuff. Even if it's only an English spot, I always let people know. And you know what? 50% of the time, they come back to me and say, you know what? We posted a separate for the Spanish. We'll just go with you for both of them. So whatever language that is that you're in, use it. And even if you don't think they'll ever use you in -- let people know, 'cause they're not gonna know unless you tell them, right? So that is my biggest piece of advice is just brag on yourself, man. Let 'em know. Joe: And if I may quote Jaco Pastorias, the great late bass player, it ain't bragging if you can back it up. Milena: Heyo. Ramesh: Absolutely. Anne: Ramesh, your thoughts? Ramesh: Yeah. Well, I think in my case, I was speaking to Joe about this actually a few, a few days back, it, it's very market specific. I mean I live in Spain and I don't really market myself to Spanish clients in Spanish, I suppose because I know there's, there's a whole plethora of Spanish voice artists here. Why would they necessarily go to me? So they come to me for English and as Milena said, once they come to me for English, then I'd bring out the Spanish. I'm like, here you go. I can do it in Spanish for you. Oh great. That saves us so much trouble and hassle finding somebody who can do it in Spanish. And likewise with international clients that I book in English, you know, I tell them I, I can do the Spanish, but I think you, as Milena said, you have to let it be known that you can do both and do whatever you're good at. If you're good at corporate, well, sell yourself at corporate and be even better at corporate, and then perhaps branch out to something that you may want to aspire to. If you wanted to do some animation in Spanish, you've never done that before, get coaching, but focus on your strengths and build your strengths and be really confident that my strong piece is this. And I can promote that openly and confidently, because confidence is, is 90% of the game. If they see that you say I can do Spanish for you as well. And you know, you don't have a belief in yourself, it's gonna seep through. I mean, I do French voicing, but I tell the clients, I'm not a native French speaker. I've got a very good accent, but it's not native. And I try and pull it off because I have confidence that I can do it. Joe: I totally agree. We don't read minds. And I, I was in a corporate multinational advertising agency for a while, and bilingualism in the States is a really important thing. I mean, I don't know what you think, Ramesh, if you agree with me, but for certain reasons, I think there's more of a bilingual ambient in the States than there is in Spain. 'Cause Spain is too busy with politics and they're busy with co-official languages. They're not dialects, they're official languages like Catalan, Gallego, or Galician and, and Basque. And the, the thing is that, uh, because of the way English is taught in Spain and, and because of dubbing, this is the reason why English is not a second nature, uh, language in Spain. So you always have to have client education in mind in the good sense to try to explain to them because they may not read your mind. They may not understand to what level you are in the other language. It's not easy. I mean, it's, we live in a world that is very multiplied because of social media. And you know, I see this from the musician standpoint, again, you know, the advent of pop star. You do a 3000 line casting. You, you get in, you're on TV, it's instant stardom. I mean, there's a lot of ways to get known really quickly and dramatically in this world. And a lot of people are strutting their stuff. So it's a complicated thing to market yourself effectively. It's not just marketing, and here I would like Anne to take over on the marketing thing because you're a master at this, but it's a really important question, what you ask. How do you market yourself in English and Spanish effectively and be taken seriously? You know? Anne: Well, I mean spoken by the guy who has the bilingualvoiceover guy.com, right? I mean me@thebilingualvoice -- so that I'll tell you, right in your URL, you're advertising, and you've got multiple URLs. And I know that, you know, all of you on your websites are focusing or you have the fact that you are bilingual. And I think that's number one, I mean, in this online world and Pilar, I know does an exorbitant amount of not just bilingual voiceover, but also dubbing. So Pilar, any specific, additional tips that we haven't talked about that maybe you could offer as advice to, let's say, bilingual voiceover talent that are coming into the industry now? Pilar: Um, well a lot has been said about it. When I first started in the industry, in voiceover, I was encouraged not to do a bilingual voiceover demo for example by a very, very well known coach here that Anne and I both know who shall remain nameless who said, absolutely. You never mesh the two together. Milena: I've been told that too. Pilar: You have Spanish on one side and English on the other. So I did, not with them. And so then I, I was like, okay. So I went with somebody else. I did it, Spanish, English, fine. And then I thought, no, I'm gonna go ahead and do a bilingual voiceover demo. And I did, and that is one that's booked me so many jobs. The other one is really good. The other two that I did, the Spanish and English and it, my agents prefer me separating them. So that's fine. But the Spanglish one is what has booked me so many jobs. And so for somebody starting out, I think it's just important to keep at it, just to keep putting yourself out there. And also you never know what the client's gonna ask. I just, I find it so hysterical that I get booked for something. We'll do it in English. We'll do it in Spanish. And then they'll say, well, can you just give us a little accent? I'm like, you're kidding, right? And I don't have an accent in either. I mean, in Spanish, I always think I do, but I don't. I know I don't, it's just, it's so minuscule, but they're like, can you just make it a little bit more for us? And then in English, can you just give us a little bit more, a little thicker? I'm like, okay, fine. If that's what the client wants, that's what the client gets. So I think that the key is to be elastic and to say, yes, I can do this. I can do this. Never say no. A lot of times I've come up against artists who sit there, and they say, oh, well, I passed on that because I can't do it. And I was like, well, why can't you do it? Well, I didn't, I didn't think I could. Well, if you don't think you can, then you're not gonna be able to. Right. Exactly. So always be available and let the person who is casting see if you're right for it or not. And you know, keep putting yourself out there, no matter what. Milena: I wanted to ask, 'cause this is the question that I have and I think maybe some that are coming in would appreciate an answer to this -- in the US, the majority of my buyers are speaking English, right, whether they want Spanish or not. Now I do work with buyers that speak Spanish, but the majority of them are in English. So I've struggled with the decision to make my website, do a Spanish website, all Spanish website, or just an all English website. So I've chosen to do an all English website that says I'm bilingual and I'm gonna have an about me page that's just in Spanish, just my about me page. And I just wanted to get your feedback on that, 'cause I think that's a question that a lot of people have coming in as well. Like do I need to have these two separate entities like I have for my demos? Or like I said, for me, the majority of my buyers speak English regardless whether their client is or they -- their primary language may be Spanish, but my buyers are usually in English. Pilar: So this might sound a little radical. Milena: I like it. Anne: Already. Pilar: I'm not thinking about who my buyers are. I'm thinking about me. And if I go, and I did this, 'cause I had two separate websites 'cause I actually followed what this person said to me at first, and I had an English website and I had a Spanish website. And all that does is dilute you. That does nothing for your SEO, does nothing for the persona. And if you're talking about branding, for me, this did not work. It might work for other people, but I just park everything in one place and I have different categories. That's just me. Milena: Perfect. I like it. Pilar: And that has worked better. I think it's worked better in consolidating everything because at one time I had like three different websites. It was just crazy. And it just diluted -- Milena: It's a lot to manage. Yeah. Pilar: Exactly. Joe: I mean, Milena, you could put a tab -- you could have your website in English and then put a little tab of in Spanish and then they can click, and then they'll, they'll go to that same site, and you'll have it all translated into Spanish. What I'm not an expert is an SEO and how it behaves looking at a, at a site in one language and if it can complement SEO ratings on the same site. So just because I could, I have the Bilingual Voiceover Guy, but I have both Voces Bilingue, and right now I'm redirecting them. But the idea is to have Voces Bilingue in Spanish and then have it linked to the English one. Anne: And then Joe, you have a page on your, the Bilingual Voiceover Guy, English that also is translated in Spanish, correct? Joe: Yes, because I hadn't had this thing that I just talked about yet. That, that, that was a sort of a patch in the meantime. And funny enough, that page is what's ranking. Anne: I was just gonna say that, if you have that page, if it's all in Spanish, because if somebody doesn't speak English, and they're typing a search term in Spanish, that would match your page, your landing page. And it still comes to your central, you know, I call it the central website, but you've just got another page. Yeah, a separate tab, a landing page. And I think that's a really good strategy that you'll be able to capture the best of both SEO worlds. Yeah. Pilar: Yeah. The tab is essential. Joe: Yeah. The tab, mm-hmm. Anyway, I mean, my thing is work in progress too, but the way I choose to think is that there's 2 billion English speakers, and there's 600,000 Spanish speakers. So that's a market of 2.6 billion. Anne: Yeah. Joe: For each one of us. And sky's the limit. Pilar: Absolutely. Anne: Ramesh, how do you work your website? Do you have a special page dedicated? Ramesh: I just have it in English actually. I think that's, that's definitely something I need to work on to see how I can, but I've -- to be absolutely honest, I'm quite happy with the level of work that I've got right now. So -- Milena: If it ain't broke. Ramesh: -- smooth sailing, I don't wanna sound arrogant, but I'm comfortable. So I, I could perhaps do all these lovely suggestions that you guys have come up with, but perhaps another time. Anne: Well, I don't have another language page, but I have literally four other genre specific pages like website, because I specialize in corporate narration or I specialize in e-learning. So I have the e-learningvoice.com. I have medical-narration.com, phone voice. And so even though I may not get a ton of activity on those sites, the words on those sites get indexed, and it contributes to my SEO. And each of those sites also maps back to my core site, which I think is my core brand of AnneGanguzza.com in addition to my VO BOSS and VO Peeps brands. So I handle probably 11 sites. Pilar: That's next level marketing. Go to AnneGanguzza.com for next level marketing, that's, that's that's our next, our next job. Anne: But yeah, it just helps to be found and it kind of just works on its own. And every once in a while I do have, as a matter of fact, I'm looking to refresh those pages just to make sure they keep generating people, pointing at my website. And again, it's a wonderful position to be in. If you have a, a good amount of work, I think that's amazing. Then things are working for you. And so that's why your advice and everything we're talking about today is so valuable for people that are coming into this industry. So we thank you, guys, so much for joining us. Milena: Thank you for this contest -- Joe: Thank you for having us. Milena: -- and this swag. Hello! Ramesh: Thank you for having us. Anne: I know. So yeah, I do wanna mention the swag. So not only did you guys get, uh, thank you again to Liz Atherton, but also you guys got BOSS swag, which Pilar and Milena are wearing right now. Ramesh: Yeah. Mine's on the way. It'll be here in about next -- Anne: Which it is on the way. As a matter of fact, I will tell you because you're on that little island there, Ramesh, it might take a little longer to get you. Milena: It's gonna come by carrier pigeon. Ramesh: Keep on looking at the skies to make sure the drones are dropping in. Anne: I can't wait to see pictures of you in that t-shirt. Ramesh: Oh, I will. Anne: And Joe with your mug. That's awesome. So. Ramesh: I love it. Super. Anne: You guys, amazing job. Thank you so much. It's been, this has been so wonderful, and we thank you for sharing your wisdom with us, and yeah, I wanna do this like now every six months. Milena: Down for it. Anne: Think we should -- Joe: -- amazing. Anne: You know, right? Ramesh: It would be pleasure. Anne: So what's been going on in six months in the bilingual world? So yeah. Awesome. Well guys, I'm gonna give a great big shout-out to our sponsor, ipDTL. You guys can connect and network like we have on ipDTL. Find out more at ipdtl.com. And also I will say that this was recorded today with Riverside. So I'm extremely happy to have given this a try, and thanks for the wonderful video and audio tracks that we're going to get. And one more sponsor, 100 Voices Who Care. If you want to use your voice to make an immediate difference and give back to the communities that give to you, find out more at 100voiceswhocare.org. Thanks, guys, so much for joining us again. It's been amazing and we'll see you next week. Ramesh: Thank you very much. Joe: It was lovely. Milena: Thank you. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voBOSS.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

KQED’s Perspectives
Al Gilbert: A Job Interview Is An Audition

KQED’s Perspectives

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 3:02


Al Gilbert says the secret to a successful job interview is to realize it's not an interview.

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown
Sandra Lord - Master Career Strategist & Networking Expert

The Actors Guide with Anne Johnstonbrown

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 30:53


Anne Johnstonbrown interviews master career strategist and networking expert Sandra Lord:A key figure in facilitating access and connections in Hollywood, Sandra Lord is a MASTER CAREER STRATEGIST/COACH and definitive NETWORKING EXPERT/GURU, whose experience and success as a (former) talent and literary manager have enabled her to work with creatives at various levels in FILM, TELEVISION, NEW MEDIA, PUBLISHING and MUSIC. Talent, from ACADEMY, EMMY, VMA, TELLY, GABRIEL and CINE award winners and nominees, to professional and EMERGING content creators, have all sought her counsel, guidance and creative vision, with regard to their projects, overall career strategy and effective networking. Lord's tools and services have been described as “LIFE CHANGING.” She is also known for her ingenious ideas, networking programs and groundbreaking events and opportunities — she is the founder of the award-winning Hollywood Networking Breakfast®, and Women Helping Women in Entertainment, among other endeavors. Host: Anne JohnstonbrownGuest: Sandra Lord2022 IS ALMOST HALF OVER...It's Not Too Late to Design Your Path to Success! JOIN US AT SANDRA LORD'S POPULAR & POWERFUL MID-YEARFREECAREER STRATEGY PROGRAMA FREE VIRTUAL EVENT VIA ZOOMOnline - so you can attend from ANYWHERE! ARE YOU:• STUCK in Neutral? • FRUSTRATED? • SPINNING Your Wheels?• Hit a BRICK WALL? • Need GUIDANCE & a FRESH Perspective? GET EFFECTIVE STRATEGIES & TOOLS TO TAKE ON THE REST OF 2022 WITH CONFIDENCE & GUSTO! WHAT ATTENDEES ARE SAYING:“5 out of 5 stars!" • “Best professional decision ever made.” • “Life altering!”"NOTHING else like this in town” • “Profound! Enlightening! Magnificent!” "Miracle worker for creatives” • “Truly the BEST” • “100% Game Changer!” “Without equal, BAR NONE!” • "MORPHEUS offering you the RED PILL” “Highly, highly recommended!” • “My career has taken a 180 degree turn”“More insight than some paid events I've attended” • “1,000% recommended!"“Radically changed the way I assess and approach both my personal and career goals”(Read MORE Comments & Testimonials below) ONE DATE ONLY:SUNDAY, June 5th, 2022  2pm - 4:30pm PST (5pm - 7:30am EST) Presented byMaster Strategist/Coach, Networking Expert & Former Talent/Lit ManagerSANDRA LORD(Founder of the award-winning Hollywood Networking Breakfast®, Women Helping Women in Entertainment, and the Los Angeles Film & TV Meetup (LAFTV).  Ms. Lord is a key figure in facilitating access and connections in Hollywood and is known for her ingenious ideas, networking programs, and groundbreaking events and opportunities.  Lord is a master career strategist/coach and definitive networking expert, whose experience and success as a (former) talent and literary manager have enabled her to work with talent at various levels in film, television, new media, and music.  Creatives from ACADEMY, EMMY, VMA, TELLY, GABRIEL, and CINE award winners and nominees to professional and EMERGING content creators have all sought her counsel and guidance, as well as her creative vision, with regard to their projects, overall career strategy, and effective networking, and have described her services as “LIFE CHANGING."_________________________________________________________WHO SHOULD ATTEND:PRO-ACTIVE CREATIVES AT ALL LEVELS in front of and behind the camera, looking to get to the next level, transition into a new area, start, advance, re-invent, or resurrect their careers, businesses, projects, ideas, or events. THIS CLASS WILL BENEFIT YOU IF:•  You can't seem to get your FOOT IN THE DOOR•  You HAVE SOME SUCCESS, but are stagnant or your credits are old•  You need a GUIDANCE and a FRESH PERSPECTIVE - you have no idea what the next step is or how to take the next step•  You need an ACTION PLAN to take on the rest of 2022•  The pandemic has immobilized you and PROCRASTINATION has become your best friend•  You HAVE REPRESENTATION, BUT are still not getting the opportunities you desire•  You need to get better at NETWORKING - you LACK CONNECTIONS or don't know how to effectively use the ones you have OR need to network at a higher level•  You have CONFIDENCE/SELF-ESTEEM ISSUES, or self-defeating behaviors holding you back        ...AND MORE! This NO-HOLDS BARRED FREE SEMINAR will provide LOTS of information, PRACTICAL tools & MOTIVATION to help you TAKE ACTION! REGISTER NOW! Register for this FREE SEMINAR at the link below:https://www.eventbrite.com/e/free-career-strategy-seminar-powerful-tools-to-take-on-the-rest-of-2022-registration-341264440127Once confirmed, Zoom access info will be emailed by the day before. Be prepared to take extensive notes.  NO RECORDINGS ALLOWED.Space is limited -- "first come, first served"RSVP LINK FOR FREE CCS SEMINAR ON SUNDAY, JUNE 5, 2022:@EVENT BRITE:  https://www.eventbrite.com/e/free-career-strategy-seminar-powerful-tools-to-take-on-the-rest-of-2022-registration-341264440127  CREATIVE CAREER STRATEGIES TESTIMONIALS:https://secure.campaigner.com/csb/Public/show/9ddz-2jfxh2--zf9gz-u2d9xr8(https://bit.ly/CCS_TESTIMONIALS2022)For questions or more information:Call: (323) 465-9800 orEmail: VIPList@hgenonline.com

Before The Break
59. INDUSTRY SERIES: Senior Agent Matt Redmond

Before The Break

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 69:21


This week on a special episode of BEFORE THE BREAK, the boys sit down with agent, Matt Redmond. Matt is the owner and a senior agent at the NYC boutique talent agency, DGRW. We discuss acting being his gateway into the industry, how he picks clients, the importance of clients knowing what they want, the instincts of an agent, why mental health is an important factor of your education, actor do's and dont's, why good communication is paramount, and the dangers of making an audition too perfect. That and much more!Follow Before The Break - on Instagram at @beforethebreakpodhttps://beforethebreak.buzzsprout.com/Follow Matt -on Instagram at @mattyredmondFollow Tommy -on Instagram at @imtommybythewayhttps://www.tommybeardmore.com/Follow Adam -on Instagram at @thatadamdecarlohttp://adamdecarlo.com/Don't forget to subscribe, leave a review, and give us a rating!

Dom, Meg & Randell Catchup Podcast - The Edge
Full Show - 27 May 2022: Steph and the "Cabbage Kid"

Dom, Meg & Randell Catchup Podcast - The Edge

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 64:24


On today's podcast with Nickson, Meg & Eli - happy Fri!! We kick off the feel good vibes with a brand new segment of being proud of yourselves (go you!!), we get the inside scoop into the celebs you've hooked up with before they were famous (involving Steph and a cabbage baby...) & what's Nickson's rule when it comes to platonic relationships?!  Enjoy the podcast! :)  Chapters:  02:00 - Hook up with a celeb 07:47 - Being in a good place 15:30 - Steph's Audition - flatmates  18:50 - Platonic friendships  24:51 - Intern Cal returns movie ticket  28:10 - Eli's first bridal party  36:00 - Brekkie banger: party songs  43:20 - Meg's Quiz for Dummies  46:00 - MasterChef judges join us  52:35 - What's The Buzz 56:30 - Ship Came Into The Harbour  59:50 - Harry's House 62:00 - Winner - Hamilton Is.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Acting Business Boot Camp
Episode 180: TV Auditions, Callbacks & the Job with Master Teacher Katie Flahive

Acting Business Boot Camp

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 43:49


Time Management for Actors May 21st and 28th 7-10 pm EST Learn more HERE Two Day TV Script Analysis Workshop w/ Katie Flahive Saturday & Sunday June 4 & 5 3-6PM  $199 8-10 students  Sign up HERE This class will be a 2 day intensive that helps the actor develop the understanding of how to break down acts/character/plot points/tone/tempo in a network and streaming platform pilot.  Day 1: Elements will include: the table read, the breakdowns from casting Day 2: Implementation of script analysis with a mock audition. Actors will choose from the script/breakdowns which role they want to read for- adjustments for camera/audition will be given and feedback with the room will be offered. Katie Flahive TV Class - MONDAYS or WEDNESDAYS MONDAYS 6-9PM EST June 13, 20, 27, July 11 (skipping 4th of July)  SIGN UP HERE   WEDNESDAYS 7-10 PM EST June 15, 22, 29, July 6 SIGN UP HERE In this class, we will look at how to break down scripts for episodic, streaming platforms, pilots, and network hour and half-hour drama/comedy.  Sides will be sent to each person, specifically addressing type and where they are in the industry.  Audition style setting will be the main focus in the class (students will be working with materials each week under the timeline and expectations of what they would be in the real-world scenario of the audition).  About Katie: Katie Flahive is Ted Sluberski's right-hand woman and is an accomplished actor and singer working in theatre, film, TV, animation, audiobooks, and commercials.  Katie is also a company member of The Actors Center in NYC. She recurs on the Hulu Series The Looming Towering and the seventh season of Venture Brothers on Adult Swim.  Her other recurring and guest role appearances include Law and Order: SVU, Chicago PD, Glow, The Affair, Nurse Jackie, Feed the Beast, and Blue Bloods. She has worked as an on-set coach in both LA and NYC. Katie is THE person to train with if you're looking to break into film and TV or if you're looking to deepen your on-camera performance.   Why acting training is so important How to get the job! The difference between the audition, the callback, and the job. How you behave in the world is how you're going to be as an actor. Your job is to be available, flexible, and willing to play. Maturity is knowing what you can actually get done in a day. Take your emotions out of your to-do list. How bad do I want it? How to change limiting beliefs to thoughts that work for you. The need for a communal approach.

VO BOSS Podcast
BOSS VOCES: Bilingual Audition Challenge

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 35:47


Anne & Pilar are casting directors! Or at least they were for the first ever #VOBOSS Bilingual Audition challenge. They share the common mistakes, honorable mentions, and (of course) the winners! Tune in to sharpen your auditioning skills & learn what the audition selection process is really like. Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. Pilar: Hola, BOSS Voces. Bienvenidos al podcast con Anne Ganguzza y Pilar Uribe. Anne: Hey everyone. Welcome to the VO BOSS podcast. I'm your host Anne Ganguzza, and I am here with the one and only amazing special guest co-host Pilar Uribe. Hey Pilar. How are you? Pilar: Hola todos. ¿Cómo están hoy? Anne: Hola. So Pilar, I'm super excited today because a few weeks back we launched the VO BOSS Spanish bilingual audition challenge. Woohoo! Like it was our first bilingual audition challenge that I've ever seen actually and conducted. And I'm super excited because we sent out the casting first of all through our good friends over there at CastVoices, Liz Atherton and the team over there at CastVoices. We sent out this audition through their system, and we also sent an email to all of you BOSSes out there. And we also published far and wide on social media. So let's talk a little bit about what the specs were for this audition challenge. So the specs were, it could be male, female, non-binary, age range from 25 to 65. So the purpose of this audition challenge was primarily for educational purposes. And so we cast the net far and wide. Our specs were for male, female, and non-binary, age range from 25 to 65. So our specs also wanted to grab a diverse range of voice talent. The voice should be confident, knowledgeable, we have a lot of adjectives here, optimistic, never take themselves too seriously, but at the same time don't come off as sarcastic either, warm, human, down-to-earth, and playful. Their delivery is conversational, relatable, and above all else nothing that is typical commercial sounding ,movie trailer, or announcery at all. Sounds pretty common to me, those specs, right, Pilar? . Pilar: Yeah. And, and the thing is, is that a lot of the times you get just this three paragraphs worth of specs, 'cause they, they want to really throw the kitchen sink in. And the casting directors, they're looking for something. So they're trying to be as helpful as possible. Anne: Yes. Pilar: And sometimes as voice actors, we go, oh my gosh, they gave us so much. Anne: Sometimes it's not helpful. Pilar: Really and truly -- yeah, well right. But they're trying to give you as much information as possible -- Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: -- so you can make your creative choices. Anne: Absolutely. We also specified that talent should read both Spanish and English versions with or without a specific regional accent. And we were going to judge on performance. We wanted two separate MP3s delivered and labeled and named in a particular fashion. And also what else did we specify? Oh, it needed to be uploaded to a Dropbox location that we had set up for the challenge. Pilar: Well, and I think we were very conscious of what we do on a daily basis. I mean the auditions that come in from my agents are very, very similar to that. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: So we wanted to make it as close to a real audition as possible. Anne: Absolutely. Pilar: And you get this list of things that you need to look at and you need to look at all the aspects of the audition. Anne: Absolutely. We also gave some references. So if people wanted to learn some more, we pointed back to a couple of episodes that you and I did about bilingual on the VO BOSS podcast. And very exciting, we have prizes. So we are going to be selecting today three winners. We are going to select the best English audition, the best Spanish audition, and the best English and Spanish combined. So the prizes are going to be an amazing choice of swag from the VO BOSS shop. And also thank you so much to, again, our friends over there at CastVoices and Liz Atherton, a one year CastVoices pro membership, courtesy of Liz and CastVoices. So very excited about that. All right. So let's talk overall what we thought about the contest and how it went. And actually we gave, I think it was almost two weeks we gave. The due date was to -- Pilar: Mm-hmm. Anne: -- have everything submitted by 6:00 PM Pacific on April 15th. And we took that very seriously because that gave you almost two weeks to submit. We did have some people that submitted a couple, and I was okay with that. Normally that's not how it works in the audition process. You wanna get your audition in probably sooner if you can, rather than later, but because this was an educational experiment, an educational process, I said it was okay to upload alternate files as long as they were in by the due date. So let's talk about the good, the bad and the ugly Pilar: Oh yeah. Anne: Let's start with the ugly. I'm just gonna say, we could probably say it together. One of the biggest things was not following directions. I mean, everything from uploading to the wrong spot and the one that you kept catching. So I know you're gonna say no slate. We requested a slate, and there was so many people that did not have a slate. And that made a difference if it came between two close contestants. So it did make a difference. Not auditioning for both spots. And I'm gonna say the ugly would be ugly audio because people didn't have a good recording environment. There might have been noise. People might have been -- noise in the background. I heard like some whirring and hissing and I don't even know, people plosive-ing on the mics. Pilar: Or they were different levels. Anne: Yep. Different levels. Pilar: One was really loud. The other one was way softer. Anne: Exactly. So yeah. What was ugly for you? Pilar: So for me, the reason why we did this was really, we wanted to simulate what a real audition is like. And the whole slating thing is just, I've been in webinars where they say, well, it doesn't really matter anymore. It really does. And I get probably, on any given day, let's say, I'll get 10 auditions, five of them say, please slate your name when you send in your MP3. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: And that's one thing and it's into highlighted. And then the other way it comes in is do not slate anywhere on your file, in bold letters, capitalized, highlighted. So the direction was, and it was really simple, just slate your name. Anne: Right. Pilar: And of -- we had 110 auditions, almost half -- Anne: I think it was 120, yeah. Pilar: 120? Anne: Yeah, okay, so half of them. Pilar: So almost half of them -- Anne: Yeah. Pilar: -- came without a slate. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: So that is just glaring because obviously people were quick to rush. Other things that we got, which weren't really necessary -- and I will tell you, because my agents in LA are a little bit more forgiving, but the agents in New York, they are very clear on their auditions that if you don't do it exactly the way they say, they are just not submitting you. Anne: Yeah. If you can't follow directions, then it's very likely that you can't follow direction. Pilar: Right. Anne: Get it? Pilar: And -- exactly. And so when it says, like your name, you slate your name. Don't slate your hometown, don't slate -- Anne: Yeah. Pilar: -- your email address. When you label -- and this is something that is, you know, you copy and you paste it. You don't try to sit there and memorize it. The reason I say this too is because as a voice actor, I saw a lot of mistakes that I have been guilty of at some point. So it was actually a real learning experience for me to go, oh, okay. Once I have done my audition, I've edited it, and I've checked all these things, I -- and I've been doing this for a while, but it really makes me understand that I have to have an eagle ear -- I go and I put it in a file. I go away, I take my headphones off, and then I come back to it and I listen to it as an MP3. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: Because you can't trust your ears. And a lot of the times there are things that just, they don't correlate. So if it says, slate your name, you slate your name. And when you label, you label the way they're asking you to label. So you have to check and recheck your audition because here's the thing about auditions. Auditions are the job. This is what we do. This is what I do every day. The gigs are the hobby, and the gigs are wonderful, but really it is the job. And so if you are submitting to your agent, they need to know that you're serious. They need to know that you're gonna be able to send your auditions the way they asked you to send them. Anne: Mm-hmm. absolutely. Pilar: Because this is not a dress rehearsal. It's not something that you just slap together. It's better not even to send it in, if you're just gonna kind of do it in this sort of half-baked way. Anne: That's such a good point. What happens is, especially if you're sending to your agent, I think that if you become a person and they -- you get a lot of auditions from your agent and you submit all the time -- if you're constantly not following directions, that agent remembers it. And whether or not they mention that to you, I'm sure they will at some point, but it just sticks in their brain. It sticks in my brain when you don't follow directions, because I'm like, ah, that would was a great read, but they didn't name it right. Or I lost it; where did it go? If they had named it right, I would find it. What was that audition that was so good? Or they didn't slate. Oh yeah. What was that guy? So really it becomes something that sticks out in a way that maybe is not as positive as you'd like. And the next time you're asked to submit an audition, I think it just becomes something that gets stuck in their memory. Then it becomes like, well, again, they forgot to slate, or again, they didn't name the file correctly, so now I've gotta go and fix it here on my system. So that just really stands out, I think if you cannot follow directions. And again, if you can't follow directions, it leads me to think that you cannot follow direction either, so. Pilar: Well, and here's the thing that it's even more serious because it's your category, and it's one audition. They're probably dealing with 30 auditions on any given day -- Anne: If not more, right? Exactly. Pilar: Yeah. But let's just put 30 as a, let's just say 30 auditions on one given day. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: So let's say they are submitting five of their best people, but they're sending it out to 50 people for each audition. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: They don't have time to sit there and email you back and say, you did not slate. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. Pilar: Or you did something or, or there was a mistake here. They're just not gonna submit you the next time. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: They're not gonna tell you because the whole thing is on you. You have to be proud of the fact that you are -- this is -- it's a craft; auditions are a craft. And so it's like, you're giving like a little mini performance. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: Because you're basically saying to the person who's hearing on the other end, I can do what you asked me to. Anne: Mm-hmm. Absolutely. Pilar: So you have to make sure that it, it is all in place because if you ask them, because I have. I mean, at the very beginning, when I first started working with my agents and I wasn't booking and I, so I asked them, and they gave me some really constructive criticism. And so I went and I studied more with some specific people, and then I started booking, but they're not gonna sit there and say, oh well, you didn't slate and you keep not slating. And we can't submit you. They're just gonna ignore you. Anne: Everything contributes, everything contributes to it. Pilar: Yeah, exactly. Anne: Absolutely. Pilar: So it, it's so important. For everybody who slated, thank you. And for everybody who followed the directions, thank you. But for the people who didn't, just remember that there's more than one pair of ears listening. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. Pilar: And so for the next time, make sure that you've crossed your T's and dotted your I's when you send submissions in. Anne: I mean, every time when people are asking casting directors, what are the worst things you can do when you submit an audition? Pilar: What's your pet peeves, yeah. Anne: And that is not following directions. Now, the other thing I noticed for the ugly was the bad audio. So, you know, it's unfortunate. It is part of the business though; you do have to have a good studio or a great studio where you can produce quality audio. And if you have bad audio and, and it becomes between you and another person who had it, maybe an equally great read, I'm gonna pick the person that has the good studio or the, the studio. Because I cannot guarantee, let's say, even though you may not have the best studio sound, that you're gonna be able to come into the studio and then execute by tomorrow, if that's when I need the spot to be done. So you really have to invest in figuring out how to get the best quality audio out of your studio. Pilar: And just, it's so important to note that having the best quality studio does not mean you have to spend $5,000. Anne: Exactly. Pilar: Because what they're looking for to be able to submit to the client, what they're looking for is clean audio. It does not have to be a $10,000 studio, a $10,000 booth. It has to be clean. So there's, there are parameters that you have to follow in terms of getting that -65 DB noise floor. It's not hard, but it just takes work. And you have to be able to put in the time and find out how to get that quality. Anne: Well, the cool thing is is that once you get it set up, usually you don't have to change it. It's not like you're gonna have to improve it afterwards. Pilar: Exactly. Anne: And there's a lot of really wonderful audio engineers out there that can help you. They don't have to come to your house. Pilar: And they don't have to cost an arm and a leg either. Anne: They don't, but they're very well worth -- Pilar: There's some great people out there. Anne: They're very well worth the investment of getting that sound to be in tiptop shape. Pilar: Yeah. Yes. Because once you have it, then you've got it forever. I, yeah, absolutely. Anne: Exactly. Pilar: Good point. Anne: And that's, and it's done, you know, set and done. So let's talk about, okay, that was the ugly. There might be more if we, if we wanna talk about it more, but I'm gonna go into the bad now, which is not quite as ugly, but the bad is -- so let's think about this. Probably 90% of the time for a commercial read these days, we are being asked for conversational, nothing, typical commercial sounding or announcery. Pilar: Mm-hmm. Anne: Honest to God. Every time I see it, it's like nothing that sounds commercially. So I think that for a lot of you, it's hard to hear yourselves because I think what you're trying to do is sound like you're conversational, and you're not actually acting, and you're not actually in a scene and being conversational. So I'm just gonna say that it's not bad. It's just that you need to develop that ear. You need to really put in the hours for getting yourself as best as you can be in the scene, acting it out so that it's believable and it's authentic. And the thing is, is that when you listen to 200 auditions, it is very obvious which ones are sounding authentic and genuine, and which ones are just trying to sound conversational, and of course those that are being announcery. So it becomes very evident to the ear when you listen to it. And I think when we reveal some of the winners, you're gonna hear that as well. So I'm just gonna say maybe not the bad, but I think everybody always, it is our job to be good at what we do and to be able to bring that copy to life in the way that the director wants to. And so to get my ear, the casting director's ear, if you can show me that you can act, I'm gonna hire you because then if I want you to sound commercially, it's a piece of cake. And a lot of times that might be what you hear on the television. But the fact is is that when you're auditioning, you gotta show me that you can act, and that's the audition that I'm gonna pick. Pilar: And the thing is when you know, people will say, well, what do I do? Where do I go? And coaching is so expensive and this and this and that. Well, it does take work, and it does take learning, but here's the thing. YouTube and iSpot TV are your best friends. Anne: Mm, I'm gonna disagree with you there. Pilar: Why? Anne: Because yes, you can go and listen to the commercials. But again, if the end result is being directed to sound commercially, it's not necessarily gonna help you not sound commercially. Pilar: No, but I'm talking about getting an ear for what is being heard on the radio. For example, if you don't know what it sounds like for, let's say a Ford commercial, you go and you look up a Ford commercial. It's like, when you don't know something, you go and you look it up. If you're auditioning, like, let's say you don't know what a microwave sounds like. You go and you look up, what does a microwave sound like? How can I experiment with how a microwave sounds like? Let me play with it. 'Cause that's what we saw, what we heard in these reads, people who were willing to take a little chance and people who were willing to sort of put some of their personality in there. That's what I mean in terms of doing research for trying to figure out, well, what is it, if I don't really know what it is -- go listen and also study. Absolutely. But there's always research to be done when you are voicing something that you might not be super familiar with. Anne: I will agree with you there. If you're not familiar with the brand, I would absolutely go and do a Google search of the brand. And I'm gonna just say, I'm gonna be very careful listening to other commercials on YouTube and or iSpot. Some of them are amazing, but some of them are not -- if they're ask for a particular style of a read, just be careful. Because not everything that you hear on TV is conversational. And so if the specs are asking for that, then make sure that you go and find something that sounds conversational and not commercial. And if you are new to the industry, I would recommend that you get some coaching to help you with that, to help develop your ear. I think you should consider it to be an investment in your business. And I'm not saying this because I'm a coach. I'm really not. I just know that the longevity of this profession, you learn it's a marathon, not a sprint. Over the years, I've studied, I've coached and I've developed an ear. And I think that that is something that doesn't happen overnight. And so you really have to go and study, Google and make sure you're listening to good commercials and great actors and invest in a coach. And I'm not saying you need to invest in a coach for 10 years, but I think even the best still hit up coaches so that they can continue to be their best. All right. So, and now for the really good, now we're going to announce the winners of each category. So let's start with the winner for English, and the winner is....Joe Lewis. Yay, Joe. Let's play his winning audition. Joe: Beep beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know you can trust Toyota and our all new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep -- oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Anne: Yay. Congratulations, Joe Lewis. So let's talk about what we liked about Joe's audition. I'll start with saying, I really liked his warm tone. I thought that it was really friendly and super conversational. Pilar: Yeah, absolutely. I will say he did not slate... but his audition was so good, and he made me feel sort of like, oh wow. He made me feel warm. That's what his voice made me feel. Anne: Yeah, me too. Pilar: And that, and that's so important -- Anne: Me too. Pilar: -- when you're listening to any kind of commercial, when you're listening to a voiceover, if they make you feel something -- Anne: I was just gonna say that, yes. Pilar: Then you know that you have reached that person. You've reached that, you know, it's like you've gone through the sound and through the, through the computer, through the cyberspace, and you've reached that person, 'cause you're like, oh yeah, okay. This is, this is cool. I, I, I could trust this person. Anne: Yeah. Such a good point because that is exactly how I felt when I listened to it. And when I listened to it for the first time, I immediately went, oh it wasn't like, oh I love the sound of that. I love the way he did this particular. I mean, there's lots of aspects of it that I love, but it was the feeling that I was left with, and that is gold, pure gold. So yeah, if you can just listen to an audition or listen to a spot and you are able to feel something about it, then I think that is, that is the money, that is the money read. So yeah. Congratulations. And I loved how at the end he really kind of had a different tone, a change of tone. He kind of brought his voice down like, oh it was a secret about the burrito. So I liked his ending burrito. Awesome. All right. So now there were so many good reads that we also decided to award an honorable mention for the English category, and we think you're gonna really enjoy her read too. So the honorable mention in English goes to....Sofia Zita. Congratulations, Sofia. Let's play her audition. Sophia: Beep beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know you can trust Toyota and our all new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep -- oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Anne: Oh gosh. So I love Sophia's beep that like that struck me from the beginning. I just thought it was really cute. And I'm gonna say at the very end, like she did something, she went off mic. She did an off mic technique for her burrito, which I thought was super creative and super fun. And I thought that her personality, while I thought there were some places in, you know, maybe her first couple sentences where it may not have the flow of a conversational English, her personality just shown so brightly through it that I couldn't help but smile when listening to her. So again, it evoked a feeling out of me, and that pretty much just said, yep. She needs to get an honorable mention for that. So great work on that, Sophia. What are your thoughts? Pilar: I felt like she was talking right to me. I felt like she was standing right next to me talking to me from the get-go. And I was like, oh wow. It's like, she was right there next to me. I don't know it just, again, it gave me this warm feeling inside, and I was like, okay. Yeah. Anne: Yeah. So that really unique beep and that off mic technique really grabbed me at the beginning and at the end too. Pilar: Yep. Anne: So it made her pretty memorable. Pilar: Mm-hmm. Anne: All right. Congratulations, Sofia. All right. Let's talk about now the winner in the Spanish category, and Pilar, I'm gonna let you handle that. Pilar: So the winner in the Spanish category is.... Milena Benefiel, and this is her submission. Milena: Milena Benefiel. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Pilar: I felt like she was very just right there and very straight forward. And you know, this is how it's done. And there was that little sort of laugh at the end. And I, I just, I love this read. Anne: I thought she had a nice, warm smile and a lot of personality in it. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: And so I really enjoyed her, and there were so many good ones, but I, I think for her, I just felt an immediate connection with that. Pilar: Mm-hmm. Anne: She was, it was almost like she was in my ear. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: And that's a very cool feeling. It's like, hey, telling you a secret and let me tell you about this Toyota. So yeah. Lots of fun and nicely done. Congratulations, Milena. Pilar: Okay. So now we have an honorable mention for the Spanish version and the runner-up was....Nicoletta Mondellini, and here is her read. Nicki: Soy Nicki Mandolini con Dos Thomas. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo en la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito ya está listo. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo en la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Anne: . I'm all about her beep, I'm just saying. Pilar: Her, yeah, her beeps are really fun. And so since we didn't specify one take -- Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: -- or two takes, obviously there a few people who submitted two takes, and I really liked her read because it was different, the first one from the second. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: The first one was very bubbly. Anne: Mm-hmm, yep, absolutely. Pilar: And it was bouncy, and it was full of energy, and the second one was straightforward, but it was still warm, still engaging. Anne: I agree. Pilar: Still talking right to you. And I liked that. Anne: I agree. And I, I think you're right. We didn't say one or two takes, we didn't make a specification, but I think that if you are going to submit two takes, make sure that those two takes are different and different enough so that we can hear that difference. Because for me, that ended up being the point where I said, oh, that was a really cute take. I was like, okay. Short list. But there was a few people on my short list, but when she went on the second take, it showed to me that she could actually have a different take and act. And so I tended to choose her because she did the second take because now I know for a fact that she can give me a different read, and I know I can feel confident that when I'm directing the session, that she can give me what I need. Pilar: That she can deliver. Anne: Yeah. That she can deliver. And so congratulations. And that beep really kind of stuck out. And so here's the thing we asked, 'cause beep beep was kind of a sound effect in the file. We never really specified where the beep was coming from. Even though it seems obvious that maybe it would come from a car or a microwave. But what I loved is most people had a lot of fun with the beep beeps, and I applaud that because that's what made your auditions stand out, if you had fun with the beeps or if you could laugh at yourself. I had a couple of people that really, really went all out for the beeps. And I think that it paid off. Pilar: Because when you bring that little teeny weeny piece of creativity, it affects your voice. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: And it affects your attitude. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: And so that tells us as the casting directors, oh, they know how to play. They know how to give us a, a little bit of a different flavor for that particular moment, even if it's just two seconds long. Anne: Yup. Absolutely. Pilar: So that's really important. Anne: Cool. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: All right. So now our final category, our combination. Pilar: You know what? Anne: Yeah? Pilar: I feel like this deserves two drum rolls. Okay? Anne: because let's talk about the English first and then the Spanish. How's that? Pilar: Exactly. Anne: We'll do that. So one drum roll, one drum roll. Pilar: One drum roll. Anne: Winner of the English is Ramesh Mathani. Congratulations, Ramesh. Let's play his winning read in English. Ramesh: This is Ramesh Mathani. Beep beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know you can trust Toyota and all our new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep -- oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Beep beep. That is the sound of me signaling that this is a car commercial while being considerate of the fact that you may be on the road. It's exactly this kind of consideration that lets you know you can trust Toyota and our all new 2022 Highlander SUV to get you where you need to be faster and more reliably. Beep beep beep beep beep -- oops. Sorry. I think my burrito's done. Anne: So two completely different reads and interestingly enough, he had a little bit of a, a global international accent on his first read and then more of a straight English read on the second, but they were definitely different. And I remember listening to his first read, I thought, oh, that's really, that sounds nice. But I was just like, okay, I let it -- and then when he came in with the second one and had a different read completely, and even had a different like burrito he had a different burrito expression, I really just thought that that really showed his acting ability. And I was, I was just very impressed. Pilar: Yeah. And I just, I wanna reiterate how important it is to have, if you're going to do two reads, make them different. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: Obviously you don't wanna, you know, have a low voice and then have a high voice because that's kind of silly, but there were a couple of entries where the exact same thing was uploaded twice. Anne: Mm-hmm. yep. Pilar: Or a read was done double time, much quicker. Anne: Mm-hmm. Mm-hmm. Pilar: But that doesn't make it a different read. What's your attitude? Who are you talking to? Anne: Right, exactly. Pilar: Are you talking to your mother or are you talking to your best friend? Anne: Sure. Pilar: Are you talking your husband? 'Cause that's going to inform the difference in the read and that's what's gonna make a difference and show us that you know how to act. Anne: Yeah. Change the scene and change your read. Don't just change what it sounds like. Right? Pilar: Yeah. Anne: Change your scene and it'll change your reaction to it and your acting. Pilar: Yeah. Anne: So awesome. So now let's go ahead and play his winning audition in Spanish. Oh! Pilar: One more time for the drumroll. Anne: That's right. Ramesh. Pilar: Ramesh. Ramesh: Soy Ramesh Mathani. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo en la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Beep beep. Es el sonido que uso para siñolar que este es un commercial de autos mientras que usted podria está conduciendo en la caretera. Este tipo de servicio es lo que le permite saber que puede confiar en Toyota y en nuestra nueva SUV Highlander 2022 para que se transporte de un lugar a otro de la manera más rápida y confiable. Beep beep beep beep beep -- balla, lo siento, creo que mi burrito está listo. Anne: You know what I love about that? Pilar: What? Anne: So besides that he's got two different reads, what is really strategic that he did is he placed in both his English and Spanish placed his second read right at the end of the first so that there was no time for the casting director to just like, okay, next. So he literally almost ran them into each other so that it was obvious that there was a second read coming, and it was actually really kind of cool that beep beep was the words because it made it even more like distinct that here's the first read. Here's the second read. But he just, he really butted them up against each other to strategically not allow the casting director to take the ears off of the listen. Pilar: Yeah. And that's so important as we've probably discussed in an earlier podcast, how casting directors are gonna listen to you. They say they listen to everything, but my question has always been -- 'cause I listened to every single one of these. Anne: Do they? Yes, I did too. Mm-hmm. Pilar: And to the end. So when I hear casting directors say we listen to every single one, I wonder, do they listen to every single one to the end? Anne: Right. Pilar: Or do they in fact listen to -- Anne: The first part. Pilar: -- six seconds -- Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: -- which is what is sort of the average. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: And that's why it's so important to remember the ears that are listening to it on the other end. What you're saying is something that I'm gonna use too is just to -- Anne: Yeah, super strategic. Pilar: -- just to smoosh it right next to it so you you're not giving -- to me, one of the things I learned when I started doing on camera work so many years ago, 'cause I've been doing auditions for like over 30 years, is that you wanna make it really difficult for them to turn you off. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. That's it, that's key. Pilar: Or to discount you. Anne: Yep. Pilar: So you wanna do everything possible and obviously you don't wanna make it sound rushed, but it's -- and that's what it means about making, just perfecting the audition. So it's like a little slice of this perfect 30 seconds, and it's not about, you know, being perfect. That's not the point of it. Anne: Yeah, absolutely, good point. Pilar: But it's just about how much you can give to the audition that you're sending in. And then you just, you know, you send it in, and then you let it go and you release it. Anne: Yep. Exactly. Pilar: And I think that he gave us variation. He gave us warmth. Anne: He gave us the feels. Pilar: I trusted him in both languages. So I felt like, oh yeah, okay. If this stranger came up to me and spoke to me, I'd be like, yeah, this is okay. I can go with this. Anne: Yeah, absolutely. Pilar: So that's so important because it's about confidence. It's about confidence in what you're doing in the moment as you are acting. And so if you believe what you're saying, the person on the other end is gonna believe it as well. Anne: Absolutely. Absolutely. Oh, great takeaways. I mean, so let's remember, BOSSes, make sure that first of all, you follow directions . First of all, follow directions, make sure that you've got some good audio coming out, really work on your acting, make us feel something at the end of your read. And again like Pilar, I love that you said it doesn't have to be perfect. And as a matter of fact, there's a lot of imperfections. I even wrote a blog article on it once, but imperfections are beautiful, and imperfections make me listen. They make me connect. It makes you relatable. It makes you real and authentic, and play, have fun. Pilar: Play and have fun. And don't be worried about if your throat does something weird and it comes out -- Anne: Yeah. Pilar: -- and it's funny, keep it. Anne: If you don't think it sounds right. Pilar: Yeah. Right. Like don't get rid of all your breaths. If that's part of the acting, keep them in there. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: It does not have to be perfect. Anne: Yeah. Pilar: But it has to be engaging so we stop and go, oh yeah. That's what that, that's it, that's the one. 'Cause most of the times casting directors don't know what they're looking for. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: But when they hear it, they're like, yes, that's it. Anne: Mm-hmm. Pilar: That's what I want. Anne: Absolutely. Well, to wrap this all up guys, congratulations. Thank you all for participating. It was an amazing challenge, I think. Everyone, I thank you all for participating. Congratulations to our winners, winner of the English, Joe Lewis, and honorable mention to Sofia Zita. Pilar: Winner of Spanish Milena Benefiel, winner honorable mention Nicoletta Mondellini. Anne: And the winner for both English and Spanish, Ramesh Mathani. Pilar: Ramesh! Woo-hoo! Anne: Congratulations, everyone. I'd like to give a huge shout-out to our sponsor, ipDTL. You too can connect like BOSSes and find out more atipddl.com. You guys, have an amazing week, and we'll catch you next week. Congratulations, winners. Woo-hoo! Pilar: Ciao. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to coast connectivity via ipDTL.

Studying the Song - Audition & Music Preparation for Musical Theatre
Should you sing a familiar song or a lesser known song for your audition? Pros and Cons of both!

Studying the Song - Audition & Music Preparation for Musical Theatre

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 35:01


Friends, are you constantly worried you're singing a song that's overdone for auditions?  Do you worry you won't stand out from the crowd and that maybe, GASP, someone else will sing the same songs as you?!  OR, do you have this undiscovered gem of a song and you're not sure if it's a good choice for your audition? Well, first let me way:  There's a time and place for every song - both the well worn classic tune and the undiscovered gem.   In today's episode, I'm going to walk you through the pros and cons of each type of song - the Familiar song and the Lesser Known song - so that you can make your decision with confidence and go into your audition without any apprehension. Press play and let's get into it! Xo, Korrie Check out www.korrieyamaoka.com to find info about FREE RESOURCES and AUDITION COACHING, and to sign up for my email list. Korrie's Email List - Sign up for weekly resources about auditioning, information on new offerings, and the latest news from Studying the Song. Did you enjoy today's episode?  Please Rate, Review, and Subscribe today! Contact me at hello@korrieyamaoka.com.

Fox Sports Radio Weekends
Brian Noe Wants More Nick Saban versus Jimbo Fisher & Patrick Beverley's Grand Slam TV Audition

Fox Sports Radio Weekends

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 159:28


On The Brian Noe Show, Brian kicks off the hour with some NBA Conference Finals talk, and he specifically zones in on Luka Doncic and the Mavericks going down 0-2 in their series against the Warriors. In hour 2, Brian plays some sound from Nick Saban going off on Texas A&M's approach to the wild west of recruiting, then we hear Jimbo Fisher's response. In hour 3, Brian praises Patrick Beverley's grand slam appearance on television earlier in the week. Then, Brian thinks Jason Kidd is getting too much criticism. Finally, Brian reacts to Joe Burrow's revealing comments he made during a podcast appearance. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

improv4humans with Matt Besser
Danny Boyle's Greatest Audition

improv4humans with Matt Besser

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2022 81:21


Mary Holland and Craig Rowin join Matt Besser for this week's improv4humans! They'll do bits in a hurricane, heckle a pitch meeting, and admire Harry Chapin's willingness to say yes to literally anything. Plus, Craig's Twitter feed inspires scenes about being cut from a movie, peeing ADR, and more!