Podcast appearances and mentions of Jim Morrison

American singer-songwriter, poet, actor and director

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Jim Morrison

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Latest podcast episodes about Jim Morrison

Les Nuits de France Culture
Jim Morrison, du psychédélisme californien aux dernières errances à Paris

Les Nuits de France Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2023 82:59


durée : 01:22:59 - Les Nuits de France Culture - par : Philippe Garbit - Le chanteur et poète Jim Morrison est mort à Paris le 3 juillet 1971. L'émission "Opus" diffusait en 1991 un numéro pour lui rendre hommage 20 ans après sa mort, avec Hervé Muller, qui a connu Jim Morrison à Paris, et un extrait d'un entretien avec le chanteur grâce à une archive exceptionnelle. - invités : Jim Morrison Chanteur, poète, membre du groupe de rock "The Doors" (1943-1971)

Screens in Focus Podcast
TWD: Daryl Dixon Ep. 3 Recap: Exploring Art, Relationships, and Walker Experiments, Ep. 206

Screens in Focus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2023 60:00


Join us for a captivating journey through 'TWD: Daryl Dixon Ep. 3 Recap: Exploring Art, Relationships, and Walker Experiments,'. Renee Hansen joins Diana in exploring the intricate details, art, and culture woven into this episode. From a memorable cemetery scene to a mind-blowing underground nightclub, we delve into the genius of the setting. Discover how the relationship between Daryl and Isabelle evolves, their shared purpose in caring for children, and the differences in their opinions regarding Laurent. We discuss moments of vulnerability and kick-ass action, the intriguing Jim Morrison tidbit, and the themes of hope and belief. Plus, brace yourself for the thrilling and scary encounters with walker experiments and variant walkers. As always, we kick off with a fun question of the day and wrap up with TV and movie recommendations. And here's the list of TV and movie recommendations: "The Hitcher" (2007) - Movie "The Office: Superfan Episodes" (Peacock) - TV Series "Love is Blind" Season 5 (Netflix) - TV Series "Harlan Coben's Shelter" (Prime) - TV Series "Invasion" (AppleTV) - TV Series "The Voice" (NBC) - TV Series "Guy Ritchie's The Covenant" (Prime) - Movie Renee Hansen:  https://linktr.ee/renee.hansen Follow and subscribe to Screens in Focus. Website: www.screensinfocus.com Email: screensinfocus@gmail.com  Twitter https://twitter.com/screensinfocus  Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/screensinfocuspodcast/ Facebook: Screens in Focus  Free background music from JewelBeat.com: www.jewelbeat.com  

FRUMESS
Did Danzig actually get Knocked Out? Glenn Danzig vs North Side Kings | The Misfits who Walked Among Us Episode 81 | Frumess

FRUMESS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2023 180:04


In 2004, Glenn Danzig got into an argument with Danny Marianino from the band Northside Kings. It culminated with Glenn Danzig shoving Danny Marianino and Danny b!tch slapping Glenn Danzig, causing him to fall to the ground. Someone from the NSK filmed the exchange, taking the physical exchange, and uploaded it to the internet. The results were not stellar for either party, Glenn Danzig or Danny Marianino and the Northside Kings. This infamous Danzig video from 2004 has NEVER sat well with me. For our 50th episode, we will take a look at this video and try and find some truth behind what I have always felt was a myth: Danzig was knocked out on video. FRUMESS is POWERED by ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.riotstickers.com/frumess⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ GET 1000 STICKERS FOR $79  RIGHT HERE - NO PROMO CODE NEED! JOIN THE PATREON FOR LESS THAN A $2 CUP OF COFFEE!! ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://www.patreon.com/Frumess ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠

FRUMESS
UNRELEASED DANZIG Contest Letters from 1989! | The Misfits who Walked Among Us Episode 80 | Frumess

FRUMESS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2023 169:10


Musician, writer, journalist, and archivist Greg Fasolino joins us today on the show to discuss his experiences growing up in one of the coolest NYC music scenes. We will also read some of the Danzig Contest Letters from the Faces interview from 1989 and add commentary along the way. Please make sure to SUBSCRIBE to Greg's incredible channel full of his archival recordings - ⁠https://www.youtube.com/user/GreenGerg/videos⁠ FRUMESS is POWERED by ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.riotstickers.com/frumess⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ GET 1000 STICKERS FOR $79  RIGHT HERE - NO PROMO CODE NEED! JOIN THE PATREON FOR LESS THAN A $2 CUP OF COFFEE!! ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://www.patreon.com/Frumess ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠

FRUMESS
An UNRELEASED Glenn Danzig Interview from 1988! | The Misfits who Walked Among Us Episode 79 | Frumess

FRUMESS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2023 212:44


Musician, writer, journalist, and archivist Greg Fasolino gives us ANOTHER gift of a NEVER BEFORE HEARD DANZIG ERA GLENN DANZIG INTERVIEW from 1988. We will listen to a cleaned up version and add commentary along the way. Please make sure to SUBSCRIBE to Greg's incredible channel full of his archival recordings - https://www.youtube.com/user/GreenGerg/videos FRUMESS is POWERED by ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.riotstickers.com/frumess⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ GET 1000 STICKERS FOR $79  RIGHT HERE - NO PROMO CODE NEED! JOIN THE PATREON FOR LESS THAN A $2 CUP OF COFFEE!! ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://www.patreon.com/Frumess ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠

FRUMESS
We listen to Glenn Danzig's Who Killed Marilyn Vinyl Reissue & Remixed | The Misfits who Walked Among Us Episode 77 | Frumess

FRUMESS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2023 64:24


We finally sit down and listen to the “new” mixes and compare them to the old. Glenn Danzig has FINALLY reissued his first solo record Who Killed Marilyn? via Cleopatra Records and his own Evilive imprint. He initially recorded and released this 7 inch single while there was a lull in Misfits activity. Glenn plays on all the instruments for the title track as well as the B Side “Spook City USA.” Get it here: https://www.7thhouse.com/wkm-picturedisc https://cleorecs.com/store/product-category/_vinyl-record/ FRUMESS is POWERED by ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.riotstickers.com/frumess⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ GET 1000 STICKERS FOR $79  RIGHT HERE - NO PROMO CODE NEED! JOIN THE PATREON FOR LESS THAN A $2 CUP OF COFFEE!! ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://www.patreon.com/Frumess ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠

FRUMESS
An UNRELEASED Misfits Interview with Glenn Danzig from 1982! | The Misfits who Walked Among Us Episode 78 | Frumess

FRUMESS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2023 150:52


Original Fiend Club member, musician, writer, journalist, and archivist Greg Fasolino gives us this gift of a NEVER BEFORE HEARD MISFITS INTERVIEW from WFMU, East Orange, NJ on December 2, 1982. The band was interviewed by Pat Duncan and a young Greg taped it off the radio! Man. What a treasure. ENDLESS gratitude to Greg for this discovery. We will listen to a cleaned-up version and add commentary along the way. Please make sure to SUBSCRIBE to Greg's incredible channel full of his archival recordings - https://www.youtube.com/user/GreenGerg/videos FRUMESS is POWERED by ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠www.riotstickers.com/frumess⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠ GET 1000 STICKERS FOR $79  RIGHT HERE - NO PROMO CODE NEED! JOIN THE PATREON FOR LESS THAN A $2 CUP OF COFFEE!! ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠https://www.patreon.com/Frumess ⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠⁠

Uncorked with Funny Wine Girl
We'll Drink Wine in the After Life

Uncorked with Funny Wine Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2023 46:30


Who would you like to have a drink with in the After Life (assuming that it exists)? My guest this week would like to raise a glass with Jim Morrison...and me. I would love to share a Pontarlier glass of absinthe with Vincent van Gogh with stars in my eyes shining as brightly as those in his most famous painting. This week I'm chatting with my friend and fellow Standardized Patient Julie Esty, who is a recurring guest on the podcast. Julie talks about her recently published book "Center Street Murders" and who she believes might have "dunnit" all those years ago, and we talk about her upcoming, annual Dunmore Cemetery Tour presented by The Dearly Departed Players in Dunmore, PA on Sundays Oct. 1 & 8 at 2PM with free admission. Check out The Dunmore Cemetery Tour on Facebook for more information and fun photos. If you would like to show some love for this podcast (and Jeannine), a donation of any amount is appreciated by visiting Buy Me A Coffee page. Remember that you can also show your support by writing a review, sharing this podcast on your social media and telling a friend, foe or anyone you know to listen! I appreciate you from the bottom of my heart and the bottom of my wine glass.

That's So F****d Up
The 27 Club- Ep. 3: Jim Morrison

That's So F****d Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2023 49:22


This week, Ali tells Ash about Jim Morrison, the controversial lead singer of The Doors who died at the young age of... you guessed it, 27. You heard about him last week when he allegedly grabbed fellow 27 Club member Janis Joplin by the hair and she hit him over the head with a bottle of Southern Comfort. He was also known as The King of Orgasmic Rock and The Lizard King. His dad had a hand in starting the Vietnam war and he was a big fan of Nietzsche. Jim Morrison is a wild ride.-Join us for as little as $5 a month on Patreon!-We'd love to see you in our Discord, come hang out!-We have really fun merch, go take a look!-Follow us on Instagram and Twitter!-Research assistance by Kesha Epperson.-Audio editing by Tina Lukic.-Sources:https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/the-rolling-stone-interview-jim-morrison-73308/https://www.biography.com/musicians/jim-morrisonhttps://youtu.be/cf0WtrvYd9Qhttps://youtu.be/EQfr-BtcDIIhttps://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/lifestyle/1980/07/17/the-jim-morrison-story-behind-closed-doors/2b44aa3d-9442-4140-b7b3-c2e4a873a751/https://allthatsinteresting.com/jim-morrison-deathThis show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/4523794/advertisement

Jagbags
You Know The Day Destroys The Night, Night Divides The Day: The Music of the Doors

Jagbags

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2023 46:27


The L.A. band the Doors continue to inspire strong opinions, even in 2023, and Beave and Len talk through the band's music in detail. Will their popularity come roaring back yet again, or has their time passed at last? Was Jim Morrison the first art rock poet, or was he a drunken fraud? Does the music hold up 50 years later? What was the secret of the band's appeal (make no mistake, at their zenith they were as big as anyone)? Tune in for some strange days.

Bioneers: Revolution From the Heart of Nature | Bioneers Radio Series
Art As Social Change: Birthing the Dawn Of A New Day | John Densmore & Climbing PoeTree

Bioneers: Revolution From the Heart of Nature | Bioneers Radio Series

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2023 29:14


“Art is not a mirror held up to reality, but a hammer with which to shape it.” (Bertolt Brecht). John Densmore, legendary drummer of the Doors, joins visionary spoken word duo Climbing PoeTree in an exploration of creativity and social change. This episode of the Bioneers features exclusive interviews with the artists and a special Bioneers performance of Jim Morrison's poem, “American Prayer”.

Thats Classic!
Charlotte Stewart Miss Beadle Little House on the Prairie - Behind the Scenes Interview

Thats Classic!

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2023 53:17


Charlotte Stewart, Miss Beadle from Little House on the Prairie has a blast talking with John in this interview! Charlotte chats about her unbelievable first audition with Michael Landon, meeting Melissa Gilbert for the first time, flashbacks of her own grandmother being on the Little House set, and bringing her parents to meet and have lunch with William Frawley on My Three Sons. She also talks about her fling with Ralph Waite from The Waltons and her 5 day road trip with Jim Morrison and so much more! Just an amazing woman. Thanks so much Charlotte! Become a That's Classic! PATREON member including the opportunity to see Exclusive Bonus Footage: patreon.com/thatsclassic Subscribe for free to That's Classic YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBtpVKzLW389x6_nIVHpQcA?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: facebook.com/thatsclassictv Charlotte's book - Little House in the Hollywood Hills: A Bad Girl's Guide to Becoming Miss Beadle, Mary X and Me Link to Marina Coates "Mockingbird Lane" to see the re-creations of famous television homes: https://www.youtube.com/@marinacoatesMockingbirdLane Hosted by John Cato, actor, voiceover artist, and moderator for over 20 years for the television and movie industry. John's background brings a unique insight and passion to the podcast. --- Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/john-cato/support

Jim Paris Live (James L. Paris)
The Death Of John Belushi And Other Mysteries Of The Chateau Marmont

Jim Paris Live (James L. Paris)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2023 42:00


Since 1929, Hollywood's brightest stars have flocked to the Chateau Marmont as if it were a second home. An apartment building-turned-hotel, the Chateau has been the backdrop for generations of gossip and folklore: where director Nicholas Ray slept with his 16-year-old Rebel Without a Cause star Natalie Wood; Jim Morrison swung from the balconies; John Belushi suffered a fatal overdose; and Lindsay Lohan got the boot after racking up nearly $50,000 in charges in less than two months. But despite its mythic reputation, much of what has happened inside the Chateau's walls has eluded the public eye - until now. With wit and insight, Shawn Levy recounts the wild revelries and scandalous liaisons, the creative breakthroughs and marital breakdowns, the births and deaths to which the hotel has been a party. Vivid, salacious, and richly informed, The Castle on Sunset is a glittering tribute to Hollywood as seen from inside the walls of its most hallowed hotel.

That's So F****d Up
The 27 Club- Ep. 2: Janis Joplin

That's So F****d Up

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2023 59:11


This month, your hosts, Ash and Ali, are covering The 27 Club, a list of approximately 75 popular musicians, artists, actors, and other celebrities who all died at the mysterious age of 27. Ali details the stories of the deaths of four young, prolific musicians who all tragically joined the infamous 27 Club.Ali tells the story of Janis Joplin, aka "The Wild Woman of Blues", who joined the 27 Club in October of 1970, at the height of her career and the psychedelic rock era. Janis, like so many other young rockstars, loved to party, with Southern Comfort and the ever popular drug of the time, heroin, as her party favors of choice. She hung out with other members of the 27 Club including Jim Morrison and Jimi Hendrix. She was mercillesly teased in high school, and her sexual freeness and appetite, and bluesy music, made her quite the controversial character in her time, but one that is beloved by many today.We think y'all are gonna love this season, big thanks to our incredible research assistants Toni Wormold and Kesha Epperson for making this an awesome season!-Join us for as little as $5 a month on Patreon!-We'd love to see you in our Discord, come hang out!-We have really fun merch, go take a look!-Follow us on Instagram and Twitter!-Research assistance by Toni Wormold.-Audio editing by Dallas Hernandez.-Sources:https://shows.acast.com/deadrockstars/episodes/deadrockstars21-janisjoplinhttps://www.amazon.com/Janis-Joplin-Her-Final-Hours/dp/B07H3BKBNPhttps://janisjoplin.comhttps://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janis_Joplinhttps://www.britannica.com/biography/Janis-Joplinhttps://www.texasmonthly.com/arts-entertainment/o-janis/https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/goodbye-janis-joplin-68526/amp/https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-album-reviews/janis-joplin-book-holly-george-warren-908222/amp/https://www.jambase.com/article/janis-joplin-dick-cavett-show#:~:text=The%20pair%20would%20go%20on,to%20The%20Dick%20Cavett%20Show.https://hightimes.com/culture/high-times-greats-janis-joplin/https://www.amazon.com/Janis-Little-Girl-Special-Directors/dp/B01C37VQBYhttps://www.ranker.com/list/janis-joplin-personal-life-and-relationships/jordan-breedinghttps://happymag.tv/5-amazing-things-you-didnt-know-about-janis-joplin/https://www.countrythangdaily.com/janis-joplin-me-and-bobby-mcgee-2/#https://www.simplemost.com/janis-joplin-facts-every-fan-know/https://www.nytimes.com/2019/10/25/books/review-janis-joplin-biography-holly-george-warren.htmlThis show is part of the Spreaker Prime Network, if you are interested in advertising on this podcast, contact us at https://www.spreaker.com/show/4523794/advertisement

The Revisionist History Podcast
Tuesday Book Review: No One Here Gets Out Alive

The Revisionist History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2023 9:50


Today's episode is a little different in that I am not only reviewing a book, but one in which I believe the myths it contains are actually a good thing. Let's look at "No One Here Gets Out Alive," the biography of Doors lead singer Jim Morrison and an interesting chronicle of the 1960s. --- Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/revisionisthistory/support

Vetenskapsradion Historia
1600-talets sorgligaste man

Vetenskapsradion Historia

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2023 44:45


Lasse Lucidor är känd som 1600-talspoeten som kastades i fängelse för sin diktning och blev nedstucken på en stockholmssylta i en duell. Nu tecknas hans porträtt i en aktuell bok. Han var 1600-talets Unge Werther eller Jim Morrison och föregångare till Bellman. På Maria Magdalena kyrkogård på Södermalm finns minnesstenen över Lasse Lucidor, poeten som ansetts vara 1600-talets viktigaste svenske författare, men som levde ett liv som gör få avundsjuka – fängslad som han blev för sin ökända bröllopsdikt, och dödad i en duell. Historikern Annika Sandén tecknar nu Lucidors porträtt och skildrar tiden han levde i i boken Jag, en olycklig spåman.- Hade jag varit 20 år hade jag varit störtkär i honom, säger hon, men nu känner jag mer omsorg och sympati.Dessutom kryper vi in i Dödskallegrottan på Lilla Karlsö som ruvar på hemligheter från stenålderns säljägarkultur. Arkeologen Alexander Sjöstrand berättar om de aktuella utgrävningarna vid Suder Vagnhus på ön som man hoppas ska ge en ny bild av den svenska stenåldern.Programledare är Tobias Svanelid.

Metal Nerdery
#210 DANZIG - Inside The Metal

Metal Nerdery

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2023 112:09


If you were to blend the dark, heavy riffs of Sabbath & Zeppelin with the straight-ahead power of AC/DC and then add the incredible vocal crooning style of The Doors' frontman Jim Morrison, mixing everything with a generous infusion of punk rock angst and Halloween themed, gothic horror vibes to tie it all together, the end result would be DANZIG, the “modern classic” sounding “horror metal” band fronted by GLENN DANZIG (formerly of Misfits & Samhain).   Prepare to enjoy yourself some quality horror croon from deep within the Bunkerpoon and head downstairs for some “dingle, dangle (followed by a liberal dose of ‘mind bleach')” so you can finally comprehend what “between your cheek and gum” actually means while “making mugshots great again…so they can nay-nay” when you JOIN US  as we dig deep into “The Johnny Cash of Metal” and dive into the eerie, inky-black darkness of DANZIG - Inside The Metal:  The 80's & 90's.   Visit www.metalnerdery.com/podcast for more on this episode Leave us a Voicemail to be played on a future episode: 980-666-8182 Metal Nerdery Tees and Hoodies – metalnerdery.com/merch and kindly leave us a review and/or rating on the iTunes/Apple Podcasts - Spotify or your favorite Podcast app Listen on iTunes, Spotify, Podbean, Google Podcasts or wherever you get your Podcasts. Follow us on the Socials: Facebook - Instagram - Twitter   Email: metalnerdery@gmail.com Can't be LOUD Enough Playlist on Spotify   Metal Nerdery Munchies on YouTube @metalnerderypodcast   Show Notes: (00:01): “God, you're old!” / “Now I #dangle…and I'm about to be a #flailer in a minute!” / “If you can have #curling…you can have #flailing…” / “Ooooh, is this the maple?” / ***WELCOME BACK TO THE METAL NERDERY PODCAST!!!*** / ***WARNING***:  #listenerdiscretionisadvised #warningASMR / “A lotta sugar in that!” / #almosttasteslikebreakfast #smokedmaplewhiskey / #specialguestnerd #thefourhorsemenoftheNerdery ***BREAKING NEWS***:  #RIP #BobBarker #HailToBobBarker #TheBettyWhiteOfGameShowHosts / “Talk about casting a shadow…” / “Wait, that's cool?” / #youllneverforgetit #thatBobBarkerisaBlessin / “We can't ‘officially' call this a beer…” / #dietingnonsenseASMR / “If Russ is on a diet…” / #veryunselfless / “It's big…” / #ChungsPackage / #loverboy (“You're not comfortable…”) / “Did you have THAT shirt on?” / #NO / “At least it's fucking cold!” / #DeathRowRecords #HappyDads #HardSeltzer / #admonitions / “It's weird…” / “It tastes like a #FantaGrape without the #sugarsyrup” / “H'Ayll Yay-uhh!!” / “I'm used to it now…” / “I'll just start drinkin' more…” / #hangovernutritionASMR / “Just order the bloody mary…” / #charcuterie (“that's a bagle…a popsicle!?”) / #thedrinkthatdrinkslikeameal / “If you give ‘em just a little bit of space…” / Is there a #chickenandwafflesbloodymary out there?” / “I didn't actually ‘come' there” / #memoriesofBob / “He's a talented fucker!” / “The place is where my place used to be…” / #jazzandblueshousebands #artisticquality / #MatthewsReflections / “Life goes on…long after the thrill, of living is gone…like how MUCH longer, JCM?” / “Just to work it up…it's at 10 o'clock, what else do you need?  I can't get it #fromsixtomidnight “/ #thatseventeenyearoldfeeling / “If she's willing to be patient and just lay there…” / #justpretend /    (15:04): “It was just fucked up…” / #fakenews / #voicemail ***GIVE US A CALL AND LEAVE US A VOICEMAIL AT 980-666-8182!!!*** / #thereturnofthepost #djentleman #thepost / “It was a whole to-do…” / ***WHO IS THE GREATEST “METALLY METAL” DRUMMER OF ALL TIME!?!?!? *** #weloveyoutoo / Our (not so) brief assessment of various #metaldrummers who have transcended metal, music, and perhaps even genre. / “That's a tough question…” / ***Check out our 3 BadAss Drummers episode for reference*** / “It's odd…” / “That dude's ridiculous…” / #woodpaneledwall #orangeshagcarpet #woodpaneledcarpetmetal / ***IF YOU WANNA EMAIL US YOU CAN DO SO AT metalnerdery@gmail.com ***/ #socialmedia #instagram #instatits #instavag #facegram #metalnerderypodcast / “Only if they're ‘into it' dude…” / #undownloads and the words of #fuckbag / #coviddeniers / “He came back…” / “Bill got another year older…and Russell's getting smaller…” / #wewentnuts / #somelikeithot “I could just roll around in that shit naked…” / #notinthepeehole / #smokefreeASMR / “You just saved yourself a lotta damn money!” / “You got it? I got it.” / “Wait, where do you PUT the pouch?” / “Wait, there's a ‘gum' down there?” / #theinsideofyourbutthole / “It's a #robotdick “/ It's really not even close to the same… #IYKYK / “It's just #reconditioning the way you are in the world…” #stopsmokingASMR /    (27:15): “I'm done actually…” / “I don't wanna get political or anything…” #herewego / #arrested #arraigned #booked (“Yeah, but for…what did he do?”) #theyllfigureitout / “They match, dude…” / “that #mugshot is great” / #makingmugshotsgreatagain #makemugshotsgreatagain #thebestmugshot / “I'm still waiting for one…just ONE…word of praise…” / “He can't find the front…” / #MatthewsPoliticalCorner / #HateUberAlles / “Learning how to #emptynest” / “This is what you get for being up at 2 ‘o'clock in the morning / #dingledangle / “You'll be #flailin” / #mindbleach    (31:41): The best #Crooner in Metal / #MetalCrooner METAL NERDERY PODCAST PRESENTS:  DANZIG – INSIDE THE METAL: PT. 1 – The 80's and 90's / “It's kinda like #BlackSabbathMeetsTheDoorsMeetsACDC ”/ “That's a pretty metal tune…” #whyisthisonWREKage / “This was certainly NOT thrash…” / Acceptable artists outside of thrash, back in the day. / The sound of #Danzig back in the day, relative to the rest of the #metaluniverse at the time/ #BlackAria / “If I'm remembering the right show…” / #Danzig and #Samhain #doubleduty / The sonic sorcery of #RickRubin / Thinking back on past #DanzigTours … / “Is that a fart?” / Close encounters of the Danzig kind… / #backstage #meetandgreet / “Loose-uh-fudge” #lucyfudge #chocolatebutthole / Clarification of the parameters of this episode… / “That's how tall my wife is…” / “That's just all I can see now…” / #bestfriends (5'12” at LEAST!) / “Don't you get it?” / “If we ARE gonna go back to #TheMisfits I wanna hear some WHERE EAGLES DARE (1979)” / But first… LAST CARESS (1980) / “It's weird to hear #crooning over #punkrock / #horrorpunk / “That almost sounds like #QOTSA…” / “Easy fella…” / “Next was #Samhain (or “sou-wain…”) / #usephonetics #itsdumb #seriously #literally / “I don't know of any…” / “Can you imagine what it would be like!?” / BLACK FLAME    (47:07): “Twist of Cain was the first song I heard…” / Danzig (1988) / Backing vocals courtesy of one #JamesHetfield / “Because I did this, nothing got spilt…” / TWIST OF CAIN #seventiesstyle (“Not a lot of #cokelines”) #feelinboobies / “Typical…” / POSSESSION (“It's probably his ‘Enter Sandman…”) / THE HUNTER (#callme) / “Don't use the #LoveGun …” / END OF TIME #creepysoftintro (“It's not this one…”) / EVIL THING (“I think this might be it…”) / “I know where you're going…” / #WhiteZombieComparison / SHE RIDES (“You make me feel…”) / “Wait, no next MONTH!” / #allkillernofiller / #thefirstevershufflealbumdive #birthdayextravaganza (“So that's what comes out?”) / “Maybe that's what happens…” / “You got any mayonnaise or bacon grease…or an egg?” / #noforeplay / “If you ever flail when you're doing that, then you're doing it wrong…” / #bonerknowledgeASMR    (1:00:51): “I'll bet when #Danzig was a young man…” / #coolandcreepy #oldschool #creepydoowop #creepyandold (“You can play triangle…”) / #looseafudge / The “update” regarding #bassplayers and #musicians / “He's a musician first…” / “I just go in there and hide…” / #familymath / “He almost got punched in the fuckin' face the other night…” / #RussellsReflectionsASMR #LiveActionDemo #FingerSqueezer / Danzig II: Lucifuge (1990) /The way Russell says it, it sounds like “loose a fudge”…it is what it is…) / #socialdistancerepriseASMR #ElectionYearASMR #DanzigAsAUnitOfMeasurement #forthegreatergood #justbeingabsurd / “Or a speed bag…” / Some sort of drama between Danzig and another band… and full on #fisticuffs / This is why you have stage & house management to direct these sort of “disagreements”…) / “Did they ever open for #KISS?” / #TheSecondChroniclesASMR / HER BLACK WINGS (“A little more balls in the production department…”) / “That riff is totally #ZeroTheHero …” / #pinchharmonics (There's definitely a finesse to it…) / #markthetime / “No, that's goin ‘in!” / #itsmarked / #killeropener LONG WAY BACK FROM HELL #IommicVibes #Recordscratch / “More of an #RJDSabbathRiff?” / No, it's not that… / I'M THE ONE #bluesy #hellbillyASMR / “A snick eyed boy…”    (1:14:14): Our respective #endpoints in the catalog / Danzig III: How The Gods Kill (1992) / “He named it #Elvis?” / #werenotbestfriends #NAMM (“a war we weren't even supposed to be involved with…”) / GODLESS #weird (“that's definitely MORE metal!”) “That's just eerie as fuck!” / ***NOTE:  the “bottle clink” sound at the end of the song goes on for a count of 18…*** / #creepybottleclinkyASMR / DIRTY BLACK SUMMER / #refrigeratorhauntingASMR / “that's kinda what it sounds like…” / HOW THE GODS KILL (“When this one kicks in, it's really, really cool!”) / “Scorpions with a side of DIO” / #RonnieJamesDanzig / “He's playin' all the ‘Dream On' notes…” / “Does this one kick in?” / #softintro #mediumbone to #midnightbone #pinchharmonics / #theuglynotes #diabolicaldoowop / “It was the hair…” / #LessThanZero #LifeFadesAway (“Usually…”) LIFE FADES AWAY #actualsize    (1:29:01): “We'll go halfway…” / Danzig 4 (1994) / #killeropener BRAND NEW GOD / More punk vibes… / LITTLE WHIP #allthecokelines (“So they can #naynay”) / “It's everything I like…” / #TheJohnnyCashOfMetal / How did people buy albums in the 70's? / “we had the same photographer…I remember the shoot.” / #healwayshadicecream / “I found boxes…”/ “I was like 11…” / #RussellsRegretsASMR #RussellsReflectionsASMR / Danzig 5: BLACKACIDDEVIL (1996) / HAND OF DOOM: version #BlackSabbathCover (“The vocals are a little different…”) / “The bass sounds very flatulent…” / #industrialmetal / “Like your favorite band, #KISS when they did the #discoalbum…” / #RussellsReflectionsExtendedProgSuperMixEditionASMR / “That was nice…” / “Okay, cool…” / BLACKACIDDEVIL #flailermetal / “This is his Load…” / #dontyouworryaboutit / “I call it an inhaler…” / “Do the 6:66 Satan's Child (1999) / “There's a vag…” / #alternatecover #limitededition #zombiepuss #hugehangar FIVE FINGER CRAWL / “I was, once…” / “a little #Elvis?” / “we still refer to it as having to frost…” / Danzig Sings Elvis (2020) / ALWAYS ON MY MIND #creepy (#TwinPeaksSoundtrackVibe) #markthetime ONE NIGHT / “Our time has come upon us…” / ***THANK YOU FOR JOINING US!!!*** Happy Birthday Billiam and thank you Adam for joining as well!!!*** / #nextweek #thelastword / ***COME GET YOUR MERCH FIX AT THE BUNKERPOON GIFT SHOPPE LOCATED VIA www.metalnerdery.com/merch and purchandise your #metalnerderypodcastmerchandise / #outroreelmegamix #theresnosoundinspace #legendary #thankyouforthat #werenotbestfriends    

13 O'Clock Podcast
Episode 366: Mysteries of Rock & Roll 2

13 O'Clock Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2023


Way back on episode 69, we discussed several enduring mysteries of rock and roll, and now we’re finally getting around to talking about a few more, including the controversies surrounding the deaths of Sam Cooke, Jimi Hendrix, Jim Morrison, and Gary Driscoll, plus the bizarre disappearance of Richey Edwards of the Manic Street Preachers. Audio … Continue reading Episode 366: Mysteries of Rock & Roll 2

I AM Athlete Podcast
Paper Route: Ep. 93 | Vet Talk With Legendary Hall Of Fame RB LaDainian Tomlinson

I AM Athlete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2023 105:21


Brandon Marshall and Ashley Nicole Moss discuss Lonzo Ball shutting down Stephen A. Smith's false reporting, Chiefs star DT Chris Jones is willing to sit out HALF the NFL season, and a sit down with legendary Hall Of Fame RB LaDainian Tomlinson.

Drinks with Johnny Podcast
The Legend of the 27 Club

Drinks with Johnny Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2023 69:58


In this riveting episode of Drinks with Johnny, we delve deep into the enigmatic and haunting phenomenon known as the "27 Club." We invite you on a journey through the lives, music, and tragic fates of some of the most iconic artists who left an indelible mark on the world before their untimely deaths at the age of 27. Drawing from interviews with renowned music historians, psychologists, and fellow musicians, Johnny and his guests attempt to unravel the mystique surrounding the 27 Club. They explore the interconnected lives of legends like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jim Morrison, and Kurt Cobain. Through insightful discussions, they analyze the circumstances that led these brilliant souls to the peak of fame and creativity, only to meet a tragic end. Listeners will gain an intimate understanding of the pressures, challenges, and emotional turbulence that often accompany artistic genius. The episode also examines the societal and cultural factors that contribute to the allure of the 27 Club, raising thought-provoking questions about the price of fame and the impact of mental health in the music industry. As Johnny and his guests raise a toast to the memory of these unforgettable artists, they delve into their iconic discographies, sharing personal anecdotes and favorite tracks that continue to resonate with fans worldwide. The episode not only pays homage to the incredible contributions of the 27 Club members but also encourages a broader dialogue about mental health, the responsibilities of fame, and the enduring legacy of these musical icons. So grab your favorite drink, settle in, and join Johnny and his guests for a deep and introspective conversation that navigates the highs and lows of artistic brilliance, the allure of the 27 Club, and the eternal impact of their music on generations to come. Become a FILTHY ANIMAL and get access to exclusive content: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC2qKyxOwoa_Uz5d5xCZEUPw/join Explore More Drinks With Johnny: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/drinkswithjohnny Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drinkswithjohnny Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/drinkswithjohnny Twitter: https://twitter.com/drinkswjohnny​​​​ Shop: https://www.drinkswithjohnny.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST
RU257: EMMALEA RUSSO & MARY WILD ON CINEMA, POETRY, PSYCHOANALYSIS, PHILOSOPHY & CULTURE

RENDERING UNCONSCIOUS PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2023 79:05


Rendering Unconscious episode 257. Emmalea Russo is a writer and astrologer. Her poetry and writings on film and visual art have appeared in many venues including Artforum, BOMB, Granta, Compact, and Los Angeles Review of Books. She is the author of several books of poetry, most recently Confetti (2022). Emmalea regularly teaches classes independently on poetry, cinema, and the occult. She has also taught a range of courses at institutions such as Northeastern University, Global Center for Advanced Studies, The Home School, Saint Peter's University, Melbourne School of Continental Philosophy, Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies, and elsewhere. Her website is https://emmalearusso.com Mary Wild is the host of the Projections series held at the Freud Museum, London, as well as co-host of Projections Podcast with Sarah Cleaver. Join Mary at Patreon where she creates exclusive content every week. She contributed the Foreword to Psychoanalytic Perspectives on the Films of Ingmar Bergman: From Freud to Lacan and Beyond (2023) edited by Dr. Vanessa Sinclair. Follow her at Twitter @psycstar and Instagram @psycstar Check out upcoming Freud Film Club Screening‘s at the Freud museum London with introductory lectures by Mary Wild. 2 September – Melancholia (2011) | 3 September – Rebecca (1940) | 5 September – The Shining (1980) | 7 September – Medea (1969) | 8 September – Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) https://www.freud.org.uk/events/category/events/ Join Mary and I for Online Talk · The Decaying Female Body in Horror Cinema with Mary Wild. Visit http://psychartcult.org for details. Support the podcast at our Patreon where we post exclusive content every week, as well as unreleased material and works in progress, and a Discord server: https://www.patreon.com/vanessa23carl We also have a Substack where weekly content is posted: https://vanessa23carl.substack.com Your support is GREATLY appreciated! Rendering Unconscious is a labor of love put together by Dr. Vanessa Sinclair with no support from outside sources. All support comes from the listeners and fans. All episodes of Rendering Unconscious are available streaming and most also have video posted up at YouTube for those who prefer to watch the discussion and to provide transcription of podcast content. None of the podcast content is hidden behind paywalls. All podcast content is made available for everyone to access. Dr. Sinclair does all the interviews, scheduling, editing of video and audio content, management of the website, marketing and promotion herself, with no aid from others. Your support of Rendering Unconscious Podcast means the world, and also supports her other creative endeavors. Thank you for your support! Rendering Unconscious Podcast is hosted by Dr. Vanessa Sinclair, a psychoanalyst based in Sweden, who works with people internationally: www.drvanessasinclair.net Follow Dr. Vanessa Sinclair on social media: Twitter: https://twitter.com/rawsin_ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rawsin_/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@drvanessasinclair23 Visit the main website for more information and links to everything: www.renderingunconscious.org Many thanks to Carl Abrahamsson, who created the intro and outro music for Rendering Unconscious podcast. https://www.carlabrahamsson.com Check out Highbrow Lowlife at Bandcamp: https://highbrowlowlife.bandcamp.com His publishing company is Trapart Books, Films and Editions. https://store.trapart.net Follow him at: Twitter: https://twitter.com/CaAbrahamsson Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/carl.abrahamsson/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@carlabrahamsson Vimeo on Demand: https://vimeo.com/user3979080/vod_pages The song at the end of the episode is “Sex in the confessional” from the album the same name by Vanessa Sinclair & Pete Murphy: https://petemurphy.bandcamp.com Image: collage portrait of Jim Morrison by Vanessa Sinclaircollage portrait of Jim Morrison by Vanessa Sinclair

Across the Margin: The Podcast
Episode 168: The Beggar with Michael Gira (Swans)

Across the Margin: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2023 40:34


This episode of Across The Margin : The Podcast features an interview with singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, author, and artist Michael Gira. Gira is the founder of the band Swans, in which he sings and plays guitar. He is also the founder of Young God Records and previously fronted Angels of Light. The focus of this episode is on Swans latest release, a terrific album entitled The Beggar. Michael Gira founded the groundbreaking NYC band Swans in 1982. Initially notorious for their relentless, brutal, high-volume onslaughts of sound, the extreme, abject imagery of Gira's lyrics, and his thundering vocals, Swans latest album, The Beggar, is a sprawling, sonically dizzying, and thought-provoking work of art that showcases the extreme abilities of a legendary frontman and band that somehow still sounds at the height of their talents. In this episode host Michael Shields and Michael Gira discuss the themes abounding in The Beggar and the influence Argentine author Jorge Luis Borges had on the album. They give a hat tip to the talented instrumentalists that were part of the project while exploring how birthing The Beggar during the pandemic affected the entirely captivating work of art. They dig into the ins-and-outs of the 44 minute track on the album entitled “The Beggar Lover” (Three)” where, in the episode, Michael reads a section of poetry found within the all-encompassing journey of a track. They also talk about what to expect from the upcoming tour, how Jim Morrison has inspired Michael throughout his life, and a whole lot more. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Word Podcast
Sinead O'Connor, that Morrissey outburst, over-long films and the pitiful plight of roadies

Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2023 53:18


 The mellifluous melody and soaring counterpoint of this week's podcast were comprised of the following notes … … Morrissey's broadside on the treatment of Sinead O'Connor – and her electrifying moment at Dylan's 30th Anniversary tribute two weeks after she'd torn up a picture of the Pope on Saturday Night Live. … two unsettling events in the later life of Randy Meisner. … Adele revives the old Las Vegas business model (at about £8m a night). … the eternal mystery of Bob Dylan's motorcycle crash and his Shea Stadium and Russian shows that never happened. … how long news took to travel: the Battle of Waterloo (three days), the death of Jim Morrison (two weeks). … Oppenheimer and why so many films are so long. … Things It's Almost Impossible To Accept, No 97: Mick Jagger is 80! … in 2006 BBC viewers voted Morrissey second in a Greatest Living British Icons poll (Sir David Attenborough was first, McCartney third). Where would he be if they ran they voted tomorrow? … that photo of Pulp and their 57-strong entourage. … the time the Troggs turned psychedelic.… the endless value of the mantra “never apologise, never explain”. … TV clips from the Lost World of Rock And Roll – Hush tour Australia in 1997 (and pay their road crew $1 an hour);Quintessence in 1970, ‘the sound of Notting Hill Gate'.  ------------- Clips:- Sinead O'Connor at Dylan's 30th anniversary concert two weeks after she tore up a picture of the Pope on Saturday Night Live …https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKeJifOXAnA Glam-rock roadhogs Hush in 1977 …https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-Iyytr1AJ4 Getting It Straight In Notting Hill Gate …https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-getting-it-straight-in-notting-hill-gate-1970-onlineSubscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon for early - and ad-free! - access to all of our content: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Word In Your Ear
Sinead O'Connor, that Morrissey outburst, over-long films and the pitiful plight of roadies

Word In Your Ear

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2023 53:18


 The mellifluous melody and soaring counterpoint of this week's podcast were comprised of the following notes … … Morrissey's broadside on the treatment of Sinead O'Connor – and her electrifying moment at Dylan's 30th Anniversary tribute two weeks after she'd torn up a picture of the Pope on Saturday Night Live. … two unsettling events in the later life of Randy Meisner. … Adele revives the old Las Vegas business model (at about £8m a night). … the eternal mystery of Bob Dylan's motorcycle crash and his Shea Stadium and Russian shows that never happened. … how long news took to travel: the Battle of Waterloo (three days), the death of Jim Morrison (two weeks). … Oppenheimer and why so many films are so long. … Things It's Almost Impossible To Accept, No 97: Mick Jagger is 80! … in 2006 BBC viewers voted Morrissey second in a Greatest Living British Icons poll (Sir David Attenborough was first, McCartney third). Where would he be if they ran they voted tomorrow? … that photo of Pulp and their 57-strong entourage. … the time the Troggs turned psychedelic.… the endless value of the mantra “never apologise, never explain”. … TV clips from the Lost World of Rock And Roll – Hush tour Australia in 1997 (and pay their road crew $1 an hour);Quintessence in 1970, ‘the sound of Notting Hill Gate'.  ------------- Clips:- Sinead O'Connor at Dylan's 30th anniversary concert two weeks after she tore up a picture of the Pope on Saturday Night Live …https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TKeJifOXAnA Glam-rock roadhogs Hush in 1977 …https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-Iyytr1AJ4 Getting It Straight In Notting Hill Gate …https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-getting-it-straight-in-notting-hill-gate-1970-onlineSubscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon for early - and ad-free! - access to all of our content: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Take It From Toni
25 My Favorite NYC Haunts for Food & Drink

Take It From Toni

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2023 18:18


Toni turns into a trip advisor this episode as she shares her favorite restaurants and bars to visit in the West Village.  Starting with the White Horse Tavern which is the second oldest bar in NYC which opened in1880. It's home to famous people like Dylan Thomas, who's said to haunt the place, Bob Dylan and Jim Morrison.  The Monster Bar, back in the day, you would have seen Andy Warhol, Ru Paul, and even Toni. After 5pm it's where you'll find the Wall Street crowd at their piano Bar. Then head down the famous mirrored stairwell for dancing all night long.  Lips Drag Bar is a drag queen restaurant and bar with good food and better entertainment.  Sevilla Restaurant is the one restaurant Toni must eat at when she visits. And Central Park is best explored during the day.  Have questions for Toni? Submit them on the contact form at www.ToniSipka.com

Take It From Toni
25 My Favorite NYC Haunts for Food & Drink

Take It From Toni

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2023 18:18


Toni turns into a trip advisor this episode as she shares her favorite restaurants and bars to visit in the West Village.  Starting with the White Horse Tavern which is the second oldest bar in NYC which opened in1880. It's home to famous people like Dylan Thomas, who's said to haunt the place, Bob Dylan and Jim Morrison.  The Monster Bar, back in the day, you would have seen Andy Warhol, Ru Paul, and even Toni. After 5pm it's where you'll find the Wall Street crowd at their piano Bar. Then head down the famous mirrored stairwell for dancing all night long.  Lips Drag Bar is a drag queen restaurant and bar with good food and better entertainment.  Sevilla Restaurant is the one restaurant Toni must eat at when she visits. And Central Park is best explored during the day.  Have questions for Toni? Submit them on the contact form at www.ToniSipka.com

Rock Talk with Dr. Cropper

Subscriber-only episodeIn this episode, we discuss the Doors' third studio album, 'Waiting For The Sun,' in celebration of the recently-passed 55th anniversary of its July 3, 1968 release. Oddly enough, it was their only No. 1 album, which I explain the potential causality behind.In the episode, I mention my alternative track listing, which you can take for a "test drive" here...Subscribe to Rock Talk with Dr. Cropper +Instagram & TikTok — @rocktalk.dr.cropperTwitter — @RockTalkDrCroppFacebook, LinkedIn & YouTube — Rock Talk with Dr. CropperEmail — rocktalk.dr.cropper@gmail.com

The Poundcast
358: Lunch or Dinner?

The Poundcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2023 71:52


This week, the boys get into a heated debate and also listen to some acapellas from The Doors. For extended Poundcast episodes (Unzipped), subscribe on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/poundcast Follow The Poundcast on Instagram and Twitter @thepoundcast For video, check out: www.youtube.com/thepoundcast Join the Poundcast Discord here: discord.gg/GnqUMmX New Pound House "Dope Beats" Pins right here: https://www.rockinpins.com/product/pound-house-dope-beats-enamel-pin Thank you to our #sponsor Better Help, easy and affordable online therapy. Get 10% off your first month at https://www.betterhelp.com/poundcast And use the code word "POUNDCAST" at www.louisvilleveganfoods.com for, that's right, 20% off!

The Mindbuzz
MB:172 with Damian M. DeHoyos

The Mindbuzz

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2023 92:20 Transcription Available


Damian M. Dehoyos is a micro-pen and caricature artist. https://linktr.ee/DrawhoyosWelcome to another illuminating journey into the world of art and creativity. Our guest, Damien, a seasoned artist, brings his unique perspective into the mix, as we explore his artistry which has been influenced by everything from local farms to iconic musicians. Damien's artwork, often in striking black and white hues with a splash of red, is a reflection of our society, with intricacies and depths that require a closer look. Take a wander with us through these artistic landscapes, not for the faint-hearted. Delight in Damien's daring technique using Micron Pen on Newsprint and his ability to infuse shock culture into his creations. Our conversation also touches upon other aspects of his life, including his journey from discovering his passion for art to working at Disney as a caricature artist. Damien also shares his experiences with beer can design contests, the symbolism in his artwork, and his growing influence in the Pomona art scene.As we pull back the curtain on the world of art, expect to find yourselves stirred by discussions about the changing attitudes towards homosexuality, the role of race in acceptance, and the legacy of musicians like David Bowie and Jim Morrison. This episode is an open invitation to perceive symbolism afresh, explore diverse water brands, and even delve into the marketing tactics of quirky brands. So, buckle up for a journey that promises to enchant and provoke thought, where art, society, and personal narratives intertwine to form a rich tapestry of insights.FirmeMezcal.comUse promo code MYGRITO to receive a discount with your purchasehttps://www.firmemezcal.com/HouseofChingasos.comUse promo code MINDBUZZ to receive a 10% discount on entire purchasehttps://houseofchingasos.com/?ref=0F5Yfbs6SAN0f2Mindbuzz.orgStart podcasting!https://www.mindbuzz.org/ Subscribe to The Mindbuzz Youtube Channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIYj7eDCsV3YPzxv7VRKZKg Don't forget to follow us on Instagram @themindbuzz https://www.instagram.com/themindbuzz/ to keep up with our hosts, guests, and upcoming events! See you on the next one!"King without a Throne" is performed by Bad HombresKing without a Throne Official Music Videohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fNhxTYU8kUsKing without a Thronehttps://open.spotify.com/track/7tdoz0W9gr3ubetdW4ThZ8?si=9a95947f58bf416e

Left of Skeptic
Episode 129: "That was the plan the whole time, your Majesty. Totally."

Left of Skeptic

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2023 80:45


Happy Spooky Wednesday, folks! It's Kala's birthday week! And she is celebrating by covering one of her favorite haunted U.S. locations: The Queen Mary! This ship has gone from a luxury liner to a wartime terrifier to a spooky hotel in less than 100 years! She has seen her fair share of tragedy, from fallen soldiers to crushed crewmembers, and she has the ghosts to prove it. Would you dare spend a vacation knowing you may be sharing your hotel room with a ghost who finds you to be a 'hassle'? And Brittany shares the story behind the famous "27 Club." Celebrities, especially musicians, live their lives in the spotlight, and sometimes their deaths receive the spotlight as well. With famous names like Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Brian Jones, and Jimi Hendrix on the list, it leaves the public wondering how they could be taken from the world at such a young age? Is it astrological? The work of demons? Or just coincidental? Whichever way, it is definitely sad. We end the episode with another listener story!  CW: Brittany's story does mention potentially triggering topics such as death as a result of drugs and suicide. If you would like to skip the details and jump forward to the discussion, head to 1:03. If you would like to skip any mention or discussion of these things at all, please jump to 1:11. If you or someone you know is struggling with their mental health, please reach out to the 24-7 Crisis Hotline at 1-800-273-TALK or visit 988lifeline.org.

Word In Your Ear
Cathi Unsworth was a teenage goth. Think “Robert Smith's tarantula hair” and “cider like turps”

Word In Your Ear

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2023 33:05


Growing up in remote rural Norfolk, crime writer Cathi Unsworth had a Goth conversion, a condition from which, she happily admits, you never fully recover. And never want to. She discovered Dennis Wheatley's ‘To The Devil A Daughter', heard Siouxsie & the Banshees on the Peel Show and saw a picture of Robert Smith in a magazine which she stuck by her bedroom mirror to help her construct his spectacular dishevelment. She's just published ‘Season Of The Witch: the Book of Goth', a highly entertaining account of the dark side of rock starting out with the Brontes, Edgar Allan Poe and Aubrey Beardsley and heading, via Jim Morrison, Jacques Brel and Nico, to Joy Division, the Cure and the Sisters of Mercy. This is a very funny and self-mocking pod in which you'll find the following … … why Yorkshire is “Goth's Own Country”. … the secret ingredient in Mac McCulloch's vertical hair. … Nick Cave - “the Dark Lord of Goth Music” (©️ the Daily Mail) – at the Coronation. … Lee Hazlewood's advice to Nancy Sinatra when recording Goth staple These Boots Are Made For Walking. … “changing into fishnet tights in the bogs at school”, rival pop gangs, mooching about in graveyards and a mate “who used to sit up trees reading Dennis Wheatley and summoning Satan”. .. the joy of crimpers and backcombing. … “spreading the virus” at the Batcave. … the inventor of the term Goth and the key Gothmothers and Gothfathers. … local folklore about hellhounds in Norfolk. … her first gig, the York Rock Festival in 1984 featuring the Bunnymen, Sisters of Mercy, Spear of Destiny and the Redskins: “Gothtopia”! … “Beer Girls and Beer Boys” and why it was best to avoid them. … dark Satanic mills. … and the greatest Goth record ever made. Order ‘Season of the Witch: the Book of Goth' here …https://www.amazon.co.uk/Season-Witch-Book-Cathi-Unsworth/dp/1788706242Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon for early - and ad-free! - access to all of our content: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Word Podcast
Cathi Unsworth was a teenage goth. Think “Robert Smith's tarantula hair” and “cider like turps”

Word Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2023 33:05


Growing up in remote rural Norfolk, crime writer Cathi Unsworth had a Goth conversion, a condition from which, she happily admits, you never fully recover. And never want to. She discovered Dennis Wheatley's ‘To The Devil A Daughter', heard Siouxsie & the Banshees on the Peel Show and saw a picture of Robert Smith in a magazine which she stuck by her bedroom mirror to help her construct his spectacular dishevelment. She's just published ‘Season Of The Witch: the Book of Goth', a highly entertaining account of the dark side of rock starting out with the Brontes, Edgar Allan Poe and Aubrey Beardsley and heading, via Jim Morrison, Jacques Brel and Nico, to Joy Division, the Cure and the Sisters of Mercy. This is a very funny and self-mocking pod in which you'll find the following … … why Yorkshire is “Goth's Own Country”. … the secret ingredient in Mac McCulloch's vertical hair. … Nick Cave - “the Dark Lord of Goth Music” (©️ the Daily Mail) – at the Coronation. … Lee Hazlewood's advice to Nancy Sinatra when recording Goth staple These Boots Are Made For Walking. … “changing into fishnet tights in the bogs at school”, rival pop gangs, mooching about in graveyards and a mate “who used to sit up trees reading Dennis Wheatley and summoning Satan”. .. the joy of crimpers and backcombing. … “spreading the virus” at the Batcave. … the inventor of the term Goth and the key Gothmothers and Gothfathers. … local folklore about hellhounds in Norfolk. … her first gig, the York Rock Festival in 1984 featuring the Bunnymen, Sisters of Mercy, Spear of Destiny and the Redskins: “Gothtopia”! … “Beer Girls and Beer Boys” and why it was best to avoid them. … dark Satanic mills. … and the greatest Goth record ever made. Order ‘Season of the Witch: the Book of Goth' here …https://www.amazon.co.uk/Season-Witch-Book-Cathi-Unsworth/dp/1788706242Subscribe to Word In Your Ear on Patreon for early - and ad-free! - access to all of our content: https://www.patreon.com/wordinyourear Get bonus content on Patreon Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Balcony Show
Bullet To The Heart

The Balcony Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2023 52:10


In this episode of The Balcony Show, we are featuring music and an interview with Bullet To The Heart. They have just released their new EP “Death, Oddities & Romance” and it's stellar! Our dude of all things awesome Madcat has the single “In Love With The Enemy” by Koizumi, Donna Gallucci has the new single “What Are The Odds” from Silent Theory, Bo is talking meta data in this week's Spotlight, and Mike Roi is talking about Jim Morrison's grave site in this week's Mike's Music Box. All this and more! Other music from MCHNZ and Bright-Eyed & Blind. #catchingrisingstars Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Jessie Cervantes en Vivo
3 de julio - Radiografía Jim Morrison

Jessie Cervantes en Vivo

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2023 3:50


Todas las mañanas Jessie Cervantes te acompaña para iniciar tu día de la mejor forma. Escúchalo de lunes a viernes de 6:00 a 10:00 AM por Exa FM, 104.9. Durante cuatro horas, Jessie te llenará de optimismo, alegría, diversión e información. En este espacio encontrarás a tus artistas, colaboradores de primer nivel y temas de entretenimiento, sexualidad, música, desarrollo humano, moda, tecnología y humor. Asimismo, te esperan entrevistas con los artistas más reconocidos del mundo artístico y acústicos que sin duda, cambiarán tu mañana. Sigue lo más interesante de la radio con Jessie Cervantes por Exa FM.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

On est fait pour s'entendre
L'INTÉGRALE - Père Lachaise : les coulisses du plus célèbre des cimetières

On est fait pour s'entendre

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2023 38:59


REDIFF - Celui que ''Jour J'' reçoit ce soir est un veilleur. Il veille sur le passé, les souvenirs, nos chers disparus. Il est le gardien de leur repos éternel. Si les pierres tombales parlent pour ceux qui ne sont plus là, on entend aussi dans ses allées les murmures des amoureux, les pas du renard.. Et puis, c'est aussi le rendez-vous des illustres et des anonymes... Dalida, Colette, Jim Morrison, Claude Chabrol, Edith Piaf y reposent... "Jour J", c'est l'émission des grands entretiens d'actualité internationale, culturelle, économique et politique. Chaque jour sur RTL de 20h à 21h et en podcast, Flavie Flament reçoit un acteur de l'actualité et revient avec lui sur une date fondamentale de sa vie.

History & Factoids about today
(2022)July 3rd-Tom Cruise Aaron Tippin, Lisa Simpson, Ratt, Johnny Lee, Kimmy Gibler, Trent Tomlinson

History & Factoids about today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2023 15:18


National redneck day. Entertainment from 1958. Idaho became 43rd state. Todays birthdays - Kurtwood Smith, Johnny Lee, Jan Smithers, Laura Branigan, Aaron Tippin, Stephen Pearcy, Tom Cruise, Yeardley Smith, Andrea Barber, Trent Tomlinson. Jim Morrison died.

Music History Today
Music History Today Podcast July 3 - music trivia, Jim Morrison, Brian Jones, the 27 club, & Ziggy

Music History Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2023 12:55


Today on the Music Halls of Fame Podcast, two artists pass away under controversial circumstances, a couple of artists make their debuts, Ziggy played guitar for the last time, and a movie renews interest in a rock and roll pioneer. ALL MY MUSIC HISTORY TODAY PODCAST LINKS - https://allmylinks.com/musichistorytoday CHECK OUT MY OTHER PODCAST, THE MUSIC HALLS OF FAME PODCAST: LINKS - https://allmylinks.com/musichallsoffamepodcast THE MUSIC HALLS OF FAME PODCAST SPOTIFY LINK: https://spotifyanchor-web.app.link/e/Bmry9hcMxAb --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/musichistorytodaypodcast/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/musichistorytodaypodcast/support

The Truck Show Podcast
S2, E26 - Jeep's Jim Morrison, Lightning's Moment, Pedal Monster Review

The Truck Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2023 87:34


Jeep's Jim Morrison talks about the 2024 Jeep Wrangler mid-cycle refresh, Lightning finally conquers ghost cars, and Holman reviews the Banks Pedal Monster. The Truck Show Podcast is proudly presented by Nissan, in association with Banks Power, and onX Offroad.

The Lawrence Ross Show
TLRS 06-30-23 - Colleen Ballinger Is A Bad Egg

The Lawrence Ross Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2023 117:55


Episode 599 Hour 1: The host wishes his mom a happy birthday, then gives a shout out to one of his friends, Stewie chimes in. Happy Canada Day, followed by a clip from the South Park movie. The host got a new iPhone. Sports - Jim Rome gets dumb emails, runs a clone at the airport for dropping a hot box reference. The heat in Texas leads to recap of a game where the Cowboys were dropping from the heat. The head of Facebook and Twitter are going to fight in a cage match, followed by "The Facebook Wall" from "The Blind Man Cometh", track 15. The host talks about his recent dinner with one of his friends, he then talks about Colleen Ballinger, wonders why Trisha Paytas had to do all the promoting on Twitter with a podcast the two were recently involved with. Jeffrey Epstein update, followed by a new song, "Nobody Watched Epstein". Russia update, followed by "Vladimir Putin's Olympic Ltter" from "The Starving Artist", track 21. Frustrated airline passengers. The first hour concoudes with "Firecracker Mishap" from "The Jerky Boys 1", track 17. Hour 2: The host plays a clip of Jim Morrison admonishing his bandmates during a recording session of "Peace Frog". The feud between Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson, followed by the history of the national anthem being played at sporting events. Cancer drug shortage. The show closes with "Rewriting The National Anthem" by Albert Brooks. Break music - "T.N.T" by AC/DC Rejoiner music - "Peace Frog" by The Doors --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/lawrence-ross9/message

First Cup of Coffee with Jeffe Kennedy
First Cup of Coffee - June 30, 2023

First Cup of Coffee with Jeffe Kennedy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2023 21:35 Transcription Available


Tough love talk on how our families and the people who love us most can be the biggest obstacles to getting that writing time. Related: wants and needs, the difference between them and how other people try to tell what ours are.The Fae or No-Fae event is here https://farofeb.com/fae-or-no-fae/ROGUE FAMILIAR out now! https://jeffekennedy.com/rogue-familiarRead the Falling Under books  in Kindle Unlimited! https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0C1ZMDW1YJoin my Patreon and Discord for mentoring, coaching, and conversation with me! Find it at https://www.patreon.com/JeffesClosetIf you want to support me and the podcast, click on the little heart or follow this link (https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/jeffekennedy).Sign up for my newsletter here! (https://landing.mailerlite.com/webforms/landing/r2y4b9)You can watch this podcast on YouTube here https://youtu.be/6SLxex5U5OUSupport the showContact Jeffe!Tweet me at @JeffeKennedyVisit my website https://jeffekennedy.comFollow me on Amazon or BookBubSign up for my Newsletter!Find me on Instagram and TikTok!Thanks for listening!

Total Car Score
S4E42: The 2024 Jeep Wrangler is the most capable and most refined ever

Total Car Score

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2023 18:47


In this episode we are in St. George, Utah with Jim Morrison, Sr. Vice President at Jeep North America, to learn all about the 2024 Jeep Wrangler, which gets greater capability, new technology, advanced safety features and more refinement.

My Rock Moment
Author, Radio Host and Reggae Historian Roger Steffens on Bob Marley, Jim Morrison and Vietnam in the 60s: Part One

My Rock Moment

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2023 62:01


In this episode of My Rock Moment, we sit down with Roger Steffens. Roger is a writer, actor, radio host, legendary reggae historian, and author of "So Much Things to Say: The Oral History of Bob Marley" (which Rolling Stone headlined in its review “…[arguably] the Best Bob Marley Book Ever.”). Roger was co-host of the Reggae Beat on KCRW from 1979 to 1987 and Reggae Beat International from 1983 to 1987, which was syndicated internationally to 130 stations. Seven rooms of his home in Los Angeles house reggae archives, which include the world's largest collection of Bob Marley material. While most of his career has been devoted to reggae and its luminaries, his love of rock ‘n' roll started back in 1953 as a devoted fan of Alan Freed. Part One of our discussion starts with Roger remembering one particular concert in 1967 in San Francisco - it was an unforgettable night of rock ‘n' roll, as Bill Graham introduced 2 then unknown acts to an anticipant audience. The concert was a poignant way to say goodbye to the U.S. as the next day he was sent off to Vietnam. We'll discuss the 2 years he spent there working in Psyops while protest rock erupted across the nation. We'll hear Steffens' incredible story about meeting the Countess De Breteuil in Marrakesh in 1971 and how that connected him to the passing of Jim Morrison. Steffens will also share the serendipitous circumstances that led to him meeting Bob Marley for the first time.  To find out more about Roger Steffens and his work, check out the links below: The Family Acid Website: http://www.thefamilyacid.com/ The Family Acid Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thefamilyacid/?hl=en So Much Things to Say on Amazon Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Snubs
The Doors

Snubs

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2023 52:39


On Snubs, film fans and co-hosts, Caroline Young and Chris Masciarelli, discuss their favorite films that were snubbed by the Oscars. On this episode, our titular hosts discuss Oliver Stone's The Doors, and the 1992 Academy Awards it was noticeably absent from. Caroline wouldn't touch Jim Morrison with a 10 foot pole, and Chris is in love with Val Kilmer #NewShipAlert. Don't forget to follow on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/snubspod/ A High Tops Media Podcast You can follow for more High Tops Media content on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter: @hightopsmedia Check out more podcasts on our website https://hightops.media

The Mistress Carrie Podcast
159 - Chris Vos from The Record Company

The Mistress Carrie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2023 83:15


Episode #159: Chris Vos and The Record Company just wrapped up dates on the road touring with Rival Sons! From his home in LA, Chris sat in his kitchen breaking up his fighting cats, and talked to Mistress Carrie about his music philosophies, touring, inspiration, his upbringing, farming, Iggy Pop, mental health, grandma advice, his 'guitar greats', Heavy Metal, the birth of Rock, Jim Morrison, visiting rock star graves, The Beatles/Rolling Stones debate, and so much more! Join Mistress Carrie LIVE for Cocktails in the War Room 'On Deployment' on June 27, 2023 from 6p-9p! Episode Notes Check out the custom playlist for Episode #159 here Find Chris Vos online: Facebook Instagram Find The Record Company online: Website Facebook Instagram Twitter YouTube Link Tree Find Mistress Carrie online: Official Website The Mistress Carrie Backstage Pass on Patreon Twitter Facebook Instagram YouTube Cameo Pantheon Podcast Network Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Air Tight 62

"In My Grow Show"

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2023 65:28


Primos always look fot UFOs and listen to as much Greencoastradio.com as humanly possible.  If you send in your Spotify playlist of 15 bangers and we use it on the show, I'll send you a free coffee mug.  You can check them out on the station gear page.  Enjoy the playlist and have a great time.                               Air Tight #62   Karlit - Jmesuifetoopti Domonic Fike - Ant Pile Jim Morrison - latino Chrome Charles Bradley -  Stay Away Blanc Manioc - TamaLyon Billy Lee Riley - Red Hot Charles Bukowski - BlueBird Digable Planets - Rebirth of Slick Jungle Brothers - Doin' Our Own Dang Marian Hill - Oooo that's my type Lost Cat - Lust for Life Protomartyr - Polacrilex Kid Wet Leg - Chaise Lounge Viagra Boys - Slow Learner Ratigen Era - Gen Dem The Heavy - Coleen  

”It’s A Wrap with Rap”
Diane Gilman-Fashion Icon Designer. The ”Jean Queen”.

”It’s A Wrap with Rap”

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2023 74:33


Ron talks with iconic fashion designer Diane Gilman who started her career in the 1960'a dressing rock stars such as Jimi Hendrix,  Janis Joplin, Grace Slick, Jerry Garcia, Jim Morrison and the list goes on. Diane introduced washable silk to the U.S. market earning her fortune and fame in the department store industry. She reinvented herself as the Jean Queen on the HSN television network designing and selling millions of jeans to women over 40 who wanted to look stylish and confident.  Besides being a television personality, Diane is an author and a breast cancer survivor who inspires women to embrace their third act of life with zest and positivity.  Sponsors:    Hero Soap Company                     https://www.herosoapcompany.com                     Rare Patient Voice                     https://rarepatientvoice.com/itsawrapwithrap                     Eat Stop Eat                     https://b2f1egyvr0socl6dpn3q-ck-54.hop.clickbank.net                     Blue Sky CBD                     https://www.bluesky-cbd.com/pages/_go_?ref=3251:615856&discount=ron Links:          www.dianegilman.com                    https://itsawrapwithrap.com                    #HC Universal Network

Mystery History Podcast
Episode 141 - The 27 Club

Mystery History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 8, 2023 81:50


Come hear what we know about the mysterious 27 Club. Learn about some of it's very famous "members" - Robert Johnson, Jim Morrison, Janis Joplin, Brian Jones and Jimi Hendrix along with some honorable mentions and how they met their tragic ends. Join our $2 or $5 tier Patreon to receive 100+ bonus episodes, and coupon codes for discounted merch.https://www.patreon.com/MysteryHistoryPodcast Sources biography.com wikipedia.com grunge.com britannica.com rollingstone.com --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/mysteryhistorypodcast/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/mysteryhistorypodcast/support

Curious Creatures
Avey Tare Pt. 2: Nothing Lasts Forever - We Can't Really Hold On To Anything

Curious Creatures

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2023 30:43


Invisible Darlings - Fast piano  Harpsichord music - Gregorian chant  Pioneer days - with the Avant Garde We needed friends - Americans are friendly! Sleep? luxury - no sleep ‘til Hammersmith! Steak and Shake lady - Rambling about Lions Daniel's den - Puts him in a better mood Lol and Budgie - protected from the banter  Years of drumming makes hearing sparse! Four sevens Clash! - We're all numerologists  Playing each other's instruments - in search of a tune  Hawkwind's Silver Machine and 7 by 7  Lol & Budgie loved “In Search of Space” Dik-Mik & Lemmy - hippies and punks Damn Skippy – A Darker psychedeliaBeing open to change - Animal Collective's philosophy  Grow and move on - Nothing lasts  David curious about creative Psychedelics - was Pornography Psychedelic? Challenging times - But Lol's favourite Cure albumBudgie in a Camden Dreamhouse - Dinner in a Greek restaurant The Cure as a psychedelic punk band. Trout Mask Replica - Strange Days from The DoorsRobert sings backwards at 4 am  Music's a trip!___Respect: Lemmy Kilmister (24 December 1945 – 28 December 2015)___CONNECT WITH US:Curious Creatures:Website: https://curiouscreaturespodcast.comFacebook: @CuriousCreaturesOfficialTwitter: @curecreaturesInstagram: @CuriousCreaturesOfficialLol Tolhurst:Website: https://loltolhurst.comFacebook: @officialloltolhurst Twitter: @LolTolhurst Instagram: @lol.tolhurst Budgie: Facebook: @budgieofficial Twitter: @TuWhit2whooInstagram: @budgie646 Curious Creatures is a partner of the Double Elvis podcast network. For more of the best music storytelling follow @DoubleElvis on Instagram or search Double Elvis in your podcast app. 

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs
Episode 164: “White Light/White Heat” by the Velvet Underground

A History Of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2023


Episode 164 of A History of Rock Music in Five Hundred Songs looks at "White Light/White Heat" and the career of the Velvet Underground. This is a long one, lasting three hours and twenty minutes. Click the full post to read liner notes, links to more information, and a transcript of the episode. Patreon backers also have a twenty-three minute bonus episode available, on "Why Don't You Smile Now?" by the Downliners Sect. Tilt Araiza has assisted invaluably by doing a first-pass edit, and will hopefully be doing so from now on. Check out Tilt's irregular podcasts at http://www.podnose.com/jaffa-cakes-for-proust and http://sitcomclub.com/ Errata I say the Velvet Underground didn't play New York for the rest of the sixties after 1966. They played at least one gig there in 1967, but did generally avoid the city. Also, I refer to Cale and Conrad as the other surviving members of the Theater of Eternal Music. Sadly Conrad died in 2016. Resources No Mixcloud this week, as there are too many songs by the Velvet Underground, and some of the avant-garde pieces excerpted run to six hours or more. I used a lot of resources for this one. Up-Tight: The Velvet Underground Story by Victor Bockris and Gerard Malanga is the best book on the group as a group. I also used Joe Harvard's 33 1/3 book on The Velvet Underground and Nico. Bockris also wrote one of the two biographies of Reed I referred to, Transformer. The other was Lou Reed by Anthony DeCurtis. Information on Cale mostly came from Sedition and Alchemy by Tim Mitchell. Information on Nico came from Nico: The Life and Lies of an Icon by Richard Witts. I used Draw a Straight Line and Follow it by Jeremy Grimshaw as my main source for La Monte Young, The Roaring Silence by David Revill for John Cage, and Warhol: A Life as Art by Blake Gopnik for Warhol. I also referred to the Criterion Collection Blu-Ray of the 2021 documentary The Velvet Underground.  The definitive collection of the Velvet Underground's music is the sadly out-of-print box set Peel Slowly and See, which contains the four albums the group made with Reed in full, plus demos, outtakes, and live recordings. Note that the digital version of the album as sold by Amazon for some reason doesn't include the last disc -- if you want the full box set you have to buy a physical copy. All four studio albums have also been released and rereleased many times over in different configurations with different numbers of CDs at different price points -- I have used the "45th Anniversary Super-Deluxe" versions for this episode, but for most people the standard CD versions will be fine. Sadly there are no good shorter compilation overviews of the group -- they tend to emphasise either the group's "pop" mode or its "avant-garde" mode to the exclusion of the other. Patreon This podcast is brought to you by the generosity of my backers on Patreon. Why not join them? Transcript Before I begin this episode, there are a few things to say. This introductory section is going to be longer than normal because, as you will hear, this episode is also going to be longer than normal. Firstly, I try to warn people about potentially upsetting material in these episodes. But this is the first episode for 1968, and as you will see there is a *profound* increase in the amount of upsetting and disturbing material covered as we go through 1968 and 1969. The story is going to be in a much darker place for the next twenty or thirty episodes. And this episode is no exception. As always, I try to deal with everything as sensitively as possible, but you should be aware that the list of warnings for this one is so long I am very likely to have missed some. Among the topics touched on in this episode are mental illness, drug addiction, gun violence, racism, societal and medical homophobia, medical mistreatment of mental illness, domestic abuse, rape, and more. If you find discussion of any of those subjects upsetting, you might want to read the transcript. Also, I use the term "queer" freely in this episode. In the past I have received some pushback for this, because of a belief among some that "queer" is a slur. The following explanation will seem redundant to many of my listeners, but as with many of the things I discuss in the podcast I am dealing with multiple different audiences with different levels of awareness and understanding of issues, so I'd like to beg those people's indulgence a moment. The term "queer" has certainly been used as a slur in the past, but so have terms like "lesbian", "gay", "homosexual" and others. In all those cases, the term has gone from a term used as a self-identifier, to a slur, to a reclaimed slur, and back again many times. The reason for using that word, specifically, here is because the vast majority of people in this story have sexualities or genders that don't match the societal norms of their times, but used labels for themselves that have shifted in meaning over the years. There are at least two men in the story, for example, who are now dead and referred to themselves as "homosexual", but were in multiple long-term sexually-active relationships with women. Would those men now refer to themselves as "bisexual" or "pansexual" -- terms not in widespread use at the time -- or would they, in the relatively more tolerant society we live in now, only have been in same-gender relationships? We can't know. But in our current context using the word "homosexual" for those men would lead to incorrect assumptions about their behaviour. The labels people use change over time, and the definitions of them blur and shift. I have discussed this issue with many, many, friends who fall under the queer umbrella, and while not all of them are comfortable with "queer" as a personal label because of how it's been used against them in the past, there is near-unanimity from them that it's the correct word to use in this situation. Anyway, now that that rather lengthy set of disclaimers is over, let's get into the story proper, as we look at "White Light, White Heat" by the Velvet Underground: [Excerpt: The Velvet Underground, "White Light, White Heat"] And that look will start with... a disclaimer about length. This episode is going to be a long one. Not as long as episode one hundred and fifty, but almost certainly the longest episode I'll do this year, by some way. And there's a reason for that. One of the questions I've been asked repeatedly over the years about the podcast is why almost all the acts I've covered have been extremely commercially successful ones. "Where are the underground bands? The alternative bands? The little niche acts?" The answer to that is simple. Until the mid-sixties, the idea of an underground or alternative band made no sense at all in rock, pop, rock and roll, R&B, or soul. The idea would have been completely counterintuitive to the vast majority of the people we've discussed in the podcast. Those musics were commercial musics, made by people who wanted to make money and to  get the largest audiences possible. That doesn't mean that they had no artistic merit, or that there was no artistic intent behind them, but the artists making that music were *commercial* artists. They knew if they wanted to make another record, they had to sell enough copies of the last record for the record company to make another, and that if they wanted to keep eating, they had to draw enough of an audience to their gigs for promoters to keep booking them. There was no space in this worldview for what we might think of as cult success. If your record only sold a thousand copies, then you had failed in your goal, even if the thousand people who bought your record really loved it. Even less commercially successful artists we've covered to this point, like the Mothers of Invention or Love, were *trying* for commercial success, even if they made the decision not to compromise as much as others do. This started to change a tiny bit in the mid-sixties as the influence of jazz and folk in the US, and the British blues scene, started to be felt in rock music. But this influence, at first, was a one-way thing -- people who had been in the folk and jazz worlds deciding to modify their music to be more commercial. And that was followed by already massively commercial musicians, like the Beatles, taking on some of those influences and bringing their audience with them. But that started to change around the time that "rock" started to differentiate itself from "rock and roll" and "pop", in mid 1967. So in this episode and the next, we're going to look at two bands who in different ways provided a model for how to be an alternative band. Both of them still *wanted* commercial success, but neither achieved it, at least not at first and not in the conventional way. And both, when they started out, went by the name The Warlocks. But we have to take a rather circuitous route to get to this week's band, because we're now properly introducing a strand of music that has been there in the background for a while -- avant-garde art music. So before we go any further, let's have a listen to a thirty-second clip of the most famous piece of avant-garde music ever, and I'll be performing it myself: [Excerpt, Andrew Hickey "4'33 (Cage)"] Obviously that won't give the full effect, you have to listen to the whole piece to get that. That is of course a section of "4'33" by John Cage, a piece of music that is often incorrectly described as being four minutes and thirty three seconds of silence. As I've mentioned before, though, in the episode on "Papa's Got a Brand New Bag", it isn't that at all. The whole point of the piece is that there is no such thing as silence, and it's intended to make the listener appreciate all the normal ambient sounds as music, every bit as much as any piece by Bach or Beethoven. John Cage, the composer of "4'33", is possibly the single most influential avant-garde artist of the mid twentieth century, so as we're properly introducing the ideas of avant-garde music into the story here, we need to talk about him a little. Cage was, from an early age, torn between three great vocations, all of which in some fashion would shape his work for decades to come. One of these was architecture, and for a time he intended to become an architect. Another was the religious ministry, and he very seriously considered becoming a minister as a young man, and religion -- though not the religious faith of his youth -- was to be a massive factor in his work as he grew older. He started studying music from an early age, though he never had any facility as a performer -- though he did, when he discovered the work of Grieg, think that might change. He later said “For a while I played nothing else. I even imagined devoting my life to the performance of his works alone, for they did not seem to me to be too difficult, and I loved them.” [Excerpt: Grieg piano concerto in A minor] But he soon realised that he didn't have some of the basic skills that would be required to be a performer -- he never actually thought of himself as very musical -- and so he decided to move into composition, and he later talked about putting his musical limits to good use in being more inventive. From his very first pieces, Cage was trying to expand the definition of what a performance of a piece of music actually was. One of his friends, Harry Hay, who took part in the first documented performance of a piece by Cage, described how Cage's father, an inventor, had "devised a fluorescent light source over which Sample" -- Don Sample, Cage's boyfriend at the time -- "laid a piece of vellum painted with designs in oils. The blankets I was wearing were white, and a sort of lampshade shone coloured patterns onto me. It looked very good. The thing got so hot the designs began to run, but that only made it better.” Apparently the audience for this light show -- one that predated the light shows used by rock bands by a good thirty years -- were not impressed, though that may be more because the Santa Monica Women's Club in the early 1930s was not the vanguard of the avant-garde. Or maybe it was. Certainly the housewives of Santa Monica seemed more willing than one might expect to sign up for another of Cage's ideas. In 1933 he went door to door asking women if they would be interested in signing up to a lecture course from him on modern art and music. He told them that if they signed up for $2.50, he would give them ten lectures, and somewhere between twenty and forty of them signed up, even though, as he said later, “I explained to the housewives that I didn't know anything about either subject but that I was enthusiastic about both of them. I promised to learn faithfully enough about each subject so as to be able to give a talk an hour long each week.” And he did just that, going to the library every day and spending all week preparing an hour-long talk for them. History does not relate whether he ended these lectures by telling the housewives to tell just one friend about them. He said later “I came out of these lectures, with a devotion to the painting of Mondrian, on the one hand, and the music of Schoenberg on the other.” [Excerpt: Schoenberg, "Ode to Napoleon Buonaparte"] Schoenberg was one of the two most widely-respected composers in the world at that point, the other being Stravinsky, but the two had very different attitudes to composition. Schoenberg's great innovation was the creation and popularisation of the twelve-tone technique, and I should probably explain that a little before I go any further. Most Western music is based on an eight-note scale -- do, re, mi, fa, so, la, ti, do -- with the eighth note being an octave up from the first. So in the key of C major that would be C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C: [demonstrates] And when you hear notes from that scale, if your ears are accustomed to basically any Western music written before about 1920, or any Western popular music written since then, you expect the melody to lead back to C, and you know to expect that because it only uses those notes -- there are differing intervals between them, some having a tone between them and some having a semitone, and you recognise the pattern. But of course there are other notes between the notes of that scale. There are actually an infinite number of these, but in conventional Western music we only look at a few more -- C# (or D flat), D# (or E flat), F# (or G flat), G# (or A flat) and A# (or B flat). If you add in all those notes you get this: [demonstrates] There's no clear beginning or end, no do for it to come back to. And Schoenberg's great innovation, which he was only starting to promote widely around this time, was to insist that all twelve notes should be equal -- his melodies would use all twelve of the notes the exact same number of times, and so if he used say a B flat, he would have to use all eleven other notes before he used B flat again in the piece. This was a radical new idea, but Schoenberg had only started advancing it after first winning great acclaim for earlier pieces, like his "Three Pieces for Piano", a work which wasn't properly twelve-tone, but did try to do without the idea of having any one note be more important than any other: [Excerpt: Schoenberg, "Three Pieces for Piano"] At this point, that work had only been performed in the US by one performer, Richard Buhlig, and hadn't been released as a recording yet. Cage was so eager to hear it that he'd found Buhlig's phone number and called him, asking him to play the piece, but Buhlig put the phone down on him. Now he was doing these lectures, though, he had to do one on Schoenberg, and he wasn't a competent enough pianist to play Schoenberg's pieces himself, and there were still no recordings of them. Cage hitch-hiked from Santa Monica to LA, where Buhlig lived, to try to get him to come and visit his class and play some of Schoenberg's pieces for them. Buhlig wasn't in, and Cage hung around in his garden hoping for him to come back -- he pulled the leaves off a bough from one of Buhlig's trees, going "He'll come back, he won't come back, he'll come back..." and the leaves said he'd be back. Buhlig arrived back at midnight, and quite understandably told the strange twenty-one-year-old who'd spent twelve hours in his garden pulling the leaves off his trees that no, he would not come to Santa Monica and give a free performance. But he did agree that if Cage brought some of his own compositions he'd give them a look over. Buhlig started giving Cage some proper lessons in composition, although he stressed that he was a performer, not a composer. Around this time Cage wrote his Sonata for Clarinet: [Excerpt: John Cage, "Sonata For Clarinet"] Buhlig suggested that Cage send that to Henry Cowell, the composer we heard about in the episode on "Good Vibrations" who was friends with Lev Termen and who created music by playing the strings inside a piano: [Excerpt: Henry Cowell, "Aeolian Harp and Sinister Resonance"] Cowell offered to take Cage on as an assistant, in return for which Cowell would teach him for a semester, as would Adolph Weiss, a pupil of Schoenberg's. But the goal, which Cowell suggested, was always to have Cage study with Schoenberg himself. Schoenberg at first refused, saying that Cage couldn't afford his price, but eventually took Cage on as a student having been assured that he would devote his entire life to music -- a promise Cage kept. Cage started writing pieces for percussion, something that had been very rare up to that point -- only a handful of composers, most notably Edgard Varese, had written pieces for percussion alone, but Cage was: [Excerpt: John Cage, "Trio"] This is often portrayed as a break from the ideals of his teacher Schoenberg, but in fact there's a clear continuity there, once you see what Cage was taking from Schoenberg. Schoenberg's work is, in some senses, about equality, about all notes being equal. Or to put it another way, it's about fairness. About erasing arbitrary distinctions. What Cage was doing was erasing the arbitrary distinction between the more and less prominent instruments. Why should there be pieces for solo violin or string quartet, but not for multiple percussion players? That said, Schoenberg was not exactly the most encouraging of teachers. When Cage invited Schoenberg to go to a concert of Cage's percussion work, Schoenberg told him he was busy that night. When Cage offered to arrange another concert for a date Schoenberg wasn't busy, the reply came "No, I will not be free at any time". Despite this, Cage later said “Schoenberg was a magnificent teacher, who always gave the impression that he was putting us in touch with musical principles,” and said "I literally worshipped him" -- a strong statement from someone who took religious matters as seriously as Cage. Cage was so devoted to Schoenberg's music that when a concert of music by Stravinsky was promoted as "music of the world's greatest living composer", Cage stormed into the promoter's office angrily, confronting the promoter and making it very clear that such things should not be said in the city where Schoenberg lived. Schoenberg clearly didn't think much of Cage's attempts at composition, thinking -- correctly -- that Cage had no ear for harmony. And his reportedly aggressive and confrontational teaching style didn't sit well with Cage -- though it seems very similar to a lot of the teaching techniques of the Zen masters he would later go on to respect. The two eventually parted ways, although Cage always spoke highly of Schoenberg. Schoenberg later gave Cage a compliment of sorts, when asked if any of his students had gone on to do anything interesting. At first he replied that none had, but then he mentioned Cage and said “Of course he's not a composer, but an inventor—of genius.” Cage was at this point very worried if there was any point to being a composer at all. He said later “I'd read Cowell's New Musical Resources and . . . The Theory of Rhythm. I had also read Chavez's Towards a New Music. Both works gave me the feeling that everything that was possible in music had already happened. So I thought I could never compose socially important music. Only if I could invent something new, then would I be useful to society. But that seemed unlikely then.” [Excerpt: John Cage, "Totem Ancestor"] Part of the solution came when he was asked to compose music for an abstract animation by the filmmaker Oskar Fischinger, and also to work as Fischinger's assistant when making the film. He was fascinated by the stop-motion process, and by the results of the film, which he described as "a beautiful film in which these squares, triangles and circles and other things moved and changed colour.” But more than that he was overwhelmed by a comment by Fischinger, who told him “Everything in the world has its own spirit, and this spirit becomes audible by setting it into vibration.” Cage later said “That set me on fire. He started me on a path of exploration of the world around me which has never stopped—of hitting and stretching and scraping and rubbing everything.” Cage now took his ideas further. His compositions for percussion had been about, if you like, giving the underdog a chance -- percussion was always in the background, why should it not be in the spotlight? Now he realised that there were other things getting excluded in conventional music -- the sounds that we characterise as noise. Why should composers work to exclude those sounds, but work to *include* other sounds? Surely that was... well, a little unfair? Eventually this would lead to pieces like his 1952 piece "Water Music", later expanded and retitled "Water Walk", which can be heard here in his 1959 appearance on the TV show "I've Got a Secret".  It's a piece for, amongst other things, a flowerpot full of flowers, a bathtub, a watering can, a pipe, a duck call, a blender full of ice cubes, and five unplugged radios: [Excerpt: John Cage "Water Walk"] As he was now avoiding pitch and harmony as organising principles for his music, he turned to time. But note -- not to rhythm. He said “There's none of this boom, boom, boom, business in my music . . . a measure is taken as a strict measure of time—not a one two three four—which I fill with various sounds.” He came up with a system he referred to as “micro-macrocosmic rhythmic structure,” what we would now call fractals, though that word hadn't yet been invented, where the structure of the whole piece was reflected in the smallest part of it. For a time he started moving away from the term music, preferring to refer to the "art of noise" or to "organised sound" -- though he later received a telegram from Edgard Varese, one of his musical heroes and one of the few other people writing works purely for percussion, asking him not to use that phrase, which Varese used for his own work. After meeting with Varese and his wife, he later became convinced that it was Varese's wife who had initiated the telegram, as she explained to Cage's wife "we didn't want your husband's work confused with my husband's work, any more than you'd want some . . . any artist's work confused with that of a cartoonist.” While there is a humour to Cage's work, I don't really hear much qualitative difference between a Cage piece like the one we just heard and a Varese piece like Ionisation: [Excerpt: Edgard Varese, "Ionisation"] But it was in 1952, the year of "Water Music" that John Cage made his two biggest impacts on the cultural world, though the full force of those impacts wasn't felt for some years. To understand Cage's 1952 work, you first have to understand that he had become heavily influenced by Zen, which at that time was very little known in the Western world. Indeed he had studied with Daisetsu Suzuki, who is credited with introducing Zen to the West, and said later “I didn't study music with just anybody; I studied with Schoenberg, I didn't study Zen with just anybody; I studied with Suzuki. I've always gone, insofar as I could, to the president of the company.” Cage's whole worldview was profoundly affected by Zen, but he was also naturally sympathetic to it, and his work after learning about Zen is mostly a continuation of trends we can already see. In particular, he became convinced that the point of music isn't to communicate anything between two people, rather its point is merely to be experienced. I'm far from an expert on Buddhism, but one way of thinking about its central lessons is that one should experience things as they are, experiencing the thing itself rather than one's thoughts or preconceptions about it. And so at Black Mountain college came Theatre Piece Number 1: [Excerpt: Edith Piaf, "La Vie En Rose" ] In this piece, Cage had set the audience on all sides, so they'd be facing each other. He stood on a stepladder, as colleagues danced in and around the audience, another colleague played the piano, two more took turns to stand on another stepladder to recite poetry, different films and slides were projected, seemingly at random, onto the walls, and the painter Robert Rauschenberg played scratchy Edith Piaf records on a wind-up gramophone. The audience were included in the performance, and it was meant to be experienced as a gestalt, as a whole, to be what we would now call an immersive experience. One of Cage's students around this time was the artist Allan Kaprow, and he would be inspired by Theatre Piece Number 1 to put on several similar events in the late fifties. Those events he called "happenings", because the point of them was that you were meant to experience an event as it was happening rather than bring preconceptions of form and structure to them. Those happenings were the inspiration for events like The 14 Hour Technicolor Dream, and the term "happening" became such an integral part of the counterculture that by 1967 there were comedy films being released about them, including one just called The Happening with a title track by the Supremes that made number one: [Excerpt: The Supremes, "The Happening"] Theatre Piece Number 1 was retrospectively considered the first happening, and as such its influence is incalculable. But one part I didn't mention about Theatre Piece Number 1 is that as well as Rauschenberg playing Edith Piaf's records, he also displayed some of his paintings. These paintings were totally white -- at a glance, they looked like blank canvases, but as one inspected them more clearly, it became apparent that Rauschenberg had painted them with white paint, with visible brushstrokes. These paintings, along with a visit to an anechoic chamber in which Cage discovered that even in total silence one can still hear one's own blood and nervous system, so will never experience total silence, were the final key to something Cage had been working towards -- if music had minimised percussion, and excluded noise, how much more had it excluded silence? As Cage said in 1958 “Curiously enough, the twelve-tone system has no zero in it.” And so came 4'33, the piece that we heard an excerpt of near the start of this episode. That piece was the something new he'd been looking for that could be useful to society. It took the sounds the audience could already hear, and without changing them even slightly gave them a new context and made the audience hear them as they were. Simply by saying "this is music", it caused the ambient noise to be perceived as music. This idea, of recontextualising existing material, was one that had already been done in the art world -- Marcel Duchamp, in 1917, had exhibited a urinal as a sculpture titled "Fountain" -- but even Duchamp had talked about his work as "everyday objects raised to the dignity of a work of art by the artist's act of choice". The artist was *raising* the object to art. What Cage was saying was "the object is already art". This was all massively influential to a young painter who had seen Cage give lectures many times, and while at art school had with friends prepared a piano in the same way Cage did for his own experimental compositions, dampening the strings with different objects. [Excerpt: Dana Gillespie, "Andy Warhol (live)"] Duchamp and Rauschenberg were both big influences on Andy Warhol, but he would say in the early sixties "John Cage is really so responsible for so much that's going on," and would for the rest of his life cite Cage as one of the two or three prime influences of his career. Warhol is a difficult figure to discuss, because his work is very intellectual but he was not very articulate -- which is one reason I've led up to him by discussing Cage in such detail, because Cage was always eager to talk at great length about the theoretical basis of his work, while Warhol would say very few words about anything at all. Probably the person who knew him best was his business partner and collaborator Paul Morrissey, and Morrissey's descriptions of Warhol have shaped my own view of his life, but it's very worth noting that Morrissey is an extremely right-wing moralist who wishes to see a Catholic theocracy imposed to do away with the scourges of sexual immorality, drug use, hedonism, and liberalism, so his view of Warhol, a queer drug using progressive whose worldview seems to have been totally opposed to Morrissey's in every way, might be a little distorted. Warhol came from an impoverished background, and so, as many people who grew up poor do, he was, throughout his life, very eager to make money. He studied art at university, and got decent but not exceptional grades -- he was a competent draughtsman, but not a great one, and most importantly as far as success in the art world goes he didn't have what is known as his own "line" -- with most successful artists, you can look at a handful of lines they've drawn and see something of their own personality in it. You couldn't with Warhol. His drawings looked like mediocre imitations of other people's work. Perfectly competent, but nothing that stood out. So Warhol came up with a technique to make his drawings stand out -- blotting. He would do a normal drawing, then go over it with a lot of wet ink. He'd lower a piece of paper on to the wet drawing, and the new paper would soak up the ink, and that second piece of paper would become the finished work. The lines would be fractured and smeared, broken in places where the ink didn't get picked up, and thick in others where it had pooled. With this mechanical process, Warhol had managed to create an individual style, and he became an extremely successful commercial artist. In the early 1950s photography was still seen as a somewhat low-class way of advertising things. If you wanted to sell to a rich audience, you needed to use drawings or paintings. By 1955 Warhol was making about twelve thousand dollars a year -- somewhere close to a hundred and thirty thousand a year in today's money -- drawing shoes for advertisements. He also had a sideline in doing record covers for people like Count Basie: [Excerpt: Count Basie, "Seventh Avenue Express"] For most of the 1950s he also tried to put on shows of his more serious artistic work -- often with homoerotic themes -- but to little success. The dominant art style of the time was the abstract expressionism of people like Jackson Pollock, whose art was visceral, emotional, and macho. The term "action paintings" which was coined for the work of people like Pollock, sums it up. This was manly art for manly men having manly emotions and expressing them loudly. It was very male and very straight, and even the gay artists who were prominent at the time tended to be very conformist and look down on anything they considered flamboyant or effeminate. Warhol was a rather effeminate, very reserved man, who strongly disliked showing his emotions, and whose tastes ran firmly to the camp. Camp as an aesthetic of finding joy in the flamboyant or trashy, as opposed to merely a descriptive term for men who behaved in a way considered effeminate, was only just starting to be codified at this time -- it wouldn't really become a fully-formed recognisable thing until Susan Sontag's essay "Notes on Camp" in 1964 -- but of course just because something hasn't been recognised doesn't mean it doesn't exist, and Warhol's aesthetic was always very camp, and in the 1950s in the US that was frowned upon even in gay culture, where the mainstream opinion was that the best way to acceptance was through assimilation. Abstract expressionism was all about expressing the self, and that was something Warhol never wanted to do -- in fact he made some pronouncements at times which suggested he didn't think of himself as *having* a self in the conventional sense. The combination of not wanting to express himself and of wanting to work more efficiently as a commercial artist led to some interesting results. For example, he was commissioned in 1957 to do a cover for an album by Moondog, the blind street musician whose name Alan Freed had once stolen: [Excerpt: Moondog, "Gloving It"] For that cover, Warhol got his mother, Julia Warhola, to just write out the liner notes for the album in her rather ornamental cursive script, and that became the front cover, leading to an award for graphic design going that year to "Andy Warhol's mother". (Incidentally, my copy of the current CD issue of that album, complete with Julia Warhola's cover, is put out by Pickwick Records...) But towards the end of the fifties, the work for commercial artists started to dry up. If you wanted to advertise shoes, now, you just took a photo of the shoes rather than get Andy Warhol to draw a picture of them. The money started to disappear, and Warhol started to panic. If there was no room for him in graphic design any more, he had to make his living in the fine arts, which he'd been totally unsuccessful in. But luckily for Warhol, there was a new movement that was starting to form -- Pop Art. Pop Art started in England, and had originally been intended, at least in part, as a critique of American consumerist capitalism. Pieces like "Just what is it that makes today's homes so different, so appealing?" by Richard Hamilton (who went on to design the Beatles' White Album cover) are collages of found images, almost all from American sources, recontextualised and juxtaposed in interesting ways, so a bodybuilder poses in a room that's taken from an advert in Ladies' Home Journal, while on the wall, instead of a painting, hangs a blown-up cover of a Jack Kirby romance comic. Pop Art changed slightly when it got taken up in America, and there it became something rather different, something closer to Duchamp, taking those found images and displaying them as art with no juxtaposition. Where Richard Hamilton created collage art which *showed* a comic cover by Jack Kirby as a painting in the background, Roy Lichtenstein would take a panel of comic art by Kirby, or Russ Heath or Irv Novick or a dozen other comic artists, and redraw it at the size of a normal painting. So Warhol took Cage's idea that the object is already art, and brought that into painting, starting by doing paintings of Campbell's soup cans, in which he tried as far as possible to make the cans look exactly like actual soup cans. The paintings were controversial, inciting fury in some and laughter in others and causing almost everyone to question whether they were art. Warhol would embrace an aesthetic in which things considered unimportant or trash or pop culture detritus were the greatest art of all. For example pretty much every profile of him written in the mid sixties talks about him obsessively playing "Sally Go Round the Roses", a girl-group single by the one-hit wonders the Jaynettes: [Excerpt: The Jaynettes, "Sally Go Round the Roses"] After his paintings of Campbell's soup cans, and some rather controversial but less commercially successful paintings of photographs of horrors and catastrophes taken from newspapers, Warhol abandoned painting in the conventional sense altogether, instead creating brightly coloured screen prints -- a form of stencilling -- based on photographs of celebrities like Elvis Presley, Elizabeth Taylor and, most famously, Marilyn Monroe. That way he could produce images which could be mass-produced, without his active involvement, and which supposedly had none of his personality in them, though of course his personality pervades the work anyway. He put on exhibitions of wooden boxes, silk-screen printed to look exactly like shipping cartons of Brillo pads. Images we see everywhere -- in newspapers, in supermarkets -- were art. And Warhol even briefly formed a band. The Druds were a garage band formed to play at a show at the Washington Gallery of Modern Art, the opening night of an exhibition that featured a silkscreen by Warhol of 210 identical bottles of Coca-Cola, as well as paintings by Rauschenberg and others. That opening night featured a happening by Claes Oldenburg, and a performance by Cage -- Cage gave a live lecture while three recordings of his own voice also played. The Druds were also meant to perform, but they fell apart after only a few rehearsals. Some recordings apparently exist, but they don't seem to circulate, but they'd be fascinating to hear as almost the entire band were non-musician artists like Warhol, Jasper Johns, and the sculptor Walter de Maria. Warhol said of the group “It didn't go too well, but if we had just stayed on it it would have been great.” On the other hand, the one actual musician in the group said “It was kind of ridiculous, so I quit after the second rehearsal". That musician was La Monte Young: [Excerpt: La Monte Young, "The Well-Tuned Piano"] That's an excerpt from what is generally considered Young's masterwork, "The Well-Tuned Piano". It's six and a half hours long. If Warhol is a difficult figure to write about, Young is almost impossible. He's a musician with a career stretching sixty years, who is arguably the most influential musician from the classical tradition in that time period. He's generally considered the father of minimalism, and he's also been called by Brian Eno "the daddy of us all" -- without Young you simply *do not* get art rock at all. Without Young there is no Velvet Underground, no David Bowie, no Eno, no New York punk scene, no Yoko Ono. Anywhere that the fine arts or conceptual art have intersected with popular music in the last fifty or more years has been influenced in one way or another by Young's work. BUT... he only rarely publishes his scores. He very, very rarely allows recordings of his work to be released -- there are four recordings on his bandcamp, plus a handful of recordings of his older, published, pieces, and very little else. He doesn't allow his music to be performed live without his supervision. There *are* bootleg recordings of his music, but even those are not easily obtainable -- Young is vigorous in enforcing his copyrights and issues takedown notices against anywhere that hosts them. So other than that handful of legitimately available recordings -- plus a recording by Young's Theater of Eternal Music, the legality of which is still disputed, and an off-air recording of a 1971 radio programme I've managed to track down, the only way to experience Young's music unless you're willing to travel to one of his rare live performances or installations is second-hand, by reading about it. Except that the one book that deals solely with Young and his music is not only a dense and difficult book to read, it's also one that Young vehemently disagreed with and considered extremely inaccurate, to the point he refused to allow permissions to quote his work in the book. Young did apparently prepare a list of corrections for the book, but he wouldn't tell the author what they were without payment. So please assume that anything I say about Young is wrong, but also accept that the short section of this episode about Young has required more work to *try* to get it right than pretty much anything else this year. Young's musical career actually started out in a relatively straightforward manner. He didn't grow up in the most loving of homes -- he's talked about his father beating him as a child because he had been told that young La Monte was clever -- but his father did buy him a saxophone and teach him the rudiments of the instrument, and as a child he was most influenced by the music of the big band saxophone player Jimmy Dorsey: [Excerpt: Jimmy Dorsey, “It's the Dreamer in Me”] The family, who were Mormon farmers, relocated several times in Young's childhood, from Idaho first to California and then to Utah, but everywhere they went La Monte seemed to find musical inspiration, whether from an uncle who had been part of the Kansas City jazz scene, a classmate who was a musical prodigy who had played with Perez Prado in his early teens, or a teacher who took the class to see a performance of Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra: [Excerpt: Bartok, "Concerto for Orchestra"] After leaving high school, Young went to Los Angeles City College to study music under Leonard Stein, who had been Schoenberg's assistant when Schoenberg had taught at UCLA, and there he became part of the thriving jazz scene based around Central Avenue, studying and performing with musicians like Ornette Coleman, Don Cherry, and Eric Dolphy -- Young once beat Dolphy in an audition for a place in the City College dance band, and the two would apparently substitute for each other on their regular gigs when one couldn't make it. During this time, Young's musical tastes became much more adventurous. He was a particular fan of the work of John Coltrane, and also got inspired by City of Glass, an album by Stan Kenton that attempted to combine jazz and modern classical music: [Excerpt: Stan Kenton's Innovations Orchestra, "City of Glass: The Structures"] His other major musical discovery in the mid-fifties was one we've talked about on several previous occasions -- the album Music of India, Morning and Evening Ragas by Ali Akhbar Khan: [Excerpt: Ali Akhbar Khan, "Rag Sindhi Bhairavi"] Young's music at this point was becoming increasingly modal, and equally influenced by the blues and Indian music. But he was also becoming interested in serialism. Serialism is an extension and generalisation of twelve-tone music, inspired by mathematical set theory. In serialism, you choose a set of musical elements -- in twelve-tone music that's the twelve notes in the twelve-tone scale, but it can also be a set of tonal relations, a chord, or any other set of elements. You then define all the possible ways you can permute those elements, a defined set of operations you can perform on them -- so you could play a scale forwards, play it backwards, play all the notes in the scale simultaneously, and so on. You then go through all the possible permutations, exactly once, and that's your piece of music. Young was particularly influenced by the works of Anton Webern, one of the earliest serialists: [Excerpt: Anton Webern, "Cantata number 1 for Soprano, Mixed Chorus, and Orchestra"] That piece we just heard, Webern's "Cantata number 1", was the subject of some of the earliest theoretical discussion of serialism, and in particular led to some discussion of the next step on from serialism. If serialism was all about going through every single permutation of a set, what if you *didn't* permute every element? There was a lot of discussion in the late fifties in music-theoretical circles about the idea of invariance. Normally in music, the interesting thing is what gets changed. To use a very simple example, you might change a melody from a major key to a minor one to make it sound sadder. What theorists at this point were starting to discuss is what happens if you leave something the same, but change the surrounding context, so the thing you *don't* vary sounds different because of the changed context. And going further, what if you don't change the context at all, and merely *imply* a changed context? These ideas were some of those which inspired Young's first major work, his Trio For Strings from 1958, a complex, palindromic, serial piece which is now credited as the first work of minimalism, because the notes in it change so infrequently: [Excerpt: La Monte Young, "Trio for Strings"] Though I should point out that Young never considers his works truly finished, and constantly rewrites them, and what we just heard is an excerpt from the only recording of the trio ever officially released, which is of the 2015 version. So I can't state for certain how close what we just heard is to the piece he wrote in 1958, except that it sounds very like the written descriptions of it I've read. After writing the Trio For Strings, Young moved to Germany to study with the modernist composer Karlheinz Stockhausen. While studying with Stockhausen, he became interested in the work of John Cage, and started up a correspondence with Cage. On his return to New York he studied with Cage and started writing pieces inspired by Cage, of which the most musical is probably Composition 1960 #7: [Excerpt: La Monte Young, "Composition 1960 #7"] The score for that piece is a stave on which is drawn a treble clef, the notes B and F#, and the words "To be held for a long Time". Other of his compositions from 1960 -- which are among the few of his compositions which have been published -- include composition 1960 #10 ("To Bob Morris"), the score for which is just the instruction "Draw a straight line and follow it.", and Piano Piece for David  Tudor #1, the score for which reads "Bring a bale of hay and a bucket of water onto the stage for the piano to eat and drink. The performer may then feed the piano or leave it to eat by itself. If the former, the piece is over after the piano has been fed. If the latter, it is over after the piano eats or decides not to". Most of these compositions were performed as part of a loose New York art collective called Fluxus, all of whom were influenced by Cage and the Dadaists. This collective, led by George Maciunas, sometimes involved Cage himself, but also involved people like Henry Flynt, the inventor of conceptual art, who later became a campaigner against art itself, and who also much to Young's bemusement abandoned abstract music in the mid-sixties to form a garage band with Walter de Maria (who had played drums with the Druds): [Excerpt: Henry Flynt and the Insurrections, "I Don't Wanna"] Much of Young's work was performed at Fluxus concerts given in a New York loft belonging to another member of the collective, Yoko Ono, who co-curated the concerts with Young. One of Ono's mid-sixties pieces, her "Four Pieces for Orchestra" is dedicated to Young, and consists of such instructions as "Count all the stars of that night by heart. The piece ends when all the orchestra members finish counting the stars, or when it dawns. This can be done with windows instead of stars." But while these conceptual ideas remained a huge part of Young's thinking, he soon became interested in two other ideas. The first was the idea of just intonation -- tuning instruments and voices to perfect harmonics, rather than using the subtly-off tuning that is used in Western music. I'm sure I've explained that before in a previous episode, but to put it simply when you're tuning an instrument with fixed pitches like a piano, you have a choice -- you can either tune it so that the notes in one key are perfectly in tune with each other, but then when you change key things go very out of tune, or you can choose to make *everything* a tiny bit, almost unnoticeably, out of tune, but equally so. For the last several hundred years, musicians as a community have chosen the latter course, which was among other things promoted by Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier, a collection of compositions which shows how the different keys work together: [Excerpt: Bach (Glenn Gould), "The Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II: Fugue in F-sharp minor, BWV 883"] Young, by contrast, has his own esoteric tuning system, which he uses in his own work The Well-Tuned Piano: [Excerpt: La Monte Young, "The Well-Tuned Piano"] The other idea that Young took on was from Indian music, the idea of the drone. One of the four recordings of Young's music that is available from his Bandcamp, a 1982 recording titled The Tamburas of Pandit Pran Nath, consists of one hour, thirteen minutes, and fifty-eight seconds of this: [Excerpt: La Monte Young, "The Tamburas of Pandit Pran Nath"] Yes, I have listened to the whole piece. No, nothing else happens. The minimalist composer Terry Riley describes the recording as "a singularly rare contribution that far outshines any other attempts to capture this instrument in recorded media". In 1962, Young started writing pieces based on what he called the "dream chord", a chord consisting of a root, fourth, sharpened fourth, and fifth: [dream chord] That chord had already appeared in his Trio for Strings, but now it would become the focus of much of his work, in pieces like his 1962 piece The Second Dream of the High-Tension Line Stepdown Transformer, heard here in a 1982 revision: [Excerpt: La Monte Young, "The Second Dream of the High-Tension Line Stepdown Transformer"] That was part of a series of works titled The Four Dreams of China, and Young began to plan an installation work titled Dream House, which would eventually be created, and which currently exists in Tribeca, New York, where it's been in continuous "performance" for thirty years -- and which consists of thirty-two different pure sine wave tones all played continuously, plus purple lighting by Young's wife Marian Zazeela. But as an initial step towards creating this, Young formed a collective called Theatre of Eternal Music, which some of the members -- though never Young himself -- always claim also went by the alternative name The Dream Syndicate. According to John Cale, a member of the group, that name came about because the group tuned their instruments to the 60hz hum of the fridge in Young's apartment, which Cale called "the key of Western civilisation". According to Cale, that meant the fundamental of the chords they played was 10hz, the frequency of alpha waves when dreaming -- hence the name. The group initially consisted of Young, Zazeela, the photographer Billy Name, and percussionist Angus MacLise, but by this recording in 1964 the lineup was Young, Zazeela, MacLise, Tony Conrad and John Cale: [Excerpt: "Cale, Conrad, Maclise, Young, Zazeela - The Dream Syndicate 2 IV 64-4"] That recording, like any others that have leaked by the 1960s version of the Theatre of Eternal Music or Dream Syndicate, is of disputed legality, because Young and Zazeela claim to this day that what the group performed were La Monte Young's compositions, while the other two surviving members, Cale and Conrad, claim that their performances were improvisational collaborations and should be equally credited to all the members, and so there have been lawsuits and countersuits any time anyone has released the recordings. John Cale, the youngest member of the group, was also the only one who wasn't American. He'd been born in Wales in 1942, and had had the kind of childhood that, in retrospect, seems guaranteed to lead to eccentricity. He was the product of a mixed-language marriage -- his father, William, was an English speaker while his mother, Margaret, spoke Welsh, but the couple had moved in on their marriage with Margaret's mother, who insisted that only Welsh could be spoken in her house. William didn't speak Welsh, and while he eventually picked up the basics from spending all his life surrounded by Welsh-speakers, he refused on principle to capitulate to his mother-in-law, and so remained silent in the house. John, meanwhile, grew up a monolingual Welsh speaker, and didn't start to learn English until he went to school when he was seven, and so couldn't speak to his father until then even though they lived together. Young John was extremely unwell for most of his childhood, both physically -- he had bronchial problems for which he had to take a cough mixture that was largely opium to help him sleep at night -- and mentally. He was hospitalised when he was sixteen with what was at first thought to be meningitis, but turned out to be a psychosomatic condition, the result of what he has described as a nervous breakdown. That breakdown is probably connected to the fact that during his teenage years he was sexually assaulted by two adults in positions of authority -- a vicar and a music teacher -- and felt unable to talk to anyone about this. He was, though, a child prodigy and was playing viola with the National Youth Orchestra of Wales from the age of thirteen, and listening to music by Schoenberg, Webern, and Stravinsky. He was so talented a multi-instrumentalist that at school he was the only person other than one of the music teachers and the headmaster who was allowed to use the piano -- which led to a prank on his very last day at school. The headmaster would, on the last day, hit a low G on the piano to cue the assembly to stand up, and Cale had placed a comb on the string, muting it and stopping the note from sounding -- in much the same way that his near-namesake John Cage was "preparing" pianos for his own compositions in the USA. Cale went on to Goldsmith's College to study music and composition, under Humphrey Searle, one of Britain's greatest proponents of serialism who had himself studied under Webern. Cale's main instrument was the viola, but he insisted on also playing pieces written for the violin, because they required more technical skill. For his final exam he chose to play Hindemith's notoriously difficult Viola Sonata: [Excerpt: Hindemith Viola Sonata] While at Goldsmith's, Cale became friendly with Cornelius Cardew, a composer and cellist who had studied with Stockhausen and at the time was a great admirer of and advocate for the works of Cage and Young (though by the mid-seventies Cardew rejected their work as counter-revolutionary bourgeois imperialism). Through Cardew, Cale started to correspond with Cage, and with George Maciunas and other members of Fluxus. In July 1963, just after he'd finished his studies at Goldsmith's, Cale presented a festival there consisting of an afternoon and an evening show. These shows included the first British performances of several works including Cardew's Autumn '60 for Orchestra -- a piece in which the musicians were given blank staves on which to write whatever part they wanted to play, but a separate set of instructions in *how* to play the parts they'd written. Another piece Cale presented in its British premiere at that show was Cage's "Concerto for Piano and Orchestra": [Excerpt: John Cage, "Concerto for Piano and Orchestra"] In the evening show, they performed Two Pieces For String Quartet by George Brecht (in which the musicians polish their instruments with dusters, making scraping sounds as they clean them),  and two new pieces by Cale, one of which involved a plant being put on the stage, and then the performer, Robin Page, screaming from the balcony at the plant that it would die, then running down, through the audience, and onto the stage, screaming abuse and threats at the plant. The final piece in the show was a performance by Cale (the first one in Britain) of La Monte Young's "X For Henry Flynt". For this piece, Cale put his hands together and then smashed both his arms onto the keyboard as hard as he could, over and over. After five minutes some of the audience stormed the stage and tried to drag the piano away from him. Cale followed the piano on his knees, continuing to bang the keys, and eventually the audience gave up in defeat and Cale the performer won. After this Cale moved to the USA, to further study composition, this time with Iannis Xenakis, the modernist composer who had also taught Mickey Baker orchestration after Baker left Mickey and Sylvia, and who composed such works as "Orient Occident": [Excerpt: Iannis Xenakis, "Orient Occident"] Cale had been recommended to Xenakis as a student by Aaron Copland, who thought the young man was probably a genius. But Cale's musical ambitions were rather too great for Tanglewood, Massachusetts -- he discovered that the institute had eighty-eight pianos, the same number as there are keys on a piano keyboard, and thought it would be great if for a piece he could take all eighty-eight pianos, put them all on different boats, sail the boats out onto a lake, and have eighty-eight different musicians each play one note on each piano, while the boats sank with the pianos on board. For some reason, Cale wasn't allowed to perform this composition, and instead had to make do with one where he pulled an axe out of a single piano and slammed it down on a table. Hardly the same, I'm sure you'll agree. From Tanglewood, Cale moved on to New York, where he soon became part of the artistic circles surrounding John Cage and La Monte Young. It was at this time that he joined Young's Theatre of Eternal Music, and also took part in a performance with Cage that would get Cale his first television exposure: [Excerpt: John Cale playing Erik Satie's "Vexations" on "I've Got a Secret"] That's Cale playing through "Vexations", a piece by Erik Satie that wasn't published until after Satie's death, and that remained in obscurity until Cage popularised -- if that's the word -- the piece. The piece, which Cage had found while studying Satie's notes, seems to be written as an exercise and has the inscription (in French) "In order to play the motif 840 times in succession, it would be advisable to prepare oneself beforehand, and in the deepest silence, by serious immobilities." Cage interpreted that, possibly correctly, as an instruction that the piece should be played eight hundred and forty times straight through, and so he put together a performance of the piece, the first one ever, by a group he called the Pocket Theatre Piano Relay Team, which included Cage himself, Cale, Joshua Rifkin, and several other notable musical figures, who took it in turns playing the piece. For that performance, which ended up lasting eighteen hours, there was an entry fee of five dollars, and there was a time-clock in the lobby. Audience members punched in and punched out, and got a refund of five cents for every twenty minutes they'd spent listening to the music. Supposedly, at the end, one audience member yelled "Encore!" A week later, Cale appeared on "I've Got a Secret", a popular game-show in which celebrities tried to guess people's secrets (and which is where that performance of Cage's "Water Walk" we heard earlier comes from): [Excerpt: John Cale on I've Got a Secret] For a while, Cale lived with a friend of La Monte Young's, Terry Jennings, before moving in to a flat with Tony Conrad, one of the other members of the Theatre of Eternal Music. Angus MacLise lived in another flat in the same building. As there was not much money to be made in avant-garde music, Cale also worked in a bookshop -- a job Cage had found him -- and had a sideline in dealing drugs. But rents were so cheap at this time that Cale and Conrad only had to work part-time, and could spend much of their time working on the music they were making with Young. Both were string players -- Conrad violin, Cale viola -- and they soon modified their instruments. Conrad merely attached pickups to his so it could be amplified, but Cale went much further. He filed down the viola's bridge so he could play three strings at once, and he replaced the normal viola strings with thicker, heavier, guitar and mandolin strings. This created a sound so loud that it sounded like a distorted electric guitar -- though in late 1963 and early 1964 there were very few people who even knew what a distorted guitar sounded like. Cale and Conrad were also starting to become interested in rock and roll music, to which neither of them had previously paid much attention, because John Cage's music had taught them to listen for music in sounds they previously dismissed. In particular, Cale became fascinated with the harmonies of the Everly Brothers, hearing in them the same just intonation that Young advocated for: [Excerpt: The Everly Brothers, "All I Have to Do is Dream"] And it was with this newfound interest in rock and roll that Cale and Conrad suddenly found themselves members of a manufactured pop band. The two men had been invited to a party on the Lower East Side, and there they'd been introduced to Terry Phillips of Pickwick Records. Phillips had seen their long hair and asked if they were musicians, so they'd answered "yes". He asked if they were in a band, and they said yes. He asked if that band had a drummer, and again they said yes. By this point they realised that he had assumed they were rock guitarists, rather than experimental avant-garde string players, but they decided to play along and see where this was going. Phillips told them that if they brought along their drummer to Pickwick's studios the next day, he had a job for them. The two of them went along with Walter de Maria, who did play the drums a little in between his conceptual art work, and there they were played a record: [Excerpt: The Primitives, "The Ostrich"] It was explained to them that Pickwick made knock-off records -- soundalikes of big hits, and their own records in the style of those hits, all played by a bunch of session musicians and put out under different band names. This one, by "the Primitives", they thought had a shot at being an actual hit, even though it was a dance-craze song about a dance where one partner lays on the floor and the other stamps on their head. But if it was going to be a hit, they needed an actual band to go out and perform it, backing the singer. How would Cale, Conrad, and de Maria like to be three quarters of the Primitives? It sounded fun, but of course they weren't actually guitarists. But as it turned out, that wasn't going to be a problem. They were told that the guitars on the track had all been tuned to one note -- not even to an open chord, like we talked about Steve Cropper doing last episode, but all the strings to one note. Cale and Conrad were astonished -- that was exactly the kind of thing they'd been doing in their drone experiments with La Monte Young. Who was this person who was independently inventing the most advanced ideas in experimental music but applying them to pop songs? And that was how they met Lou Reed: [Excerpt: The Primitives, "The Ostrich"] Where Cale and Conrad were avant-gardeists who had only just started paying attention to rock and roll music, rock and roll was in Lou Reed's blood, but there were a few striking similarities between him and Cale, even though at a glance their backgrounds could not have seemed more different. Reed had been brought up in a comfortably middle-class home in Long Island, but despised the suburban conformity that surrounded him from a very early age, and by his teens was starting to rebel against it very strongly. According to one classmate “Lou was always more advanced than the rest of us. The drinking age was eighteen back then, so we all started drinking at around sixteen. We were drinking quarts of beer, but Lou was smoking joints. He didn't do that in front of many people, but I knew he was doing it. While we were looking at girls in Playboy, Lou was reading Story of O. He was reading the Marquis de Sade, stuff that I wouldn't even have thought about or known how to find.” But one way in which Reed was a typical teenager of the period was his love for rock and roll, especially doo-wop. He'd got himself a guitar, but only had one lesson -- according to the story he would tell on numerous occasions, he turned up with a copy of "Blue Suede Shoes" and told the teacher he only wanted to know how to play the chords for that, and he'd work out the rest himself. Reed and two schoolfriends, Alan Walters and Phil Harris, put together a doo-wop trio they called The Shades, because they wore sunglasses, and a neighbour introduced them to Bob Shad, who had been an A&R man for Mercury Records and was starting his own new label. He renamed them the Jades and took them into the studio with some of the best New York session players, and at fourteen years old Lou Reed was writing songs and singing them backed by Mickey Baker and King Curtis: [Excerpt: The Jades, "Leave Her For Me"] Sadly the Jades' single was a flop -- the closest it came to success was being played on Murray the K's radio show, but on a day when Murray the K was off ill and someone else was filling in for him, much to Reed's disappointment. Phil Harris, the lead singer of the group, got to record some solo sessions after that, but the Jades split up and it would be several years before Reed made any more records. Partly this was because of Reed's mental health, and here's where things get disputed and rather messy. What we know is that in his late teens, just after he'd gone off to New