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Jewish rabbinical law

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Latest podcast episodes about halacha

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Hanukah - The Custom to Light Candles in the Synagogue

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 7:28


Although the Misva of the Hanukah candle lighting requires only lighting in one's home, it is customary to light also in the synagogue, and this custom is mentioned already by the Shulhan Aruch (Orah Haim 671). The standard Berachot are recited over the lighting in the synagogue ("Le'hadlik," "She'asa Nissim," and, on the first night, "She'hehiyanu").The custom among Sephardic communities is to place the Menorah along the southern side of the synagogue, placing the first candle on the first night on the westernmost end of the Menorah, and then adding one candle each night and lighting the candles from east to west.If the person chosen to light candles in the synagogue on the first night – when the Beracha of "She'hehiyanu" is recited – lives alone, then when he returns home and lights his own candles, he does not repeat the Beracha of "She'hehiyanu." Since this fellow lit in the synagogue and recited "She'hehiyanu," and he is lighting at home only for himself, and not for family members, he does not repeat "She'hehiyanu." This is the ruling of the Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909), in Parashat Vayesheb. Conversely, if the first night of Hanukah is on Friday night, when people come to the synagogue after having already lit at home, the person who lights in the synagogue omits the Beracha of "She'hehiyanu." Since he recited "She'hehiyanu" when he lit at home, he does not repeat the Beracha when he lights in the synagogue.In his discussion of this subject, the Ben Ish Hai mentions only "She'hehiyanu," and not the Beracha of "She'asa Nissim." The clear implication of his comments is that in both these cases, the Beracha of "She'asa Nissim" is repeated. In the Ben Ish Hai's view, it seems, the Beracha of "She'hehiyanu" refers to the holiday of Hanukah, such that once it is recited on Hanukah it cannot be then repeated, whereas the Beracha of "She'asa Nissim" is linked to the act of lighting. And therefore, whenever one lights with a Beracha, he recites not only the Beracha of "Le'hadlik," but also the Beracha of "She'asa Nissim." This is also the view of Hacham Bension Abba Shaul (Israel, 1924-1998).However, Hacham Ovadia Yosef cites those who disagree, and who maintain that the Beracha of "She'asa Nissim" resembles "She'hehiyanu" in this regard. Therefore, if a person lit in the synagogue, and he lives alone, when he lights at home he recites only the first Beracha – "Le'hadlik." Conversely, on Friday night, the one who lights in the synagogue recites only "Le'hadlik," and does not repeat "She'asa Nissim" or, on the first night, "She'hehiyanu."Hacham Ovadia rules that if a synagogue has several different Minyanim for Minha, Hanukah candles are lit after each Minyan, with the recitation of Berachot. Even though candles were lit in the previous Minyanim, each Minyan lights candles, and the Berachot are recited. Hacham Ovadia notes that this is the custom is the famous Musayof synagogue in Jerusalem, which has many different Minyanim for Minha. Hacham Bension, however, maintained that it is preferable in such synagogues for candles to be lit after the first Minyan with enough oil supplied for the candles to burn throughout the duration of all subsequent Minyanim.It should be noted that if a Minyan is being held for Arbit late in the evening during Hanukah, such as at 10pm, and the people had clearly all prayed Minha in the synagogue where candles were lit, new candles are not lit at the Minyan for Arbit.Candles are lit in the synagogue only if ten people are present. Hacham Bension maintained that the presence of ten men is required for the synagogue lighting, but the Ben Ish Hai appeared to have held that women in the women's section can also be included. Since women are required to light Hanukah candles just as men are, they may be counted towards the group of ten that is necessary for the synagogue candle lighting. Sometimes, on Friday afternoon, ten men have not yet arrived by the time the Hanukah candles need to be lit in the synagogue. In such a case, the congregation may rely on the ruling of the Ben Ish Hai and count the women present in the women's section towards the required quorum of ten people, so the candles may be lit, with a Beracha.Hacham Benssion addresses the question of whether gentiles may be included in the "Pirsumeh Nisa" (publicizing of the miracle) required for the synagogue lighting. He concludes that non-Jews are not included in "Pirsumeh Nisa," and thus specifically ten Jews are needed for the synagogue lighting.Summary: If the one who lights candles in the synagogue lives alone, then when he returns home and lights Hanukah candles, he repeats only the Beracha of "Le'hadlik"; he does not recite "She'asa Nissim," or "She'hehiyanu" on the first night. On Friday night, the one who lights candles in the synagogue recites only "Le'hadlik," and does not repeat "She'asa Nissim" or "She'hehiyanu." If a synagogue has several different Minyanim for Minha, the Hanukah candles are lit after each Minyan, with the Berachot. Candles are lit in the synagogue only if ten people – men or women – are present.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Chanukah- Is It Permissible To Move The Lit Menorah

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 5:27


The Shulhan Aruch in Siman 675 establishes an important Halachic principle: "Hadlakah Osah Misva"-The act of lighting the Menorah fulfils the Misva, as opposed to "Hanaha Osah Misva"-the placement of the Menorah is the Misva. That is, it makes no difference if the Menorah was set up by a minor or others who are exempt from the Misva; one would not have to set it up again. This is also true regarding the Shabbat and Yom Tob candles.There is a discussion amongst the Poskim whether may light the Menorah in one place and then move it to another place. All agree that it is preferable to leave it in the place it was lit. Shulhan Aruch (675:1) clearly writes that the Menorah should not be moved after it was lit, because people will assume that he lit it for his own benefit like a lantern. The Shulhan Aruch also rules that one may not light the Menorah and hold it in his hands for the full half hour. This also appears that he is using it for his own benefit. Based on this, the Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909) ruled that a sick person who is bedbound upstairs should not light the Menorah in his bedroom and then have it brought downstairs to his window. Rather he should appoint an agent to light for him downstairs. Hacham Ovadia writes that today the circumstances have changed. It is not such a severe concern that people will think he is using the Menorah for his own benefit, since we use a special Menorah designated for the Misva. Therefore, even if he moved around with it, nobody would assume that he is using it as a lantern. In the olden days, people used regular candles both for the Misva and for illumination, so it was easy to get confused. Therefore, if one moved his Menorah, his Misva is not invalidated. This is also the opinion of the Mishna Berura in Siman 675. In the case of the sick person, Hacham Ovadia would allow him to light in his bedroom and then have it brought downstairs, but he still prefers the option of appointing an agent. It is also preferable not to move the Shabbat and Yom Tob candles after they have been lit. (Although not preferable, one may move Shabbat candles as long as hee didn't accept Shabbat yet.) Although the Taz (Rabbi David Segal, Poland, 1586-1667) holds that Shabbat and Yom Tob are different, The Hida (Rav Haim Yosef David Azulai, 1724-1806) defends the position of those who equate the two Misvot. The way to remember this Halacha is that the Beracha for all these Misvot is "L'Hadlik"-to light-meaning that the lighting is the Misva. SUMMARYIt is preferable not to move the Chanukah candles after they have been lit, but doing do would not invalidate the Misva..

The Franciska Show
Hair & Halacha - (Part 1 Of The Hair Covering Series) with Rachel Peleg

The Franciska Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 23:38


Rachel Peleg reviews all the major sources throughout history and halacha about hair covering. Prequel to the hair covering program.   To contact Franciska- franciskakay@gmail.com

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

On the first night of Chanukah we make three berachot before lighting the menorah: L'hadlik Ner Chanukah, She'asah Nisim and Shehechiyanu. What would be the Halacha in case where someone's wife lit for him on the first night and recited all three berachot? For example, he had to stay late in the office and told his wife to light with the kids. On the second night, when he lights, does he now say the beracha of Shehechiyanu?Hacham Ben Sion Abba Shaul (Israel, 1923-1998), rules that he does not say Shehechiyanu. He has fulfilled his obligation with his wife's beracha. For that matter, if the wife wasn't at home on the first night, and the husband lit, she does not have to make a Shehechiyanu on the second night. SUMMARYIf either the ba'al ha'bayit or the ba'alat ha'bayit lit and made a Shehechiyanu on the first night, the rest of the household has fulfilled their obligation to say Shehechiyanu, even if they were not present.

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim
Ten Minute Halacha - Tevilas Keilim for Chanukah Shaped Cookie Cutters

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 11:05


TO TORAH - Rabbi Steinhauers shiurim
Halacha series - Channuka and Shabbos

TO TORAH - Rabbi Steinhauers shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 28:35


Jewish Thoughtflow
Branches of the Menorah - Curved or Straight

Jewish Thoughtflow

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 34:38


Were the branches of the menorah straight or curved? If you ask your average person (try it) you will generally recieve the response: It's a machlokes Rishonim. If you ask a more academic leaning person, the answer may be 'it was definitely rounded, haven't you seen the arch?'. However, the Lubavitcher Rebbe was adament that it was in fact straight. Who is correct? Sources used in the episode: תרומה כה:לב - וְשִׁשָּׁ֣ה קָנִ֔ים יֹצְאִ֖ים מִצִּדֶּ֑יהָ שְׁלֹשָׁ֣ה ׀ קְנֵ֣י מְנֹרָ֗ה מִצִּדָּהּ֙ הָאֶחָ֔ד וּשְׁלֹשָׁה֙ קְנֵ֣י מְנֹרָ֔ה מִצִּדָּ֖הּ הַשֵּׁנִֽי רש'י תרומה כה:לב. - לְכָאן וּלְכָאן בַּאֲלַכְסוֹן, נִמְשָׁכִים וְעוֹלִין עַד כְּנֶגֶד גָּבְהָהּ שֶׁל מְנוֹרָה שֶׁהוּא קָנֶה הָאֶמְצָעִי. רמב'ם ביאת המקדש 3:2 - וְשָׁלֹשׁ רַגְלַיִם הָיוּ לָהּ. וּשְׁלֹשָׁה כַּפְתּוֹרִים אֲחֵרִים הָיוּ בִּקְנֵה הַמְּנוֹרָה שֶׁמֵּהֶן יוֹצְאִים שֵׁשֶׁת הַקָּנִים. שְׁלֹשָׁה מִצַּד זֶה וּשְׁלֹשָׁה מִצַּד זֶה. פירוש המשניות מנחות ג:ז. - ראיתי לצייר בכאן צורת המנורה שלימה... ואני מצייר עכשיו הצורה הזאת שהגביעים צורת דבר משולש והכפתור עגולה והפרח חצי עגולה כדי שיהיה קל להצטייר שאין הכוונה בצורה הזאת להודיע בה צורת הגביע על אמתתו לפי שכבר בארתי אותו לך אבל הכוונה להודיע בה מספר הגביעים וכפתורים והפרחים ומקומותם והשיעור הנשאר מעמוד המנורה שאין בו שום דבר והמקומות שהיו בהן הפרחים והכפתורים וכולה איך היתה וזו היא צורת כל זה: אברהם בן הרמב'ם תרומה כה:לב - בכור שור תרומה כה:לא - וכל הקנים היו שוים במדה אחת ועשוים כמין ענפי האילן קנה גוף המנורה גבוה מכולם שנים שבצדו נמוכים ממנה מעט כפי האלכסין והשנים נמוכים מן הראשונים כפי שהם יוצאים בנמוך והשלישיים יותר כפי שהם יוצאים בנמוך Menachos 28b - ר' יוסי בר רבי יהודה אומר אף של עץ לא יעשה כדרך שעשו מלכי בית חשמונאי אמרו לו משם ראיה שפודים של ברזל היו וחיפום בבעץ העשירו עשאום של כסף חזרו והעשירו עשאום של זהב אבן עזרא כה:לב - וששה. טעם קנים. עגולים ארוכים חלולים braaisa in midos 46 (yalkut brings down pretty much the same) - שבעה נרותיה כנגד שבעה כוכבים המשמשין את העולם ואלו הן שצ״מ חנכ״ל https://templeinstitute.org/menorah-archeological-evidence/ https://outorah.org/p/5720/

The Q & A with Rabbi Breitowitz Podcast
Q&A- Chanukah Kavannos, Ohr HaGanuz, & Talmud Censorship

The Q & A with Rabbi Breitowitz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 107:12


Join Mentors Mission in Israel! A Booster We Can All Agree On!  December 28, 2021 - January 2, 2022 Experience of A Lifetime At the Ohr Somayach New Bais Medrash Itinerary and Packages Available on our Website Vaccination within 6 months Required Limited Time Offer - Hotel Package (Hotel Bookings before November 28th Only) Register Now to Insure Availability www.mentorsmission.com 718-644-9037 Where did the minhag of showing tzitzis out come from? 5:38 When mashiach comes will we have a unified Halacha? 8:45 What principles disqualify someone from olam haba? 15:14 What is the basis of hatred of Jews from Arabs? 20:00 What is the significance of mentioning the sons of Rav Pappa in a siyyum? 21:44 Why don't we enunciate Hashem's 4 letter name as we do other names? 25:12 Is a Jew that makes a lot of money and he's generous, can he justify having fancy stuff? 31:42 Why is there so much evil and hashchasa when it comes to gender? 40:39 Is money won in poker (by a frum Jew) given to tzedaka clean? 48:00 Is thanksgiving assur for Jews to celebrate? 51:45 Why does the first bracha in birkas hamazon differ among Jews? 54:01 To what extent does Hashem listen to evil people or people of other religions? 1:00:08 Could someone give more than 20% ma'aser if they have the capacity? 1:02:30 Hashem keeps Torah, so how do we explain rain on Shabbat? 1:04:50 Why did the song yedid nefesh change? 1:09:08 In shidduch dating, how much leniency should someone have in hashgafa differences? 1:11:22 Why are there no other holidays about dedication of the Temple (such as Chanukah)? 1:13:44 What was the effect of the church's censorship the Talmud? 1:16:00 Why don't non Jews that Hashem speaks to in Torah narrative immediately believe in Hashem (over their own idols)?   1:17:39 What are the difference between animals and humans? 1:21:44 Why was King Shlomo allowed to have so many wives and how could some not  be Jewish? 1:24:40 What is the “Ohr HaGanuz”? 1:25:57 What level of authority does the Saatmar Rav have on the matter of medinas Israel? 1:29:47 What is Kaf HaKelah? 1:30:48 What does the Torah say about whistleblowers? Should Jews be journalists? 1:33:14 Does a child from a woman who converted for marriage (but it was a “legal” conversion) have questionable Judaism? 1:35:26 What is the proper kavanna to have when lighting a menorah on Chanukah? 1:36:31 Is the book “garden of emunah” good for a Baal Teshuva to read? 1:38:01 Is it halachically permissible for a married couple to have a hyphenated last name or for a husband to take his wife's last name? 1:42:14 Do goyim have a neshama? 1:43:25 Do all Jewish names have meaning / Ruach HaKodesh of parents? 1:46:40 When Shabbos is over we lose the special neshama, but if I don't eat melava malka, do I still have it?  Comments? Feedback? Would you like to sponsor an episode? A series? We'd love to hear from you : podcasts@ohr.edu https://podcasts.ohr.edu/ Visit us @ ohr.edu !   Produced by:  

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Mukse: Moving a Mukse Item for a Permitted Purpose

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 9:25


One of the categories of Mukse is Keli She'm'lachto L'isur-a utensil whose primary function is prohibited on Shabbat. The Hachamim permitted moving such an item only L'sorech Gufo-for another permitted function or L'sorech M'komo-for its place. One example of Keli She'm'lachto L'isur is a sewing needle, as its primary purpose is for sewing which is prohibited. It would be permitted to use it to remove a splinter, L'Sorech Gufo. The same applies to knitting needles. The Poskim define rulers and scales, as Kelim She'm'lachtam L'isur, since it is prohibited to measure on Shabbat. This applies to non-digital scales as well. It is only permitted to use a food scale for the purpose of a Misva, such as measuring Masa or Maror for the Misva on Pesah. Other examples include: calculators, radios and flashlights. Accordingly, if someone wanted to move his clock radio to see the time, it would be permitted, as that would constitute L'sorech Gufo, as long as he is careful not to pull out the plug. He would also be permitted to move the clock radio from the dresser, L'sorech M'komo, in order to make space for something else that he wants to put there. A car is Keli She'm'lachto L'isur. If someone forgot food in the car before Shabbat, he may open the door or trunk to remove the food. This is considered L'sorech M'komo, since the closed door is blocking access to the food, it may be moved out of the way. Of course, this leniency applies only to rare cases in which opening the car door or trunk does not activate any lights or electric circuits. Also, there is no rationale to permit directly closing the door after removing the needed items.Clothes that were left in a closed electric dryer before Shabbat may be removed on Shabbat, assuming that opening the dryer door does not activate lights or electric circuits. Like the car, the leniency is because the door is a Keli She'm'lachto L'isur and opening the door is L'sorech M'komo. It would not be permitted to directly close the door after removing the clothes. Electric fans and electric blankets are Kelim She'm'lachtam L'isur, and may be used as long as they were plugged in before Shabbat. Of course, the dial or button may not be adjusted. It is permitted to move the fan to bring the flow of air closer, since that is considered L'sorech Gufo. Likewise, the fan may be moved so that the flow of air blows away from him, since that is considered L'sorech M'komo. Percolators, crockpots and coffee makers are classified as Keli She'm'lachto L'isur. If they have water inside of them, it is permissible to move them as needed. If not, they may be moved only L'sorech Gufo and L'sorech M'komo, e.g. remove them from the counter if their space is needed.Other examples of Keli She'm'lachto L'isur include:• extensions cords • adapters• scissors• Shabbat timers• nail clippers• fly swatters• regular pens (as opposed to special artist pens or quills which would have a stricter classification.• hole punchers, staplers• umbrellas• hair brush and comb• gardening tools such as hoes, rakes and sprinklersWallets- There is a Machloket (disagreement) between Ashkenazim and Sepharadim regarding wallets. When it has money in it, it is clearly Mukse as a Ba'sees (base) and may not be moved at all. However, if there was no money in the wallet, Ashkenazim are strict since it is designated for money. However, Maran in 310:7 rules that it is permissible. Similarly, an empty Sedaka pouch or an empty case of a musical instrument is also not Mukse.Toothbrush- According to the Poskim that brushing teeth with toothpaste is prohibited, a toothbrush is a Keli She'm'lachto L'isur. Hacham Ovadia has a famous ruling to permit the use of toothpaste on Shabbat, in which case the toothbrush is not considered Mukse at all.

KMTT - the Torah Podcast
Parashat Vayeshev with Rav Dovid Gottlieb

KMTT - the Torah Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 33:57


Parashat Vayeshev with Rav Dovid Gottlieb #1 - Classical Commentaries - Who Sold Yosef? It's Not As Simple As You Might Think #2 - Contemporary Commentaries - What Can We Learn from Esav's Children? An Amazing Teaching from the Oznayim Le'Torah #3 - Sparks of Chassidus - Being True To Yourself - A Beautiful Teaching from the Sefas Emes #4 - Sparks of Musar - The Hardest Thing in Life: Admitting Mistakes #5 - Halacha from the Parsha - The Prohibition to Embarrass Another Person

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Mukse- Moving A Non-Mukse Item Unnecessarily and Other Items

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 5:03


The Shulhan Aruch (308:4) states that a Keli She'm'lachto L'heter-A utensil which has a permitted function, may be moved for any purpose, including its own protection. However, Maran adds a caveat that even such a utensil should not be moved "Shelo L'sorech Klal"-for no purpose whatsoever. That is, one should not fidget with these items for no reason. Maran then lists two exception to this rule: food and holy books. These items may be moved randomly, in any fashion. Some Poskim want to include clothing and jewelry in this category of exceptions, as well. However, Hacham Ovadia in Hazon Ovadia (Vol. 3, p. 34) cites the Me'iri who rules that clothes and jewelry may not be moved randomly.-----Hacham Ovadia (Hazon Ovadia Vol 3, p. 47) rules that a food vessel requiring Tevilah (immersion) in a Mikveh before use, is not Mukse, even though it may not be immersed on Shabbat. He bases his leniency on the fact that some opinions do permit Tevilat Kelim on Shabbat, and even according to the mainstream opinion, the vessel can be given to a non-Jew, which removes the obligation for immersion, and then be used by borrowing it back from the non-Jew. A pot which became non-kosher, which needs Koshering through Hag'ala, is not Mukse. Hacham Ovadia explains that although it may not be koshered on Shabbat, it is still suitable for containing cold food.------There is a question whether one may move a food item which has a questionable Kashrut. For example, there is debate whether powdered milk was included in the prohibition of consuming milk from a non-Jew. Hacham Ovadia was strict on this matter and ruled that such products are not kosher. If one had a chocolate bar made with such milk, would it be Mukse on Shabbat? Hacham Ovadia gives several reasons why it is not Mukse. First, it may be given to a non-Jew or even to young children. Second, the dissenting opinions who do permit the powdered milk of non-Jews may be relied upon in the context of Mukse. ------Hacham Ovadia (Hazon Ovadia Vol. 3, p. 9) rules that stale bread is not Mukse, because it can be consumed in soup on Shabbat. SUMMARYNon-Mukse items may not be moved randomly, for no reason, except for food and holy books.Pots in need of immersion or Koshering are not Mukse. Products made with non-Kosher powdered milk are not Mukse. Stale bread is not Mukse.

Mikvah.org
Halacha Review: Preparing for Immersion with Mrs. Ruthie Sperlin

Mikvah.org

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 105:00


Mrs. Ruthie Sperlin presents the halachos for Chafifa & Tevilla - preparing for immersion, recorded live at Miriams Motherhood Center of Crown Heights. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mikvah/support

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Is It Permissible to Touch a Mukse Item Without Moving It?

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 3:19


The Shulhan Aruch establishes in several places that it is permissible to touch Mukse items, as long as not even a part of it moves. For example, Maran rules that a corpse is Mukse, and even though a single limb may not be moved, it is permissible to touch it. The Shulhan Aruch (306:6) records the Halacha that covering a Mukse item with a vessel is permitted, only if he does not touch the Mukse itself. The commentaries wonder what the problem is, since it is permitted to touch Mukse. The Maggid Mishne understands that the case is referring to a Mukse item which is round, and touching it will cause the item to roll on its axis. The Trumat Ha'deshen (Rav Yisrael Isserlin, 1390-1460) offers an alternate explanation: Touching Mukse is prohibited in a case where the purpose of the contact is to benefit the Mukse item. The case of placing a protective covering over the Mukse item is for the benefit of the Mukse item, and that is why it is prohibited. Thus, there is a disagreement between the Maggid Mishne and the Trumat Ha'deshen whether one may touch a Mukse item for its benefit. The Bet Yosef brings both positions. The Magen Abraham (Rabbi Abraham Gombiner, Poland, 1637-1682) is stringent in accordance with the Trumat Ha'deshen. However, many Poskim rule in accordance with the Maggid Mishne, including the Vilna Gaon and the Mishna Berura.Hacham Ovadia brings a proof to be lenient from the ruling of Maran who permits anointing a corpse with oil on Shabbat, even though the corpse is being touched for its benefit. This is also the opinion of Teshubot Bene Sion.SUMMARYIt is permissible to touch a Mukse item for its benefit, as long as no part of it will move.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Making a Permissible Item Mukse on Shabbat

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 5:01


The Halacha prohibits "Bitul Keli MeHechano"-neutralizing a vessel from functioning on Shabbat. That is, one may not perform an action that would render an otherwise permitted vessel to be Mukse. The classic example is placing a bowl underneath a hen to catch her egg. The egg is Mukse as "Nolad"-an item that came into being on Shabbat. Once the egg falls in the bowl, the bowl becomes Mukse as a "Basees"-a base for Mukse. Another case would be placing a vessel underneath a lit candle to catch the oil that drips. That oil is Mukse because it was designated for lighting. This is prohibited because when the oil drips on the bowl, it neutralizes the bowl from any other use. The Mishna Berura (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933) discusses an interesting case brought by the Magen Abraham (Rav Abraham Gombiner, Poland, 1637-1682) in which one neutralizes a vessel by "Gerama"-indirect means. For example, if there was a drip of oil from a hanging lamp on to the table. If one placed a vessel under the table, is it permitted to then move the table to expose the vessel and catch the drip? The Magen Abraham rules that it is permitted to do so, because he merely moved the obstacle and the bowl became aligned "automatically." Similarly, the Gemara deals with a case of "Teruma Tehora" (pure gifts to the Kohen), which is not Mukse, and "Teruma Temeah" (impure gifts to the Kohen) which is Mukse, in the same basket. As long as both are in the basket, the basket may be moved. The Gemara permits removing the "Teruma Tehora" on Shabbat, leaving only the Mukse "Teruma Temeah," even though the basket becomes Mukse as a "Basees." This is permitted since, taking out the "good" neutralized the basket only indirectly by leaving the "bad" to remain. This leniency can also be applied to a plate of food which also contains Mukse bones. It is permitted to eat all the food and leave only the bones, even though the plate becomes Mukse. Again, since the vessel was neutralized indirectly it is permitted. This is the conclusion of Hacham Yishak, as well.SUMMARYOne may rely on the lenient authorities and neutralize a vessel from use through indirect means.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Mukse: Firewood, Matches and Disposable Pans

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 8:30


Hacham Yishak Beracha, in his book Birhat Yishak on Hilchot Mukse (p.10), establishes a principle based on the Gemara in Masechet Shabbat (p. 124) that any item not considered a Keli (utensil), is completely Mukse, and may not be moved even L'Sorech M'komo-for its place, or L'sorech Gufo-for a permitted function. Therefore, a log of firewood is altogether Mukse and may not be moved for any purpose. A log is not a Keli (utensil), since it only has a one-time use; it is consumed as soon as its purpose is fulfilled. Hacham Yishak applies this principle to matches, cigarettes and charcoal, as well. These items are not considered a Keli, since they are consumed and destroyed with their use. However, he cites Hacham Bension who distinguished between a natural log of firewood and these items which were designed and produced expressly for this purpose. Therefore, he considers the match a Keli (utensil), and it may be moved L'Sorech M'komo-for its place, or L'sorech Gufo-for a permitted function-such as a toothpick or collar stay. Rav Moshe Feinstein (Russia-New York, 1895-1986) was stringent and did not view matches as a utensil, rather as firewood. However, all agree that this line of reasoning does not apply to a disposable utensil whose function was prohibited, such as an aluminum foil baking pan. Although like firewood, it too is discarded upon completing its function, there are two major differences. First, while the disposable pan may be thrown away after use, it does not disintegrate as the log, match and cigarette. Moreover, it is common to reuse aluminum foil pans nowadays. Therefore, disposable pans have the same Halacha as cooking pots and are designated Keli She'm'lachto L'isur, which may be moved L'Sorech M'komo-for its place, or L'sorech Gufo-for a permitted function. SUMMARYA log of firewood is completely Mukse and may not be moved for any purpose. Disposable baking pans are utensils and may be moved L'Sorech M'komo-for its place, or L'sorech Gufo-for a permitted function. One should avoid using matches for a permitted function, such as for a toothpick, although there are those who are lenient.

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim
Ten Minute Halacha - May a Woman Affix a Mezuzah?

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 11:03


The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)
3 Minute Halacha- A 7 Branch Menorah and Leichter

The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 3:03


Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Are Fruit Peels, Flour, Raw Rice, or Raw Potatoes Considered Mukse?

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 4:10


Shells and peels of food which are edible, even if only to animals, are not Mukse. For example, the Shemirat Shabbat K'hilhata (Yehoshua Yeshaya Neuvirth, Jerusalem 1927-1913, Ch. 20:27) rules that orange peels, watermelon pits and soft bones are not Mukse and may be handled on Shabbat. He goes as far as to say that even if these items were already put in the garbage, they are not Mukse. On the other hand, there are foods which are Mukse on Shabbat. For example, flour or raw rice are Mukse because they are inedible and may not be prepared on Shabbat. Regarding raw potatoes, the Shemirat Shabbat K'hilhata is stringent, although the Menuhat Ahaba (Rabbi Moshe Halevy, Israel, 1961-2001) was lenient, since they are edible under extenuating circumstances. Similarly, all types of raw meat are not Mukse, since it can be consumed. Therefore, if a woman left raw meat on the counter before Shabbat, she may place it in the freezer on Shabbat. Frozen raw meat in the freezer may be moved, as long as it could be thawed out before the end of Shabbat. Food which is Asur B'hana'ah-forbidden to benefit from, such as Hames on Pesach, is Mukse. Therefore, it is prohibited to handle or rearrange Hames items on Shabbat and Yom Tob of Pesah that have been sold to the non-Jew before Pesah. Similarly, fruit which is Orlah (within the first three years) or food upon which a vow of forbidding benefit has been taken, are also Mukse.SUMMARYWatermelon pits, orange peels, soft bones, raw potatoes and raw meat are NOT Mukse.Raw rice and flour ARE Mukse, as well as food items that are forbidden to benefit from, such as Hames, Orlah and foods upon which there is a vow forbidding benefit.

YUTORAH: R' Eliakim Koenigsberg -- Recent Shiurim
Halacha Topics - Tzitzis - Techeiles

YUTORAH: R' Eliakim Koenigsberg -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 22:57


TO TORAH - Rabbi Steinhauers shiurim
Halacha series: home is where... you light the Menora

TO TORAH - Rabbi Steinhauers shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 29:08


Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Mukse- Using One's Body to Move a Mukse Item

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 4:05


The Halacha only prohibits moving Mukse with one's hands. However, it is permitted to move any type of Mukse item with other parts of the body, including feet, head, mouth etc. This leniency is known as "Tiltul B'Gufo" and applies to all categories of Mukse. Accordingly, if there is a hundred-dollar bill on the floor, it is permitted to kick it to the corner of the room for safekeeping until after Shabbat. The Shulhan Aruch, in Siman 311, permits using one's body, even when the purpose of moving the Mukse item is for the benefit or protection of the item itself. The Poskim discuss whether moving Mukse with the back of one's hand is also considered using the body, or is it deemed the regular prohibited use of the hands. The Halacha Shelema cites Hacham Bension (Ohr Lesion II) that it's permissible. Nevertheless, he marshals many sources, including from the Rishonim, that the back of the hand is prohibited just like the hand. Therefore, one should be strict and not use the back of the hand to move Mukse.Another question on this matter is whether Mukse items that are normally handled with other body parts, besides the hands, can also be included in the leniency of "Tiltul B'Gufo." For example, is it permitted to kick a Mukse soccer ball? Hacham Ovadia clearly rules that it is prohibited. The leniency only applies when it is not the regular way to handle the Mukse.SUMMARYIt is permitted to move any category of Mukse item, with another part of his body besides his hands, even for the purpose of protecting the Mukse item. The back of the hand is prohibited just like the hands. If the normal way to move the item is with his body, then it is prohibited.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

The Shulhan Aruch (311:8) introduces the concept in Hilchot Mukse of "Tiltul Min Ha'sad"-indirectly moving a Mukse item. He brings the classic example of pulling a radish out the ground before it takes root. In this action, it is permitted to move the Mukse dirt indirectly through pulling the non-Mukse radish. However, Maran restricts this principle to cases in which the indirect movement of the Mukse is for the purpose of the non-Mukse item, in this case for the radish. The Poskim discuss common applications of this principle, for example, if pistachio shells or olive pits (which are clearly Mukse, since they are not edible even to animals) were left on the Shabbat table. If there was a substantial amount that would constitute a "Graf Shel Re'i"- a repulsive heap, it is permissible to remove the Mukse directly. However, if it was not such an amount, it is prohibited to directly move the shells or pits. The question is whether one may remove them indirectly using a permitted object such a knife to scrape them off the table into the garbage pail. Hagaon Rabbi Zalman (Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, 1745-1812, Russia) holds that using a knife is not considered "Tiltul Min Ha'sad"-indirect handling; it is considered direct handling. Therefore, it is prohibited. This also the opinion of the Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim Baghdad, 1833-1909) in the second year, Mikes, where he says that it is prohibited to clean bones off the table neither with his hand or with a utensil. However, on the other hand the majority of the Poskim are lenient, including the Ramban (Milhamot Hashem, Shabbat 48b), the Rosh (4:10). This is how the Taz (Rabbi David Segal, Poland, 1586-1667) and the Mishna Berura (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933) rule. Hacham Bension and Menuhat Ahaba also clearly permits using a knife to scrape off refuse from the table, and this is the accepted ruling. Even if a knife is considered indirect, the question is whether a utensil designed for scraping and cleaning, such a broom, is also considered indirect, or is that considered the direct way of handling the Mukse. The Poskim are lenient and permit using a broom and a dustpan to sweep up Mukse items, for the purpose of cleaning the floor or table. Likewise, it is permitted to roll up a disposable tablecloth with all the Mukse refuse and remove it from the table for disposal.SUMMARYIt is permitted to clean Mukse items off a table or floor indirectly, using a knife, broom or dustpan.

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim
Ten Minute Halacha - The World Can't Exist Without Yisrael

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 11:00


YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim
Ten Minute Halacha - Learning Torah at Night

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 14:15


Rabbi Shmuel Silber - Institute for Jewish Continuity
Tefillah | Halacha and Hashkafa (Part 1)

Rabbi Shmuel Silber - Institute for Jewish Continuity

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 58:51


New series by Rabbi Shmuel Silber

Mikvah.org
Halacha Review: Counting the 7 days with Mrs. Mushky Kotlarsky

Mikvah.org

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 81:19


Mrs. Mushky Kotlarsky presents the Halachos of the Hefsek Tahara and the following 7 days, recorded live at Miriams Motherhood Center of Crown Heights. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mikvah/support

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Mukse- If a Mukse Item Gets Mixed Up With Similar Non-Mukse Items

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 3:57


One type of Mukse is "Basees L'davar Ha'asur"- a base for a Mukse item also becomes Mukse. Even if the Mukse item is subsequently removed, the base remains Mukse, as long as the Mukse item was on it during Ben Hash'mashot (twilight) of Ereb Shabbat. For example, if money was placed on a chair on Friday, the chair becomes Mukse, even if a non-Jew removed the money during Shabbat.Hacham Ovadia was asked the following question regarding this Halacha: What is the Halacha if the Mukse chair became mixed in with the other identical (non-Mukse) chairs in the house? Does the concept of Bitul (nullification) in the majority apply to Mukse, as it does to meat and milk? Accordingly, if there were a total of three chairs, then the Mukse chair would be Batel (nullified) in the majority of permitted chairs. However, the principle of Bitul does not apply to "Davar She'Yesh Lo Matirin"-cases in which the forbidden item will later become permitted. The classic case is an egg laid on Yom Tob, which is Mukse of Nolad, that became mixed in one thousand permitted eggs is not Batel, since that egg will become permitted after Yom Tob. Similarly, in the case of the chairs, the Mukse chair will become permitted after Shabbat, and would not be nullified in the mixture. Nevertheless, the Nodeh B'Yehuda (R. Yechezkel ben Yehuda Landau, 1713-1793, Prague) has the famous opinion that the restriction of "Davar She'Yesh Lo Matirin" applies only to food. His rationale is that food is a one-time use; it's eaten and then it's gone. Regarding such items the Halacha requires delaying the one-time consumption to eat it in its permitted state and not while it is still forbidden, since anyway there is only "one shot." However, something like a chair can be used time and time again. Therefore, the Halacha does not require one to miss out benefiting from it on Shabbat. Hacham Ovadia is lenient and relies on the Nodeh B'Yehuda in the case of Mukse, which is M'drabanan, and permits using all the chairs.SUMMARYIf a Mukse non-food item became mixed in with identical permitted items, one may rely on the lenient opinion and use all the items on Shabbat.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Mukse- Is It Permissible to Pet an Animal on Shabbat?

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 3:42


Animals are Mukse. Therefore, it is prohibited to pick up a pet, such as a dog or a cat on Shabbat. The Poskim discuss whether it is permitted to pet the hair of an animal, without moving its body. The Be'ur Halacha (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933, 312:11) does not reach a firm conclusion, but he leans towards the position that the hair is different from the body of the animal, even though it is attached. Accordingly, it should be permitted to wipe one's hands on the tail of a horse. Apparently, this distinction between the hair and the body is based on the fact that the whole reason the animal is Mukse is because it is prohibited from use on Shabbat. The prohibition of using an animal only applies to its body, and therefore the Mukse does as well. Just as there was no Gezerah-enactment prohibiting use of the hair, there was also no classification as Mukse. Nevertheless, practically it is difficult to separate between petting the hair and contact with the animal's body. Hacham Yishak Beracha in his book on Mukse (p.86) brings both sides of the argument, but concludes that it is preferable to be strict and not pet animals.SUMMARYAnimals are Mukse, and it is best to refrain from petting them.

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim
Ten Minute Halacha - Adding Lines Into Tefilah

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 10:50


Rabbi Daniel Kalish Shas Illuminated
Upon Learning Halacha, We Arrive At Hashkafa by Rabbi Daniel Kalish

Rabbi Daniel Kalish Shas Illuminated

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021


Upon Learning Halacha, We Arrive At Hashkafa in Pesach by Rabbi Daniel Kalish

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Mukse- Is Flour, Coffee or Raw Eggs Considered Mukse?

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 3:41


Hacham Ovadia discusses different food items that may fall into the category of Mukse. First, he deals with flour. He rules that even though it cannot be used for baking on Shabbat, nevertheless, since it can be mixed with sugar and consumed "as-is," it is considered edible and not Mukse. Similarly, ground coffee (not instant) is also not Mukse, since it can be mixed with sugar and consumed. This is brought by MaHarit Paracci in his Ginat Veradim (OC 3:3).Hacham Ovadia rules that a raw egg is not Mukse. Since some people do eat raw eggs, e.g. to enhance their voice, it is deemed edible and not Mukse. In Hazon Ovadia (3:226) he rules that an egg that has a blood spot in the yellow is still not Mukse. Although it is forbidden to be eaten, it may be given to a dog.The Menuhat Ahaba (Rabbi Moshe Halevi, Israel, 1961-2001) rules that even foods which cannot be eaten without cooking, such as a potato, are still not Mukse, since they can be consumed under extenuating circumstances. Hacham Ovadia disagrees and considers such foods Mukse. SUMMARYFlour, ground coffee grinds and raw eggs are not Mukse. Raw potatoes and other foods that cannot be eaten raw should be considered Mukse.

Rabbi Yisrael Motzen - Ner Tamid Congregation

Women's Halacha class

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Mukse- Documents, Driver's License, Passports

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 3:32


There is a category of Mukse known as "Mukse Mahamat Hesron Kis"-items that are Mukse because of their value. These items may not be handled for their designated use, because they are prohibited, yet the owner will not use them for any other conceivable permitted use, because of their value. It is prohibited to handle items in this category of Mukse for any purpose- whether for a permitted function, for its place or to protect it. Examples of this category included important documents, such as passports, driver's licenses or a birth certificate. These items are prohibited from use on Shabbat, as they may not be read, and at the same time, they are too important to use for any other permitted purpose. A credit card and bills or receipts that one saves are also Mukse Mahamat Hesron Kis. They are different from a regular sheet of paper, which although is designated a Keli She'm'lachto L'isur, because it is designated for writing, but it may be used for a permitted function or for its place. The Sefer Tiltul Shabbat also includes in this category items which were purchased and one intends to return them. Since they are being designated for return, on will not use it for any purpose, including permitted functions, so as not to lose the opportunity to return it intact. This would be like merchandise which is also Mukse.SUMMARYImportant documents and items designated for return to a store are Mukse and may not be handled for any purpose.

YUTORAH: R' Eliakim Koenigsberg -- Recent Shiurim
Halacha Topics - Tzitzis - Ripped Tzitzis

YUTORAH: R' Eliakim Koenigsberg -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 13:33


Insight of the Week
Parashat Vayeseh: The Enduring Impact of Our Actions

Insight of the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2021


The opening verse of Parashat Vayeseh tells, "Va'yeseh Yaakob Mi'Be'er Sheba Va'yelech Harana" – "Yakaob left from Be'er Sheba, and he went to Haran." Rashi notes that the first half of this verse – "Yaakob left from Be'er Sheba" – seems redundant. After all, the Torah is now going to tell us of Yaakob's experiences after leaving and heading to Haran, and we already know that he had been living in Be'er Sheba. There thus seems to be no reason for the Torah to inform us that Yaakob left from Be'er Sheba. Rashi answers by stating, "This teaches that a righteous people's departure from a place makes an impression…" The Torah mentioned that Yaakob left Be'er Sheba to emphasize that his departure "made an impression." The standard understanding of Rashi's comment is that a Sadik's departure leaves a void that is palpably felt. A city, or a community, is simply not the same once a righteous person leaves. Significantly, this point is made specifically about Yaakob, who is described earlier (25:27) as a "Yosheb Ohalim" – "dweller of tents," referring to his diligent engagement in Torah learning. Yaakob was not a public figure. He did not give speeches or teach students. He spent his time devotedly engrossed in his studies. Nevertheless, his departure was discernibly felt, because his presence infused the town with an element of sanctity that was then lost when he left. There is, however, also a different understanding of Rashi's comment. The scholars of Kabbalah teach the concept of "Reshimu" – the spiritual impact of a person's actions which endures forever in that location. Every Misva we perform leaves an indelible impression upon the place where we fulfilled it. If we learn Torah in a certain location, the sanctity of our Torah learning remains in that place for all eternity. This is why Halacha urges one who, for whatever reason, is unable to pray with a Minyan to nevertheless pray in a synagogue. Even though he will be praying privately, it is far preferable to pray in a synagogue, a place infused with the Kedusha of the countless prayers recited and words of Torah spoken there. This, then, might be the meaning of Rashi's comment, that a Sadik's departure "Oseh Roshem" – "makes an impression." Even after he leaves, the spiritual impact of his many good deeds remains and continues to benefit the residents of his town. Conversely, the sins we commit have a harmful spiritual impact that endures forever. Even if nobody witnesses the forbidden act, its spiritual effects make an impression that will have detrimental consequences many years later. For this reason, Rav Haim Palachi (Turkey, 1788-1868) writes that if one sees two people fighting in the street, he should ensure not to walk on that side of the street where the fight took place. Few sins are more grievous and spiritually harmful than anger and fighting, and so when two people quarrel, they leave an especially detrimental impact upon that spot – to the point where even innocent, uninvolved passersby are negatively affected. Let us always remember that each and every action we perform has a profound spiritual impact, yielding consequences for many years into the future. This awareness should motivate us to always strive to perform Misvot and avoid wrongdoing of any kind.

Daily Insights by Rabbi Eli Silberstein
Surrogate motherhood in this parsha- who's the real mother according to Halacha? An answer from ויצא

Daily Insights by Rabbi Eli Silberstein

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 13:07


Surrogate motherhood in this parsha- who's the real mother according to Halacha? We can learn from the story in this parsha a possible answer.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Is It Permissible to Repair a Mezuzah or Door Knob on Shabbat?

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 3:21


In Siman 313, The Shulhan Aruch begins to outline the Halachot of "Boneh"-constructing on Shabbat. The Hachamim instituted a prohibition to return a door that has become dislodged to its place, out of concern that one will fasten it in place with a nail. Hacham Ovadia (Hazon Ovadia Shabbat Vol. 3, p. 10) discusses a case which is not included in this restriction: If a Mezuzah scroll falls out of its case on Shabbat, it is permissible to return it to its place. The scroll is not Mukse, because it is Kitveh Kodesh-holy scripture, and the Hachamim did not include such a case in their restriction.The English Yalkut Yosef, as well as Shemirat Shabbat K'hilhata (23:32) discus a common case in which a door knob or door handle falls out of the door. They hold that it is problematic to return it to its place, as this would constitute "Boneh." It is better to use a screwdriver to open the door than to reinsert the handle, since a screwdriver is a Keli She'm'lachto L'isur and may be used L'sorech Gufo-for a permitted function. If the handle was designed to come in and out, it is permitted to reinsert it. The new Mishna Berura Tiferet edition rules that a cobweb is Mukse and may not be broken by hand. If it is attached to the house it may also be an issue of Tolesh MeMehubar-detaching from the ground. If it was attached to a vessel, it is permitted to remove it utilizing Tiltul Min Ha'sad-indirectly, using a stick or the back of the hand. SUMMARYIt is permissible to return a Mezuzah scroll to its case on Shabbat. It is prohibited to return a fallen door knob.Cobwebs may be removed only if not attached to the house and by indirect means.

TO TORAH - Rabbi Steinhauers shiurim
Halacha series : Brachos - Shehakol

TO TORAH - Rabbi Steinhauers shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 29:01


The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)
3 Minute Halacha- Drawing Pictures of the Sun and Moon

The Mordy Shteibel's Podcast (Rabbi Binyomin Weinrib)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 4:03


Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Is It Permitted on Shabbat to Cover One's Head with a Jacket for Protection from the Elements?

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 3:48


The prohibition of constructing an Ohel (tent) applies when there is a roof and four walls. The Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909)holds that even if there are no walls, constructing an overhanging alone is prohibited, if its purpose is to protect that which is underneath it, e.g. to provide shade or shelter from the rain. Based on this, is it permitted to hold a jacket over one's head on Shabbat to protect himself from the rain or sun? The Bet Meir (Rabbi Meir Posner, 1729-1807) in Siman 315 addresses this question. He cites a Gemara (Shabbat 43) which permits two people to hold a sheet over a corpse to provide shade and protect it from decomposing. He asks: How could that be permitted? Shouldn't that be a violation of Ohel? Even though there are no walls, the overhanging is used for protecting that which is underneath it. He answers that from here a general principle can be derived: If the overhanging is held by people, and not fastened to a structure, there is no prohibition. Based on this, there is no problem to hold a jacket over one's head. Accordingly, the Sis Eliezer (R. Eliezer Yehuda Waldenberg, 1915-2006, Jerusalem) in Vol. 10:4 permitted holding a Talet over a Sefer Torah at the Kotel on Shabbat to protect it from the rain, since people are holding it.SUMMARYIt is permitted to hold a jacket over one's head for protection from the elements on Shabbat in a place where there is an Erub.

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim
Ten Minute Halacha - Orlah in Chutz L'Aretz

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 11:55


Mikvah.org
Halacha Review: Harchakos with Mrs. Ita Broh

Mikvah.org

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 83:43


The Halachos of Harchakos with Mrs. Ita Broh, recorded live at Miriams Motherhood Center of Crown Heights. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mikvah/support

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour
Is It Permissible to Open or Use an Already Opened Umbrella on Shabbat or Yom Tob?

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 4:38


The Shulhan Aruch in Siman 315 discusses the prohibition of making an Ohel (tent) on Shabbat. An Ohel is defined as space enclosed by partitions covered by a roof or overhanging to protect that which is underneath it. This protection includes, for example, providing shade from the sun or shelter from the rain. One of the most famous modern applications of this prohibition is opening and using an umbrella on Shabbat. The Shulhan Aruch rules that a folding chair, known as a "Kiseh Traskal," may be opened on Shabbat. The Hazon Ish (Rav Abraham Yeshaya Karelitz, 1878-1953) derived from this a general principle that anything that is already built, but is merely folded or collapsed, may be opened on Shabbat, even though it forms an Ohel beneath it. Accordingly, it should follow that the Hazon Ish would permit opening an umbrella, since it is already fully assembled, and there are no pieces being added. Nevertheless, he rules that an umbrella may not be opened since it constitutes "Uvdin D'hol" (mundane activity). The Hatan Sofer also found reasons to be lenient, although his conclusion is to be strict. The Bet Meir (Rabbi Meir Posner, 1729-1807) went so far as to actually permit opening an umbrella. The Hida (Rav Haim Yosef David Azulai, 1724-1807) in his Birkeh Yosef (end of 315 in the Shiyureh Beracha) cites a Posek called the Giva'at Pinhas who prohibits opening the umbrella but allows carrying an umbrella that was already open before Yom Tob. Hacham Ovadia in Yehaveh Da'at and Hazon Ovadia (Vol. 5), as well as most contemporary Poskim, prohibit both opening and using an umbrella on Shabbat. They contend that the case of the umbrella is critically different from the case of the folding chair. The open chair does not serve the space underneath it, whereas the open umbrella is designed to protect the person beneath it.SUMMARYIt is prohibited to open an umbrella on Shabbat and Yom Tob, as well as to use an already open umbrella.

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim
Ten Minute Halacha - Hand Creams and Lip Balms on Shabbos

YUTORAH: R' Aryeh Lebowitz -- Recent Shiurim

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 9:47


Intimate Judaism: A Jewish Approach to Intimacy, Sexuality, and Relationships
(36) Out of the Closet Without Shame: Balancing Conflicting Identities of LGBTQ and Orthodoxy

Intimate Judaism: A Jewish Approach to Intimacy, Sexuality, and Relationships

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 59:15


In past decades, being Orthodox and gay meant suffering in the closet, or choosing to live authentically at the expense of religion. Today, more LGBTQ individuals and couples wish to retain their religious identities while embracing their sexual orientation. Join Rabbi Scott Kahn and Talli Rosenbaum in a moving interview with Rachel Weinstein, Shimmy Feintuch and Joshua Brook. Become an Intimate Judaism Patreon subscriber to get additional episodes, merch, and more, including a Q and A dropping this week. Just go to https://www.patreon.com/intimatejudaism.

Daily Halacha Podcast - Daily Halacha By Rabbi Eli J. Mansour

The Poskim discusses whether one may open cans of food and other containers on Shabbat. For example, may one open a tuna fish can or container of juice? Does this constitute a violation of the Melacha of "Soter"-dismantling/destroying? Hacham Ovadia in Halichot Olam (Ch.4) and Hacham Bension in Or Lesion permit doing so, on condition that one does not intend to keep the container, but merely to remove the contents and discard the container. In such a case, these vessels are similar to what the Gemara refers to as "Mustaki"-insubstantial, disposable containers that when torn open, are not significant enough to be considered a violation of "Soter."SUMMARYIt is permitted to open cans with a can opener on Shabbat, provided that the can is discarded after removing its contents.

Kosher Money
Fascinating Money Questions & Answers - Halacha Discussion (Feat. R' Yosef Kushner)

Kosher Money

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2021 58:56


In the span of just a few short years, the rapid advance of modern technology has changed the face of business and commerce forever. Computers and automated systems have given rise to new forms of trade never dreamed of in days gone by. But these new business methods have also brought a host of Shabbos-related and other halachic questions not clearly addressed by Poskim of the previous generation. Also, are some newer businesses even ethical?- Is one permitted to list an item on ebay if the auction is scheduled to conclude on Shabbos? - May one allow his e-commerce website to remain open on Shabbos? - Is it advisable to get into the cash advance business? - What should people know about their OWN business as it pertains to Halacha? These issues, as well as many others, are discussed in Rabbi Yosef Kushner's book named Commerce & Shabbos, which is relevant, clear and concise. Who better to join us on Kosher Money?Enjoy this important and entertaining episode as we provide informative answers for both the inquiring businessman as well as the accomplished scholar.You can purchase the book here: https://amzn.to/3jJCeblTo see more podcasts brought to you by Living Lchaim visit LivingLchaim.comSubscribe to our YouTube channel here: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJHk7NZyFnyphA_jfdK5rvA See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.