Podcasts about lcsw

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  • 1,753PODCASTS
  • 4,609EPISODES
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Best podcasts about lcsw

Show all podcasts related to lcsw

Latest podcast episodes about lcsw

Reclamation: An NWM Initiative
What is a Trigger? & Practical Ideas for Comfort at Home while Healing from Trauma. With Mary Ellen Mann, LCSW

Reclamation: An NWM Initiative

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 40:31


"Trigger" is a hot word these days, but do you know what it really means? What does getting "triggered" look like and feel like? And how can you help yourself in your "triggered" moments? In this episode, Naomi is joined by Mary Ellen Mann, licensed psychotherapist, to discuss triggers from trauma and practical tips for at-home or on-the-go help to get through those really difficult moments. Additionally, join NWM for our December Livestream on YouTube, December 13th at 12pm ET, to ask Mary Ellen your follow up questions live! See you back here in 2 weeks! Be the one who prevents the next story by keeping this work going. Visit naomiwrightministries.com/donate to make a tax deductible donation. ________ For more information: Mary Ellen Mann

Guy's Guy Radio
#491 Author/Professor Raj Venkatesan and LSCW/Author Marcia Naomi Berger

Guy's Guy Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 55:00


Rajkumar Venkatesan is the Ronald Trzcinski Professor of Business Administration at the Darden Business School at the University of Virginia. Raj has written about and taught quantitative marketing to MBA and executive education students worldwide. At Darden, he has taught a course on marketing analytics for more than ten years, and a course on marketing technology products for five years. His experience in these courses he translated into the books, Cutting Edge Marketing Analytics, published by Pearson Education in 2014, and The AI Marketing Canvas in 2021. He has published extensively in the Journal of Marketing, Journal of Marketing Research, Marketing Science, Journal of Academy of Marketing Science, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Harvard Business Review, and California Management Review. Marcia Naomi Berger, MSW, LCSW, leads dynamic marriage and communication workshops and is a popular speaker at conferences. A clinical social worker with a private psychotherapy practice, she has taught continuing education classes for therapists at the University of California Berkeley Extension, Alliant International University, and for various professional associations. Berger lives in Marin County, California, with her husband of thirty-three years. She gives their weekly marriage meetings major credit for their lasting happiness together, which inspired her to write her first book, the best-selling Marriage Meetings for Lasting Love. Join Robert Manni, author of The Guys' Guy's Guide To Love as we discuss life, love and the pursuit of happiness. Subscribe to Guy's Guy Radio on YouTube, iTunes and wherever you get your podcasts! Buy The Guys' Guy's Guide to Love now!

The Yours Chewly Podcast
Episode 156: Rejecting Diet Culture During The Holidays- Rerun with Shira Rosenbluth

The Yours Chewly Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 48:40


Dear Listener, In today's episode, we're taking a trip back in time to December 2020 to revisit a holiday themed conversation I recorded with the one and only Shira Rosenbluth. I receive a lot of questions this time of year about how to navigate diet talk, set boundaries, and work towards a healthy relationship with food during the holidays...so I thought it would be helpful to pull this episode from the archives and bring it back to center stage! During our chat, Shira shares tips for navigating recovery from chronic dieting and eating disorders over the holidays and during days of religious fasting. She also offers some guidance for setting boundaries and shutting down diet talk during this time of year and beyond! Shira is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) and body positive style blogger. In her work as a LCSW, she specializes in the treatment of disordered eating, eating disorders, and body image dissatisfaction using a weight-inclusive, Health at Every Size® approach. If you'd like to learn more about Shira and her work, you can check her out on IG (@theshirarose). You can find her work at shirarosenbluthlcsw.com and her style blog at theshirarose.com. Thanks for listening and don't forget to tap those five stars if you love this episode! Yours Chewly with gratitude, Claire P.S. If you entered our November Attitude of Gratitude podcast giveaway, don't miss the intro to this episode where I announce our winner! Join our free, private FB community: https://clairechewning.com/community Work with Claire 1:1: https://clairechewning.com/work-with-me The self-paced, online Intuitive Eating Discovery Course: https://clairechewning.com/intuitive-eating-course (Use code “PODCAST” at checkout for 10% off of your enrollment investment

Transforming Trauma
Healing Trauma Through Curiosity and Compassion with Chaz Franke, LCSW

Transforming Trauma

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 48:23


Chaz Franke, LCSW, is the owner of Light Source, a private practice in Belleville, Illinois, is an adjunct professor in the MSW program at St. Louis University, and has over 15 years of experience working with trauma. Chaz shares his journey to becoming a trauma therapist, the role curiosity can play in the therapeutic relationship, and how his work has impacted him and his clients.  Chaz had many opportunities early in his career that supported him to better understand trauma and how to be with clients in a way that supports their healing. He was mentored by highly skilled figures in the field of trauma and therapy such as Dr. Ira Chasnoff and Dr. Bruce Perry. Chaz shares that Dr. Perry helped him to look beyond the behaviors and to try and understand the person, not pathologizing them, but to hold compassion and curiosity. Chaz also shares about his background in Zen Buddhism which helped him better understand suffering and the importance of not putting pressure on himself or his clients to rush the healing process. The relational framework that Chaz uses, which involves the therapist slowing down and not pressuring themselves, or their clients, is aligned with the NARM framework as well. Chaz reflects on the reality that despite their best intentions, helping professionals over the years have created harm for their patients due to the lack of support and competency around trauma. He explains that an important area of trauma-informed focus for therapists is on their own connection to Self as helping professionals. He shares about how he uses supervision as an opportunity for therapists to be self-reflective, shifting patterns of self-criticism and self-shaming that lead to over-efforting, pressuring, comparing and other disruptive strategies for therapists.  When give the right kind of support, therapists can be more effective in connecting with themselves and their clients, and more effective in their healing work.   Chaz finds hope in the healing work of trauma therapy.  He shares, “I think that therapy is 100% the coolest thing in the world.” Bio: Chaz Franke, MSW, LCSW owns Light Source, a private practice in Belleville, Illinois and is an adjunct professor in the MSW program at Saint Louis University. Chaz has over 15 years experience working with trauma and has been providing clinical supervision since 2010. Learn more at: www.findyourlightsource.com To read the full show notes and discover more resources visit http://www.narmtraining.com/podcast *** NARM Training Institute http://www.NARMtraining.com View upcoming trainings: https://narmtraining.com/schedule Join the Inner Circle: https://narmtraining.com/online-learning/inner-circle *** The NARM Training Institute provides tools for transforming complex trauma through: in-person and online trainings for mental health care professionals; in-person and online workshops on complex trauma and how it interplays with areas like addiction, parenting, and cultural trauma; an online self-paced learning program, the NARM Inner Circle; and other trauma-informed learning resources.   We want to connect with you! Facebook @NARMtraining Twitter @NARMtraining YouTube Instagram @thenarmtraininginstitute

Conversations with a Wounded Healer
Camesha Jones - Community Mental Wellness for Black Women Benefits Everyone

Conversations with a Wounded Healer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 43:48


Pardon me while I drop my first ever LIVE episode into this space! And, wouldn't you know it, my guest and I cover all the Conversations With a Wounded Healer favorites: community, connection, spiritual anchors, resiliency, the white-washing of mental wellness spaces, and the importance of therapists engaging in their own work (natch).  What a joy to sit beside Camesha Jones, LCSW, at Sista Afya Community Mental Wellness, her gorgeous social enterprise located in Chicago's South Shore neighborhood. Founded in 2017, Sista Afya is dedicated to providing low- to no-cost mental wellness services that center the experiences of Black women. Let's chat about why centers like it are important––and, believe me, there aren't many places like Sista Afya, sadly. “Sometimes people keep saying this BS that Black people don't want to engage in therapy,” says Camesha. Ah, yes, the narrative about which communities are and aren't receptive to supportive healing, created by those outside the community to stigmatize and keep critical infrastructure like therapy from reaching those who need it. Camesha flatly refutes the trope.  Camesha has built a center that's community focused down to its core. The name, for instance, combines sista, a term of endearment used between Black women, and afya, a Swahili word that means to be healthy, free from psychological and physical illness.  In her own life, Camesha takes continual care to address challenges inherent to living with bi-polar disorder. She offers hope to folks, including fellow therapists, with similar experiences, modelling self-awareness and practicing sustainable self-care while running a successful business. “I go to therapy. I go to my psychiatrist. I take my meds. I do all the things [ ] and that's part of why I call myself a mental illness survivor,” she says, adding, “we're dealing with some of the same things, we're all dealing with some of the same things. It doesn't mean that we can't be effective in this work.” GUEST BIO Camesha Jones, LCSW, is a Social Worker, Entrepreneur, and Community Mental Wellness Advocate who serves at the intersection of culture, community, and social justice. Camesha strongly believes in eliminating barriers in the mental health field that people of diverse cultural backgrounds experience by creating affordable and accessible care that centers on the well-being of the whole person. Camesha is the Founder and Executive Director of Sista Afya Community Mental Wellness.  “WHOLE WOMAN, WHOLE COMMUNITIES” FUNDRAISER INFO To donate to Sista Afya's campaign, please visit: https://donorbox.org/saccwholewomen/fundraiser/sarah-buino I'm excited to support Sista Afya's Fall campaign, “Whole Women. Whole Communities.” This year, Sista Afya Community Care has offered 650 free therapy sessions and over 35 community workshops and classes that have collectively served over 200 women. The goal is to raise $35,000 to continue offering free mental wellness care to Black women in Chicago. They need your support to sustain the progress they've made so far. Sista Afya continues to remove barriers to accessing mental wellness care in their communities. Will you contribute to the annual year-end campaign by giving $50, $100, $250, or whatever amount you can towards our goal of $35,000 to help deepen the impact in providing free mental wellness care for Black women? The campaign will run the entire month of December, but make sure to donate now.  For full show notes, resources, and links to connect with our guest, visit: http://www.headhearttherapy.com/podcast *** Conversations with a Wounded Healer is a proud member of @mhnrnetwork. Let's be friends! You can find me in the following places... Website: www.headhearttherapy.com/podcast Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WoundedHealr/ https://www.facebook.com/HeadHeartTherapy/ Instagram: @headhearttherapy Twitter: @WoundedHealr @HeadHeart_Chi

Honest AF Show
#87 Life Changes After 50 with Maggie Sepkowitz

Honest AF Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 52:52


It's never too late to change your life. In today's episode, the girls talk with Daniella's childhood friend Counselor and Psychotherapist Maggie Sepkowitz, LCSW about the impact of a year and a half of isolation that led to the powerful move to transition her life and career. Wanna hear a few stories from Daniella's youth? It's not all bicycles and side ponytails. Daniella and Barbaranne discuss Paulina Porizkova's nude photo which sparks a conversation about why society won't let aging women be who they want to be. Throw in bucket lists and Cryptocurrency and we got one hell of an Honest AF Show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Soul Sessions with Jodie Gale
Assertiveness for Women with Dr Julie Hanks

Soul Sessions with Jodie Gale

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 25:54


In Assertiveness for Women, Dr Julie Hanks talks about her book, The Assertiveness Guide for Women: How to Communicate Your Needs, Set Healthy Boundaries, and Transform Your Relationships. This episode will be transformative for anyone who has suffered with early childhood trauma (attachment trauma, complex trauma, development trauma) and childhood emotional neglect as well as disordered eating or an eating disorder.  Dr. Julie Hanks, PhD, LCSW is a licensed psychotherapist, coach, content creator, author, speaker, owner of Wasatch Family Therapy, and host of the Ask Dr. Julie Hanks podcast. With nearly 30 years experience, Dr. Hanks provides a safe place for healing conversations that educate and empower women to prioritize their dreams, revolutionize their families, and personalize their faith. In Assertiveness for Women, Dr Julie Hanks also talks about What brought her to this work Julie's history as a people pleasing perfectionist What is assertiveness? What causes women to not be assertive? What has attachment got to do with assertiveness? Eating disorders, disordered eating and assertiveness Why is assertiveness so important? Assertiveness, food and feelings Feelings and needs The 5 skills women need to develop to be assertive Trauma, boundaries and assertiveness

NextQuest Podcast
Jeana Martin, LPC on Somatic Experiencing

NextQuest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 74:08


NextQuest Podcast is back with Season 5 of all new Austin area mental health professionals!   This week's episode features Jeana Martin, LPC on Somatic Experiencing.   Jeana's website: https://www.pilgrimsonajourney.org   Theme song credit: "NextQuestion" by Greer Culbertson, LCSW-- lyrics, guitar, and vocals and Landon Laws-- drums   Sound Engineer: Amanda Justice   The interview process on this show is based entirely on the concept of consent in which an interviewee may choose to pass on any question at any time by simply saying "NextQuestion." No questions asked.    Thank you for listening to NextQuest Podcast. I learned something new today and I hope you did too. Stay tuned for next week's episode featuring Morgan Grace, LCSW, LCDC, who will be speaking about her practice and an area of specialty, Generational Trauma and In Utero Processing.  NextQuest Podcast relies solely on donations to keep this project going. Please consider making a donation via Venmo to username @NQCATX or by buying me a coffee at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/nxtquestpodcast

Living in this Queer Body
DISPATCHES FROM OUR QUEER BODIES IN PANDEMIC TIMES (#20): Susana Victoria Parras

Living in this Queer Body

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 10:17


Susana Victoria Parras (@heal2gether) is the founder of Heal Together, a Guatemalan daughter, Anti-Racist, LCSW, Intersectional, Mother and Partner. Susana is committed to justice and dignity for all peoples. In this dispatch, we hear a testimony of the intergenerational impact of multi-systemic oppression (separation, neglect, abuse, poverty, disordered eating, alcoholism), the way this trauma lives in the body of a parentified child, and the efforts Susana is making to reflect, transform, honor grief and proclaim: FUCK THE CONDITIONS THAT HURT CAREGIVERS THAT HURT US. "My practice is to be a whole ass human with my child, with my partner, to keep the distance that I thought I couldn't keep because I thought I always had to be there for my parents." --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/asher-pandjiris/message

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Mental Health Monday: Body Image

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 25:56


Deaconess Heidi Goehmann, LCSW, joins Andy and Sarah to talk about Body Image, including how we define this term, how our culture influences our perception of our body image, whether body image includes more than just our physical bodies, an how God's incarnation in Christ Jesus shapes how we think about human bodies. Find your copy of Finding Hope: From Brokenness to Restoration at cph.org/findinghope. Hear Mental Health Mondays each Monday at 9am CT! Find all episode with the tag "Mental Health Monday." View Deaconess Heidi's Mental Health Playlist on Youtube, listen to the Life in Relationship Podcast, and find all of her writings and resources at heidigoehmann.com.

All Things Private Practice Podcast
Setting Bougie Boundaries In Your Private Practice

All Things Private Practice Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 31:51


In this episode, I talk with Montoyia McGowan, LCSW and owner of Stopping The Chase Counseling and Consulting out of Memphis, TN. Montoyia tells her story from working at the VA to starting her private practice and consulting business which focuses on BIPOC entrepreneurs and helps empower creatives and the working well to stop the mentally exhausting cycle of chasing people, places, things, and relationships we often feel would contribute to our happiness.We discuss "Bougie" boundaries, the need for self-care and working through codependency, and "NOT BEING A JESUS JR." Montoyia is a force to be reckoned with in the field and has her own podcast and YouTube channel: Bougie Black Therapist.This was a really enjoyable episode because Montoyia has such a fun perspective on topics that are really difficult for helping professionals.Listen, Download, Share and Subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts. For more information on private practice and small business coaching and consulting, upcoming courses and retreats join here: https://www.allthingspractice.com/

Empowered Enneagram
Attachment & Relationship Healing: A Conversation with Type 2 Elizabeth Gillette

Empowered Enneagram

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 50:27


This season is all about the Enneagram and work! In this episode, Hanna & Monica talk to Elizabeth Gillette MSW, LCSW owner of Heirloom Counseling. A Social 2, she shares her expertise on attachment styles and explores how she's used to Enneagram to work through her own relationship healing. Love the podcast? We would LOVE if you help us grow and leave a review! . . Keep up with us on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/empoweredenneagram/ . https://empoweredenneagram.com/ . Our Guest Elizabeth Gillette MSW, LCSW www.heirloomcounseling.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Spirituali-TEA
The Mental Health Series: Boundaries (Season 3:Episode 15)

Spirituali-TEA

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 56:02


Setting boundaries is not only important for your mental health but your spiritual health as well. However, we can often forget to set boundaries for ourselves and for the people we are connected to. This episode is full of gems that will have you setting boundaries to protect your peace, space, and mental health. Many have become enablers because of past experiences with rejection. Learn new ways to set boundaries, why it is important, and how to set boundaries like Jesus. Shakeeta Torress, LCSW is bringing the heat in this episode and you don't want to miss it as we continue the Mental Health Series. Guest:Shakeeta Torres, LCSW 10 Ways to Set Boundaries: God's Way (Free Guide): https://www.empoweredpurposeacademy.com/10wayssetboundaries Service: https://shakeetatorres.com/coaching-new/ The Mental Health Candle https://bit.ly/mentalhealthcandle Devotional Journal https://bit.ly/SpiritualiTEADevotionalJournal Contact Dr. LaTanya https://bit.ly/drlatanyamoore

The Health Fix
Ep 264: How to Stop Anxiety, Depression & Traumatic Stress Without Spending Years in Therapy

The Health Fix

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 27, 2021 57:40


Is your anxiety, depression, or traumatic stress weighing you down?  Have you tried therapy but aren't seeing the results you thought you'd have by now?  Rachelle McCloud, LCSW is a Mental Health Therapist she specializes in emotional wellness. Through years of successfully helping clients move their anxiety, depression, and trauma disorders into remission, she has developed an 8 week program that empowers people to skillfully get rid of symptoms and heal and she's sharing it with the world.  Her mission is to empower clients to become friends with their brains and learn to do their own healing work effectively, safely, and skillfully.  In this episode of The Health Fix Podcast, Dr. Jannine Krause interviews Rachelle on how you can become your own best therapist to naturally resolve your symptoms and actually bring your disorder to an end in 2 to 6 months.    What You'll Learn In Today's Episode: Why you can get more done in 120-300 hours of treatment focused brain work vs years of therapy Why working on your mental health doesn't have to be painful How to get the tools to repair your brain's response to stress triggers Why becoming friends with your brain will create solutions for your mental health issues How anxiety, depression & trauma responses are your brain trying to regulate it's problem solving pathways Resources from the Show: Rachelle's email: rachellemccloudlcsw@gmail.com https://rachellemccloud.com/ Rachelle's Youtube Channel - Get Rid of ANXIETY

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Holidays and the Ministry Family (Rebroadcast)

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 12:09


Deaconess Heidi Goehmann, LMHP, LCSW, joins Andy and Sarah to talk about how the holidays might be different for church worker families, some sources of tension, and how different personality types may affect the stress or tension we feel. Find the NAMI article referenced at nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/November-2015/Tips-for-Managing-the-Holiday-Blues. Find LCMS Worker Wellness resources at lcms.org/wellness. Find the Ministry Talks Episode 11: Holidays and the Ministry Family Video on YouTube at youtu.be/9j-D5CfT9hM. Find more episodes in the Church Worker Wellness series with Deaconess Heidi Goehmann with the tag "Church Worker Wellness." This is a rebroadcast from November 6, 2018.

High Heels and Heartache Podcast
Why Should You Stop Giving Unsolicited Advice?

High Heels and Heartache Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 48:06


Sharon Martin stops by to discuss unsolicited advice.  She defines unsolicited advice, tells us how to stop giving and what we should do when we receive it! Sharon Martin, MSW, LCSW is a licensed psychotherapist who has been practicing in San Jose, CA for over 20 years. She specializes in helping individuals struggling with perfectionism, codependency, and people-pleasing. Her own struggle to feel “good enough”, inspired her passion for helping others learn to accept and love themselves. Sharon is the author of The Better Boundaries Workbook and The CBT Workbook for Perfectionism. Her work has also been featured in various media outlets including Psychology Today, Highly Sensitive Refuge, Web MD, and Psych Central. Blog post: https://www.livewellwithsharonmartin.com/unsolicited-advice/ Book: https://www.amazon.com/Better-Boundaries-Workbook-CBT-Based-Relationships/dp/1684037581

Groove Therapy
Episode 33: Backline for Mental Health with Kendall and Hallie

Groove Therapy

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 65:05


Taraleigh and Leah chat with Backline co-founders Hallie Lincoln and Hallie Kendall Corso about the role Backline is playing in providing mental health and wellness resources for the music industry. Hallie and Kendall talk about the inspiration for Backline after two big names in the music industry lost their life to death by suicide, shining a light on the depth of need in this unique community. We talk about the intention and focus of Backline in supporting artists and music professionals through all steps of the mental health and wellness journey. Also touched on is how covid has impacted and increased the needs for the music community and how Backline is helping to meet those needs, as well as their focus on being more inclusive and socially conscious to all music industry professionals. Lastly, listeners can learn how funding has shifted since covid and how you can support the artists you love in caring for themselves. For the “Did you Know,” Leah shares statistics on mental health in the music industry and why the need is so great. Taraleigh offers a quick and easy way to show your appreciation in the “Daily Jam.”Kendall Corso has worked in the music industry for 10 years, holding various roles in production, management, marketing, and media with Live For Live Music, 11E1EVEN Group, Mempho Music Festival, and more. Her contributions to the scene culminated in 2019 with the co-creation of Backline, the music industry's mental health and wellness resource hub—drawing from both personal and collective experiences with the unique challenges that come from working in music. She currently serves as the Wellness Advisor to the organization, bringing in partnerships with mindfulness apps and holistic products in hopes of breaking down financial barriers between this community and finding their own wellness journey. Backline is a 501(c)(3) non-profit that connects music industry professionals and their families with mental health and wellness resources. We want to build a safer and more supportive music industry by helping our community access quality mental health care providers that understand this line of work. Hallie Lincoln, LCSW, is a Psychotherapist based in Denver, CO, and is a Co-Founder of Backline. She holds a BS in Child Psychology from Vanderbilt University, a Masters in Clinical Social Work from The University of Denver, and postgraduate degree in Marriage and Family Therapy. Hallie is a clinician who uses a strengths-based, friendly, and inclusive approach to provide individual, couples, and family therapy to clients of all ages, and from all walks of life. Before redirecting her efforts towards working in private practice, Hallie worked at various non-profits and has extensive experience working in case management and client care coordination. Hallie has been exposed to the unique challenges and stressors faced by those in the music industry first by way of her brother, a touring music industry professional, and now is the Director of Backline's Case Management program and treats clients from the music industry in her private practice.This podcast is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. Please leave us a rating or review on iTunes and join our Facebook group to dive deeper into the conversation of live music and health and wellness.Groove Therapy is... See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

A Rational Fear
Labor's 2022 Election Strategy: Rhyming — Matt Okine, Alex Dyson, Dom Knight, Andy Lee, Lewis Hobba, Dan Ilic + Tim Bailey

A Rational Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 42:33


JOWMA (Jewish Orthodox Women's Medical Association) Podcast
Playful Parenting with Gelly Asovski, LCSW-R, RPT-S

JOWMA (Jewish Orthodox Women's Medical Association) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 49:08


Gelly Asovski, LCSW-R RPT-S is a mother, grandmother and Yiddish speaking Child and Family Therapist practicing in Monsey, NY for the past 20 years. She s a Registered Play Therapy Supervisor and EMDR Consultant, bringing the best of cutting edge therapy to the frum community. In addition to her private practice, Asovski runs her parenting program, Playful Parenting, both as a 6 week heimishe telecourse and as an online yearlong program.She enjoys being a grandmother and loves reading, learning, traveling and having fun time with family and friends. Find out more about her work at parentingwithgelly.com. 

Mikvah.org
When Abuse is in the News: Navigating Difficult Conversations with our Children

Mikvah.org

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 74:22


Does abuse in the news change the narrative we have with our children? How much do we discuss with them? Join us for an important lecture with Debi Fox, LCSW and Torah educators Sara Morozow and Rivky Boyarsky, RN. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mikvah/support

Harvesting Happiness
Pragmatic Parenting: Managing Digital Delirium and Raising Sane Kids with Dr. Alex Packer & Neil Brown LCSW

Harvesting Happiness

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 59:11


Yoga | Birth | Babies
Am I More Than A Parent? with Katherine "Kat" Casey

Yoga | Birth | Babies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 57:36


Have you ever looked at an old picture of yourself before kids and thought about how much your life has changed?  Crossing the threshold into parenthood isn't about simply adjusting to life with a child. It's a remarkable transformation to one's personal identity and how you relate to the world around you and within relationships.  In this episode of Yoga|Birth|Babies, I speak with the director and founder of The Root Therapy NYC, Katherine Casey, LCSW about identity outside of parenthood. Kat gives suggestions on preparing for the shift into parenthood and creating clear boundaries.  Support Our Sponsors: Hello Fresh: America's #1 meal kit! Go to HelloFresh.com/ybb14 and use code ybb14 for up to 14 free meals AND 3 free gifts! Somfy: Learn more about Somfy powered motorized window coverings, or connect with a Somfy dealer in your area to get a customized quote for your home by visiting somfysystems.com/podcast Boober: Looking for a  lactation support, birth doulas, mental health therapists, and postpartum doulas. Use the code PYC to get 10% off your first service at www.getboober.com  Get the most out of each episode by checking out the show notes with links, resources and other related podcasts at: prenatalyogacenter.com If you love what you've been listening to, please leave a rating and review! Yoga| Birth|Babies To connect with Deb and the PYC Community:  Instagram & Facebook: @prenatalyogacenter Youtube: Prenatal Yoga Center Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Soul Healing Love
Episode #22 Moving from Survive to Thrive with Guest Lisa Brooks, LCSW

Soul Healing Love

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 27:02


Have you ever looked at life and thought "I'm not sure this is what I signed up for?!" Lisa Brooks is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker that worked for 20 years in child abuse and neglect to find herself with vicarious trauma herself. She took a deep dive into her own personal healing and found a new passion in helping others see that overwork, overwhelm, and survival mode are not the only option in life. She founded Wilmington Thrive Tribes in her community to help bring awareness and growth into a life of Thriving. Learn more about her at lisabrookslcsw.com and follow her for fantastic daily advice at @lisabrookslcsw on Instagram.

SportsEpreneur Podcast
AthMindset | Project Myself with DeVante DuBose

SportsEpreneur Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 46:22


In this AthMindset episode, Lisa Bonta Sumii, LCSW, CSW, shares space with DeVante DuBose. DeVante is a soccer player for the Richmond Kickers of the USL. He is from Oakland, California, and before joining the Kickers, he was the first-ever signing for the Oakland Roots Soccer Club. As you'll quickly realize though, DeVante is way ... Read more The post AthMindset | Project Myself with DeVante DuBose appeared first on SportsEpreneur.

Cancer Buzz
Leading with Gratitude

Cancer Buzz

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 8:12


In this special podcast episode, we talk with oncology social worker and ACCC President Krista Nelson, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C, FAOSW, about finding opportunities to practice gratitude each day for colleagues and patients. Hear how taking the time to pause and connect during your workday can support your psychological health by reconnecting to the passion behind your job, helping you provide care with intention and compassion, and strengthening your well-being and positive social connections.Guest: Krista Nelson, MSW, LCSW, OSW-C, FAOSWACCC 2021-2022 PresidentProgram Manager of Quality & Research, Cancer Support Services & CompassionProvidence Cancer InstitutePortland, ORRelated Content:Mindfulness Meditation SeriesReal-World Lessons from COVID-19: Driving Oncology Care Forward[VIDEO PODCAST] Ep 01: Real-World Lessons from COVID-19[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 28: Staff Resiliency During COVID-19Trending Now in Cancer Care: Focus on COVID-19's Impact[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 59: Collaboration and Innovation in the Time of COVID-19[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 64: A Summer of Disconnect for Cancer Professionals[MINI-PODCAST] Ep 67: Coping with Pandemic GriefA Social Worker Leads ACCC, and Her Timing is Perfect

Unit3d
Relationship Status: It's Complicated

Unit3d

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 43:11


Relationships are vital to our lives as we all need each other to survive and thrive.  These relationships can be tricky as we go through different stages in our lives and as we travel to different places and move through different roles.  Cindy Aron, LCSW has done a lot of work researching and presenting on the topic of relationships.  There are so many types of relationships that are important to us: relationships with friends, parents, coaches, teammates, love interests, and more.  In this episode of Unit3d we discuss how to recognize and navigate health and unhealthy relationships, how to get more out of our relationships, and how to build new relationships.

I Survived Theatre School
Carole Schweid

I Survived Theatre School

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 98:48


Intro: buzzsaws and clean slates, rage, Where the Wild Things AreLet Me Run This By You: MoneyInterview: We talk to Carole Schweid about Juilliard, Phoebe Brand, John Lehne, Michael Brand, Midnight Cowboy, musical comedy performance, open dance calls, starring in the original cast of A Chorus Line, Bob Fosse, Pat Birch, Martha Graham, Minnie's Boys, Mervyn Nelson, playing Fastrada in the first national tour of Pippin, being a lone wolf in theatre, Lewis J. Stadlen, doing West Side Story at Bucks County Playhouse, Shelly Winters, Mary Hinkson, Nellie Forbush in South Pacific, playing Tzeitel in Fiddler on the Roof, Peppermint Lounge, Nick Dante, Michael Bennett, Marvin Hamlisch, Public Theater, Gerry Schoenfeld, The Shubert, the wish for a job vs. the real experience of working, Theda Bara & The Frontier Rabbi, Agnes de Mille, Play With Your Food, Staged Reading Magic, Albert Hague.FULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited):2 (10s):And I'm Gina Pulice.1 (11s):We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later,2 (16s):We're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense1 (20s):If at all we survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? As more space is actually a huge thing.2 (36s):Yeah. I have to apologize for the sound of buzz saws. What is going to be going the whole time I'm talking, doing well, you1 (50s):Took some trees down, right.2 (53s):You know, that's how it started. Yeah. It started with actually, you know, it all was a surprise to me, basically one we've been talking about taking down all the trees in the front of our house. And one day Aaron said, they're coming tomorrow to take down the trees. And I'm like, how much did that cost? Because you know, taking down trees is usually really expensive. And so he says, well, he's going to do everything in the front for whatever. It was $5,000.1 (1m 22s):Yeah. She was pretty good for more than one tree. Cause one tree we had removed was $5,000 at my mom's.2 (1m 28s):Well, and it's not like they have to extract the whole tree. It's just, you know, just chopping it down. Like it's not, I don't know if it's different when they have to take out the, yeah,1 (1m 38s):I think it is when they have to take the stump out the roots and all that.2 (1m 43s):So that was fine. Although I did think to myself, Hmm. We have $5,000 to spend and this is what we're spending it on.1 (1m 54s):I've been there. Oh, I've been there2 (1m 56s):So the morning, but I'm letting it go. And so the morning comes and he tells me to go outside so we can talk about the trees and, and, and I, anyway, we, we designate some trees and they're all in the lower part of the front of our house.1 (2m 10s):Yes. You, and by the way, for people that don't know, like you have a lot of land for, for, for, for not being in the super super country, you have a lot of courage. I mean, you got a lot of trees.2 (2m 21s):Well, yeah, we have an acre and it's a lot of trees and it's a lot of junk trees. What they call junk trees. Because the idea here is once upon a time, when everybody got their heat from wood, you had to have fast growing trees. So it's these skinny trees. Yeah. Anyway, so I thought we were sort of on the same page about what we were going down. This is where I'm getting with this. And I had a couple of meetings yesterday and I was hearing the sound pretty close, but it wasn't until I looked outside that I saw, they took everything out.2 (3m 1s):The, every living thing out in the, in the front, in front of our house, including the only tree I was really attached to was I have a beautiful lilac tree.1 (3m 14s):Okay. Oh shit. And everything out.2 (3m 21s):What's that? Why they1 (3m 22s):Take everything out? Is that the plant? I think,2 (3m 25s):I think what happened was for the first couple of days, the boss was here. And then I think yesterday, the boss was like, you guys just go and finish up. And I don't know that anyway, you know what, I'm just choosing it to be, I'm choosing to look at it like, okay, well we're getting to start over and it can be exactly how we want it to be. So yeah,1 (3m 45s):That is a great attitude because there's nothing you can do you really do about it? Absolutely. Zero. You can do about threes coming out.2 (3m 53s):The only bummer is that it sounds like buzz saws all day at my house and at my neighbor's house, I'm sure they're annoyed with us too. Well,1 (4m 2s):What are you going to put? It is. Okay. So, so, okay. The good, that's the sort of wonky news, but what the good news is, what are you going to put in? Like, is there going to be a whole new,2 (4m 12s):I think it's just going to GRA, I mean, I think it's just going to be grass, which is fine. I mean, my thing was actually, it does a little bit of a metaphor because when we first moved here, we loved how quiet and private and everything is. And part of why everything feels very private at our house is there's trees and bushes blocking our view of anything. I mean, all we can see is trees and bushes when we're laying on the front, which for a while seemed cozy. And then it started to seem like annoying that we could never see. And actually there's kind of a really beautiful view of the mountains behind us. So our mountains Hills.1 (4m 51s):Yeah. But I mean, small mountains, like small2 (4m 53s):Mountains. Yeah. So I realized that it does coincide with our psychological spelunking and trying to just be like more open about everything. Like totally. You know what I mean? Like this is just be open to people seeing our house. This is open to seeing out and let's have, and actually my kids were kind of like, oh, but it's just also open and we don't have any privacy. And I'm like, yeah, well you have your room and bathroom. I mean, there's, there's places to go if you don't want people to, to see you, but let's just be open.1 (5m 31s):There's like a whole, yeah. It's a great metaphor for being visible. Like I am all about lately. I have found a lot of comfort and refuge in the truth of the matter, even if it's not pretty, even if I don't actually like it. So like getting the facts of the matter and also sharing the, of the matter without a judgment. So I appreciate this, like wanting to be seen and then letting go of what people make of that, whether your house is this way or that way, or the neighbors think this or that, I'm also the, I I'm all about it.1 (6m 15s):I'm like, you know, this is, there's something about transparency. That's very comforting for me. It's also scary because people don't like it when they can see, or they can say whatever they want, but the hiding, I think I'm pretty convinced hiding from myself and from others leads to trouble.2 (6m 37s):It leads to trouble. And any time you're having to kind of keep track of what you're, you know, being open about and what you're not, and what you've said, you know, it just it's like it's T it's listen. If I only have a certain amount of real estate in my mind, I really don't want to allocate any of it too. Right. Hiding something and trying to remember. Right.1 (7m 1s):And it's interesting, the more that we do this podcast, the more I see that, like, you know what I thought gene, I thought when we're dead, this podcast is going to remain. And then our children's children's children. I mean, I don't have kids, but my nieces and nephew and your children's children's children will have a record of this. And, and I'd rather it be a record of the truth, the truth and transparency, then some show about pretending. So I think it's going to be good for them to be able to look back and be like, for me, it's like the, my crazy aunt, like, what was she doing? And what did she think? And, and, oh my God, it's a record of the times too.1 (7m 43s):Yeah.2 (7m 43s):I think about that kind of a lot. And I think about, of course I say all this and my kids are probably like going to be, have no interests unless the, until they get to a certain age, I mean, I'll put it to you this way. If I could listen to a podcast of my mother in her, you know, in the time that I don't really the time of life, certainly before I was born, but in my life where I still didn't see her as a person until, you know, I'd love to just things like what her voice sounded like then, and that kind of thing. I mean, it's interesting.1 (8m 16s):I have nothing of my mom, like we have a very few, it was interesting because we didn't, you know, we, there was not a lot of video of my mother and today's actually the 10th anniversary of her passing.2 (8m 28s):Oh, wow. Wow. That's hard.1 (8m 31s):It is hard. You know, it is hard. And I'm working through, I started therapy with a new therapist, like a regular LCSW lady. Who's not because my last guy was an Orthodox Jewish man who wanted me to have children. Like it was a whole new, I just got involved in all the Shannon Diego's of like weirdness. I attracted that weirdest and whatever. So this lady is like a legit, you know, therapist. And they only bummer is, and I totally understand she's on zoom, but like, I I'm so sick of like, I would love to be in a room with a therapist, but I get it. She's in, she's an older lady, which is also great. I was so sick of having like 28 year old therapists.1 (9m 13s):Yeah,2 (9m 13s):Yeah, yeah. For sure.1 (9m 16s):I don't even seem right. Unless clients are like, you know, fit seven to 17. So anyway, so, but all this to say about my mom, I was thinking about it and I think what's harder than right. My mom's death right now is that there's I just, you know, and this is something I wanted to bring up with you is just like, I have a lot of rage that's coming up lately about my childhood and we weren't allowed to feel rage. And my mom was the only one allowed to feel rage. And so this rage mixed with perimenopause slash menopause. I mean, like I still get a period, but like, it's, it's a matter of time before that's over.1 (9m 58s):So, but the rage, so I guess, right. I get, you know, people like to talk about rage as some or anger as something we need to process and we need to do this and that, but the truth of the matter is since we're being transparent, like rage can be really scary. Like sometimes the rage, I feel, it's not like I'm going to do anything. Why wonky? I hope, but it's more like a, I don't know what to do with it. That is my, and I was talking in therapy about that. Like, I'm not actually sure. Practically when the feelings come up, what to do with rage. And I feel like it speaks to in our culture of like, we're all about now, this sort of like, we talk about this fake positivity and shit like that.1 (10m 41s):And also like embracing all your feelings, but there's not really practical things that we learn what to do when you feel like you're going to take your laptop and literally take it and throw it across the room and then go to jail. Like you, you. So I have to like look up things on the internet with literally like what to do with my rage.2 (11m 1s):I think that's why that's part of my attraction to reality. Television shows is a, is a performance of rage. That's that I wouldn't do just because I don't think I could tolerate the consequences. I mean, an upwards interpretation is, oh, it's not my value, but it's really just like, I don't think I can manage the content of the consequences. I'm totally at having all these blown up1 (11m 30s):And people mad at me and legal consequences. I can't,2 (11m 35s):It's something very gratifying about watching people just give in to all of their rage impulses and it's yeah. I, it it's, it may be particularly true for women, but I think it's really just true for everybody that there's very few rage outlets, although I guess actually maybe sports. Well, when it turns, when it turns sideways, then that's also not acceptable.1 (12m 3s):Yeah. I mean, and maybe that's why I love all this true crime is like, these people act out their rage, but like lately to be honest, the true crime hasn't been doing it for me. It's interesting. That is interesting. Yeah. It's sort of like, well, I've watched so much of it that like now I'm watching stuff in different languages, true crime. And I'll start again. No, no, just stories. I haven't all been the only stories that I haven't heard really, really are the ones from other countries now. So I'm watching like, like true crime in new, in Delhi.2 (12m 42s):Do you need your fix? I actually was listening to some podcasts that I listened to. There's always an ad and it's exactly about this. It's like, we love true crime, but we've heard every story we know about every grisly murder, you know, detail. And it was touting itself as a podcast of, for next time I listened to it. I'll note the name of it so I can share it with you. You know, about this crimes. You haven't heard about1 (13m 9s):T the thing is a lot of them now, because I'm becoming more of a kind of sewer. Like a lot of it is just shittily made. So like the, the they're subtitled and dubbed in India, like India. So you've got like the, the they're speaking another language and then they're and if they don't match, so then I'm like, well, who's right. Like, is it the dubbing that's right. Or the subtitles that are right. And, and actually the words matter because I'm a writer. So it was like one anyway, it's poorly done is what I'm saying in my mind. And so it sort of scraped scraping the bottom of the barrel. It's like deli 9 1 1. I swear to God. That's what it, and, and it's, and also it's, it's horrifying because the, you know, the legal systems everywhere fucked, but India has quite a system.2 (13m 57s):I think that to the rage, like, tell me more about what comes up for you with rage and where you,1 (14m 6s):Yeah. Okay. So some of it is physiological, like where I feel literally like, and I think this is what my doctor's talking about. The menopause symptoms. I literally feel like a gnashing, my teeth. Like, I feel a tenseness in my jaw. Like, that's literally that. And she's like, that could also be your heart medication. So talk to your heart doctor. I mean, we're checking out all the things, but like, but it's tension. That's what it really feels like in my body is like tight tension where I feel earth like that. If I had to put a sound effect to it, it's like, ah, so I, I feel that is the first symptom of my rage. And then I feel like, and, and I say out loud, sometimes I hate my life.1 (14m 54s):That's what I say. And that is something I have never allowed myself to say before. Like I, I think unconsciously, I always told myself, like, you just, you have to be grateful and you know, those are the messages we receive, but sometimes life just fucking sucks. And sometimes my life, I just, I just can't stand. And, and in moments, you know, I never loved myself. So it's mostly a physical symptom followed by this is intolerable, what someone is doing. Sometimes my dog or my husband, but even, even if the coworking space, you know, like the lady was talking too loud and I was like, oh my God, this is intolerable.1 (15m 34s):She has to shut up. So agitation, that's what it is. And, and then it passes when I, if I, if I can say, oh my gosh, I am so fricking in Rouge right now. Then it passes.2 (15m 52s):Yeah. Well, it, it kind of sounds like from, from you and probably for most people, the only real option is to turn it in on yourself, you know, like you're not going to put it elsewhere. So you've, you know, you have, which is, so I guess maybe it's okay if you turn it on yourself, if you're doing, if you're working, if you're doing it with acceptance, which is the thing I'm gathering from you, as opposed to stewing and festering. And1 (16m 21s):I mean, it becomes, it's interesting. Yes, it is. So it's like, so red, hot, and so sudden, almost that the only thing I can do is say, okay, this is actually happening. Like, I can't pretend this isn't happening. I, it I'm like physically clenching my fists. And then I, yeah, there is a level of acceptance. I don't get panicked anymore. Now that I, that something is wrong. I just say, oh, this is rage. I name it. I'm like, I feel enraged and white, hot rage, and then it, and then it, and then I say, that's what this is.1 (17m 3s):I don't know why. I don't know where it's coming from. Right. In this moment. It's not proportionate to the lady, like literally talking on the phone at my coworking space that she's not shouting. So it's not that. And I don't want to miss that. I'm not like I can't fool myself to think that it's really, that lady's problem. That I feel like throwing my laptop at her head. And then, and then it passes. But, but, but it is, it is more and more. And, and I think a lot of it, not a lot of it, but you know, my doctor really does think that it's, it's hormonal. A lot of it just doesn't help the matter. I mean, it's not like, oh, great. It's hormonal. Everything's fine. But it, it does help to make me feel a little less bonkers.2 (17m 45s):Maybe you should have like a, a whole rage. Like what, like a rate. Well, first I was thinking you should have a range outfit. Like, oh, for me, if I, I noticed I pee in the winter anyway, I pick like my meanest boots and my leather jacket. When I'm feeling, you know, maybe say maybe kind of a rage outfit, when did Pierce?1 (18m 9s):No, I, I scratched myself in my sleep. Oh no, it's okay. It happens all the time. I do it in my sleep. It's a thing that it's like a little skin tag that I need to get removed. It's2 (18m 23s):So you could have a rage outfit and then you could have a rage playlist, And then you might even have like rage props. I'm just trying to think about a way that your ma you, you could write because if, if how you process something is artistically creatively, then maybe you needed a creative outlet that's specifically for, for race.1 (18m 48s):Yeah. And you know, the, I, I love that. And now I'm thinking about like, as a kid, we, because we, anger was so off limits to us. I used to violently chew gum. Like I would chew on the gum. That was a way, and my mom did the same thing, even though she also got her rage out, but it was like, you know, when people violently chew on their gum, like that was a way I could get my aggression out. That's so sad that that's like the only way.2 (19m 16s):Well, I mean, you find it wherever you can find me. It's like water looking for whatever that expression is, right? Yeah. Huh. Well, I have to get more in touch with my rage because I I'm told that I seem angry a lot.1 (19m 33s):You do.2 (19m 35s):I, I do get told that, but, but that sucks for me because I feel like I'm not expressing my anger and I'm, but I'm not. So I'm not, and I'm being seen as angry at certain times. So that means I didn't even get the benefit of like letting out the anger that somebody is.1 (19m 56s):Right. You didn't even get to act out the anger. It's like, yeah. So for me, miles tells me that all the time, like, he's like, you seem really in couples therapy. Also, I have to admit yesterday was a big day. We had couples therapy on zoom. Then I had individual therapy. And in between I had all kinds of like, just stuff happening. So, but yeah, I'm told I a miles is like, you seem so angry and he's not wrong. And, and we take it out on the people that we live in a two by four apartment with. So I also feel like this office space is helping with that, but yeah, I dunno, I'm going to have to keep exploring my, my rage and that's what it is.1 (20m 37s):And also it is like, I am the character in where the wild things are that kid, that is what I feel like. And it feels it's like the perfect cause he wants to gnash his teeth and, and he does, and a thrash, thrash, thrashing mash, or the words 2 (21m 6s):Let me run this by you that I wanted to do when we're going to talk to Molly that we didn't get to do. And it was based on made, you know, and just about money and, and wondering like what your relationship is right now with money. And also, but when were you at your lowest with money? What do you remember as being your lowest moment? Sure, sure. With money with money.1 (21m 40s):Okay. I have moments of what first comes to mind was when right. I was at DePaul. So it's an apropos in college and there was obviously a sense. I had a sense of lack, always, even though based on whatever, but it was phone. Somehow my accounts were always negative, right? Like, and I would call the number, the banking number, incessantly to check, and it would always be negative. So I have this panic thoughts about that. Like being a time of like, and that's not the only time that happened like that.1 (22m 23s):Where, what is the feeling? The feeling was that, and this was in college where it started to happen, where I felt like there's never enough. No, one's going to help me. I'm irresponsible with money. Was the message I told myself and I probably was, I was in college, but I can't handle money. And literally that, that panic was also, I mean, it was true. I had no money, but my parents would have backed me, probably helped me out, but I was too scared to ask for help. So that's like, that's when, when you asked that question, that's where I go.1 (23m 4s):But, but that's also a college kind of me. So like in terms of an adult, me, that's a really great, great question. My lowest, I don't know. What about you?2 (23m 22s):Well, I've got a lot of Loma Loehmann's moments with money when I was in high school. The thing was, I lost my wallet all the time.1 (23m 35s):Oh, I remember this. I remember you talking about,2 (23m 38s):Yeah, that'd be still lose stuff all the time. That actually started at a young age with, you know, my mom would, she, my mom was really into jewelry and she would buy me destroyed. And there's nothing wrong with the fact that she brought me jewelry, but I lost it. You know, she buy me nice gold jewelry1 (23m 59s):Because she likes nice things. That's right. Yeah.2 (24m 4s):In college it was pretty bad. And the first time it was pretty bad. I had to move back in with my mom because I couldn't afford rent. And then the second time I just, I re I really, if I had more bravery, I probably would have signed up to be one of those girls in the back of the Chicago reader. Like, I, I, I just figured what ha how literally, how else? Because I had a job, but I only worked however much I could work given the fact that we were in rehearsals and like busy all day, so I never could make enough money. And then I just, I think I always have had a dysfunctional relationship with money.1 (24m 51s):Wait a minute, but I have to interrupt. Why, why didn't our parents fucking help us? Okay. Look, I know I sound like a spoiled asshole brat, but like, when I think of the anxiety that we were going through and I know your mom did, so I'm not going to talk shit about your mom or anything, but I'm just saying like, why did we feel so alone in this when we were so young, this is not right.2 (25m 11s):Yeah. Well, my mom did help me out as much as she possibly could, but I think part of it too, my dad certainly didn't think it was that. I mean, when my mom was 18 and my dad was 19, they bought a house and had a baby. So I think part of it is, has been like, what's the matter with you? Cause I didn't go to college, you know, that's the other thing. So, so then when I, then I had a period for like 10 years where I always had three jobs, me two, what1 (25m 46s):Did you have enough then? I mean like, could you make rapid enough?2 (25m 49s):I had enough then yeah, I had enough then. But then when Aaron decided he wants to go to medical school, it was really on me to, to bring in the income. I mean, his parents always gave him money. They helped, it was a lot more. I mean, and actually it's why he became a therapist because I thought, well, we're going to be living with no income because he's going to be a student. Right. So I better giddy up and get a job. So the whole time I was in social work school, I was bartending. I remember that. And then I went quickly into private practice so that I could make money.2 (26m 29s):And it turned out to be, it turned out to backfire on me. Tell1 (26m 35s):Me, tell me, tell me more.2 (26m 37s):It backfired in two ways. Number one, I was, I shouldn't have been operating a private practice without my LCSW. I had my MSW and I was working at the time in a psych hospital. And all of the psychiatrist said, you should start your private practice. You should start your private practice. And I remember saying at the beginning, I don't know if I'm allowed to oh yes, yes. You definitely can. I know tons of MSWs into plenty of people and it's true. I don't know if it's still true now in New York, but at that time you could walk around and see plenty of nameplates for offices where somebody in private practice and that just have an MSW.2 (27m 18s):They just had to have a supervisor1 (27m 19s):Or something.2 (27m 22s):I don't know. Okay. I dunno. Right. So that ended up coming to haunt me when a disgruntled patient. And they're all disgruntled in some way, a family who actually had been swindled by a con artist, like they, they were a blue blood, rich ass family and they got swindled by a con artist. And so they were talking about rage. They had a lot of rage about that. When this guy who was paying for his daughter's treatment, didn't think it was going where, you know, he wanted it to right.2 (28m 4s):He started pushing back about the fee and then he was submitting to his insurance company and they were not reimbursing because I didn't have the LCSW. So then he reported me to the New York state office of professional discipline or1 (28m 21s):Whatever yeah.2 (28m 21s):Regulation or whatever. Yeah. And I ha I had to go through a whole thing. I had to have a lawyer and I had to go, yeah, yeah. It was a nightmare. It was a complete and total nightmare. And I, and I said nothing, but like, yeah, I did that. I did do that. And I did it because I needed to make the money. I mean, in some ways I don't regret it because I did it worked for the time that it worked. And then by the time it stopped working, I was ready to leave private practice anyway. Oh my God. Yeah. But then it also backfired because we were taking in this money, which we desperately needed living in New York city with two kids.2 (29m 3s):And, and we were, we were spending it all and not hold withholding any for taxes. So then that started, that started, that started almost 10 year saga of just, I mean, I, it's embarrassing to even say how much money we've paid in just in fees, compounded fees. Nope. I'm sure. In the last 10 years we've given the government a million dollars.1 (29m 29s):That sounds, that sounds about right. And you know, I think the thing with money too, is the amount of forgiveness I've need to muster up for the financial decisions that I have made. So one of them that I'm super embarrassed about is that, and I, and I hear you when it's like, yeah, I, it, it's embarrassing. I, I, when I did my solo show, I inherited the year that my mom died. My great aunt also died, who I very barely knew. And I inherited like, like a lot of money. Well, to me, a lot, like 50 grand from her, and I spent 15,000 on a publicist for my solo show that did nothing.1 (30m 14s):So I was swindled. Oh,2 (30m 17s):I'm so sorry to hear that. That really did nothing.1 (30m 22s):I could have done it all on my own. I could have done it all on my own, on drugs, in a coma. Do you know what I'm saying? Like, like, come on. So I have done made some questionable decisions. I did the best we did the best we could with, with the information that we all had at the time. I would never make that decision. I wouldn't, I will never make that mistake again. So yeah. Money is very, very, obviously this is so like kind of obvious to say, but it is, it is. So it is a way in which we really, really use it to either prize or shame ourselves. Right. And, and, and w I do it either way, like I do it.1 (31m 2s):Oh, I'm so fancy. I inherited this dough. And then I also do it. It's that thing that they talk about in program, which is like, you're the worm, but you're the best worm for the festival, special worms. And like, you're not a worker among workers. I'm just like the best idiot out there. It's like,2 (31m 18s):Dude. Yeah. And you're making me realize that money might be the only very quantifiable way of understanding your psychology list. The money is like, understanding your psychology through math. It's going okay. If you're a person like me who gets offered a credit card at age 20 totally signs up and, and immediately maxes it out at whatever, to get 27% interest rate. So whatever little thousand dollars of clothes I got, I probably paid $10 for it. And for the longest time. So, so that's me being afraid of the truth of my financial situation, being unwilling to sacrifice, having, you know, whatever, cute clothes being about the immediate gratification of it all and not thinking longterm.2 (32m 15s):Yeah.1 (32m 16s):Okay. Well, not asking for help either. Like, like, I don't know who I'd asked, but someone had to know more than me. I didn't ask my parents. They didn't really know what was happening at, or that just was their generation of like, not teaching us about money. It was sort of like, good luck. Get it together. We got it together. You get it together. Okay. Fine. But like unwillingness and fear to ask, to be taught something about money. Like, I didn't know, Jack shit about credit or interest Jack shit.2 (32m 46s):Yeah. And I recently realized that I'm basically redoing that with my kids, because we supposedly have this allowance. Only one of my kids ever remembers to ask for it because you know, only one of my kids is very, you know, very interested in money, but like, in a way I can understand why the others don't because it's like, well, anytime they want something, I pay for it. I never say sometimes I'll say recently, I've gotten better about saying, if we're going to go back to school shopping I'll especially if the oldest one, I'll say, this is your budget. If you, if you spend it all on one pair of sneakers, then I hope you're okay with your sweat pants that don't fit and wear them everyday for the rest of the school year.2 (33m 31s):Right. But it's, we've, we've just been extremely inconsistent in tying, like, for example, chores to your allowance,1 (33m 42s):It's fucking miserable and hard. And I have trouble doing that for myself. I wouldn't be able to do that for my children. If I had children, I can't not give the dog people food. What are you talking about? How am I going to bring it? Doesn't shock me. We didn't learn the skills and I'm not blaming. I mean, I'm blaming, of course my parents, but I'm also just saying, it's just the facts. If we're going to be that in the truth, like, I didn't learn, I didn't educate myself and nobody educated me. So I'm really learning through trial and error. Mostly error, how to be okay with money. And it is you're right. Like finances, romance, and finance teach us the most about our psychology.2 (34m 24s):Yeah. Yeah. Romance finance. I love that. 1 (34m 28s):I think that my boss at Lutheran social services to say all the time, finance and romance, romance, and finance, that's what all these addictions are about is that's how you see them. I'm like, she's right. I mean, she was, I liked her. She was bonkers, but I liked her. She said some good. She, she also is famous for saying, and she didn't say it, but she would always quote, the, no one gets out of here alive. You know, none of us getting out of here life, we might as well start2 (34m 54s):. Well, today on the podcast, we were talking to Carol Schweid and original cast member of the original production of a chorus line on Broadway. She's got great stories to tell she's a fascinating person. And I think you're going to really enjoy this conversation with Carol Schweid. Exactly. Carol shrine. Congratulations. You survived theater school. I did. You did.2 (35m 34s):And where did you go to theater school. Okay. First of all,3 (35m 38s):Let me just take my coffee, my extra coffee off of the stove and put it on my table. Cause it's gonna burn because we don't want that.4 (35m 51s):Okay. You're I am looking for a cop. If you have one, you know, this is ridiculous.3 (36m 2s):Hi there. Hi. This is a riot that you talk about surviving theater school. I think it's great. Okay. So this is working, right? You can hear me. Yeah, no, totally. A hundred percent. So this is my, I started college at Boston university. I was an acting major, which I loved. I really did, but I, what I loved more than anything was I loved the history of the theater. We had a great professor who told the tales of the gladiators and the, you know, the gladiators on the island and the fighting, and then the island, the survivors, and then the island would slowly sink into the water.3 (36m 45s):What is this? What did I miss? It was the early history of the theater. It was starting on the church steps. It was, you know, the second, whatever all of that history was, I found it really interesting. I also loved the station shop crew stuff. I liked learning about lighting. I was terrible at it. I, you know, I would fall off ladder, but I, I, I enjoyed the backstage stuff as much as I enjoy. I just, I liked it. I, we did the rose tattoo and my, and my first job was to take care of the goat. I was on the prop crew.3 (37m 28s):I took care of the goat. Was it a stuffed goat? No, it was a real goat. Wow. What can I tell you? The rose tattoo. There's a goat in the play. I didn't realize you could have livestock and colleges, college, whatever it was. I look like I have jaundice with is that something's wrong with the light jump I sent you stop your, where is the microphone part of your, do you want me to hold it up better? Because when you move, it hits your shirt and it makes like a scratching, right? That's right. I'll do it this way. I won't move around. When you look tan, you look, you don't like jaundice at all. Okay. Well then that's all right. Good. Thanks. Were the goat handlers.3 (38m 8s):Good to talk to you. I mean, that was, and I didn't mind, I didn't mind being an usher. All of those things, you know, I remember somebody sitting us down and saying, you're you are the first person. The audience we'll meet tonight as an usher. I took all of the stuff I did, but the acting business was very confusing to me. I didn't quite know. I had done a lot of theater and dancing and been in the shows and stuff, but I really, I was a little more of a dancer than an actor. I'd taken class in the city. I'd followed some cute guy from summer camp to his acting class. But half the time, I honestly didn't understand a word.3 (38m 48s):Anybody said, I just, nobody does. I really didn't get it so much at the time I loved it, but I didn't always get it. And for some reason, and I have no idea where this, why this happened. I had a boyfriend in summer stock whose mother worked at Barnard and her best friend was a woman named Martha Hill. Martha Hill ran the dance department at a school called Julliard. Nope. I had no idea. Cool. Just a little, nothing school. This is back in the day. It's a long time ago. It was just a plain old school. It wasn't like a school, you know, where you bow down. And I really was a very good dancer and always loved dancing.3 (39m 33s):You know, I've been dancing since I'm like a kid, a little five or six or whatever. So I was a little disenchanted with my successes at Boston U even though I had friends, I was having a great time. I mean, Boston in the late sixties was amazingly fun, but I felt like I wasn't getting it. I mean, it wasn't a school that was cutting people. Thank God, because that would have been torture. I don't know how anybody survives that, but I audition for this dance department in this school called Juilliard and got in and then told my parents that I was going to change colleges. I remember making up a dance in the basement of my dorm in Boston.3 (40m 17s):Cause you had a sort of take class and then you had to show something that you should have made up. And somebody else from college was leaving school to come to New York to be a singer. So we decided we were going to be roommates. And then we had a summer stock. Somebody at BU started some summer theaters. So I had a job or two, I think I had some friends from there. So I ended up moving, changing colleges and going to Juilliard. And I spent three years there. I was a modern dancer major. So we had the Limone company, including Jose Lamone wow teachers and the Graham company.3 (40m 59s):I mean, Martha, Martha Graham did not teach, but her company did as a winter and Helen, I was Helen McGee. One of the, they were maniacs. I mean, they're, they're like gods and goddesses and their whole life is about dance. And I was one of those demonstrators for her eight o'clock beginning class, my third year of school. I mean, I, it was all about technique. We had amazing ballet teachers. We had Fiorella Keane who, I mean, Anthony tutor taught class there and he was Anthony. I mean, so I got a out of being at that school that I have never lost. I mean, I can, I'm making up the answers for high school kids now really.3 (41m 42s):I'm just finishing up a production of grease, which is really kind of boring, but whatever I liked Greece, tell me more. Yeah. It's okay. If you hear it enough, you really get sick of it. Well, that's true. Yeah. I mean high school kids doing high school kids is like, Jesus, God, you just want to slit your throat. The moodiness when it comes to the girls. I mean, I love them. I really love them. I love the guys because puppies, they fall all over each other and they're fabulous, but that's a lie anyway. So I did something that I don't know why I did it and how it worked out. That way I left. I had a very best friend in college that was, you know, and I came to New York and made, made and shared an apartment with this slightly crazy woman.3 (42m 32s):And a year later I got myself a studio apartment on west end avenue and 71st street. And my mom co-signed the lease. And I spent three years dancing, honestly dancing almost every day. I wanted to take sights singing, but they wouldn't let me because I was in the dance department. And I didn't know, you could advocate for that. Sure. I didn't know. You could take classes at Columbia. I mean, who had time anyway, but was it a three-year program? It was a four year program, but I had taken a music class at BU that was like music appreciation one. Yeah. And for whatever reason, they gave me credit for that.3 (43m 14s):So I had a full year credit. Yep. Three years of Juilliard where I really worked my tail off. What's weird about it is that I am, you know, just a plain old Jewish girl from New Jersey, you know, a middle-class Jewish girlfriend. And to, to think that I could have a profession where people don't talk and don't eat, which is what the answers do is a riot to me. Yeah. Yeah. It's an absolute riot because you know, I mean, that should be basically the manual for dancers. Don't talk, don't eat, but I always knew that I was heading to Broadway. I really have always wanted to do that.3 (43m 55s):And I, and, and w was not really ever in question that I would, I somehow assumed if I worked hard and figured it out enough, I would find my way to working on Broadway. And I, and I made the right choice in the sense of switching colleges. Because in the seventies, if you look at your list of Broadway shows, all the directors were choreographers. They were all dancers, all of them Fauci, Michael Bennett champion, all of them. So I started working when I got out of school, you know, it was, and I had already done a couple of summers of summer stock and I did a summer Bushkill pencil, you know, these ridiculous, stupid theaters all over, but it was a blast.3 (44m 36s):It was fun. Where, what was your first job out of school? I was still, I was in school and it was the Mount Suttington Playhouse, which was like a tin shell in Connecticut. And I think it was still in college. Cause two guys from school had opened this theater at the skiing place, but it wasn't skiing. Then it was a sh it was like a tin shell. So couldn't really do a show when it was raining very well. And I believe it was stopped the world. I want to get off and I can still remember the Alto harmony to some of the songs. So you okay. Wait, so you don't consider, you didn't consider yourself a, an actor or did you?3 (45m 20s):Well, I did, but I think what happened was I had to audition for something. It'd be you like, they had grad programs and it wasn't that I was unsuccessful there, but somebody came and I didn't get cast. I didn't get hired. And I didn't understand, you know, like they give you all these acting exercises. We do sense memory. Well, I didn't know they were exercises. I didn't, they were they're like plea aids. Right. They're like learning things. I took this all very seriously. I would stand in a room and try to feel it was like that song from chorus line, you know, try to feel the emotion, feel the, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah.3 (46m 5s):I did all of that. I didn't really understand the simple, what am I want here? And what's in my way of trying to get it. Yeah. It took me so long to find teachers that I really could understand and make me a better actor. So when did you find them? When did you start to find them? Oh, that's interesting. Well, I found a couple of good teachers in New York. I mean, honestly there was a woman named Mary Tarsa who had been in the group theater and an older lady. I mean, it's a long time ago anyway, you know, but I remember sitting in her class and she would talk about using imagery and th and I started to sort of understand a little bit, which is amazing to me because after I moved to Westport and I met, do you know the name Phoebe brand?3 (46m 58s):Yeah. Phoebe brand was in our theater workshop. Oh, taught a class. She was already up in her eighties and she taught a class, a Shakespeare class on Sunday mornings. And all of a sudden these things that I didn't understand from decades before. Hmm. It sort of pulled it all together. But for me, I went, I was in California after I got married and moved to LA for a couple of years, found a teacher named John LAN and Lee H N E and two years in his class. I started to really understand how to do it. And then when I came back to New York, he sent me to Michael Howard and Michael Howard, Michael Howard was a great teacher for me.3 (47m 44s):He's still a great, I don't know if he's still around if he's teaching or not, but he was a wonderful teacher. And I started to understand how to do it. Was Len the, did he teach the method or what was yes, he was, he was an actor studio teacher. And I started to understand about being present on the stage and being able to deal with people. All of it, it just changed dramatically. I mean, I started to understand what this was about and seeing other good actors and chipping away at it and finding people to rehearse with. And1 (48m 22s):You, you, from what I know, and what I'm gathering is that once you graduated Juilliard, you were cast in New York.3 (48m 30s):Well, you know, I did get my very, my V I I've. I mean, I, I remember going to see midnight cowboy, which was about the same time as I got out of college. And I remember going into a terrible panic of, oh my God. I mean, really scared about all of it. And I, I went, I joined a class that a friend of mine, somebody told me about this class, you know, I always follow somebody to a class. I'm always, I have good friends. And I, somebody says, oh, I love this guy come to class and I'd show up.3 (49m 12s):And this was a musical comedy singing class, kind of where there were writers in the class and actors in the class. And the writers in the class would work on a musical that they didn't have permission for. It wasn't like they were, we were doing this for money or for, for future. So my friend who I became friends with wrote her musical version of barefoot in the park and which has never been done, but I remember I was in it and this guy was in it. And we, it was the kind of a class where it was a very warm, funny group, funny group of wacko theater people. And I would go to open calls and I'd usually go to open dance calls because that was a door for me.3 (49m 59s):And also I used to have to sneak out of Jew, not sneak necessarily, but essentially sneak out to take my singing lessons. And I took singing lessons every, you know, every week for years, for three years, I would, you know, and I, and I was not really, I don't think a very good singer, but I became a good singer. I would sneak out of school and go to an acting class. I don't even know when I started that, but I know that I would find the time to do it and then talk about acting and find a teacher so that when I would audition for a musical and I would get through the dancing. Usually if I got through the first cut, I would make it to the end. I wouldn't always get the job, but if I made it through that first horrible, random cut, you know, where there's 200 people in your dancing across the stage and it's yes, no, yes, no.3 (50m 47s):Is it really?1 (50m 48s):Because I'm not a dancer. So I never had this. I, when my agents are like, oh, there's an open dance call. I'm like, ah, that's you sent the wrong person, the email. So it's really like that, like in, in chorus line where they say, you know,3 (51m 1s):Oh yeah. It's like all that jazz. It's really like that.2 (51m 6s):Wait, I have a question. I want to hear the re the rest of that. But I, I just, I've never asked anybody. What's the biggest difference between the people who got cut immediately. I mean, was it training or were there people that, in other words, were there people who were just walking in off the street with no training trying to audition? Yeah,1 (51m 29s):No, truly an open call.3 (51m 31s):No. And sometimes these were equity calls. Cause I, I, I did get my equity card on a summer. That one summer I worked for a non-union, you know, we were in either Bushkill Pennsylvania or Southern Eaton Connecticut, or I did a couple of those summers. And then the next summer, the choreographer from that show had an equity job. And he hired like three of us from our non-unions summer stock, because we were good enough. And1 (52m 4s):So when you went to these open calls, everyone, there was a bad-ass dancer. No one, there was like,3 (52m 10s):That's not true. That's not true. There were all different levels of dancers, but it was also a look await, you know, it was always, I was always like seven pounds overweight. It was like, the torture is thing of weight does enough to put anybody over the edge1 (52m 26s):That they literally3 (52m 27s):Weigh you, Carol. Oh God. No. Oh, but it's so look, and I will tell you there's one. There was one time when I remember auditioning for above Fossey show and there were a lot of people on the stage and we were whatever we were doing. And then at 1.3 Fossey dancers, it was their turn. And these three gals, okay. Their hair was perfect. Their makeup was fabulous. They had a little necklace, they had a black leotards, you know, cut up high, but not out of control. Good tights, no, no runs, nice shoes, nails done.3 (53m 7s):And they were fantastic. They were clean. They were technically, and we all sort of went, oh fuck.1 (53m 16s):Right.3 (53m 18s):Right. And I have friends who became Fossey dancers. I mean, I worked for Bob, but I have friends who did a lot of shows him. And they had that same experience where they saw other people, the way it should be. And then they would go back a month later and get the job because they knew what it took. It was all about knowing what it takes. But the thing about having studied acting and having slowly studied singing is that in the world of musical theater, I was ahead of the game because there's not that much time. So you have to be willing to spend all of your time.3 (54m 0s):Right.1 (54m 1s):There are some people I'm assuming Carol, that could dance wonderfully, but couldn't do the singing and the acting part. And that's where you were like, that's the triple threat newness of it all is like, you could do3 (54m 12s):Well, I could do them better than a lot of people. And I certainly could sing well, and I had, I could sing a short song and I knew that you sing a short song. I knew that you'd probably do an uptempo, you know? And also I tend to be a little angry when I go into an audition. It's like, why do I fuck? Do I have to audition? I better, duh. So I needed to find things that allowed me to be a little angry so I could be myself. And I could also be a little funny if I could figure out how to do that. So all of these things worked in my favor. And then of course, like everybody else in her, a lot of people, pat Birch, who was a choreographer, she had like a gazillion shows running, including Greece on Broadway. And now over here, I don't know if she did grease, but she did over here.3 (54m 55s):She did. She was very prolific choreographer. She had been a Martha Graham dancer and she had taught a couple of classes at Julliard. And when it came to my auditioning for her, she needed girls who could dance like boys. She didn't need tall leggy, chorus girls. We were doing the show she was working on, was a show called Minnie's boys. And it was a show about the Marx brothers and the last number of the show. We were all the whole chorus was dressed up like different Marx brothers. And she needed girls who could be low to the ground, who can, you could turn who and I was the right person.3 (55m 36s):And I remember being in that class, that wonderful musical theater class with a teacher named Mervin Nelson, who was just a great older guy who kind of worked in the business. I remember I had to go to my callback. I went to my class and the callback was at night. And I remember him walking me to the door, putting his arm around me and saying, go get the job. And if you don't get this one, we'll get you. The next one1 (56m 4s):That makes me want to3 (56m 4s):Cry. Well, it made me feel like part of the family, cause we all want to be part of that theater family. And so I tend to do that when I'm with an actor, who's going to go get a job or go get, you know, you want to feel like it's possible. Yeah. You feel like you can, you deserve it.1 (56m 29s):You said, you mentioned briefly that you worked for Bob3 (56m 32s):Fossey. I did.1 (56m 35s):Oh my gosh. Did you turn into one of those ladies that looked like a bossy dancer too? Like, did you then show up to those auditions? Like, oh3 (56m 43s):No, I don't think I, I couldn't, I didn't, I could not get into a chorus of Bob Fossey, but I did get to play for strata in Pippin in the, in the, in the first national tour. And he, Bob was the, he was the director and I, I knew I was the right person for that job. It was also a funny, kind of lovely circumstances that I was in some off-Broadway an off-Broadway show that had started as an awful off, off of a, that, that Bubba, that moved to an off-Broadway theater. I got some excellent reviews. And I think the day the review came out was the day I had my audition for Bob Fossey.3 (57m 24s):So I, and I played it. I had talked to people who knew him. I talked to, you know, I, I knew that I, I don't know, I just, I, I had done some work and I just, I don't know the right person at the right time, somebody, he needed it. That part required a good dancer. Who could, I don't know how I got the part. I just,1 (57m 57s):I'm kind of getting the impression that we're talking about being a strong dancer.3 (58m 0s):Well, let's strong dancer. And also being able to, being able to talk and sing was really the key. I'm not sure that I certainly, as a young person, I, I didn't do nearly as much comedy as I did when I got a little older, but, and also there were a lot of divisions. You sort of either did musicals or you did straight plays and it was hard to get into an audition even for a straight play. And the truth is I think that a lot of us who thought we were better than we were as you get better, you see when you really, wasn't a very strong actor.1 (58m 43s):Right. But there's something about that. What I'm noticing and what you're talking about is like, there's something about the confidence that you had by maybe thinking that you might've been a little better than you were that actually behooves young actors and performers that, you know, cause when Gina and I talked to these people were like, oh my God, they have a healthy ego, which actually helps them to not give up as where I was like, I'm terrible. I'm giving up at the first hour.3 (59m 9s):Exactly. Right. Right. And, and it, and it goes back and forth. It's like a CSO one day, you feel like, oh yeah, I'm good at this. I can walk it. I get, I'm like, I'm okay with this. And the next day you just to hide under the bed, I think that's sort of the way it goes. I didn't know that people who worked on Broadway even then all had coaches and teachers and support systems and you know, being kind of a little more of a lone Wolf, which I was, and still fight against in a way I come against that a lot, for whatever reasons, you know, whatever it doesn't work, what to be a lone Wolf.3 (59m 54s):Yeah. Yeah. You can't do this alone. You can't do it without a support system. It's just too hard because when I actually had the best opportunity I had, which was being part of a chorus line, it was harder than I thought to just be normal, come up with a good performance every night, you know, it was up and down and loaded and that you lost your voice and had nobody to talk to because you couldn't talk anyway. And we didn't have the internet yet. You know, there was so many, it was so much pressure and so much, and I hadn't really figured out how to create that support system up for myself.3 (1h 0m 42s):And it was harder, harder than it needed to be. Did you ultimately find it with the cast? No. Oh, not really where they mean, oh, none of the cast was fine. It wasn't that anybody was mean it's that I didn't take care of myself and I didn't know how I was supposed to take care of my shirt. How old were you when you were cast in a chorus line? 27? Maybe I was, I was young and, but I wasn't that young. I just, but it wasn't that C w it was a strange situation to, I was, I had already had one Broadway show, so I had done, and then I had gone out of town to bucks county Playhouse.3 (1h 1m 25s):And did west side story Romeo was your first Broadway show. I'm sorry. It was called Minnie's boys. Oh, that was it. That was my, I did. And it was a show about the Marx brothers. Right. And I don't know if you know who Louis. We would probably do Louis Stadol and Louis J Staglin who works with, he works with Nathan Lane a lot. Oh yeah. Yeah. He's like second bun and he's incredibly talented. He played Groucho. Okay. We were all 25 years old. We were kids. We were right out of college. And the weirdest part of all was that the mother was played by Shelley winters. And this was a musical. What a weird you've really. Okay. So then you went onto chorus line.3 (1h 2m 6s):Well then, well then in between that, this is like, you know, then, then I went out of town to bucks county. I love being in bucks county for a year. We did west side story. We did Romeo and Juliet during the week. We do them together, one in the morning, one in the afternoon for high school kids. And then on the weekends, we do one of the, and I was the only person in the cast who liked dancing at 10 o'clock in the morning. You know, I didn't mind doing west side at 10 in the morning. I'd been up at eight, being a demonstrator for Mary Hinkson, teaching people how to do a contraction. So I didn't care. I love working in the daytime. That's what I play with your food is such a nice success. My lunchtime theaters here, I get tired at night.3 (1h 2m 47s):I don't know.2 (1h 2m 49s):Most people do wait. So was the, was the audition process for chorus line?3 (1h 2m 56s):I have a great story. I can tell you what my story is. Okay. So I, I was in, I don't know what I was doing. I had done a lot of off-Broadway work. I had been doing, I had been working a lot. And then of course there were the year where I didn't work. And then I went off to south North Carolina and played Nellie Forbush in south Pacific, in the dinner theater for three months. And I loved that. Actually, I think it was one of those times I had a job and a boyfriend and it was like a relief. It was wonderful to have like a life and then do the show at night. You know, I, I enjoyed that a lot and I didn't, you know, it was a big part and I didn't panic about seeing it.3 (1h 3m 37s):And it was just, I learned a lot from doing a part like that. I was doing Fiddler on the roof at a dinner theater in New Jersey, down the street from where my folks lived. And occasionally my mom would stop by her rehearsal and watch the wedding scene. Honest to God. I'm not kidding. She's like, Carol, you ever gonna get married? Are you ever gonna? Okay. So I'm doing Fiddler on the roof, in New Jersey. And there's a guy in the cast, one of the bottle dancers who were dropping off at night on 55th street, because he's working on this little musical about dancers and he would bring in monologues and he'd asked me to read them at rehearsal because he wanted to hear them out loud.3 (1h 4m 25s):And there was some stuff about this place to ever hear the peppermint lounge back in the studio. Right. It was a disco thing, but it was also a place where there was something. I remember one the couch girls, girls who would just lie on the couches and the guys, I mean really crazy stuff that did not make it into the show, but some interesting stuff. And I was playing the eldest daughter sidle, and it's a terrific part for me. So I was good. Yeah. And Nick knew I was a dancer. Anyway, this little show called the chorus line was in its workshop. Second workshop. They had already done the I, cause I was not a Michael Bennett dancer. I didn't, you know, I, I, I had auditioned for my goal once for the tour of two for the Seesaw.3 (1h 5m 10s):And it was the leading part and I didn't get it. I auditioned, I sang and I read and I read and I sang and I didn't get the part. And I came home and I was like in hysterics for like five days. I just, you know, I, I didn't get the part year and a half later, I'm doing Fiddler on the roof with Nick, Dante in New Jersey. And somebody leaves the second workshop and Nick brings up my name because there's a job all of a sudden to cover, to be in the opening and to cover a couple of parts next, bring up my name. And Michael Bennett says, wait a minute. I know her. I know she's an actress and she's a singer. Can she dance?3 (1h 5m 52s):So I showed up the next morning and I danced for 10 minutes and I got the job. I mean, I think, wow. Yeah. That's a great story.2 (1h 6m 1s):No. So that means you didn't have to participate in3 (1h 6m 4s):Callbacks or nothing. Oh, I started that day. I mean, honestly, it was Fiddler on the roof, you know what, I don't remember whether, how it went. Cause we were already in performance tour or something, you know, I, I it's a long time ago, so I don't really remember, but I know that this particular story is the absolute truth. That's fantastic. That2 (1h 6m 27s):Was it a hit right away3 (1h 6m 29s):Chorus line. Well, it wasn't, we were in previews. I'm no, we weren't even previous the second workshop, which means it was still being figured out. And when I came to the first rehearsal and sat and watched what was going on, I could not believe what I was seeing because the truth of what was happening on stage and the way it was being built was astounding. It was absolutely astounding because something about it was so bizarre. Oh. And also, also Marvin Hamlisch was the rehearsal pianist on Minnie's boys.3 (1h 7m 10s):Wow. So I knew him a little bit, not well, you know, but he was the rehearsal pianist that nobody would listen to a show about the Marx brothers, Marvin would say, wait, this is the Marx brothers. You got to have a naked girl running out of the orchestra pit. You gotta, you gotta, and of course, nobody would listen to him. Wait a minute, just turn this off, stop, stop, turn off. Sorry. So I couldn't get over what I was seeing. And I, I knew from the beginning, of course, I think most of us did that. Something very, very unique was going on and it was always changing. Like Donna McKechnie came in late at the audition, all dressed up in like a fur thing.3 (1h 7m 56s):And it was like, I'm sorry, I'm late. I'm sorry. I'm late. And then Zach says, would you put on dance clothes? And she said, no, no, wait a minute. Anyway, you couldn't help. But know sort of, you just kind of put,2 (1h 8m 8s):I mean, I remember seeing it when I was a kid and not, not being able to relate as an actor, but now that I think back, it just must've felt so gratifying to be seen for all of the, you know, because like we w the Joe Montana episode, we3 (1h 8m 28s):Haven't listened to yet, but I'm looking forward to2 (1h 8m 30s):It here today. But he was saying, I love3 (1h 8m 33s):Him2 (1h 8m 34s):For you. You were saying that when he won the Tony and everybody would say, well, it's like to win the Tony, what's it? Like he said, it's like, you won the lottery, but you been buying tickets for 15 years. You know, that's the part of acting that people now, I think it's a pretty common knowledge that it's really difficult to be an actor, but I don't know how Hmm, how known that was then. And it just, must've been so gratifying for all of those people. I mean, who are living in their real life? The story of that musical. Yeah.3 (1h 9m 9s):I think that that's true. And also, I mean, it really did come out of people's experiences. Those stories are so, so to be part of something like that, and down at the public theater, which of course it was a vol place to be, you know, you, you knew that Meryl Streep was walking down the hallway and you knew that. I mean, talk about confidence. I mean, I don't know if you've read her new book, no book about her. No, it's worth the time I listened to it. Actually, I didn't read it. I listened to, it's quite wonderful because you see a very confident person who's working on creating who she is.1 (1h 9m 47s):Do you feel, I feel like you have a really strong sense of confidence about yourself too. Where did that come from? Would you agree? First of all, that you have, it sounds like you had some comps, some real chutzpah as a youngster and maybe now as well. Where'd that come from3 (1h 10m 5s):Beats me. I have it now because I, I, I, I've had a lot of, a lot of experience. And I, I think that, that, I, I think I know a lot about this, but I don't know that I had it. The trick was to have this kind of confidence when it really matters. Yes. And I think I had it, like if I was in an off-Broadway show, I could say, I don't think that's good enough. Could you restage this blah, blah, blah. Or if I'm in North Carolina, I'm not, I think we need to dah, dah, dah, dah, dah. But when it comes down to the real nitty gritty of standing up for yourself, when it really, really matters, boy, that's harder than it looks.3 (1h 10m 51s):You know, even things like, I mean, my character, when I eventually took over the role of Miralis, which I under, you know, I was we've covered all these parts. There were nine of us. We sang in the little booth in the wings. We had microphones and little headsets. And the coolest part of all was Jerry Schoenfeld, who was the chairman of the Schubert organization would bring any visiting dignitary who was visiting the city that he was showing around his theaters. He would bring them into our little booth. And then we would watch the show from stage left in our little booth while we're singing, give me the ball, give him the ball. Cause half the dancers on the stage, cause stop singing because they had a solo coming up.3 (1h 11m 31s):So, you know, singing in a musical is not easy. You know, there's a lot of pressure and you got to hit high notes and you, you know, you just wake up in the middle of the night going torture, torture, and you have to work through that and finally go, fuck it. You know, fuck it. I don't care what I weigh. Fuck it. I don't care if I, if I can't hit the high note, but it, it takes a long time to get there. You know, I see people who do this all the time. I don't know how they live. I don't know how they sleep at night. There's no wonder people like to hire singers who have graduated from programs where they really understand their voice, know how to protect that, which you don't, you know, you have to learn, you have to learn how to really take.3 (1h 12m 24s):That's why, you know, it's wondering about ballet companies now have misuses and we didn't have any of that. You were hanging out there alone. I felt maybe I'm wrong, but that's how I felt. And if I was vulnerable or if I didn't feel well, and I was like, oh, what am I going to do? I can't tell anybo

NextQuest Podcast
Hanna Del Toro, LCSW on The Wisdom of Anxiety

NextQuest Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 65:34


NextQuest Podcast is back with Season 5 of all new Austin area mental health professionals!   This week's episode features Hanna Del Toro, LCSW on The Wisdom of Anxiety   Hanna's website: https://www.hannadeltoro.com/   Theme song credit: "NextQuestion" by Greer Culbertson, LCSW-- lyrics, guitar, and vocals and Landon Laws-- drums   Sound Engineer: Amanda Justice   The interview process on this show is based entirely on the concept of consent in which an interviewee may choose to pass on any question at any time by simply saying "NextQuestion." No questions asked.    Thank you for listening to NextQuest Podcast. I learned something new today and I hope you did too. Stay tuned for next week's episode featuring Jeana Martin, Licensed Professional Counselor, who will be speaking about her practice and an area of interest, Somatic Experiencing.  NextQuest Podcast relies solely on donations to keep this project going. Please consider making a donation via Venmo to username @NQCATX or by buying me a coffee at https://www.buymeacoffee.com/nxtquestpodcast

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio
Mental Health Monday: Brokenness and Disintegration

The Coffee Hour from KFUO Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 25:02


Deaconess Heidi Goehmann, LCSW, joins Andy and Sarah to talk about Brokenness and Disintegration, including the definitions of brokenness and disintegration, why we avoid talking about hard things like these, the impact of "the fall" on humanity and relationships, and what happens when we see ourselves as parts rather than a whole. Find your copy of Finding Hope: From Brokenness to Restoration at cph.org/findinghope. Hear Mental Health Mondays each Monday at 9am CT! Find all episode with the tag "Mental Health Monday." View Deaconess Heidi's Mental Health Playlist on Youtube, listen to the Life in Relationship Podcast, and find all of her writings and resources at heidigoehmann.com.

High Heels and Heartache Podcast
Why Should You Stop Giving Unsolicited Advice?

High Heels and Heartache Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 48:06


Sharon Martin stops by to chat about unsolicited advice.  She walks us through the definition of unsolicited advice, why people give it, how to stop yourself from giving it and how to react when unsolicited advice is given to you! Sharon Martin, MSW, LCSW is a licensed psychotherapist who has been practicing in San Jose, CA for over 20 years. She specializes in helping individuals struggling with perfectionism, codependency, and people-pleasing. Her own struggle to feel “good enough”, inspired her passion for helping others learn to accept and love themselves. Sharon is the author of The Better Boundaries Workbook and The CBT Workbook for Perfectionism. Her work has also been featured in various media outlets including Psychology Today, Highly Sensitive Refuge, Web MD, and Psych Central. Blog post: https://www.livewellwithsharonmartin.com/unsolicited-advice/ Book: https://www.amazon.com/Better-Boundaries-Workbook-CBT-Based-Relationships/dp/1684037581

End-of-Life University
Ep. 326 The Sweetest Therapy: How Baking Heals Grief with Chase Cassine LCSW

End-of-Life University

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


Learn how a grief therapist coped with his own grief by turning to baking and creating a cookbook/grief book. My guest Chase Cassine is a licensed clinic social worker who proves individual therapy at a local community health clinic in New Orleans where he assists clients through grief, loss, depression, anxiety, adjustment issues, and communication… Continue reading Ep. 326 The Sweetest Therapy: How Baking Heals Grief with Chase Cassine LCSW

Sheryl Sitts – Exploring Possibilities Podcast -Holistic Spiritual Living – Journey of Possiblities.
EP285 Ken Breniman on Mortality, Therapy and Sacred Psychedelics (Entheogens) on Exploring Possibilities

Sheryl Sitts – Exploring Possibilities Podcast -Holistic Spiritual Living – Journey of Possiblities.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2021 44:39


Ken Breniman, LCSW, C-IAYT, Licensed Psychotherapist, Certified Yoga Therapist & Thanatologist (http://www.kenbreniman.com) talks with host Sheryl Sitts, MPA, BA, Possibilities Coach & Holistic Practitioner (http://www.sherylsitts.com) about: As we enter what is widely viewed as a happy time of year, the holidays, many of us are carrying grief from real and imagined losses we have experienced […] The post EP285 Ken Breniman on Mortality, Therapy and Sacred Psychedelics (Entheogens) on Exploring Possibilities first appeared on Journey of Possibilities - Holistic Spiritual Living - Exploring Possibilities Podcast.

Another Mother Runner
Running Games to Get You Going [Repeat]

Another Mother Runner

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 73:02


An ideal episode if your running needs an infusion of fun! Sarah welcomes therapist Kate Kneifel, MSW, LCSW, who shares running games that can change your outlook and approach to running—and life. This one-on-one conversation (co-host Katie scoots after the intro chitchat) zigs and zags in delightful directions, including: -detailing running games you've never considered; -how creativity and playfulness can invigorate your relationship with running; -the value of giving your brain “something to chew on”; -the joy of small things; and,  -how to get “unstuck.” Before Katie ducks out of the episode (which originally aired 7/10/20), the hosting duo laughs over an unexpected TMI topic. Kate the therapist enters the scene at 20:48. When you shop our sponsors, you help AMR. We appreciate your—and their—support! We can all use some help: For 10% off your first month, go to betterhelp.com/amr Share stories—and StoryWorth: Get $10 off your first purchase at StoryWorth.com/amr  A rare Rothy's discount! Get $20 off your first purchase at rothys.com/AMR Subscribe and use code amr at checkout to save 10% off your first order at shopflamingo.com/amr Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Support After Abortion
Men Healing From Trauma Apologize from a Power Chick with Lisa Rowe, LCSW

Support After Abortion

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 16:55


Experience the power of feminism and how it pushes women and men into roles and places that God did not intend. Read more at Support After Abortion

Light Up The Couch
The Truths of Transracial Adoption: Evaluating Impact and Considerations for Care, Ep. 143

Light Up The Couch

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 61:07


Jaclyn Skalnik, LCSW, provides a detailed discourse about how therapists can conceptualize identity development of those who are transracially-adopted and better support the needs of this population, including discussion about working with individuals or couples who are considering transracial adoption. Interview with Elizabeth Irias, LMFT

MoonWise
EMPATHY: Anna King on Parenting as a Highly Sensitive Person (Ep. 49)

MoonWise

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 51:31


"Highly sensitive people need a little bit more time to adjust to changes and new experiences because we are processing so much information at any given time." - Anna King In this episode of Moonwise, we speak with clinical social worker and perinatal mental health specialist Anna King about parenting as a highly sensitive person. We talk about the characteristics of this evolutionary trait and some of the gifts and challenges that it presents. Anna shares tips for dealing with overstimulation and how to support HSPs so that they can thrive in parenthood. She also shares her unique insights about why HSPs are at a higher risk for postpartum depression and anxiety and some of systemic and cultural barriers for understanding this trait within communities of color. We also talk about: HSPs and altered states of consciousness Inequity in maternal mental health The myth of the “strong black woman” Expanding our concept about what it means to be a parent Anna King, LCSW, PMH-C, (she/her) is a licensed clinical social worker and certified perinatal mental health specialist who uses an integrative, trauma-informed approach in her work grounded in reproductive and transformative justice. Anna serves as Clinical Training Specialist at Maternal Mental Health NOW, where she curates training events and curriculum and facilitates live and pre-recorded training to educate providers on perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs). Prior to joining the MMH-NOW team, she served as a full-time social worker in the emergency department and eventually found her home when she transitioned to serving a birth center and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). Throughout her experiences, Anna has realized the significant barriers to care for birthing people, especially for Black, Indigenous and people of color (BIPOC), and queer, trans, and gender diverse individuals and families. Her work centers on the embodied liberation of marginalized groups in reproductive spaces. She is also currently a part-time psychotherapist with ARC Counseling and Wellness and a third-year Ph.D. student in the Integral and Transpersonal Psychology program at the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS). Her research interests include spiritual activism, the highly sensitive person (HSP) trait, birth and postpartum tradition, and the transition to parenthood as a rite of passage. Links: Maternal Mental Health NOW ARC Counseling and Wellness The Highly Sensitive Parent Rooted pregnancy journal —> Leave us a written review on Apple Podcasts, and get a shout out on the show! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/moonwise/message

VSC Podcast
VSC Podcast episode 88 - Non-reported Cases of Sexual Assault

VSC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 43:44


On the 88th episode of the VSC Podcast, Education Coordinator Emilie Mitchell is joined by FCASV's Director of Programs Melissa Ashton and VSC's Lead Victim Advocate Rhonda Wilson to chat about the many barriers survivors may face when it comes to reporting, the different options survivors have and the resources available to them whether or not they want to report, and why it is important for survivors to make choices that are right for them on their healing journey. Melissa Ashton, LCSW (she/her) has been in the field of victim services since 2001. She began her career primarily supporting survivors of domestic and sexual violence through the criminal justice system. Melissa also served as a campus based advocate for nearly 10 years where she worked with survivors of all types of crimes. Through her work at FCASV, Melissa has worked with survivors on their civil legal needs under the LAV grant and has also provided technical assistance to Florida advocates, law enforcement and prosecutors. She is currently the Director of Programs and in this role provides training and technical assistance to Florida's 31 certified sexual assault programs around the state. Melissa also works on PREA issues and continues to train advocates. In her free time Melissa enjoys spending time with her family and training for her next race! Rhonda Wilson (she/her) has been part of the VSC team for over 12 years. She has three graduate degrees, a Master of Human Services, a MBA and a Master in Administration of Justice and Security. Rhonda has over 30 years of experience in criminal/military justice. She served in the U.S. Navy for 20 years. After retiring from the Navy, Rhonda worked as the Director of a Residential Re-entry Center for inmates transitioning from federal prisons. Rhonda's goal is to engage the entire community in activities that prevent sexual assault and crime. You can listen to this episode on our Youtube Channel: https://youtu.be/SQOkyztYWPY You can also listen to this episode on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts! Want to make a difference? Visit Victimservicecenter.org to learn how you can get involved and help the VSC continue supporting survivors of trauma. ----------------------------------- Trigger Warning: In this podcast we will be discussing sensitive topics such as Sexual Assault. It's important to take care of yourself while listening. Some suggestions are listening while you're in a healthy head space or knowing who you can reach out to if you become upset. Our 24/7 helpline for crisis calls based out of Central Florida is 407 500 HEAL, for the Florida state sexual helpline call (888) 956-7273. By contacting the National Hotline at 1-800-656-4673 you can get support and learn about your local resources. There is always someone ready to help.

Unsweetened Sio
118 - Breaking Up With Sugar With Molly Carmel, LCSW-R

Unsweetened Sio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 54:39


In today's episode I talk with Molly Carmel, LCSW-R, about breaking up with sugar and overcoming the diet mentality that has most of us so traumatized. Molly speaks from the heart and shares her own story and how she now helps other people. Molly is the Founder of the Beacon Program clinic and Beacon by MC signature programs which offer individual and group solutions to help people heal their relationship with food and with themselves. She is also the author of the book, Breaking Up with Sugar. As she battled an eating disorder and addiction for over 20 years, Molly was shocked and disheartened by the lack of viable treatment options. This fueled her to create her groundbreaking clinic and treatment method to help people heal their relationships with food and with themselves. In addition to her extensive training in Substance Use and Eating Disorders, Molly is trained in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, certified in BREATHE breathwork, a dedicated devotee of daily meditation, and an intenSati instructor. Molly is also the podcast host of "What You're Craving." Website:mollycarmel.com Instagram:@mollycarmel Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mollycarmel.buws/ Podcast: https://mollycarmel.com/podcast/ Thanks for listening! If you enjoyed this episode and were inspired in some way, I would love to hear from you. Take a screenshot of you listening on your device, post it to your Instagram Stories and tag me @unsweetenedsio. 5 star ratings and positive reviews really help the podcast too! Website: www.unsweetenedsio.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/unsweetenedsio/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/unsweetenedsio Twitter: https://twitter.com/UnSweetenedSio YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYVw0_4Ms1GNE5-p6LT0qlw LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/siobhan-harris-64663317/

Badass Confidence Coach
063.What Is Your Attachment Style?

Badass Confidence Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:35


My guest today is therapist, Jeremy Fox. Jeremy is a Licensed Professional Counselor and an EMDR Consultant specializing in Trauma Recovery as well as the treatment of Anxiety and Depression.  Jeremy gives us a masterclass in understanding Attachment Theory and the different Attachment Styles.  This is good stuff.  Learn about your own attachment style and how it shows up in your life.  Where you can find Jeremy on social media: Instagram @foxcounselor Twitter @FoxtherapyLLC Clubhouse@foxtherapy  Resources mentioned:  Books: Attached: The New Science of Adult Attachment and How It Can Help You Find-and Keep-Love by Amir Levine, MD & Rachel S.F. Heller, M.A. The Body Keeps The Score: Brain , Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma by Bessel van Der Kolk, MD. Getting Past Your Past: Take Control Of Your Life with Self-Help Techniques From EMDR by Francine Shapiro Stop Walking On Eggshells: Taking Back Your Life When Someone You Care About Borderline Personality Disorder by Paul T. Mason and Randi Kreger Books by LCSW and Author, Brene Brown. For information about EMDR: contact www.emdria.org           

Polyvagal Podcast
Bad Therapy: "Get Over It," Client Quote Book & more!

Polyvagal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 35:04


Part 1 of 2, talking with Heidi Rogers about some bad therapy! Our episode on her podcast - https://www.heidirogers.com.au/blog/justin-sunseri-polyvagal-theory/  Heidi's Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/heidirogers_/  Building Safety Anchors -https://www.justinlmft.com/bsa  Polyvagal 101 Class  - https://www.justinlmft.com/PVT101   Become a $5 Patron - https://www.patreon.com/justinlmft  Intro/Outro music & Transition Sounds by Benjo Beats - https://soundcloud.com/benjobeats   National Suicide Prevention Hotline - 1 (800) 273-8255 National Domestic Violence Hotline -1 (800) 799-7233 LGBT Trevor Project Lifeline - 1 (866) 488-7386 National Sexual Assault Hotline - 1 (800) 656-4673 Crisis Text Line - Text “HOME” to 741741 Call 911 for emergency   This and other content produced by Justin Sunseri (“JustinLMFT”) (i.e; podcast, YouTube, Instagram, etc.) is not therapy, not intended to be therapy or be a replacement for therapy.  Nothing in this creates or indicates a therapeutic relationship.  Please consult with your therapist or seek for one in your area if you are experiencing mental health sx.  Nothing should be construed to be specific life advice; it is for educational and entertainment purposes only.

Uncorking a Story
Author and LCSW Cindy Finch

Uncorking a Story

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 49:10


Cindy Finch is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW) who specializes in helping people through their darkest times. She trained at the Mayo Clinic and has been featured in the Los Angeles Times, HuffPost, and CURE magazine. A survivor of traumatic life events, Cindy writes and works from lived experiences. She's helped thousands of people through their suffering, encouraging them to move forward and keep enduring to come out invincible. Her latest book, When Grief is Good, was released this past September and, at some point during this interview, we actually talked about it. Before that, though, she turns the tables a few times and puts me in the hot seat. This is definitely one you have to buckle up for and stay to the end because if you do I've got two words for you—hot monogamy! You can learn more about Cindy at her website, cindyfinch.com. Additionally, Cindy would love it if you learned more about Love to Pivot, an organization that helps individuals, couples, families, and groups pivot from unhealthy relationships into healthy relationships.

Get Divorced Without Getting Screwed
53. Positive Parenting Through Divorce (Guest: Janet Philbin)

Get Divorced Without Getting Screwed

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 51:51


Did you know that the way we deal with our children can be directly traced to our own childhoods? When you go through a divorce, children can get caught in the middle, making your ability to be the best parent of them even more important. Come learn how you can be the parent that your children need with special guest Janet Philbin, LCSW. (@janet_philbin_lcsw)

Resilience and Resistance Podcast
Quandra Chaffers, LCSW - Going Deeper Childhood Sexual Abuse

Resilience and Resistance Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 43:20


As a trauma specialist, Quandra Chaffers helps teenagers and adults overcome intimate partner violence and sexual abuse. Quandra is also a kink & poly knowledgeable sex therapist. She specialize in areas of sexless marriages, painful sex, and problematic sexual behaviors. For over 10 years, she has honed her skill set in cutting edge therapies such as Eye Movement Desensitization & Reprocessing (EMDR) in order to mitigate the effects of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues that result from exposure to trauma. Quandra is a powerhouse sexpert because she attacks the issues of sexual violence as a trifecta—community educator, therapist consultant, and psychotherapist. Before transitioning into private practice, Quandra worked for 3 semesters at Washington University in St. Louis as an Adjunct Professor. She taught graduate students a better understanding of developmental psychology as it applies to sexuality across the life course. For 4 and half years, Quandra treated on average 90 survivors per year as a Case Manager-Therapist at the YWCA St Louis Regional Sexual Assault Center. As a volunteer of Rape and Violence Ends Now (RAVEN), She co-facilitated batter's intervention programming for 6 years, working to rehabilitate men who have been abusive.IG: @sasstherapyTwitter: @sasstherapywww.sasstherapy.comIf you are interested in Marisol Solarte-Erlacher supporting your business or organization by speaking or training on topics such as Work Trauma for BIPOC women, Racial Battle Fatigue, supporting mental health in traumatic times, and building resilience in employees and resilient leadership in BIPOC women. Contact her directly at marisol@marisolerlacher.com if you want to learn more.Follow the podcast on Instagram @Resilience_and_ResistanceArt: Maite Nazario | http://www.maitenazario.comMusic: Inte-Gritty by Bianca MikahnPodcast Production: https://www.theplug-agency.comSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Trueface
Keisha Brown, LCSW // What does love look like?

Trueface

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 32:15


On this episode of the Trueface podcast, Robby is with Keisha Brown. As a Licensed Clinical Social Worker, her therapeutic approach focuses on person-centered and empowerment-focused therapies. According to Keisha's view of counseling, the ultimate goal is to empower each client with the tools they need to improve their quality of life. Regarding Holistic Health coaching, Keisha believes that nutrition and lifestyle directly affect one's mood and overall mental health. Keisha lives and works in North Georgia with her loving husband David Brown, and her two young children. Pre Order Crazy Making Today! www.trueface.org/crazymakingWant to know when we release episodes? Sign up here: https://www.trueface.org/podcast-subscribe.Support the show (https://trueface.givingfuel.com/buildtrust)

QBT with Shawny and Jerms
Attachment and Queer Healing with Adam MacDonald, LCSW

QBT with Shawny and Jerms

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 55:06


This week we are talking with self-identified queer, fat therapist, Adam MacDonald, LCSW. Adam practices in Austin, TX and specializes in attachment-based therapy (among other modalities) and joins us to talk about the impacts our families of origin and original attachment figures can have on how we build future relationships. Adam breaks down the basics of attachment theory and how he works toward healing with his queer clients. You're going to love Adam and the sweet, funny way he navigates this work.    Thank you for your likes, comments, subscribes, and 5-star reviews. Learn more by checking out our Recs and Resources Doc.  Listen to our playlist on Spotify.  We are in Feedspot's list of Top 45 Gay Podcasts!   Follow us on instagram and twitter:   @qbtpod   @mattyjerms   @shawnyboy   Big thanks to Momager Alie Kilts, Promo Babes Carlos Valle and Keana Marrero, and music contributions from Chanti Darling and Maarquii.

To (Mom) Life
Episode 66: Navigating Eating Disorders with Your Child

To (Mom) Life

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 30:23


What are eating disorders? What are the signs? How do parents help their children recover? In this episode, Jodi and guest Temimah Zucker discuss the answers to these questions and more, including the differences between eating disorders and disordered eating, how to address the topic using the proper language and the next steps for healing. About Our Guest: Temimah Zucker, LCSW, works with individuals ages 14 and older in New York and New Jersey (virtually at this time) struggling with mental health concerns, and specializes in working with those looking to heal their relationships between their bodies and souls. Temimah is an adjunct professor at the Wurzweiler School of Social Work and a Metro-NY supervisor at Monte Nido. To learn more or to reach her, please visit www.temimah.com or @temimahzuckerlcsw on Instagram. Show Notes: 7:43: Disordered Eating vs. Eating Disorders"Ironically, it's sort of a fun fact, people probably think most of eating disorders and they think of anorexia.  And that's actually the least prevalent eating disorder.  The most common is what's called other specified feeding and eating disorders, which is kind of like a mix of different symptoms."11:50: How to Identify the Signs of an Eating Disorder"One of the most common misconceptions is you can tell if someone has an eating disorder by how they look. That's completely not true. Even people with raging cases of anorexia nervosa could be at a weight that is quote, unquote, like average or higher than average."18:13: Purging Behaviors"You know, like, movement is great movement is beautiful. But it shouldn't be about compensating for what you're eating."19:13: How to Address Eating Disorders and Next Steps "So that's just like preventative, but also being mindful, forever, kind of going forward.  How we talk to ourselves really, really is heard by our kids."22:13: How to Use the Proper Language "So starting off with just very caring, neutral language, meaning, I'm noticing this change has been happening recently. Can you tell me more about what's going on?"25:13: Navigating Resistance to Therapy"Your goal does not have to be I want to like, get through this. The goal could be like, I want my parents leave me alone. I can help you do that. But only if you show up."27:43: Last Pieces of Advice "It has to be equal parts, like addressing the emotional needs of the person, and how this is really just a symptom of whatever it is they're going through. But also knowing that like you, you have to address it behaviorally too."Connect with Temimah Zucker, LCSW: WebsiteInstagramCredits: Host: Jodi FriedGuest: Temimah ZuckerEditors: Iris Nelson and Ilyana Castillo

Sounds True: Insights at the Edge
Becoming an Active Operator of Your Nervous System

Sounds True: Insights at the Edge

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 64:22


Deb Dana, LCSW, is a clinician and consultant specializing in using the lens of Polyvagal Theory to understand and resolve the impact of trauma and create ways of working that honor the role of the autonomic nervous system. Her clinical publications include The Polyvagal Theory in Therapy: Engaging the Rhythm of Regulation and The Polyvagal Flip Chart: Understanding the Science of Safety, and her Sounds True publications include the audio program, Befriending Your Nervous System: Looking Through the Lens of Polyvagal Theory, and her new book Anchored: How to Befriend Your Nervous System Using Polyvagal Theory. In this podcast, Tami Simon converses with Deb Dana to offer listeners a practical understanding of Polyvagal Theory and how we can begin to decode the language of our body for better health and better relationships. Tami and Deb also discuss the dorsal, sympathetic, and ventral states of our nervous system; the gifts of becoming "anchored in ventral"; neuroception, your nervous system's way of taking in information to assess your safety; curiosity and the capacity for self-reflection; the importance of self-care; co-regulation as a biological imperative; why self-regulation is especially critical for therapists and other helping professionals; music and nature as healing resources; the practice of self-compassion as a means of "getting our anchor back"; and more.

The Practice of the Practice Podcast | Innovative Ideas to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice
Lisa R. Savage, LCSW, Built A 50+ Clinician Practice and Added Measurement-Based Care | PoP 631

The Practice of the Practice Podcast | Innovative Ideas to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 33:16


What is the practice-growing power behind niching down into your topic? How do you manage a large group practice with ease? Are you considering... The post Lisa R. Savage, LCSW, Built A 50+ Clinician Practice and Added Measurement-Based Care | PoP 631 appeared first on How to Start, Grow, and Scale a Private Practice| Practice of the Practice.

The Papaya Podcast
The One About Navigating Relationships Starting, During or Ending With Brittainy Noel

The Papaya Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 50:23


Brittainy Noel, LCSW is a Licenced Therapist & Mindset Coach who has written and entire workbook Called “Whole Again: A Woman's Guide to Healing After Heartbreak”. When it comes to ourselves and relationships, it can be hard to put yourself first, know what you want vs what you need and figuring out how to stop self betrayal in the process. Whether you're struggling in finding a relationship, finding yourself IN a relationship, or navigating the ending of one, this podcast has some incredible note-worthy moments that are completely life and perspective changing. You can follow Brittainy on IG/FB @BrittainyNoel or visit her website for workbooks and more www.brittainynoel.com   Visit www.thrivecausemetics.com/papaya for 15% off your first order!   Whether you're looking to get your kids back on track or want to ensure they're staying ahead with their math studies, find a center near you atmathnasium.com and contact them for a free in center or online consultation   Produced by Dear Meidia 

The Cure for Chronic Pain with Nicole Sachs, LCSW
BONUS EPISODE: Lisa Schlosberg's New Pod! The Fundamentals of Mind-Body Healing with Nicole Sachs, LCSW

The Cure for Chronic Pain with Nicole Sachs, LCSW

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 56:41


Hello friends! As I get ready to bring the pod back, I am taking this opportunity to debut my friend and colleague Lisa Schlosberg's very brand new baby. Lisa has been inspiring people for years with her own work, and in the beautiful ways in which she carries the message of mine. I hope you enjoy this interview we did together! Nicole Sachs, LCSW shares her story and explains this work in the clearest of terms. Topics: Nicole Sachs, LCSW and “The Cure for Chronic Pain” TMS and Chronic Pain Defined Emotional Eating Non-judgmentally [3:55] Nicole tells her story. At 19 her “back goes out” and she is diagnosed with an abnormality in her lower spine. The doctor warned her there would be no more long car rides, no more sports, and that it was very unlikely she would be able to have children (something she wanted more than anything in the world). She was told that without surgery, she would not live long past 40. Nicole headed back to college and began to live a life of chronic pain and chronic fear. [8:43] Nicole becomes aware of the work of Dr. John Sarno, a revolutionary medical doctor, speaking about how a mind-body connection, our trauma, and the emotional world actually affect us physically. She began exploring case studies and decided to do a science experiment on herself. Wondering with curiosity in place of fear, “Is there more to this than I had known before?” [11:30] Nicole describes freeing herself of chronic pain through Dr. Sarno's work, JournalSpeak, and understanding the mind-body connection. It has been 20 years since she's had back pain despite her scans looking exactly as they did when she was 19 years old. Nicole gave birth to 3 beautiful children. She is free. [14:40] Nicole explains the connection between the emotional world and physical world as it pertains not only to chronic pain… and also emotional eating. [17:48] Nicole touches on brain science and how our nervous system chooses chronic pain as an act of love. [21:45] Lisa explains how her work and Nicole's work are very much the same and how we are connected through human pain. [25:45] Nicole explains how she created her brand and how she came up with “The Cure for Chronic Pain,” even though she believes it is truly, “The Cure for Everything,” and how chronic pain includes not only physical illness but also mental issues like anxiety and/or depression. [30:09] Nicole says the pain is not in your head and is not your fault. Your nervous system is operating in a way to protect you. [32:45] Nicole talks about the influence of Lisa's work on her own relationship to emotional eating and body image, and how she can observe herself emotionally eating and invites herself to feel her feelings. [34:15] Lisa shares how negative thoughts about her body were a distraction from grieving her father's impending death. [39:58] Nicole shares what Lisa believes to be a very important concept: “Life is a choice between what hurts and what hurts worse.” [43:45] Lisa and Nicole share about their past and present relationship with emotional eating. [48:13] Nicole gives a quick overview of her work and what it means to “get free.” Resources: Nicole: For More Info and Nicole's Online Courses and Virtual Retreats: www.thecureforchronicpain.com Listen to “The Cure for Chronic Pain” Podcast wherever you listen to podcasts “The Meaning of Truth” https://www.amazon.com/Meaning-Truth-embrace-truth-create/dp/1482387352 JournalSpeak Facebook Group https://www.facebook.com/groups/132748670815140 Lisa: Instagram: www.instagram.com/lisa.schlosberg Join the Community with an Out of the Cave Membership: https://www.outofthecave.health/membership