Podcasts about Interventions

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Best podcasts about Interventions

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Latest podcast episodes about Interventions

The Millennial Nutritionist
045: Key Non-Nutrition Interventions for Losing Weight with TMN Coach Courtney, Registered Dietitian

The Millennial Nutritionist

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 46:19


While nutrition is an important part of losing weight and being healthy, there are other key lifestyle habits that help to make the process more sustainable in the long run. In today's episode, Illa and TMN Coach Courtney McMahan discuss the lifestyle traits that have made the biggest impact in their clients' weight loss journeys. Illa and Courtney also discuss the intermittent fasting methods that David Harbour (also known as Jim Hopper) used when losing weight for the 4th Season of Stranger Things. Tune in to hear which lifestyle habits you already master and which ones need improvement. Check out our 3-month Lifestyle Reset Program! If you're serious about reaching your weight loss goals this year in a sustainable way, book your discovery call today! - https://themillennialnutritionist.com/contact Links mentioned: Insider Magazine article on David Harbour using Intermittent Fasting 3 important lifestyle habits discussed in this episode…. Sleep is not to be overlooked. When you sleep your body is recovering and rebuilding. Skipping out on this often leads to feelings of hunger. Consistency. Stick with the plan. Many weight loss habits take time to show results but these are the results that will stay with you for the long term. Remaining Positive. Celebrate every win no matter how big or small. Positivity builds on itself and drives motivation. Hi! I'm Illa (MS, RDN) and I am a Registered Dietitian who provides weight loss coaching for millennials. There are so many health companies and fad diets out there that want to convince you to buy their products, but I'm here to show you that you don't need any products to lose weight! It just takes a little behavior change and food tracking. The Millennial Nutritionist is a private practice dedicated to helping people lose weight and build better health habits to support their busy lifestyles. We offer a 3-month Lifestyle Reset Program and a monthly Millennial Living Membership to support you with your goals! Learn more about our programs at https://themillennialnutritionist.com/services. Connect with us!: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the.millennial.nutritionist/ TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@millennialnutritionist Website: https://themillennialnutritionist.com/

The Perfect Stool Understanding and Healing the Gut Microbiome
Anxiety and the Gut: Evidence-Based Interventions to Calm the Mind

The Perfect Stool Understanding and Healing the Gut Microbiome

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 36:13


There is a direct connection between gut health and mental health. Learn how the food you eat and supplements you take can impact anxiety and calm your mind with Camila Smith, LCSW, DHSc, licensed psychotherapist, anxiety expert and Chief Clinical Officer at bekome, a mental wellness supplement company and sponsor of this podcast. Lindsey Parsons, your host, helps clients solve gut issues and reverse autoimmune disease naturally. Take her quiz to see which stool or functional medicine test will help you find out what's wrong. She's a Certified Health Coach at High Desert Health in Tucson, Arizona. She coaches clients locally and nationwide. You can also follow Lindsey on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Pinterest or reach her via email at lindsey@highdeserthealthcoaching.com to set up a free 30-minute Gut Healing Breakthrough Session. Show Notes

Podcasts from the Cochrane Library
Control interventions in randomised trials for people with a mental health disorder

Podcasts from the Cochrane Library

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 3:52


The Cochrane Methodology Review Group produces reviews that examine the methods used in research and, in April 2022, we published a new review of the effects of having different types of control group in trials among people with mental health disorders. Here's lead author, Erlend Faltinsen from Cochrane Denmark, to tell us about the review and its findings

A Bit More Complicated
Episode 11. How we think about racial inequality (with Michael Kraus)

A Bit More Complicated

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 46:28


We welcome Dr. Michael Kraus to the podcast to talk about his research on the psychology of racial inequality. We discuss the fact that people can't solve a problem if they don't know it exists, and strategies to help people see the ways in which inequality manifests. We also talk a bit about sports and research on physical touch in basketball (Dr. Kraus is a Warriors fan). Episode 2 featuring Dr. Kraus's research Manny's blog article outlining the many forms of racial inequality in the US People misperceive racial inequality Black-White wealth inequality Misperception of the Black-White income gap Neighborhoods and perception of inequality Perceptions of economic equality Interventions to reduce misperceptions Misperception of racial progress Narratives and DEI Teammate touching in the NBA Image by Michael Reichelt from Pixabay

Throwback Thursday Cold cases At The EGO
Mental health issues complicate the analysis, but suggested behavioral interventions can be utilized in combination with pharmaceutical

Throwback Thursday Cold cases At The EGO

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 0:20


BattleWounds
Red Flags and Interventions

BattleWounds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 61:17


Brien, Johnny and Chris talk more stories from terrificon, Red flags, interventions, plan Bs and much more

Polity.org.za Audio Articles
In just six months, 24 Western Cape cops arrested for fraud, extortion - Cele

Polity.org.za Audio Articles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 3:13


Police Minister Bheki Cele says some officers are breaking the law, extorting communities, and committing acts of corruption while hiding behind their blue uniforms. According to Cele, between 1 April and September this year, 24 police officers were arrested for various crimes in the Western Cape. On Thursday, he addressed a press conference in Parliament where he described the police's efforts to curb extortion and kidnappings in the Western Cape. "This includes 11 police arrested for corruption. Four officers were arrested for fraud, four more were arrested for extortion, and another four members were arrested for defeating the ends of justice. One officer has been found in possession of drugs and is answering to that charge," Cele said. "We have agreed that restoring the trust deficit between communities and the SAPS will need the police service clean house. I believe these arrests, while they are painful, they do send a strong message that police ineptness and police corruption will never be tolerated and won't go unpunished." Cele said police in the Western Cape were investigating 32 cases of kidnapping between March and September. "It remains encouraging that the SAPS in the province continue to make inroads regarding kidnapping cases. A total of 15 kidnapping suspects have been arrested. This includes the court appearance of five suspects who appeared at the Wynberg Magistrate's Court on 12 September 2022. The five-member gang appeared on charges of conspiracy to commit a kidnapping and other charges related to the failed kidnapping of a business women of Chinese nationality." He said the judiciary was also intensifying the fight against corruption within its ranks. This included magistrate's courts that had turned into bail "wholesales" in some parts of the country. "The Correctional Service Department has also made strides in the fight against alleged corruption in its correctional facilities. This includes allegations of prison warders who are colluding with criminals while behind bars," Cele said. Cele also gave an update on attacks on public transport vehicles. He said the Western Cape transport sector had been recently marred by violence, intimidation and acts of sabotage, placing commuters' and drivers' lives at risk. "Thirty-eight cases were registered of attacks on Intercape, Golden Arrow, Mavumisa buses, as well as taxis... from 1 August to 31 August 2022. Sixteen people have been arrested, charged with public violence and malicious damage to property. Interventions to stop the attacks and violence in this sector have included investigative task teams reliant on early warnings from Crime intelligence to make arrests and prevent further attacks." Officials from the Eastern and Western Cape had been meeting to address challenges in both provinces, and increased police deployment on bus routes had also yielded encouraging results, Cele said. Meanwhile, Cape Town Mayor Geordin Hill-Lewis said Cele must establish an extortion and kidnapping task force for the city.

Dr Kathy Weston
Researcher of the Month: Dr Éadaoin Slattery - Do Sustained Attention Training Interventions Really Work?

Dr Kathy Weston

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 27:01


Researcher of the Month, Dr Éadaoin Slattery, discusses her recent paper, which systematically reviews the evidence around popular sustained attention training interventions, which are widely used in schools. She talks us through what sustained attention is, why it is important and whether or not widely used interventions are likely to have a significant impact. We've probably all heard of brain training, but here Dr Slattery also talks us through some other kinds of interventions, which potentially show more promise.

Ask Michelle & Chris About Team Building
#64: 10 Effective Techniques for Processing & Debriefing (Part 3)

Ask Michelle & Chris About Team Building

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 33:36


Michelle and Chris talk about the next two processing techniques - Intervention and Anchor Pieces. Interventions are ways to focus on correcting disruptive group behaviors and Anchors are tangible items participants can take home with them as a (learnings) reminder from a program. We hope you join us!Emails:michelle@training-wheels.comchris@onteambuilding.comFind the Show Notes with all the resource links HERESubmit a comment or team building related question HEREMichelle Cummings - Training-Wheels.comSign Up for Michelle's weekly Newsletter HEREDr. Chris Cavert - OnTeamBuilding.com  &  FUNdoing.comSign Up for FUNdoing Fridays bi-Monthly Activity email HERE

Multipolarista
US launched 251 military interventions since 1991, and 469 since 1798

Multipolarista

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 16:12


The US military launched at least 251 interventions between 1991 and 2022, according to the Congressional Research Service. Washington's meddling abroad drastically increased after the end of the first cold war. VIDEO: https://youtube.com/watch?v=h4Pr9g_7Nhc Maps, graphs, and sources here: https://multipolarista.com/2022/09/13/us-251-military-interventions-1991

BackTable Podcast
Ep. 242 Image-Guided Headache Interventions with Dan Nguyen

BackTable Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 57:52


Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American Revolution
E182: Don N. Hagist: Top Ten Weather Interventions

Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 24:16


This week our guest is JAR Editor Don N. Hagist. You can't control the weather, but it certainly controlled the outcomes of many key Revolutionary moments. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com. 

International report
Police seek to build trust with child victims in India's Rajasthan

International report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 11, 2022 5:18


In many parts of the western Indian state of Rajasthan, child labour is prevalent, with those forced to do menial jobs often victims of trafficking. Handling rescued children is a sensitive process that requires special skills – something the police are looking to improve on. Rajasthan ranks seventh in India in crimes against children reported between 2018 and 2020. According to the ministry of women and child development, more than 19,000 incidents of crimes against minors were reported during that period. For children in difficult circumstances, often the first point of contact in the juvenile justice system is the police and they have been criticised for how they interact with rescued children. But now helped by Unicef, a series of initiatives is creating a more inclusive and inviting atmosphere for children to have a trusting dialogue with police officers. “There are issues and concerns related to children. Now, police officers are friendly with children and know how to deal with them. Before they were talking to the children as if they were criminals,” said Sindhu Binujeeth, a child protection consultant at Unicef. Interventions by the One Stop Security workers, who are associated with local police stations to inform the police of problems of children, especially relating with adolescent girls is also helping. Trained police officers with expertise in child protection also operate alongside these workers. “We have registered a lot of cases of crimes against children at my police station," said police inspector Hanwant Singh Rajpurohit. "We have freed a lot of children from child labour and arrested those involved in keeping these children in bonded labour because of the help of these community workers. A humane touch “Children were mostly scared whenever they had to come to a police station," he added. "But we have child friendly stations with rooms that will provide them with a congenial atmosphere and also help them open up to the police.” More than 137 such child-friendly police stations have opened up in the Udaipur division of the state. Despite various laws and schemes to protect the rights of children, bonded labour and trafficking, and sexual abuse is rampant. A large number of tribal children are trafficked from southern Rajasthan bordering north Gujarat, to work as bonded labourers. Children are trafficked as bonded labour, where physical and sexual abuse at worksites is also not uncommon. Why are Indian women increasingly taking their own lives? Child's murder shows discrimination and violence towards India's ‘untouchables' “Awareness that police can be friendly is spreading slowly and surely," said Sheela Sen, a child welfare officer. "The police station has child welfare officers, a critical need in this part of the state, where child labour is rampant." Sanjay Nirala, a Unicef representative of Rajasthan points out that intensive work is going on in and around the area of child protection and safeguarding of children. “The situation is improving in terms of child migration, child labour and out of school children," said Nirala. "It has drastically reduced in the last four to five years because of various interventions of the police department, education and other departments.” These are still early days as the police try to change their image and implement a string of child-centric initiatives. Rajasthan Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot recently said his government was committed to eradicating offences against children such as sexual violence, child marriage and child labour.

The Dermatology Digest Podcast Exclusives
Part 3: Medical Interventions for Mature Skin

The Dermatology Digest Podcast Exclusives

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 12:31


With age, skin becomes thinner, wrinkles, fragile and can bruise and tear more easily. In the final podcast in this 3-part series that addresses aging skin and improving skin health, board-certified dermatologists, Dr. Joel Schlessinger and Dr. Roger Ceilley discuss medical interventions for mature skin, including specific ingredients and topical formulations designed to reduce the incidence and duration of bruising. Here's Drs. Schlessinger and Ceilley.

High Tower Ministries Podcast with Bill & Cara Nordeen
Testimony Tuesdays - God's Divine Interventions

High Tower Ministries Podcast with Bill & Cara Nordeen

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 28:12


Thank you for joining us today for “Testimony Tuesdays” with Bill and Cara. We have some exciting testimonies to share with you that will raise your faith to trust God in any situation that you may find yourself in, no matter how terrifying it may be! We have a very special guest with us today from our area here in Virginia, Dawn Ausley is with us to share her testimony. There are some very important keys to take away from today's show that will help you to be under and stay under God's Divine Protection with full faith in knowing that God will intervene for you! Share this broadcast with your friends and get ready to experience the unlimited power of God! Get connected with us and watch “Greater Glory” on the High Tower Ministries, Int. Facebook Page! Sundays at 9 AM & 7 PM and Wednesdays at 7 PM for inspiring messages that will raise your faith and grow you in the Word! Don't miss a message, Follow Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HighTowerMinistry.org Bookings/ Churches / Conferences: Bookings@HighTowerMinistry.org  Individual Prayer Requests: PrayerRequests@HighTowerMinistry.org Subscribe to YouTube:  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_s14njTA8GQ5oBFb4Zs_uA/featured High Tower Ministries Podcasts: High Tower Ministries Podcast with Bill & Cara Nordeen on Apple Podcasts Get Connected Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HighTowerMinistry.org Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hightowerministries_usa/ FREE DOWNLOAD / Website: www.HighTowerMinistry.org   Unlocking Glory and the Unlocking Glory Study Guide are available on our website (signed copy with free shipping within the US). Also available on Amazon and Barnes and Nobles.    

Pharmacy Preceptor Podcast
Episode 68: Time to Interventions in Sepsis

Pharmacy Preceptor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 10:23


In this episode, Sara interviews a P4 student to discuss a new article discussing the importance of timing of interventions in patients with sepsis.

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive
Dan Mitchinson: US correspondent on the legal interventions in the Trump inquiry

Heather du Plessis-Allan Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 4:44


Experts are questioning a judge's Intervention in a Trump Inquiry, what's going on?  US correspondent Dan Mitchenson explains it further, as there are plenty of documents to process and examine. “There are thousands and thousands that have been recovered from the Florida residence. And they'll determine which of those documents should be off limits to federal investigators and which aren't, based on the former President's right to attorney-client privilege.” LISTEN ABOVESee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Spectrum Autism Research
Yen for routine seeds anxiety in autistic children

Spectrum Autism Research

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 5:58


Interventions that moderate a need for ‘sameness' may prevent anxiety traits. The post Yen for routine seeds anxiety in autistic children appeared first on Spectrum | Autism Research News.

Behind The Veil
Behind The Veil - Mental Health and Wedding Planning

Behind The Veil

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 56:52


We all know it's stressful planning a wedding!  How do we balance what we think our guests want, with internal family politics, while trying to be the perfect bride.  It's enough to drive someone crazy!!Our guest this week is a clinical social worker - Dr. Tania Tania ParedesDo you need the couples counseling needed when applying for a marriage license?  Dr. Paredes is certified!  Therapist@TaniaParedes.comTania was awarded the White House Fellowship in 1997 by the Department of Health where she participated in researching treatments for various mental disorders in Washington, D.C. her training was further extended at the University of Miami's prestigious Mailman Center for Child Development and received additional training in trauma and abuse (both sexual & physical), through the University of Miami Child Protection Team. After several years working at various community mental health agencies, she began my private practice in 2003 and has since focused on advancing her clinical skills through various seminars and trainings.She also serves as the bereavement social worker at Nicklaus Children's Hospital, through Nico's Promise. She is also a certified Compassionate Care Bereavement provider. This unique training gives her the ability to treat grief and loss through both compassion and science. It is proven to help you not just grieve but also learn what to do with those emotions.  Interventions are backed by clinical research. This is a mindful non-medical approach to grief and lets you grieve without feeling guilty about having a normal response to a difficult life event. It helps you learn how to hold your grief which is often so painful. This model has been shown to reduce depression, anxiety and other trauma symptomsTo chime in live - make a comment during the show.  If you are watching via You Tube, we can pull your comment right up on screen.Join Behind the Veil Show with host Keith Willard, CWP, and co-hosts Marci Guttenberg, CPCE, CWP, and Brooke Logan Stoner for our LIVE SHOW - Tuesday September 6th, 2:00pm, 2022, ESThttps://www.youtube.com/c/BehindTheVeilByKeithWillard/PODCAST SHOW - Available after 5:00 PM EDT in iTunes, iHeart Radio, Spotify, or any major podcast players- Ask Alexa - "Play the latest podcast episode of Behind The Veil"BEHIND THE VEIL Show: Winner of the Telly Awards for best online unscripted series two years in a row - 2021 & 2022This Episode is proudly sponsored by Part Girl Potions via a generous donation to the Greater Broward Palm Beachs Chapter of NACE.  Check them out at www.partygirlpotions.comInterested in sponsoring future episodes of Behind The Veil?  Email Info@keithwillardevens.com for opportunities.Support the show

Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH)
Cultural Adaptations to Psychosocial Interventions for Refugee Families

Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health (ACAMH)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 18:49


In this podcast we are joined by Dr. Alice Taylor to discuss her co-authored CAMH paper ‘Cultural adaptations to psychosocial interventions for families with refugee/asylum-seeker status in the United Kingdom – a systematic review'.

Rounding@IOWA
48: Human Trafficking: The Role of Clinicians in Recognition and Initial Interventions

Rounding@IOWA

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 41:43


In this episode, Dr. Clancy and his guests discuss the roles clinicians can play in the recognition of and intervention in situations of human trafficking. Gerard Clancy, MD Senior Associate Dean for External Affairs Professor of Psychiatry and Emergency Medicine University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine Shannon Findlay, MD Clinical Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine Brittany McGraw, MSW LISW ACSW Social Worker University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics References/Resources:  PEARR Tool HEALTrafficking.org HumanTraffickingHotline.org Iowa Victim Service Call Center Financial Disclosures:  Dr. Gerard Clancy, his guests and the members of the planning committee for Rounding@IOWA have no relevant financial relationships to disclose. CME Credit Available:  https://uiowa.cloud-cme.com/course/courseoverview?P=0&EID=48215  Accreditation: The University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide continuing medical education for physicians. CME Credit Designation: The University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine designates this enduring material for a maximum of 0.75 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Nurses: Effective March 18, 2020, Iowa nurses may use participation in ACCME-accredited education toward their CE requirement for licensure. A certificate of participation will be available after successful completion of the course. (Nurses from other states should confirm with their licensing boards that this activity meets their state's licensing requirements.) Other Health Care Providers: A certificate of completion will be available after successful completion of the course. (It is the responsibility of licensees to determine if this continuing education activity meets the requirements of their professional licensure board.) Date Recorded: 7/19/2022

Aging-US
Press Release: Systemic Lipolysis Promotes Physiological Fitness

Aging-US

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 3:43


A new research paper was published in Aging (“Aging (Albany NY)” by Medline/PubMed, “Aging-US” by Web of Science) Volume 14, Issue 16, entitled, “Systemic lipolysis promotes physiological fitness in Drosophila melanogaster.” A large body of literature shows that lipid metabolism exerts profound regulatory effects on aging and affects stress responses. Interventions such as caloric restriction or fasting robustly promote lipid catabolism and improve aging-related phenotypical markers. Researchers Linshan Shang, Elizabeth Aughey, Huiseon Kim, Timothy D. Heden, Lu Wang, Charles P. Najt, Nicholas Esch, Sophia Brunko, Juan E. Abrahante, Marissa Macchietto, Mara T. Mashek, Todd Fairbanks, Daniel E. L. Promislow, Thomas P. Neufeld, and Douglas G. Mashek from the University of Minnesota and University of Washington investigated the direct effect of increased lipid catabolism via overexpression of bmm (brummer, FBgn0036449), the major triglyceride hydrolase in Drosophila, on lifespan and physiological fitness. Comprehensive characterization was carried out using RNA-seq, lipidomics and metabolomics analysis. Global overexpression of bmm strongly promoted numerous markers of physiological fitness, including increased female fecundity, fertility maintenance, preserved locomotion activity, increased mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative metabolism. Since bmm drives fatty acid oxidation, the data in this study implicated differential partitioning of glucose into the pentose phosphate pathway and purine biosynthesis between males and females. However, the underlying mechanisms through which bmm elicits these sex-specific effects remains to be determined. “Increased bmm robustly upregulated the heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) family of proteins, which equipped the flies with higher resistance to heat, cold, and ER [endoplasmic reticulum] stress via improved proteostasis.” Despite improved physiological fitness, bmm overexpression did not extend lifespan. Taken together, these data show that bmm overexpression has broad beneficial effects on physiological fitness, but not lifespan. “Collectively, these studies reveal diverse beneficial effects of global elevation of lipolysis on physiological fitness. This work provides additional rationale for pursuing therapeutic approaches, as done previously [39], that enhance lipolysis to mitigate metabolic and aging-related diseases.” DOI: https://doi.org/10.18632/aging.204251 Corresponding Author: Douglas G. Mashek – Email: dmashek@umn.edu Keywords: brummer, lipolysis, physiological fitness, stress resistance, proteostasis Sign up for free Altmetric alerts about this article: https://aging.altmetric.com/details/email_updates?id=10.18632%2Faging.204251 About Aging-US: Launched in 2009, Aging (Aging-US) publishes papers of general interest and biological significance in all fields of aging research and age-related diseases, including cancer—and now, with a special focus on COVID-19 vulnerability as an age-dependent syndrome. Topics in Aging go beyond traditional gerontology, including, but not limited to, cellular and molecular biology, human age-related diseases, pathology in model organisms, signal transduction pathways (e.g., p53, sirtuins, and PI-3K/AKT/mTOR, among others), and approaches to modulating these signaling pathways. Please visit our website at www.Aging-US.com​​ and connect with us: SoundCloud – https://soundcloud.com/Aging-Us Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/AgingUS/ Twitter – https://twitter.com/AgingJrnl Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/agingjrnl/ YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/agingus​ LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/company/aging/ Reddit – https://www.reddit.com/user/AgingUS Pinterest – https://www.pinterest.com/AgingUS/ For media inquiries, please contact media@impactjournals.com

Radio Islam
Pakistan flood interventions - Safeeyah Moosa

Radio Islam

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 15:23


Pakistan flood interventions - Safeeyah Moosa by Radio Islam

Addiction, Freedom & Faith
The Journey Home - Award Winning Filmmaker Tim Mahoney

Addiction, Freedom & Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 4, 2022 48:43


Visit www.FreeRecoveryBook.com to receive your FREE copy of Rob's book The Addiction Intervention Book.______________________________Timothy Mahoney is the award winning director of six feature films: Patterns of Evidence: Mt Sinai I & II, Patterns of Evidence: The Red Sea Miracle I & II, Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy, and Patterns of Evidence: The Exodus. Tim is the founder of Thinking Man Films and Media, a Minneapolis, Minnesota based international documentary & publishing company.Tim has spent almost 20 years exploring some of the biggest questions of the Bible and what they mean for our world today. His insatiable curiosity led him on a journey across the world interviewing some of the world's leading Bible scholars, archaeologists, and historians to seek answers. What he's uncovered is an amazing pattern of evidence that matches the events recorded in the Bible.Tim was raised hearing that the stories in the Bible were true, but as he got older he was challenged to lose those beliefs. These questions led him on a trip to Egypt and the very location of the Exodus story. It was there that he experienced his own crisis of faith when told there was no evidence for this account. Undeterred, he had to know – were these foundational stories in the Bible true or not? This led him on a 12-year investigation resulting in the feature documentary Patterns of Evidence: The Exodus. This award-winning film and its companion book, Patterns of Evidence: A Filmmaker's Journey challenged the traditional views of biblical criticism, demonstrating archaeological evidence that matched the Bible's narrative. The balanced approach allowed audiences to decide for themselves if the Exodus was truth or myth.A native Minnesotan, Tim's hobbies include folk music and outdoor activities. Tim and Jill have been married for 40 years. They have four (4) married children and eight (8) grandchildren._____________________________Sober since 2001, after a suicide attempt, Rob has helped thousands of people find FREEDOM from substance abuse and feeling "stuck in a rut" to living a transformed life at LiftedFromTheRut.com. He does this through sharing his testimony, Interventions, Coaching, Speaking, and being the host of both Beyond The Bars Radio and Addiction, Freedom & Faith Podcasts.Rob invests in the lives of those wanting to see positive change, whether it is coming out of addiction, prison or just wanting more for their lives. He is a dynamic speaker who shares an extremely powerful journey of persistence, faith, and inspiration. Rob is also the Author of The Addiction Intervention Book (#1 in 14 categories for Bestseller and New Release on Amazon). Mission: Restoring Hope, Identity & Purpose to the AddictedRob LohmanLifted From The RutInterventionist, Coach, Speaker, Podcaster970-331-4469rob@LiftedFromTheRut.com www.LiftedFromTheRut.com www.RobLohmanSpeaks.comwww.AddictionInterventionBook.comwww.SwimForRecovery.com (month of September)Book Signing & Night of Inspiration EventSeptember 22, 2022: 6:30 to 8:30 PMFREE Spiritual Community2122 S Lafayette St, Denver, CO 80210

SEL in EDU
014: Positive Interventions That Make Life Worth Living

SEL in EDU

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 3, 2022 50:17


Episode Highlights:Connecting physiology to engage in productive thinking patternsConsciously using breathing to self-regulate; the power of responding versus reactingAligning identity with the situationTeaching SEL with conviction, from the heartSoliciting feedback and listening creates avenues for increased voice and engagementEpisode Resources:Connect with Martín Blank: website and InstagramThe Physiology of Social-emotional LearningSelf-care is not the solution for burnout

Busting Addiction and Its Myths
What Will It Take?

Busting Addiction and Its Myths

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 9:15


In this podcast, we discuss the reality vs. the myths of what it takes to get an alcoholic or addict to ask for help.We learn that:Among the most dangerous myths is the notion that an addict or alcoholic will not seek help until they are ready.Another dangerous myth is the idea that addicts/alcoholics have to hit bottom before they are ready. We are asking the wrong questions.What we should ask is: “What can we do to get them to accept help?” Standing by waiting for them to get ready might be as good as a death sentence for some of them.Families of loved ones overcome by addiction must first learn as much as they can about the disease, lest they themselves fall prey to dangerous assumptions.Interventions can be formal or informal. No matter the immediate outcome, the family has learned a lot and the seed has been planted for a future attempt.

DNUSD Coffee and Conversation
Episode #76 Health & Wellness, Reading Interventions

DNUSD Coffee and Conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 25:04


Tune in to this latest episode where we will be talking about Health & Wellness as well as Reading Interventions. We are joined this week by Jennifer Eames, Lora Schultz, Luana Pennington, and Vonya Genoud to talk about health and wellness for all students and how their programs help to ensure a child gets the most out of their educational opportunities. Host: Jeff Harris - Superintendent of Schools Guests: Jennifer Eames - School Psychologist Lora Schultz - School Counselor, Mental Health Demonstration Grant Coordinator Luana Pennington - District School Nurse Vonya Genoud - Reading Intervention Specialist

Real Estate Espresso
Emerging Market Central Bank Intervention

Real Estate Espresso

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2022 5:55


On today's show we are taking a look at what is happening in global foreign exchange markets. It's no secret that the US dollar has been very strong. This naturally has an impact on countries that have needs for foreign reserves. The strength of the US dollar makes the cost of imports denominated in US dollars more expensive. It makes exports denominated in US dollars more profitable for local manufacturers. A few weeks ago we reported on the problems in the European central bank and in the EU in general with sovereign debt starting to suffer a crisis of confidence. Central banks all over the world are known to intervene and inject liquidity when needed to solve problems for their domestic banks when they run short of reserves, and in some cases foreign reserves. But when central banks do intervene, like the Federal Reserve has been known to do, it sets off alarms through the global financial markets. Interventions are an indication of the central bank attempting to fix a problem that has already happened. They're not being proactive, only reactive. Those transactions appear on the central bank's balance sheet for all the world to see. There is an increasing trend among central banks to perform these interventions in a clandestine manner so as not to cause panic in the financial markets. That means performing the transactions off balance sheet. ----------------- Host: Victor Menasce email: podcast@victorjm.com

Emerging Minds Podcast
Child mental health implementation strategies - part two

Emerging Minds Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 30:22


Despite the most thorough preparations and skillful collaborations, the tools and techniques introduced in therapy may not be as useful for the child and family as you'd hoped. Interventions don't always go according to plan, and sometimes the child and family experience a setback in relation to dealing with a problem. In the face of potential disappointment and discouragement, a key practice challenge is finding ways to respond that are both helpful and hopeful for the child and family. This podcast (the second in our two-part series) explores some practice ideas for responding when children and families experience setbacks in dealing with problems. It also looks at ways practitioners can future-proof children's newly acquired, developed or discovered skills in dealing with problems. In this episode we talk with child psychologists Angela Coppi, Jane Walch and Sara McLean about how they navigate these practice challenges. We also speak with Jess and Emi, two of Emerging Minds' Child and Family Partners who have contributed to the development of our Practice strategies suite of courses. Jess and Emi share their lived experience of working with practitioners in relation to their children's mental health and wellbeing. In this episode, you will learn: strategies for responding when children and families experience setbacks in dealing with problems (02:42) what you can do when tools and techniques don't seem to be helpful for the child and family (06:15) some ways to respond when children and parents express disappointment and discouragement (18:42) how you can collaboratively develop and tailor interventions with children to help future-proof their new skills (23:11) Further information and resources: Online course: Practice strategies for implementation Podcast: Child mental health implementation strategies – part one

CASCW podcast
Parenting Education and Interventions

CASCW podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 37:10


Maurice Feldman explains to us how the general principles of applied behavioral analysis has led to the creation of some important parenting education programs and a framework around assessing parenting capacity of parents with IDD. SHOWNOTES & RESOURCES available at: https://z.umn.edu/parenting-done-differently

Food Junkies Podcast
Episode 88: Dr. David Wiss, Ph.D.

Food Junkies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 56:27


Dr. David Wiss, Ph.D., RDN is the founder of Nutrition in Recovery and Wise Mind Nutrition, a group practice in Los Angeles specializing in substance use disorders, eating disorders, body image, mental health, and general wellness. Mr. Wiss has contributed numerous articles to peer-reviewed journals and book chapters on his various topics of expertise, including nutrition for substance use disorder, food addiction, and eating disorders. He has spoken at dozens of academic conferences on these topics and his dissertation describes links between early life adversity and mental health in adulthood. Mr. Wiss is passionate about helping people achieve long-term recovery. In this episode: What Trauma-Informed Nutrition is Different types of trauma ACES & Food Selection Whether or not weight gain is a protective measure Interventions for Food Addiction or Disordered Eating that are helpful or harmful Events, Effects, and Experiences How trauma alters the brain Responses to presenting Food Addiction research to Eating Disorder professionals Whether or not trauma may be the bridge for the Food Addiction and Eating Disorder camps Follow David: INSTAGRAM: @davidawiss EMAIL ADDRESS: DavidAWiss@NutritionInRecovery.com WEBSITE: Wise Mind Nutrition Nutrition In Recovery   The content of our show is educational only. It does not supplement or supersede your healthcare provider's professional relationship and direction. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified mental health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition, substance use disorder, or mental health concern.  

Heal Nourish Grow Podcast
Maximize Fertility with Diet and Lifestyle Interventions: 42

Heal Nourish Grow Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 51:58


In this week's episode, Dr. Jane Levesque shares her insight on the relationship between diet, fertility, and lifestyle. Her own journey led her to focus on her health and provoked curiosity about the effects of diets and lifestyle on fertility. This eventually led her to study naturopathy. She now teaches others about how to manipulate lifestyle factor to help with fertility and easier pregnancies.  She learned that birth is just the beginning; women tend to treat pregnancy as the marathon, but the marathon officially begins after child birth. After learning more about individualized healthcare, she realized that every woman needs a different routine, pre-pregnancy, during pregnancy, and post-partum. Dr.Levesque uses her passion and personal experiences to help other women and men through fertility, childbirth and parenthood. She shares how important diet is to maintain a balanced nervous system, personalized diet plans vs. generalized diet plans, her individualized program, and much more! Watch the interview on YouTube

Clare FM - Podcasts
"Significant Interventions" Needed To Help People During Difficult Period Ahead Says Clare Senator

Clare FM - Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 23:14


A Clare Senator insists there will have to be significant interventions in the budget to assist people through the difficult period ahead. It follows an Oireachtas Energy Committee meeting, during which Eirgrid warned there's a "heightened risk" to Ireland's energy supplies this winter. Fianna Fáil Senator Timmy Dooley and Green Senator Róisín Garvey have been speaking on Clare FM's Morning Focus about the situation.

OEA Grow
Inclusive Behavior Interventions

OEA Grow

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 24:16


Episode 10 Many educators have experienced increased student behavioral issues since the Covid-19 pandemic disrupted schools. In this final episode of Season 3, Leonne talks with Jodie Wyatt, a District Behavior Coach, about inclusive behavior interventions. Jodie has been an educator for more than 21 years. Her current role serves all 14 schools in the Corvallis district, which has embraced Collaborative Problem Solving (CPS). Jodie herself is a certified CPS coach. She works with staff in many different roles to coach them on addressing challenging behaviors. Jodie has found that traditional punishments don't usually work because they don't teach the behavior we're expecting. At the foundation of CPS is building relationships with students and using empathy to build solutions collaboratively. Students of all ages are seeking connection which is why a relational approach often works. CPS is a restorative process that can also be used with staff. Jodie offers tips for those interested in implementing CPS.    Resources: Think:Kids: Rethinking Challenging Kids Rethinking Challenging Kids-Where There's a Skill There's a Way (TED Talk)

Bulletproof Radio
Hacking Skin & Gut Issues – Interventions With Dave – Nancy Pellegrino : 972

Bulletproof Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 29:37 Very Popular


In this Episode of The Human Upgrade™...​… Dave tackles multiple issues with former Upgrade Collective member Nancy Pellegrino so she can better manage psoriasis, gut health and anxiety.Nancy's been biohacking for a few years but can't seem to land on the right combination. She does the hacks, uses the gadgets and tech, and takes the products and supplements. Instead of feeling better, she's feeling overwhelmed with information. She talks with Dave to sort it out, focusing on skin and gut health.Now in her mid-50s, Nancy's post-menopausal and does bio-identical hormone replacement therapy. She experienced—and beat!—colorectal cancer in 2017. She routinely uses her Sunlighten sauna, an ozone machine and a ChiliSleep cooling mattress pad.Her busy life as a teacher and mom to three daughters makes it hard for her to meditate and relax. She's looking to ease some body distress, focus on solutions and find benefit in biohacks that work for her particular symptoms.She hasn't found a resolution to chronic psoriasis.Despite following the Bulletproof Diet, drinking Bulletproof Coffee and regularly intermittent fasting, she continues to have unexplained digestive issues. She wakes up in the night with feelings of anxiety.Note: The "Interventions With Dave” recommendations are designed to help you upgrade yourself and your biology so you can perform better at everything you do. They are not, however, a substitute for advice or treatment by a trained medical professional that may be needed for specific health conditions, illness or injury.Hacking Deep Sleep #957Hacking Mast Cells, Hormones & Mold #949Hacking Your Biohacks for Better Sleep, Fitness & Weight Control #939Hacking Weight Loss Resistance #930Hacking Thyroid, Autoimmunity & Aging #918Hacking Inflammation #915Hacking Your Gut Microbiome #908Hacking Menopausal Weight Gain #904Hacking Eyesight #895WE APPRECIATE OUR PARTNERS, CHECK THEM OUT!Control Blood Glucose: https://pendulumlife.com, sign up for membership to get monthly supply delivery, use code DAVE20 to save $20 on your first shipmentIsometrics for Cardiovascular Health: https://www.zona.com, use code DAVE2022 to get $150 off the Zona PlusCapture Life Force Energy: https://leelaq.com, use discount code DAVE10 to get 10% off sitewideSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Know Your Physio
Cardiovascular Disease, Statins, Metformin, and Rapamycin with Kevin Bass

Know Your Physio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 35:37


Despite what we want to believe, cardiovascular disease does not only start once we are in our 50s and 60s. As we welcome Kevin Bass back to the Know Your Physio podcast, we hear his opinions on cholesterol, the medications to take, and opinions on collected long-term genetic studies. We don't hold back on having a controversial conversation around starting the reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in your mid to late 20s, the role of genetics in our predisposition to cardiovascular health issues, and how we need to look at things from an environmental, health, and nutrition perspective. Kevin tells us about his preferences and opinions on the different interventions for LDL cholesterol reduction and how he aims to (one day in the future) create a risk reduction calculator that will look at and create a risk-benefit profile. Plus, Kevin discusses his feelings toward Andrew Huberman, consulting medical professionals, and some signs of when it may be time to start looking at taking prescription cholesterol medication!Key Points From This Episode:People in the fitness industry who are pissing Kevin off.Different calculations people can do to determine their risk of cardiovascular disease.Interventions for LDL cholesterol (including prescription medication) and their side effects. A look at how to reduce LDL cholesterol.Kevin's opinions on Andrew Huberman.Unpacking cardiovascular disease considering your genetics and potential preventative measures. Why Kevin believes people 25 and older can start cholesterol medication.Where Kevin gets the long-term genetic studies data from.Analyzing and interpreting data on cardiovascular disease to create a relative risk reduction.Why Kevin wants to create his own risk reduction calculator and risk-benefit profile.Signs people should start looking for when deciding to take cholesterol medication.Questions to potentially ask your doctor to help you identify your cardiovascular risk (and why they may be unlikely to prescribe).A look at the purpose and benefits of statins, metformin, and rapamycin.Links Mentioned in Today's Episode:The Diet WarsKevin Bass on TwitterThe Kevin Bass Show YouTubeDebunking Andrew HubermanBiOptimizersAndrés PreschelKnow Your Physio PodcastSupport the show

The Nonlinear Library
EA - [Cause Exploration Prizes] Preventing stillbirths by Denise Melchin

The Nonlinear Library

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 11:42


Welcome to The Nonlinear Library, where we use Text-to-Speech software to convert the best writing from the Rationalist and EA communities into audio. This is: [Cause Exploration Prizes] Preventing stillbirths, published by Denise Melchin on August 29, 2022 on The Effective Altruism Forum. This essay was submitted to Open Philanthropy's Cause Exploration Prizes contest. If you're seeing this in summer 2022, we'll be posting many submissions in a short period. If you want to stop seeing them so often, apply a filter for the appropriate tag! Author's note: This cause area exploration is far from the depth and clear conclusions I would want and is in parts clearly in draft mode. Open Phil encouraged me to submit regardless and publish properly later. I will do this to encourage myself to actually finish it at a later date and not forget the post in the drawer. This submission might change focus later: I could imagine improved antenatal and labour care to have wider benefits on child health than reducing stillbirths. Summary Two million babies are stillborn every year. A baby is called stillborn if they die after 28 weeks of pregnancy. Most charitable interventions focus on children already born despite babies being much more vulnerable in the last trimester. Almost half of all stillborn babies were still alive until labour started, passing away hours or mere minutes before they were born. Stillbirths are usually not given a DALY weighting so are ignored in cost-effectiveness analysis. Interventions reducing maternal and child deaths often reduce stillbirths as well, so they are more cost-effective than they first appear. Intragovernmental bodies as well as philanthropists have shown much less interest in reducing stillbirths compared to maternal and child deaths. This gives philanthropists the opportunity to save more lives by focusing on stillbirths. To a first approximation, children become less vulnerable as they get older. Adjusting for the length of the time period, the stillbirth rate is much higher than the infant mortality rate which in turn is much higher than the under 5's mortality rate. Although birth is the riskiest period. As philanthropists we have already noticed that focusing on young children is often most cost-effective. All recommended GiveWell charities above the GiveDirectly bar are focusing on the lives of young children. Trying to reduce stillbirths by improving care of pregnant women would just be going one step further in this direction. Uncertainties Major This submission primarily discusses stillbirths. But the potential interventions to reduce stillbirths have wider benefits. I do not know what fraction of the benefits of the interventions actually accrue as stillbirth prevention. Therefore it is possible a later publication will pivot into antenatal interventions and/or labour care more widely. As of now, his post is missing plenty of potential interventions, instead just giving a cursory overview, as well as lacking cost-effectiveness estimates. Therefore it is hard to say whether it is a plausible competitive cause area candidate. Minor Some data is a bit outdated. This seems particularly risky due to geographic shift in stillbirths. I have not paid enough attention to different risk factors by geography. Importance Two million babies are stillborn every year. A baby is called stillborn if they die after the 28th week of pregnancy but before they are born. If born in a rich country, most of these babies would live. In the UK, a baby born at 28 weeks is around 90% likely to survive up to virtually a hundred percent if full-term. This is especially true for the almost half of all stillbirths in which the baby only dies after labour has already started. A sharp discontinuity in health cost-effectiveness analysis such that a baby passing away minutes after birth should be given the full QALY weighting while a baby passing away minutes before should be ignored seems hard to defend.Babies passing away...

Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) Podcast
Food Insecurity Interventions for Cancer Survivors With Dr. Francesca Gany and Dr. Theresa Hastert

Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 24:35


Shannon Westin, Francesca Gany, and Theresa Hastert discuss the topic of food insecurity among patients with cancer. TRANSCRIPT Dr. Shannon Westin: The guest on this podcast episode has no disclosures to declare.   Hello friends and welcome to another episode of JCO After Hours, your podcast to get more in-depth on some of the amazing work that has been published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.   I am thrilled to be here today with two fantastic investigators and researchers who are going to discuss a paper that is titled “Food to Overcome Outcomes Disparities – A Randomized Control Trial of Food Insecurity Interventions to Improve Cancer Outcomes.”   This was published online in the JCO on June 16, 2022. We're joined by the principal investigator Dr. Francesca Gany, who is the Chief of Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities service at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City.   In addition to Dr. Gany, we're also joined by Dr. Theresa Hastert, who's an associate professor in Population Science in the School of Medicine at Wayne State University in Detroit. And she published an editorial that went along with this article named “The Potential of Cancer Care Settings to Address Food Insecurity.” This was published in the JCO on July 1st, 2022.   Welcome, ladies. So excited to hear about this work.   Dr. Francesca Gany: Thank you! It's great to be here.   Dr. Theresa Hastert: Thanks so much for having me.   Dr. Shannon Westin: So, what we're seeing more and more of is oncologists getting into other areas of expertise. For a long time, we've all been involved with treatment trials, and we've started getting into survivorship and health services. But I think that we really are realizing there are other issues for our patients that affect their cancer care and outcomes.   So, first, I just wanted to level set and see if maybe Dr. Gany, you can kick us off, can you define food insecurity and just kind of briefly discuss the prevalence patterns in women and men that are diagnosed with cancer?   Dr. Francesca Gany: Sure! So, food insecurity is essentially not enough access to food to help you maintain your health. And that could come from a variety of reasons, including not having enough money to buy food, living in a food desert, where there's not availability of food and other factors that could make food inaccessible to you.   This potentially has a tremendous impact on health. We see that with folks with cancer and folks who don't have cancer. We know with cancer patients, it's a particularly difficult issue because of the increased nutritional demands that come with a cancer diagnosis, the need for special diets, and decreased absorption of nutrients for certain folks. So, it's especially important that our cancer patients have access to enough healthy food, so they can have the best cancer treatment outcomes possible.   Dr. Theresa Hastert: I can add a little bit about the prevalence of food insecurity more broadly. So, in the US population, about 4% of Americans have what's called very low food security. So, that's where people actually reduce the amount of food they eat because they have a lack of money for food.   And by contrast, in previous work among cancer survivors, that number is closer to about 15% in sort of population-based studies and much higher in certain select patient populations.   So, if you're in an under-resourced population, and as some of Dr. Gany's previous work has cited figures of more like 55 to 70% of cancer patients and survivors with low resources can be food insecure and not have enough money for food.   Dr. Francesca Gany: All of this has, of course, worsened with a COVID pandemic because just food insecurity rates have gone up overall and we have certainly seen an impact on our patients in the cancer centers in which we work.   Dr. Shannon Westin: And you can imagine with the high costs of drug pricing and all of the other issues around coverage of cancer care that people are having to make those types of decisions between food and shelter and basics and getting their treatment for their cancer, their treatment for their other related comorbidities. Am I on the right track?   Dr. Francesca Gany: Absolutely! In fact, we did a study that specifically asked patients whether they were not purchasing medications in order to be able to feed their families. And a very high percentage of them, up to a third of patients, said that they were foregoing some of their cancer meds in order to be able to feed their family.   We asked it the opposite way as well, whether purchasing their cancer meds meant that they were unable to feed their families and unfortunately, it was a similar percentage for those food insecure patients.   So, it has a tremendous impact on fully engaging in cancer treatment, and also being able to take care of one's family which of course is so important to our patients.   Dr. Theresa Hastert: So, in Detroit, we're in Michigan, which expanded Medicaid. So, in the work that we do predominantly among African-American cancer survivors, we find that most Americans are able to access care, like with the expansion of Medicaid, people are able to get treated for cancer. Paying for drugs is another thing but we still have a lot of food insecurity among this population. About 15% of our cancer survivors, African-American cancer survivors in Detroit are food insecure.   So, it's not an insurance issue in the sense. They have Medicaid coverage and they're able to get cancer care, it might not cover every out-of-pocket expense, they still have food insecurity. So, broadening insurance is not necessarily enough to help people avoid some of these follow-on impacts.   Dr. Francesca Gany: Yes! One very important issue is that looking at food insecurity at a moment in time with our patients is not enough because we know that as treatment progresses, financial hardship also progresses – financial toxicity of the cancer treatment.   So, it's really important not to do just an initial screen for food insecurity and for other social determinants of health because food insecurity is certainly a window into other essential needs that have to be met, but it's really important that we don't just ask once, but that we ask in an ongoing way because we know that as time goes on, it only gets worse.   Dr. Theresa Hastert: That's so important. I've talked to several providers who have these issues with patients, where it's the people who are sort of more middle class who are going into cancer and be like, ‘I'm fine, I'm fine, I'm fine” when first asked if they need assistance. And it's not for several weeks or months when they start racking up out-of-pocket costs, and then suddenly, they realize they're not fine. It can become very delicate also because people are used to being self-sustaining, and financially independent, and they're used to being able to maybe help other people who have financial needs to donate to charities and things like that. And there can be a shift for people when they realize, ‘'Oh, no, now I need assistance.' That can be difficult for people to grapple with. And it's so important to keep checking in with patients throughout their treatment experience to see how they're doing.   Dr. Shannon Westin: I think this is really a great segue into kind of getting into the nitty-gritty of the publication. I would love for you, Dr. Gany, to give our listeners a little bit of information around the trial, the patient population that you chose, and the intervention arms.   Dr. Francesca Gany: Sure, I'm happy to do that! So, we started when we first saw the high prevalence of food insecurity among the patients, we were working with that are partnering with safety net institutions, we knew that we needed to do something.   And so, we did a study and we looked at emergency food resources in the top 50 zip codes that our patients lived in and then we did site visits, etc, to these emergency food resources and saw how inadequate they were for our cancer patients. They were inadequate because they didn't have medically tailored foods. Often, they didn't have culturally tailored food choices. Their hours of operation were very short and with all of the appointments that our patients had to keep, it made it really hard for them to reach the pantries. They weren't that geographically accessible so that was a deterrent to patients.   So, we realized that we have to do something that was much more convenient for our patients that would address their medically tailored food needs. And also, the difficulties they might have traveling to another site to get food.   So, we started a medically tailored food pantry of one initially, in which we partnered with a local food bank for New York pantry site that was close by to the hospital and worked with them around food choices for our patients, etc. And would work with them to pack the bags at their site and then we would bring the bags over to the hospital.   We found with our patients that there was tremendous uptake of this service, and tremendous appreciation and they reported improved quality of life and improved ability to get on with their cancer care.   This grew to now 15 pantries in both safety net facilities and also Comprehensive Cancer Centers because there are a sizable number of people in Comprehensive Cancer Centers, as you know we've been discussing that are also food insecure.   So, we had 15 pantries, but pantries - they're a great piece of the solution - but we didn't feel that they were enough of the solution because even though they were medically tailored and patients had some choice, they didn't have total choice in what they were getting. And especially with cancer care, people's food preferences shift, etc. And what they need to be healthy shifts.   So, we explored two other options of home grocery delivery service where they would get to pick what groceries came to their home, and having the groceries come to their home eliminated the issues that come up certainly with having to carry heavy bags, etc.             It was some choice that this gave them but the windows of delivery were a little bit of a problem for the patients because sometimes the food delivery services would be coming at a time that didn't work for the patients.   And then, the third option was a voucher system, where people get basically a debit card, and they can buy whatever they want within, no alcoholic beverages, etc, but whenever they want to purchase with that voucher card. And we accompanied that with education around healthful food choices, nutrition during cancer, etc, which was translated into a number of different languages.   So, those ended up being three pieces of the arms of the study. The pantry had become pretty much the standard of care in all of the facilities we were working in. So, that was one arm. So usual, customary care. And then, we added to that because it was in the sites that we were at, we added a voucher arm as well.   And in the third arm, it was a home grocery delivery arm. Those were the three arms of this randomized control trial. All of the monetary amounts were the same for the three arms. So, the grocery bag cost the same as the amount they were given in the debit card, which costs the same as the home grocery delivery pretty much, or it was at least equivalent nutritional content and food content. So, those are the three arms of the study.   Dr. Shannon Westin: Great! Well, just cut to the chase and let the group know what did you find?   Dr. Francesca Gany: So, we found that after six months of participation, the voucher plus pantry arm had the greatest treatment completion rates, 94%, versus the home grocery delivery, 82.5%, versus the pantry alone, which was 77 and a half percent.   So, tremendous differences between these three arms. All three arms saw a significant improvement in food security status but those were the treatment completion rates across the arm.   We also looked at quality of life and depression symptoms across the arms at 6 months, and across all arms, patients had fewer depression symptoms in follow-up. And improved FACT-G quality of life scores. But the statistically significant differences were actually found in the pantry and the delivery plus pantry arm for both of those measures.   Dr. Shannon Westin: That is so interesting and so exciting to see this type of intervention making a difference for our patients. Was there anything that surprised you about your results?   Dr. Francesca Gany: So, the one that was a little surprising was why the quality-of-life results did not exactly mirror the treatment completion rates. And we are assuming that that has to do with the fact that with the pantry, there's a lot of in-person interaction with staff and with the home grocery delivery, actually, because many of the patients found it a little bit tricky to order the grocery deliveries online, they also had a fair amount of staff interaction. Whereas with the voucher, there was less of that.   So, perhaps that explains that we're not sure and we're doing a much larger randomized control trial now in which we're going to look at that. One really great finding was that around food choices and healthy food choices with the voucher because we wanted to look at that, we were controlling what we gave to patients with the pantry arm, and we were controlling that to some extent with the grocery delivery, especially because we were ordering with them.   But we were very interested for the voucher arm and across the board, people made very healthful choices with the voucher. Again, they all were accompanied by nutrition education, etc. And interestingly, limited English proficient patients and patients who were born abroad had the healthiest food choices.   So, this was a great way to intervene with all patients who were food insecure. And we saw that it had a tremendous impact equally regardless of country of birth, language, etc. And great extra finding that there were healthful food choices and that was especially true in immigrants and in folks who have limited English proficiency.   Dr. Shannon Westin: Great. It's so exciting. I think though, it brings up the obvious question that seems like a ton of work. So, how do we operationalize this in our clinic? How do we screen patients? How do we work with our cancer center directors or our clinic directors to be able to provide these types of interventions? Sorry, I know it sounds like it's a million-dollar question.   Dr. Francesca Gany: This screening is simple. For these studies, we use the 18-item USDA Food Security screener. That's a longer instrument but we wanted to make sure we use that for this study. But in actual clinical practice, the two item screener works. And we are working now on one question specifically for cancer patients that we're finding is also quite sensitive and quite specific, and that does not take a long time at all.   We should be screening everyone. We should be screening in an ongoing way. We should be tracking this as a very important patient outcome. What does take longer and which is a little bit daunting to folks is that once you find food insecurity, you need to treat it.   And so, we do a lot of work around how to treat food insecurity and how to treat it efficiently. In the end, I actually think that the food voucher is going to be the way to go because it requires less staff time. And people are used to paying for groceries with debit cards, and with cards, and that has not been an issue at all for our patients. And I do think from a clinical operations perspective, from a policy perspective, and from an insurer's perspective, this should be part of the workflow. The vouchers are a really easy way to do it. We'll of course have more data when the larger trial is done.   Dr. Shannon Westin: These points are so important around needing to be able to address food insecurity when you find it. The screening is very simple and providing food to somebody else is much less so. And it can actually be harmful to screen for something and then not do anything about it like that could actually increase patient's distress if you're making moves like you're going to help them and then don't, it can actually be harmful.   But I was wondering, Dr. Gany, if you could talk a little bit about how you got this off the ground, functionally speaking, at the beginning. Like, if somebody wanted to do something similar for their own cancer survivor, with their patient population, what kinds of steps can people be taking? Who did you work with? Did you get any pushback? Are there any lessons learned that you could share with people?   Dr. Francesca Gany: Yes, so I think there are more and more pantries actually now that are being implemented at cancer sites. So, I think that there is broader buy-in now on the systems part.   So, I think that's a little bit less of a heavy lift than it might have been a few years ago. We were in a very receptive place. They were really happy that we wanted to help the patients this way and were very facilitative.   And so, we partnered with a food bank for New York Food Pantry at our initial site, and we partnered at other sites, and then we became a food pantry site ourselves so that we could have access to as many varied products as possible, so that we could put together bags that were tailored, etc. And so, then patients could pick the items in the pantry that were tailored.   The couple of issues that arose was this one was a space issue, especially in New York City spaces at such a premium and the clinics were really worried about even giving over a closet. So, in one pantry, we have a few drawers in the conference room, and we pull everything out when we get there. We have a cart and we wheel it around, and we wheel to a spot, etc. So, we take care of it that way.   At another site, we keep everything in the basement. When we came to where there was more space, we wheel it up to the cancer clinic. Some sites had more space and that was great, we could set up the pantry to be permanently there and displayed.   The other issue that concerns sites was food safety, food management, vermin, etc. So, all of our folks are trained in food safety, food handling, and food storage, so that we store it in the safest way possible. And so, that there were no issues around that. So, that has really worked out.   One other thing is we've also introduced an intervention at some of the sites of food navigators. So, not only do they help patients with the pantries, etc., but they also work with folks around what are some of the other resources they can access that'll work for them in their communities near their home that have the right foods for them, etc. And that's helped. This was not in the study, but this is just in our clinical operation for this. That has helped as well.   Dr. Shannon Westin: It's so great. It's such a lot of work and it seems so essential. I think it's really going to be on us to take it back to our institutions and determine what works. I loved your line about it seems like the vouchers might be our best. I think we really need those kinds of real-world solutions that we can actually bring back to implement.   I guess my other question is, is there a role for policy change here? Is there something we can do kind of on a more national level to address these things rather than it being at the individual practice and institution levels?   Dr. Francesca Gany: Oh, my God, yes! That is our hope from these studies that at the healthcare system level, the insurer level, and then the broader policy level in New York. For instance, some of our patients are undocumented immigrants. So, they have less access to food programs that others might have access to such as SNAP.   By the way, we saw the same food insecurity rates in SNAP participants as we saw in non-SNAP participants because the benefits are not that hefty in SNAP, but that is an aside.   But for undocumented immigrants, let's say, when in New York when they are diagnosed with cancer, they are eligible for Medicaid for the treatment of emergency conditions. So, such an easy thing to do would be to do a food insecurity screener when you were doing the emergency Medicaid eligibility, and then help people right into a food program, a voucher program.   When we think of the costs of the vouchers, in this study, the costs were a little bit more than $200 a month. For the vouchers, the staff time does not cost that much. And when one thinks about the cost of cancer treatment, of cancer care, and what a teeny drop in the bucket this is compared to the cost of cancer treatment. This should be a no-brainer for policy folks because it is so little money compared to the bigger outlay with so much impact.   So, that's one example of how we see it rolling out in a policy arena. When you're screening for Medicaid, for the treatment of emergency eligibility, you ask a couple of food insecurity questions or the one we're hoping to roll out and if somebody's food insecure, it's just they automatically got the food voucher.   Dr. Theresa Hastert: I think, well, ultimately, being able to have people in with policy-level solutions for this would be amazing, it would be a huge step. In the meantime, I really think it is going to be a lot of individual people and individual cancer centers trying to connect the people in front of them with the resources that they need.   And in order to do that, I think we'll really make the biggest progress when we do get buy-in, we get champions higher up in the cancer centers. When cancer center leadership takes it up and helps smooth paths, and when funders put efforts behind it, and I think they're doing this increasingly, put efforts behind addressing social needs among cancer patients and survivors, and also our accrediting agencies in terms of tracking, ‘Are you not only screening people? Are you hooking people up with resources?'   And of course, there's a balance between cancer centers that are set up to diagnose and treat cancer but if our patients are dealing with all these other issues, we need to be doing what we can to help address those issues so people can recover from cancer, can go on to live healthy, happy lives, could have the best outcomes.   Dr. Francesca Gany: Definitely. And some natural allies, the cancer centers, our folks in nutrition services, because they totally know how important it is for people to have access to nutritious food during their treatment. So, they're great allies, social work depending navigators, and community helpers depending on how the institution is structured. But it has not been hard for us to find champions at any of the sites that we've been at despite the space issues, etc. But we're super flexible. We make it work however we have to so that the site feels that it's value-added and that it's not interrupting their clinical flow.   Dr. Shannon Westin: This was great. Ladies, thank you so much for your expertise and for giving us some really, I think, concrete things that we could potentially do back in our institutions. And thank you to all of our listeners.   Again, we were discussing  ‘Food to Overcome Outcomes Disparities – A Randomized Control Trial of Food Insecurity Interventions to Improve Cancer Outcomes.' published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology on June 16th, 2022. We're so excited that you took the time to listen, please check out our other episodes and check back soon for a new episode of the podcast. Have a great one, y'all.   Dr. Francesca Gany: Thank you!   Dr. Theresa Hastert: Thank you.     The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions.   Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.    

Healthy Wealthy & Smart
Dr. Mercedes Aguirre Valenzuela: Empowering your Patients with Advocacy

Healthy Wealthy & Smart

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 22:58


In this episode, Physical Therapist and Advocate Dr. Mercedes Aguirre Valenzuela, PT, DPT, talks about advocacy in physical therapy. Today, Dr Valenzuela talks about the different types of advocacy and the latest updates in advocacy. How is grassroots advocacy different than lobbying? Hear about APTA advocacy, making a difference as one person, and get Mercedes' advice to her younger self, all on today's episode of The Healthy, Wealthy & Smart Podcast.   Key Takeaways Three types of advocacy: Self-advocacy. Advocating for yourself. Individual advocacy. Advocating for someone else. Systems advocacy. Advocating for changing policies, laws, and rules. “You don't have to be a member of a certain group in order to send an email or make a phone call.” “Don't feel like you have to start on your own.” “You can really make a difference, even as one person.” “Get used to making mistakes, not being perfect. It's all part of learning.”   More about Dr. Mercedes Aguirre Valenzuela Dr. Aguirre Valenzuela received her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Rutgers School of Health Professions in 2020. Her dedication to professional advocacy has led her to leadership roles in the APTA on a National and State level. She was selected to serve as an APTA Board-sponsored Centennial Scholar and worked on the APTA “PT Moves Me” national campaign. In 2022, she began her term in the public policy and advocacy committee (PPAC) and CSM Steering Group. Within the Academy of Pediatric Physical Therapy, she is an active member and was elected to be in the Nominating Committee. In the state of New Jersey, she is an APTA Delegate as well as a Key Contact in her district. Clinically, she currently works in the early-intervention and school-based settings. Outside of the clinic setting, she uses social media to educate PTs/PTAs/students on how to advocate for their profession and encourage them to run for office.   Suggested Keywords Healthy, Wealthy, Smart, Physiotherapy, Advocacy, Lobbying, Legislation, APTA, Representatives, Interventions,   Resources Our Experiences Matter When it Comes To Advocacy APTA Patient Action Center   To learn more, follow Dr. Valenzuela at: LinkedIn:         Mercedes Aguirre Valenzuela Instagram:       @theptadvocate   Subscribe to Healthy, Wealthy & Smart: Website:                      https://podcast.healthywealthysmart.com Apple Podcasts:          https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/healthy-wealthy-smart/id532717264 Spotify:                        https://open.spotify.com/show/6ELmKwE4mSZXBB8TiQvp73 SoundCloud:               https://soundcloud.com/healthywealthysmart Stitcher:                       https://www.stitcher.com/show/healthy-wealthy-smart iHeart Radio:               https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-healthy-wealthy-smart-27628927   Read the Full Transcript Here: 00:00 Hi, Mercedes, welcome to the podcast, I am happy to have you on and to see you again.   00:06 Nice to be here. Thank you for having me. Yes. And today we're gonna be talking about advocacy, which, in physical therapy, which I have spoken about with a lot of different people over the years. And I think it's great to get different perspectives on advocacy, especially from younger therapists, because I think it's great that you guys get involved. So my first question to you is, how did you get involved into an advocacy work for the profession? And why is it important to you?   00:37 So I graduated in 2020.   00:43 I was very even before I started PT, school, I was very into politics, legislation and public policy.   00:53 And then once I went into PT, school, I never learned about what the abt does in terms of advocacy, I felt like he kind of mesh, kind of like the two things that are really impassionate about and enjoy. And so I became more involved as a student. And then once I graduated, I wanted to create   01:16 content that was related to advocacy and explained in a very simple way. What are like the current updates going on right now? Because I feel like legislation, can we, it can be a bit intimidating for people to understand and to really get into. And I wanted to show people, what are the updates without all these extra details that they don't really want.   01:46 And that's what I've been doing thus far. And it's been really a great learning experience. When we talk about advocacy, I think that there are a couple of different types of advocacy. So could you go into a little bit more detail on the different types of advocacy, especially in the PT world?   02:09 Yeah, you're correct. So there are several definitions of advocacy.   02:16 I can just give you three of them. So number one, is self advocacy. So advocating for yourself, for example, you're advocating for a pay raise or a change in work conditions. There's individual advocacy, so advocating for someone else, for example, sending out a letter to your patient's insurance company in order to get more PT visits. Then there is systems advocacy, which is my personal favorite. And it's about changing policies, laws, rules, and how they can impact multiple people's lives. And that is more targeted at a local state or even national level.   03:05 And when you're talking about systems advocacy, is that when you know we as physical therapists, ourselves, and maybe encourage our patients to send a letter to CMS or send a letter to your Senator, advocating for whether it be you know, the stock, the Medicare cap, that was a number of years ago, things like that.   03:26 Yes. So what are you are describing right now is a grassroots movements.   03:34 So, grassroots movement is similar to how the way grass grows from the bottom up. So we are the grassroots advocates, we are at the bottom we are what legislators call constituents meeting, someone who can vote.   03:53 And we advocate for things that affect the top so the top is like policy, law, etc.   04:03 And the APTA has grassroots movements. For example, as I mentioned before with CMS, it was the hashtag fight the cut movement, which was one of them. And there are examples of different types of movements in grassroots, such as me to or love wins, black lives matter. So that's kind of how grassroots advocacy works. How is that different than lobbying? So how does that work if you can compare and contrast the two?   04:35 Sure. Let me explain what a lobbyists first perfect, though a good start. So a lobbyist is someone whose job is to build relationships and network with legislators and their staff. And that lobbyists represents an Oregon   05:00 datian So the APTA hires lobbyists. And their job is to advocate for us, they don't have to be physical therapists themselves. But we can also do the acts of lobbying, such as making phone calls to a legislator, sending emails, even having meetings.   05:24 But it's not like our job because you know, we have our own stuff to do.   05:30 Right, exactly, exactly. So you can be part of a grassroots advocacy effort, and then kind of take that into the act of lobbying not as a professional lobbyists, like you said, but like, for example, when a PTA and I know the private practice section will do this, will have groups of physical therapists go to meet with their lawmakers from their state on Capitol Hill, and also individual states will have lobby day within the state. Yes, correct.   06:08 And you don't have to be a member of a certain group and whatnot, in order to send an email write a phone call is really what you want to see change personally, or even like a small group of people don't ever feel like you have to like be a part of something big. Like, it's about what you are passionate and care about. Right. So if you're not part of the APTA you can still lobby on behalf of patients. Is that correct? Yes, I wouldn't call it necessary lobbying, but like advocating, advocating, like, you can still send a phone call, Hey, I had this patient experience and I want you to know about this and be aware about this. There's going to be a one this change in my practice, ag whatever like your state is advocating for you can still do that without being a member. Right. And how do we know as physical therapists? What is on legislative agendas, let's say for the APTA Is there a tool we can use to find out what's going on? Yes. So the APTA has an advocacy network, and you can join, it sends a newsletter,   07:29 every month, every couple of months, you can also visit that abt patient Action Center, which they have pre written emails that you can send out to your legislators, and you don't have to be a member in order to do those things. Great. So the APTA patient Action Center, and there's an app for that, right? Yes, there is a PT,   07:57 advocacy app that you can use, and you can also go on your browser as well. Right, right. So I think the big takeaways from there is there, there is an app for that.   08:10 Or, or you can go online, and you can find sort of pre written letters and things that you can send off to your senators or your congress people, whether that be at the federal or the state level. And you don't have to be an APTA member in order to have access to that. Yes, perfect, perfect. Okay, what are our current advocacy updates? What's on the table? What's on the line? What do we need to know? So for the last couple of Congresses,   08:47 there has been a bill that has been introduced called the Allied workforce diversity Act, which helps in recruiting a more diverse allied health workforce, as well as retaining those students and   09:07 just increasing the graduation rate as well, because sometimes you get these students in these programs, but they don't graduate. So that's the goal of that bill. It has not passed in the last couple of Congresses, but it was that bill was merged. Like the right the wording of it was merged into a pandemic bill, which has a high very high probability of passing. So that has been great news. That bill is called the prevent pandemics act.   09:43 And it's just to modernize the country's pandemic response, and they felt that workforce diversity was really important in it. So that's   09:56 that that's pretty huge since it was, has been a battle   10:00 To get this bill to pass for the last couple of Congresses, another one, if you're in pediatrics going to try to diversify these updates.   10:11 So there is a bill called the specialized instructional support personal services act.   10:21 You can also find it as a gross gross CIPS Act, as well, they call it hr 7219.   10:30 So this bill is going to create grant program, a Department of Education to increase partnerships between school districts and colleges to train specialized instruction support personnel. So PTS are included as that type of personnel, as well as PTAs. And they, and this is great, because, um, I was I worked at a school based physical therapist, and there is such a need for more therapists, so I could understand why they wanted to kind of increase, have more of a network between programs and school districts in order to retain the therapists.   11:17 Especially I,   11:21 you know, I saw, we're going to school way therapists, but like, I just always get emails all the time, like, we need therapists, we need therapists. And, you know, there's some kids that like I can't even see, even in the same school. So   11:34 very important for you school, PTs and PTAs. Out there, there is also a pelvic health bill that has been introduced. So moving on to pelvic health, the purpose of this bill is to educate and train health professionals on the benefits of pelvic floor physical therapy.   12:00 I think that's such a huge thing for pelvic health therapists is just a lot of people that don't know what it is. And you know, patients that go to their physicians for answers, they don't provide them the enough guidance, because they don't know that that help is out there.   12:20 So they'll be great. And the bill will also help to educate postpartum women on the importance of pelvic floor examinations and physical therapy.   12:33 And what it is and how to obtain a pelvic physical therapy examination, which would help increase access. And this bill was actually worked by representatives from a BT pelvic health, which is pretty amazing that, you know, Pts helped in creating this bill.   12:57 Yeah, and that was introduced into the house already are in committee. It was introduced, like into the house. Yep. Fabulous. Yeah. Anything else on the legislative docket? I can talk about a federal agency. Yeah, go for it. Update from the NIH. Okay. So the ABA is part of the disability rehab research coalition. And they some, which is occupational therapists are part of it, a lot of associations are a part of it. And they submitted a comment to the NIH requesting them to consider designating people with disabilities as a health disparity population, which I didn't think that they weren't. So I was really surprised by that. And this is just so important, because for the purposes of federal research, for this minority group, and it will develop and inform critical policy solutions to reduce and eliminate health disparities for people with disabilities. So I don't know the current update, but it is great that it is being brought up at this time. Perfect. All right, so we've got allied workforce diversity act. We've got the HR hr 7219, which was for school based PTS, and that was a really, really long   14:29 name for that bill. Yeah. And then we've got the pelvic health bill. So all those those three bills plus an update from the NIH. And if people go to the advocacy APTA PT Action Center, they should be able to find more information on that on those bills and how to contact their Congress person, correct?   14:56 Yes, perfect. So   14:59 in turn   15:00 terms of like federal agencies, if you're talking about the CDC, NIH, that's not necessarily something you just send an email to.   15:09 But for other legislations, yes, you can find pre written emails in regards to that. Excellent. All right. Well, that is a great overview of where we are right now. And current current advocacy updates. Thank you so much. Now, next question. What advice do you have for students and younger physical therapists, new career physical therapists who might want to get into advocacy? But maybe they feel like, Oh, I just don't know enough? Or I'm too new. What do you say to that?   15:43 Well, I will say contact me because I love   15:48 going to students sake meetings at different states and talking about advocacy, I have been to a few SEC meeting, so contact me and I will gladly, you know, present and help you guys out in any way possible. But also, when I was a student, I was really interested in to advocacy. And there wasn't much going on around in my program student lead wise. So I contacted my trusted professor, which is someone that I looked at as a mentor, and they really helped and guided me. So don't feel like going to have to start on your own, you know, find a professor that you trust and you feel is kind of already involved in advocacy in some level.   16:37 And they will help you out as well. Perfect. And who was that professor for you? Let's give them a shout out. It was Dr. Mike Rella. Ah,   16:48 yes, yeah. She just retired, right? Yes, he did. Yeah, that's a loss for sure. Yeah. But yeah, she really helped me out a lot. Oh, amazing. Yeah, she's a nice, she's a nice lady, for sure. Well, it's great that you had that professor to help guide you. And I think that's great advice for students and, and new graduates is reach out to those professors, because they, they can really help to guide you through advocacy, and through a whole bunch of other things as well. And they can also follow you on social media. Right. So what is your what is your social media handle? And where can people find you? At the PT advocate? Perfect, and that's on on Instagram? Perfect. That's the gram. Just the gram for now. That is great. And is that the best way for people to reach out to you they can just slide into your DM. Vic about advocacy only please?   17:48 Yes, or piece, you know, yeah, yeah, or pediatric care. Perfect. Perfect. All right. So what do you want people to take away from this conversation? If you can kind of distill it down to a couple of points? What would that be? I know, sometimes we can feel that we're just one person, one change can we make? And I know I feel that way. Sometimes too. Even though I have this advocacy, Instagram, sometimes I'm just like, all the stuff that's going on in the world's I walk in Mercedes do what can I even do about this, but you can really make a difference even as one person, that phone call that email that you send, even just reading about it and being aware and talking to colleagues about it or your patients about it, increasing a word that awareness of that can still be great and can still make a change. Don't feel like you are alone. There's a whole Association backing you up in this, and it's all for, you know, to progress our profession. So don't feel alone. And don't feel that like you can't not make a change because you can and your voice is really important. I love it. And last question, it's when I ask everyone, knowing where you are now in your life and your career. What advice would you give to your younger self? I would say get used to making mistakes not being perfect.   19:21 Because when I was a student everytime made a mistake, I was like, oh proceeds How could you do that? That's horrible scar for life. And as a new grad, I make a mistake every other day, every day. So just get used to it saltwater learning. Yeah, and I can say as someone who's been out for over 20 years, I make mistakes every day, too. Yeah. So it's never it's never ending we'll have mistakes and that's okay. Because like you said, you'll constantly learn from them. Thank you so much, Mercedes, for coming on and talking about advocacy. I love your passion. And I think it's great to see new graduates out there and making a difference. So thank you for that. And thank you for coming on. Thank you   20:00 for having me. My pleasure, everyone. Thanks so much for tuning in. Have a great couple of days and stay healthy, wealthy and smart.   20:13 Thanks for listening. And don't forget to leave us your questions and comments at podcast dot healthy, wealthy smart.com

Things Fall Apart
118: PragerU & the Alt-Right Pipeline w/ Rob Dickinson & Tom Cowin

Things Fall Apart

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 44:28


On today's podcast we're talking about PragerU, the infamous and growing conservative nonprofit that's probably best known for its YouTube channel with recent uploads like “Why I Sued My Daughter's Woke School”, “What Kinds of Shows is PBS Making Now?”, and “Teachers are Training Marxist Revolutionaries.” Which on its face is quite a silly thing to talk about, but this channel receives billions of views each year and is a stronghold of conservative leaders and talking points.To help us make sense of PragerU, as well as understand what its goals and objectives are, we're joined by Rob Dickinson and Tom Cowin from the University of Sussex. Rob and Tom both have backgrounds in international relations and global policy, and together founded FRAMES project in 2020 to analyze contemporary far-right propaganda in the US, with a specific focus on PragerU. This project is virtually the first of its kind, with essentially no coverage of PragerU in academic circles.This podcast dives into the methodology and role of PragerU in the education sphere, offering educators reasons why they should care, why they need to be informed, and what actions they can take to stop PragerU from propagandizing students/other educators.GUESTSRob Dickinson, leads the African Cabinet and Political Elite Data project, working with the Scaling-up Packages of Interventions for Cardiovascular disease prevention in selected sites in Europe and Sub-Saharan Africa (SPICES) project, and researches how the Trump Administration may fit into historical patterns of neoliberalism as a candidate for a PhD in International Relations at the University of Sussex.Tom Cowin, delivers undergraduate teaching in International Relations, International Political Economy, and Globalisation and Global Governance at the University of Sussex. He previously held the position Doctoral Tutor Representative for IR, sits on the Management Committee for the weekly PGR-led Chapter Chats sessions and is a Postgraduate Researcher Representative for Sussex UCU.Both Rob and Tom are co-founders of the FRAMES project to study far-right propaganda in the United States, with a specific focus on PragerU.RESOURCESThe Alt-Education Pipeline: PragerU (Writing)Alt-Right Pipeline 2: Electric PragerU (YouTube, Zoe Bee) Our GDPR privacy policy was updated on August 8, 2022. Visit acast.com/privacy for more information.

Addiction, Freedom & Faith
The Power of Forgiveness - Teach Every Nation

Addiction, Freedom & Faith

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 38:27


Teach Every Nation's strategy draws from the global ministry experience of its President & CEO Martin Deacon to take TEN's curriculum in what is called BIBLE SCHOOL ON WHEELS to all nations. For over 30 years, Martin has been involved with numerous international start-ups, training, publishing, project management, event planning, mobilization and the connecting with leaders in and from over 100 nations. Martin loves to see national leaders and pastors empowered, equipped and changed thru transformational teaching, tools and training. Martin is married to Anneli, and they are originally from South Africa and now reside in Atlanta.70x7 Forgiveness Course for free online. https://www.tencourses.org/70x7-en/______________________________Sober since 2001, after a suicide attempt, Rob has helped thousands of people find FREEDOM from substance abuse and feeling "stuck in a rut" to living a transformed life at LiftedFromTheRut.com. He does this through sharing his testimony, Interventions, Coaching, Speaking, and being the host of both Beyond The Bars Radio and Addiction, Freedom & Faith Podcasts.Rob invests in the lives of those wanting to see positive change, whether it is coming out of addiction, prison or just wanting more for their lives. He is a dynamic speaker who shares an extremely powerful journey of persistence, faith, and inspiration. Rob is also the Author of The Addiction Intervention Book (#1 in 14 categories for Bestseller and New Release on Amazon). Mission: Restoring Hope, Identity & Purpose to the AddictedRob LohmanLifted From The RutInterventionist, Coach, Speaker, Podcaster www.LiftedFromTheRut.com www.RobLohmanSpeaks.comwww.AddictionInterventionBook.comwww.SwimForRecovery.com (month of September)

Culinary Medicine: Food Cons & Food Conversations
Cancer and The Mediterranean Diet

Culinary Medicine: Food Cons & Food Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 6:15


Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet decreases the risk of cardiovascular disease. The Seven Country Cohort Study clearly showed https://www.yourdoctorsorders.com/2022/08/the-modern-mediterranean-diet/ (this). But what about cancer? Does the Mediterranean Diet impact cancer or cancer prevention? To study this, another cohort study began called the https://epic.iarc.fr/index.php (EPIC) study. Uniquely, the EPIC showed not only a decreased risk of cancer but also mortality from cancer. All vegetables, even the green ones, have nitrates. It turns out that the components of The Mediterranean Diet decreases the risk of cancer, decreases the risk of cancer recurrence, improves survival from cancer, and decreases overall mortality. EPIC StudyThe European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) is a large cohort study involving over 521,000 individuals from 23 centers from ten countries. Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet and LongevityThe EPIC researchers developed a simple scoring system to determine adherence to the Mediterranean Diet.  Greater adherence to the Mediterranean Diet was associated with https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12826634/ (longevity). The Scoring SystemThe Mediterranean Diet is scored on a scale of one to nine. Nine being a perfect Mediterranean Diet Score, and zero being poor. Great adherence to the Mediterranean Diet is a score of seven points or more. Eating more of these foods gives you pointsThe Mediterranean diet is rich with vegetables, legumes, fruits and nuts, whole grains, and fish. You get a point for consuming 9 ounces or more of vegetables a day. If you consume less than nine ounces, you get a score of zero. Legumes will net you a point if you consume two ounces or more per day. Fruits and nuts are one point for nine ounces or more. Likewise, whole grains are worth a point for nine ounces or more. Fish is an average of an ounce a day, or two main meals per week. Thus,  by consuming a diet rich in these five components can score five points. The weight is based on pre-cooked food. Lentils are a legume, and if you consume more than 2 ounces per day, you will score one Mediterranean Diet point. They are high in protein and fiber and low in saturated fat. Eat Less for MorePeople from the Mediterranean didn't eat much meat or dairy.  By consuming less of these, you can achieve Mediterranean Diet points. Eating less than  4 ounces of meat a day  is worth one point Consuming 1.5 ounces of hard cheese a day or LESS is worth one point Consuming less than 8 ounces of dairy is worth one point (mostly consume yogurt). Thus by eating less dairy and meat, or none, you can score two additional points. You might think that 6-ounce burger is small, but if you eat less than four ounces of meat a day, you get one Mediterranean Diet point. Eat more than four ounces, and you get zero points. AlcoholAlcohol is a component of the Mediterranean Diet but in moderation. For ethanol, a value of 1 was assigned to men who consumed between 10 and 50 g per day and to women who consumed between 5 and 25 g per day. This corresponds to 5 ounces of wine for women or 10 ounces for men. Olive OilOlive oil is an important component of the Mediterranean Diet. The type of fat in olive oil is mainly monounsaturated. The ideal ratio of olive oil or monounsaturated fats to saturated fats should be at least 60%. The best olive oils come from the US. Interventions in the Mediterranean DietIncreasing the score in the Mediterranean Diet by two points in the Mediterranean diet led to an 8% reduction in https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12826634/ (mortality). Imagine a simple dietary intervention leading to a decrease in mortality. Colorectal Cancer and the Mediterranean Diet ComponentsIn a recent update of the Mediterranean Diet they found a higher consumption of fruits and vegetables combined led to a decrease in colorectal https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34684583/...

ClimateGenn hosted by Nick Breeze
… the situation is a little bit frightening! Kelly Wanser, Silver Lining Institute: climate modelling, interventions, and unlocking global south talent “quickly”

ClimateGenn hosted by Nick Breeze

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 38:29


In this ClimateGenn episode I speak to Silver Lining Institute Executive Director, Kelly Wanser about the urgent need to invest billions of dollars into expanding our global coverage of climate modelling capacity. [Support this channel on https://patreon.com/genncc] The worsening risks we face mean climate interventions to cool the planet are back in discussion in the corridors of power. We discuss the hold ups and the necessity for research that could give all of us a clear idea as to whether such schemes should be deployed or not. We also discuss how engaging the talents of global south scientists beyond the current superficial level could be a game changer in advancing our ability to respond, and to intervene, in order to counter the catastrophic impacts of warming we are seeing accelerating all around us. Quotes: “We are in the far end of what looks like a really bad place for climate change.” “The media is telling us the math doesn't add up and the situation is getting a little bit frightening.” On climate interventions: “Looking at the system where it is and the dangers to people… and the dangers to natural systems, ecology and biodiversity, we are now seeing there is more openness in those communities who were extremely opposed to this than they were in the past… and that's new!” “Ultimately, in the United States, and we'll make this call to the rest of the world, we think there needs to be a step function, a real multi-billion dollar increase in investing against our observations and out model improvements. Separate from climate intervention, just to do the problems, we are not investing enough.” “We quickly need money and this technical access for researchers in the global south if we want to say that their participation is meaningful… I'll speak bluntly, I think their participation is more superficial than it should be because they don't have the capacity to actually do the science.” Excerpts from interview with Kelly Wanser, Exec Director of SilverLining Institute.

Occupational Therapy Insights
A scoping review of occupational therapy interventions in the treatment of people with substance use disorders

Occupational Therapy Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022


The Sunday Show
Challenge Yields Experimental Interventions to Strengthen U.S. Democracy

The Sunday Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 43:45


A little more than a year ago, a coalition of multidisciplinary researchers at Stanford, MIT, Northwestern, the University of Pennsylvania and Columbia set out to crowd source ideas to address the political divide in what was dubbed the https://www.strengtheningdemocracychallenge.org/ (Strengthening Democracy Challenge). “Anti-democratic attitudes and support for political violence are at alarming levels in the US," https://pacscenter.stanford.edu/news/new-study-uses-crowdsourcing-to-strengthen-american-democracy/ (said) https://sociology.stanford.edu/people/robb-willer (Robb Willer), Director of the Polarization and Social Change Lab and Professor of Sociology at Stanford, at the time of the announcement. "We view this project as a chance to identify efficacious interventions, and also to deepen our understanding of the forces shaping these political sentiments.” After reviewing more than 250 submissions from researchers, activists and others, the research coalition selected 25 interventions it deemed most promising to test against one another in an "experimental tournament" utilizing a sample of 31,000 U.S. adults. To learn more about the challenge, some of the promising projects that emerged from it, and whether tech platforms may play a role in efforts to address polarization, I spoke to Willer and his colleague, Jhttps://sociology.stanford.edu/people/jan-gerrit-voelkel (an Gerrit Voelkel), a Ph.D. student in the Department of Sociology at Stanford University and also a member of the Polarization and Social Change Lab.

Clear Thinking Out Loud
Paradoxical Interventions in Therapy: Podcast 101

Clear Thinking Out Loud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 23, 2022 16:10


When you’re not getting the results you want, stop what isn’t working and try something new and unexpected. Widen the way you see the problem.

The Hayseed Scholar Podcast
Alexander Barder

The Hayseed Scholar Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 90:10


Professor Alexander Barder joins the Hayseed Scholar podcast. Dr. Barder was born in Paris, France, but he and his family moved to Miami very shortly thereafter. He traveled back to France often to visit family, and mainly spoke French until going to a bilingual school. His discussions with his grandpa about World War II sparked an interest in history, which, along with math, were his favorite subjects in school. Alex went to boarding school in Geneva his senior year of high school, worked at a bank and thought about finance or banking as a major. But after three semesters at American University in DC, he quite college, went back to Miami and worked various jobs (including brokering) for the next seven years. Alex chipped away at his undergraduate degree, finishing in Spring 2003 with a BS in Mathematics. He became interested in International Relations, and took an IR theory seminar, co-taught by Harry Gould and Nick Onuf, at FIU in the Spring of 2004 that got him interested in being an academic. After being wait listed that year for the PhD program at Johns Hopkins, Alex got in the following year and pursued his PhD studies there. He talks about writing and publishing with Francois Debrix, including his first book published by Routledge in the Interventions series in 2012. Alex got a job at American University of Beirut in 2013, where he and his family stayed until 2014, seeing first hand the impact of the nearby civil war in Syria. Alex returned to FIU as an Assistant Professor that year, where he has been ever since. They finish by chatting about how he approaches writing, his practices of decompressing and health, spending time with his family, and more! 

The Oncology Nursing Podcast
Episode 221: Surgical Interventions for Patients With Cancer

The Oncology Nursing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 43:08


“Our goal in surgical oncology is, of course, to treat the cancer for a cure, but to do it in a safe manner so the patient is able to recover and resume their normal living activities that they had before their surgery,” ONS member Lisa Parks, MS, APRN-CNP, ANP-BC, inpatient nurse practitioner of hepatobiliary surgery at the James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Division of Surgical Oncology, at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, OH, told Stephanie Jardine, BSN, RN, oncology clinical specialist at ONS, during a discussion on prehabilitation and preoperative assessments for patients with cancer undergoing surgery, implications of and advancements in cancer surgery, and the interprofessional collaboration that takes place in this scenario. You can earn free NCPD contact hours after listening to this episode by completing the evaluation linked below. Music Credit: "Fireflies and Stardust" by Kevin MacLeod Licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 3.0 Earn 0.75 contact hours of nursing continuing professional development (NCPD) by listening to the full recording and completing an evaluation at myoutcomes.ons.org by August 19, 2024. The planners and faculty for this episode have no relevant financial relationships with ineligible companies to disclose. ONS is accredited as a provider of NCPD by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. Episode Notes Complete this evaluation for free NCPD. Oncology Nursing Podcast episodes: Episode 58: The Power of Cancer Rehabilitation Episode 66: Updates in Surgical Oncology—ONS Congress Episode 185: Surgical Oncology: Where We've Come and Where We're Going Episode 212: When Cancer Care Gets Complex: Those Other Oncologic Emergencies ONS Voice article: The Power of Prehabilitation Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing articles: Perioperative Care Implementation: Evidence-Based Practice for Patients With Pancreaticoduodenectomy Using the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Guidelines Use of Robotics in Oncology Surgery Oncology Nursing Forum article: Cancer Prehabilitation Programs and Their Effects on Quality of Life ONS books: Surgical Oncology Nursing Gastrointestinal Cancer Care for Oncology Nurses Cancer Basics (second edition) ONS's Get Up, Get Moving Dana-Farber Cancer Institute article: How ‘Prehabilitation' Can Benefit Cancer Patients American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation article: Cancer Prehabilitation: An Opportunity to Decrease Treatment-Related Morbidity, Increase Cancer Treatment Options, and Improve Physical and Psychological Health Outcomes Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics article: Nutritional Screening in a Cancer Prehabilitation Programme: A Cohort Study National Cancer Institute article: Surgery to Treat Cancer Enhanced Recovery After Surgery Society guidelines To discuss the information in this episode with other oncology nurses, visit the ONS Communities. To provide feedback or otherwise reach ONS about the podcast, email pubONSVoice@ons.org. Highlights From Today's Episode “Prehabilitation for surgery is probably one of the most underutilized areas of the surgical process. The goal of prehabilitation is to initiate coordinated, preoperative, optimized strategies. During the patient's preoperative assessment by the oncology nurse in the clinic, as well as the provider, risk factors are identified that can be addressed for a better surgical outcome.” Timestamp (TS) 02:27 “Any solid tumor patient that is having an oncological surgery can benefit from prehabilitation. It really depends on their overall assessment preoperatively. . . . And certainly, any lengthy surgery that is going to require the patient to be under anesthesia for prolonged time, the patient would benefit from being optimized prior to a surgical procedure.” TS 07:43 “When a patient is initially seen by a surgical oncologist in a pre-op setting, all of these assessments are completed by the oncology nurse, as well as the advanced practice oncology nurse, for the patient. And in order for the patient to go through the surgical process, prehabilitation is started immediately after that initial visit. The patient will be brought back in and reassessed periodically while going through prehabilitation.” TS 09:03 “Our goal in surgical oncology is, of course, to treat the cancer for a cure, but to do it in a safe manner that the patient is able to recover and resume their normal activities that they've been living, that they had before their surgery.” TS 10:51 “I think [one] of the greatest challenges that I hear from nurses are family support. The family needs to understand the whole process of prehabilitation and the fact that the patient is not going to come to harm by waiting a couple weeks to optimize themselves to undergo a major cancer operation, and to make sure that they're providing transportation and assisting their family member if they need to go to outpatient physical therapy, occupational therapy, pulmonary rehab, things like that, that the provider may, based on assessment, refer these preoperative candidates for.” TS 12:18 “I think that people always think of surgery as being curative, but a lot of times, some of the procedures that we do are to sustain a quality of life for the patient at the end of their life.” TS 20:41 “Now, what I'm seeing is that the majority of the time, robotic surgery is utilized more often than an open surgery. Of course, any time there is uncontrolled bleeding, any time they're unable to really visualize the surgical field well, they may start out robotically, and then go to an open procedure, but certainly I'm seeing them starting the cases and scheduling them as robotic or robotic-assisted. . . . I just think that robotic-assisted surgery continues to really grow, and I don't think we've reached the full potential of what surgeons can do with the surgeries. There is a great learning curve for these surgical oncologists.” TS 28:10 “Surgical oncology nurses are trained in post-operative care, preoperative care, and for nurses that are in the OR, perioperative nursing, as well as oncology. They have to be competent, not only in surgical care, but in oncology care, too. . . . This specialty is very different than a medical oncology nurse, or a hematology nurse, who is mainly giving chemotherapies, CAR T's, immunotherapies. The surgical oncology nurse needs to understand what chemotherapies, treatments, radiation therapies, anything like that, that has been done with that patient, because that would certainly impact that patient's outcome, but also to understand the whole surgical process.” TS 31:28

The Bobby Bones Show
(Weds Full) 6th Grader Reese Stops by the Studio After We Helped Her Get In Touch with Jason Aldean + Calling Interventions For Ourselves + Lunchbox and Eddie Compete for Money

The Bobby Bones Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2022 84:05 Very Popular


Earlier this year, Reese called into the show because she wanted Jason Aldean to perform with her at the talent show, but he wasn't available to be there. We helped out by getting Jason Aldean to shoot a video introducing Reese before her performance of his song "1994."  She was in town and stopped by the show today to give us an update on her life going into 7th grade! We each share the reasons we would call interventions on ourselves. And Lunchbox and Eddie compete for money trying to identify the first 13 colonies. This was inspired by a trivia game played on a flight Amy was on.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy
Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health: An Interview with Dr. Barbara Stroud

The Modern Therapist's Survival Guide with Curt Widhalm and Katie Vernoy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 36:54


Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health: An Interview with Dr. Barbara Stroud Curt and Katie interview Dr. Barbara Stroud on infant and early childhood mental health. We explore what therapists need to know about working with very young children, including the latest brain science and the very earliest developmental stages. We talk about the importance of children being safe, seen, heard, and helped. We also look at the importance of culture and how to support under-resourced families.   Transcripts for this episode will be available at mtsgpodcast.com! An Interview with Dr. Barbara Stroud Barbara Stroud, PhD, is a licensed psychologist with over three decades worth of culturally informed clinical practice in early childhood development and mental health. She is a founding organizer and the inaugural president (2017-2019) of the California Association for Infant Mental Health, a ZERO TO THREE Fellow, and holds prestigious endorsements as an Infant and Family Mental Health Specialist/Reflective Practice Facilitator Mentor. In 2018 Dr. Stroud was honored with the Bruce D. Perry Spirit of the Child Award. Embedded in all of her trainings and consultations are the activities of reflective practice, demonstrating cultural attunement, and holding a social justice lens in the work. Dr. Stroud's book “How to Measure a Relationship” [published 2012] is improving infant mental health practices around the globe and is now available in Spanish. Her second book, an Amazon best seller, “Intentional Living: finding the inner peace to create successful relationships” walks the reader through a deeper understanding of how their brain influences relationships. Both volumes are currently available on Amazon. Additionally, Dr. Stroud is a contributing author to the text “Infant and early childhood mental health: Core concepts and clinical practice” edited by Kristie Brandt, Bruce Perry, Steve Seligman, & Ed Tronick. Dr. Stroud received her Ph.D. in Applied Developmental Psychology from Nova Southeastern University, and she has worked largely with children in urban communities with severe emotional disturbance.  Dr. Stroud's professional career path has allowed her to work across service delivery silos supporting professionals in mental health, early intervention (part c), child welfare, early care and education, family court staff, primary care, and other arenas. She is highly regarded and has been a key player in the inception and implementation of cutting-edge service delivery to children Prenatal to five and their families; her innovative approaches have won national awards. More specifically, Dr. Stroud is a former preschool director, a non-public school administrator, director of infant mental health services and agency training coordinator. She has held an adjunct faculty position at California State Long Beach and maintained a faculty position in the Infant-Parent Mental Health Fellowship for 12 years. Currently, Dr. Stroud's primary focus is professional training and private consultation from an anti-racist lens, with a focus on social justice, in the field of infant mental health. Dr. Stroud remains steadfast in her mission to ‘changing the world – one relationship at a time'.   In this podcast episode, we talk about mental health services for infants and young children Curt and Katie continue to identify gaps in typical therapist training. One such gap is working with children 0-5. We reached out to Dr. Barbara Stroud, expert in infant and early childhood to help us learn what therapists need to know about this age group.   What is infant and early childhood mental health? “What I often say to parents and providers is, it's our job to be the bigger cortex for the dysregulated midbrain. So, your little kid is not bad, they're not misbehaving, their dysregulated midbrain is doing the best it can. And we have to step in and be the cortex that holds that dysregulation and nurtures them through this process.” – Dr. Barbara Stroud Looking at big feelings and social and emotional development The current brain science that is impacting infant and early childhood mental health How adults impact infant developing brains What are the basics that therapists should know when working with children under 5 years old? The importance of dyadic therapy Parent training Social emotional developmental stages The damage of punishment on the development of an authentic self What infants need to love themselves, have healthy development “Let me give you something that I give parents and I give childcare providers and I give therapists as a way of thinking about one simple thing you can do and always remember that will support your child's social emotional health: keep them safe, make them feel seen, heard, and helped.” – Dr. Barbara Stroud Infants want to be safe, seen, heard, and helped Co-regulation and holding the big feeling with the child The impacts of this work on adults Transgenerational work – we treat the parent in the way that we would like the parent to treat the child How to support parents in healing their own wounds Therapy Interventions for infants and children under five years old Play therapy is complex and advanced and requires training and supervision Before children can think symbolically or have words, play is not effective Attunement and attachment work The impact of the pandemic on social emotional development Developmental delays seen in research of kids related to the pandemic The way children can catch up developmentally The impact of parents' stress responses on availability How the lack of interaction with age-mates impacts development The responses to stress based on these delays Cultural impacts on early childhood development Questions to ask about cultural and family traditions The stories to explore and the importance of stories and practices How to explore areas of inequity and disparities Understanding our power as professionals Interventions for families with very young children “We can take everyday tasks and turn them into not just nurturing moments, but therapeutic moments… take nurturing tasks that parents have to do already (it's already something they're going to do) and turn it into a therapeutic moment.” – Dr. Barbara Stroud Helping families to identify what they are able to do to make changes The importance of predictability for families with a lot of chaos How therapists without kids can work with parents How parenting is an individual journey The importance of loving kids and being emotionally available to kids   Our Generous Sponsor for this episode of the Modern Therapist's Survival Guide: Thrizer Thrizer is a new modern billing platform for therapists that was built on the belief that therapy should be accessible AND clinicians should earn what they are worth. Their platform automatically gets clients reimbursed by their insurance after every session. Just by billing your clients through Thrizer, you can potentially save them hundreds every month, with no extra work on your end. Every time you bill a client through Thrizer, an insurance claim is automatically generated and sent directly to the client's insurance. From there, Thrizer provides concierge support to ensure clients get their reimbursement quickly, directly into their bank account. By eliminating reimbursement by check, confusion around benefits, and obscurity with reimbursement status, they allow your clients to focus on what actually matters rather than worrying about their money. It is very quick to get set up and it works great in completement with EHR systems. Their team is super helpful and responsive, and the founder is actually a long-time therapy client who grew frustrated with his reimbursement times The best part is you don't need to give up your rate. They charge a standard 3% payment processing fee! Thrizer lets you become more accessible while remaining in complete control of your practice. A better experience for your clients during therapy means higher retention. Money won't be the reason they quit on therapy. Sign up using bit.ly/moderntherapists if you want to test Thrizer completely risk free! Sign up for Thrizer with code 'moderntherapists' for 1 month of no credit card fees or payment processing fees! That's right - you will get one month of no payment processing fees, meaning you earn 100% of your cash rate during that time.   Resources for Modern Therapists mentioned in this Podcast Episode: We've pulled together resources mentioned in this episode and put together some handy-dandy links. Please note that some of the links below may be affiliate links, so if you purchase after clicking below, we may get a little bit of cash in our pockets. We thank you in advance! drbarbarastroud.com Dr. Barbara Stroud | Changing The World One Relationship at a Time Using Reflective Practice to Examine Microaggressions The ABC's of Trauma with Dr. Chandra Ghosh Ippen https://mcsilver.nyu.edu/ttac-deconstruct-racism/ YouTube: Dr. Barbara Stroud Facebook: Barbara Stroud Training LinkedIn: Dr. Barbara Stroud https://profectum.org/ Relevant Episodes of MTSG Podcast: Crafting Your Authentic Message: An interview with Mercedes Samudio, LCSW Navigating Pregnancy as a Therapist: An interview with Emily Sanders, LMFT Infertility and Pregnancy Loss: An interview with Tracy Gilmour-Nimoy, LMFT, PMH-C Field-Based Private Practice: An Interview with Megan Costello, LMFT   Who we are: Curt Widhalm, LMFT Curt Widhalm is in private practice in the Los Angeles area. He is the cofounder of the Therapy Reimagined conference, an Adjunct Professor at Pepperdine University and CSUN, a former Subject Matter Expert for the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, former CFO of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, and a loving husband and father. He is 1/2 great person, 1/2 provocateur, and 1/2 geek, in that order. He dabbles in the dark art of making "dad jokes" and usually has a half-empty cup of coffee somewhere nearby. Learn more at: www.curtwidhalm.com Katie Vernoy, LMFT Katie Vernoy is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist, coach, and consultant supporting leaders, visionaries, executives, and helping professionals to create sustainable careers. Katie, with Curt, has developed workshops and a conference, Therapy Reimagined, to support therapists navigating through the modern challenges of this profession. Katie is also a former President of the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. In her spare time, Katie is secretly siphoning off Curt's youthful energy, so that she can take over the world. Learn more at: www.katievernoy.com A Quick Note: Our opinions are our own. We are only speaking for ourselves – except when we speak for each other, or over each other. We're working on it. Our guests are also only speaking for themselves and have their own opinions. We aren't trying to take their voice, and no one speaks for us either. Mostly because they don't want to, but hey. Stay in Touch with Curt, Katie, and the whole Therapy Reimagined #TherapyMovement: Patreon Buy Me A Coffee Podcast Homepage Therapy Reimagined Homepage Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube   Consultation services with Curt Widhalm or Katie Vernoy: The Fifty-Minute Hour Connect with the Modern Therapist Community: Our Facebook Group – The Modern Therapists Group Modern Therapist's Survival Guide Creative Credits: Voice Over by DW McCann https://www.facebook.com/McCannDW/ Music by Crystal Grooms Mangano https://groomsymusic.com/