Podcasts about Never Home

1997 studio album by Freedy Johnston

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Never Home

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Best podcasts about Never Home

Latest podcast episodes about Never Home

ConvoWMarlo
Episode 91: Nostalgia Is Never Home Part 1

ConvoWMarlo

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 25, 2022 52:15


Had to mix it up today on today's episode with a combination of the Nostalgia crew and Cordel who's One of the founders of Never home studios. I got lucky enough to have them all on episode and talk about the L's they've took in 2021 and how they bounce back from it. Also y'all won't believe some of the things they experienced. From failed boat rides While being OT To also going to New York meeting crazy big artist that we all love listening to. Nahh y'all got to tap in to this one. part 2 coming out soon

EvelChat
EvelChat #27 “How Did We Go From 'Three Weeks a Year' To You're Never Home…?”: A Chat with Donna Kaye-Harris.

EvelChat

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 132:14


If you are a committed coach in a relationship you are going to want to listen to this podcast. If you are the committed spouse or partner of a coach you are really going to want to listen to this podcast... In this, the first in a two part series of EvelChat, Derek talks to Donna Kaye-Harris, lifelong coach, sport builder & researcher, on interviews she did with 10 Olympic coaches & their partners prior to the 2016 Rio Games. In part 1 we discuss the feedback from the data on the partners of coaches, in part 2 we discuss the data from the coaches themselves. Donna interviewed each person in the cohort separately & independently, collecting feedback on how the coaching profession (obsession?) has impacted their partnership, family life, health and other important areas. While her findings are unpublished, her raw data, easily digestible & organized around quotes from both the coach & partner, can be viewed https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1jlychd2TdCh-GAzPvBDBei7UN-Oy2MoH?usp=sharing (here.) This is a fascinating discussion on the impact coaching has on a marriage, partnership, relationship and family and should not be missed. Donna Harris, ChPC, is a Chartered Professional Coach skilled in program development and implementation. She holds a Master of Arts in Kinesiology; her thesis explored the impact of passion on the performance and lives of elite coaches and their partners. The research outcomes lend insight into the requirements high performers need to be successful as well as the impact being a high performer has on the individual, their partner and their family.  The architect behind Athletics Canada's revised coaching education program, she understands the components of performance and the steps necessary to draw out the best from everyone. Topics: “They're not quite present in family life” “Knowing that you're second place” “I got to go, I went to Beijing, I went to Athens” “The coach's career trumps my career” “You're not really making a lot of the decisions that affect your life” “Worrying (about job security) doesn't really help a whole lot” “It's a job of passion, not a job you count hours” “. . .and then it consumes you” “Tell me a coach that was great and had good work-life balance”

QPR Podcast
Never home on a Saturday

QPR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 78:41


Charlie Wise debuts as host with Paul Finney, Warren Ringham and Ross Norville to pick the bones out of the pre and post-Halloween games. The guys try and explain to younger listeners what it used to be like when homes games were played Saturdays at 3 pm. File this one away in our the Memories's of the good old days' section.

Unsanctioned Talk
Ep 46 Never Home

Unsanctioned Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2020 129:48


Unsanctioned Talk returns this week to chop it up with Mason aka Never Home to talk traveling, road trips and some of his favorite spots in the country.

Matty in the Morning
Billy's Never Home

Matty in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2020 8:28


Parrott Nest
Always Never Home

Parrott Nest

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 27, 2020 53:32


Leah popped Asher, Asher got sick, and this thing called COVID-19

Positive Moms Podcast
28. Feeling Supported as a Mom - Interview with Kelsey Domiana

Positive Moms Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2019 36:56


This is the first episode in our November Giving Back Series where we are helping to showcase Moms who have a business and have found their purpose. We are Moms Supporting Moms! In this episode, Michelle interviews Kelsey Domiana, author of "Help! My husband is Never Home!" She shares tips with us on how to feel supported and not overwhelmed and stressed. She shares her experience as a wife who has a husband that travels a lot for work and how she manages all the things and stays positive and happy. Her outlook will help you change your perspective on your relationship with your husband and your role as a Mom. Stay tuned until the end of the episode for the fabulous giveaway Kelsey is offering our listeners!  You can find her and learn more about how to work with her on IG at KDomiana   Don't forget to follow us at Positive Moms Podcast

SippinWitSammie
Episode 12 - Never Home Tour

SippinWitSammie

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2019 71:14


Looking over the Never Home Tour and getting to know the talent and movers and shakers affiliated with The Chris Mack Experience & Hip Hop Since 1987! Barstool talk from the biggest sipper in Philly with some of the most innovate people in the world, Sammie is the one to sit and sip wit if you wanna enjoy conversation. #sippinwitsammie #ifuaintsippinwitsammieyouaintsippin #ifuaintsippin #geturfuckinglifetogether #craftbeerandcognac #victorybeer --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Advantage | A 5e Dungeons & Dragons actual play DnD podcast

The Party is back together and is charged by Lt. Col. Erika Tri to investigate happenings in Hirdirth, under the reign of the authoritarian King Greysunder. The four make their plan for part one of their quest. Discord: discord.gg/JkTFjdB Website: AdvantageDnD.com Twitter: @AdvantageDnD Instagram: @AdvantageDnD Facebook: Advantage Tumblr: @AdvantageDnD Email: AdvantageDnD@gmail.com

Writer's Bone
Episode 328: In the House in the Dark of the Woods Author Laird Hunt

Writer's Bone

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2018 18:48


Laird Hunt, author of Neverhome and The Evening Road, talks to Daniel Ford about his new book In the House in the Dark of the Woods.  To learn more about Laird Hunt, follow him on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Also read our review of In the House in the Dark of the Woods in November’s “Books That Should Be On Your Radar.” Today's episode is sponsored by Libro.fm and OneRoom.                   https://www.littlebrown.com/titles/laird-hunt/in-the-house-in-the-dark-of-the-woods/9780316411059/

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network
Laird Hunt joins Thorne & Cross: Haunted Nights LIVE!

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2018 30:03


Laird Hunt is the author of The Evening Road. His previous novel, Neverhome, was a New York Times Book Review Editor's Choice selection, an IndieNext selection, winner of the Grand Prix de Litterature Americaine and The Bridge prize. A resident of Boulder, CO, he is on the faculty in the creative writing PhD program at the University of Denver.

Pop-Punk & Pizza
Pop-Punk & Pizza #62: Nick Klock of Never Home

Pop-Punk & Pizza

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2018 73:20


Nick Klock, lead vocalist of North Carolina based band, Never Home, joins the podcast! Nick tells us about the band’s connection to Taking Back Sunday, engagement stories, vocal warm ups, and more. Never Home’s self titled debut EP is available everywhere online. Hosted by, Jacques LaMore. The post Pop-Punk & Pizza #62: Nick Klock of Never Home appeared first on Bangarang Radio.

Bangarang Radio
Pop-Punk & Pizza #62: Nick Klock of Never Home

Bangarang Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2018 73:20


Nick Klock, lead vocalist of North Carolina based band, Never Home, joins the podcast! Nick tells us about the band’s connection to Taking Back Sunday, engagement stories, vocal warm ups, and more. Never Home’s self titled debut EP is available everywhere online. Hosted by, Jacques LaMore. The post Pop-Punk & Pizza #62: Nick Klock of Never Home appeared first on Bangarang Radio.

GAD!Cast
GAD!Cast Episode 8: Fartz N' Roses

GAD!Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2018 57:01


The GAD!Cast goons are back to tell you all about GADFest III (because I'm sure you're not sick of hearing about that yet!) and announce even MORE exciting Tiger Helicide shows, projects, and ventures. Jay Dubya gives us some exclusive reviews of a few local and semi-local bands that he has checked out, a few of which we play at the end of the episode....so stick around! The Goddamn Rights - "Aim High" Flood Reactor - "Never Home" AATXE - "Five Wounds" And if you like them, check out their full length albums here: https://thegoddamnrights.bandcamp.com/releases https://floodreactor.bandcamp.com/album/money-mountain-demo https://aatxemusic.bandcamp.com/album/cardinal-2

Beyond Rad Podcast
Episode 15 - Nick Klock of Never Home

Beyond Rad Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2018 53:00


Thank you for checking out another episode of the podcast! We were joined this week by Nick Klock who is the lead singer of an awesome Charlotte-Based pop punk band called Never Home. Never Home's debut EP is available online on all streaming platforms. https://neverhomenc.bandcamp.com If you like this episode or the podcast, please support by sharing it on various social platforms! Facebook.com/beyondradpodcast Instagram.com/beyondradentertainment or instagram.com/MrRadChad Twitter @MrRadChad Facebook.com/detournorth Instagram.com/detournorthband detournorth.bandcamp.com AND detournorth.limitedrun.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/beyondrad/support

never home nick klock
SHH, DON'T TELL!
Wife's Never Home Anyway

SHH, DON'T TELL!

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2018 11:45


SpecialSays
Always Never Home With Syd | #SpecialDelivery

SpecialSays

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 26, 2018 8:34


Syd joins Special to talk about the stories behind naming her album 'Fin', the distinction between 'Fin' & 'Always Never Home', why she chose Buddy to come on tour with her, how she's grown as a performer, and the performers she studies. Special Education with Syd: https://youtu.be/SdrRPM_XRgg Special on Twitter: Twitter.com/SpecialSays

Nero Recordings
Never Home Interview

Nero Recordings

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2018 28:06


Nick Klock of Never Home speaks with Nero Recordings!

never home nick klock
2017 Edinburgh International Book Festival (edbookfest)
Laird Hunt & Colson Whitehead (2017 Event)

2017 Edinburgh International Book Festival (edbookfest)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2017 60:56


A TOUR OF AMERICA RACE IN AMERICA Two of the finest writers working in America today take a tour around the dark history of their country. Paul Auster called Laird Hunt's last novel Neverhome 'magnificent'; The Evening Road is his latest, which he discusses today, and it's a novel 'as audacious as it is lyrical'. Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad has already won him the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the National Book Award and the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in fiction - join him to find out why. Chaired by Jenny Niven.

2019 Edinburgh International Book Festival
Laird Hunt & Colson Whitehead (2017 Event)

2019 Edinburgh International Book Festival

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2017


Two of the finest writers working in America today take a tour around the dark history of their country. Paul Auster called Laird Hunt's last novel Neverhome 'magnificent'; The Evening Road is his latest, which he discusses in this event, and it's a novel 'as audacious as it is lyrical'. Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad has already won him the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, the National Book Award and the Carnegie Medal for Excellence in fiction - listen to the full event, recorded live at the 2017 Edinburgh International Book Festival, to find out why. Chaired by Jenny Niven.

TK with James Scott: A Writing, Reading, & Books Podcast
Ep. 14: Jamie Quatro & Agent Anna Stein

TK with James Scott: A Writing, Reading, & Books Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2016 85:40


After some negative pre-publication reviews, Jamie Quatro feared the worst. Then, critic James Wood and the NYTBR (among others) hailed her collection, I WANT TO SHOW YOU MORE, as a classic. Jamie and James talk about conflating writer and subject matter, depicting the female gaze and female sexuality, and writing novels vs short stories. Then, the agent Anna Stein joins the show to go over what an agent does, how to find one, and mistakes writers make along the way.      Jamie and James Discuss:  David Gates  Amy Hempel  Bennington College Low Residency MFA  Princeton University Pepperdine University  Sheila Kohler  E.M. Forster  Franz Kafka  Flannery O'Connor  Margot Livesey  Andre Dubus (II)  PROXIES: ESSAYS NEAR KNOWING by Brian Blanchfield  Sewanee Writers' Conference  RUNNER'S WORLD  INFINITE JEST by David Foster Wallace  QUACK THIS WAY by David Foster Wallace  BRIEF INTERVIEWS WITH HIDEOUS MEN by David Foster Wallace  BLUETS by Maggie Nelson Tin House Summer Writer's Workshop  THE FUN STUFF: AND OTHER ESSAYS by James Wood  Claire Messud  Wyatt Prunty  Ann Patchett  Urban Waite  Lincoln Michel  George Saunders  Lydia Davis Alice Munro  INTERPRETER OF MALADIES by Jhumpa Lahiri OLIVE KITTERIDGE by Elizabeth Strout  P.J. Mark  Barry Hannah Steven Milhauser  A VERY OLD MAN WITH ENORMOUS WINGS by Gabriel Garcia Marquez  LADIES AND GENTLEMEN by Adam Ross  Yaddo  Sylvia Plath  Ted Hughes Zadie Smith  The Old Testament  THE SOUND AND THE FURY by William Faulkner  Grove Atlantic    Anna and James Discuss:  Hanya Yanagihara  Ben Lerner  Garth Greenwell  Maria Semple  NEVERHOME by Laird Hunt  THE MOTHER-IN-LAW CURE by Katherine Wilson  THE EVENING ROAD by Laird Hunt  THE STORY OF A BRIEF MARRIAGE by Anuk Aradpragasam  THE CLANCYS OF QUEENS by Tara Clancy  TODAY WILL BE DIFFERENT by Maria Semple  THE PARIS REVIEW  Sewanee Writers' Conference  A LITTLE LIFE by Hanya Hanagihara  WHAT BELONGS TO YOU by Garth Greenwell    http://tkpod.com  /  tkwithjs@gmail.com  /  Twitter: @JamesScottTK https://www.facebook.com/tkwithjs/  /  Instagram: tkwithjs     

StoryWeb: Storytime for Grownups
091: Laird Hunt: "Neverhome"

StoryWeb: Storytime for Grownups

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2016 6:49


This week on StoryWeb: Laird Hunt’s novel Neverhome. Last week’s StoryWeb episode featured Mary Chesnut’s Civil War, a rare, behind-the-scenes look at the inner workings of the Confederacy. This week, I am delighted to share Laird Hunt’s 2014 novel, Neverhome, a very rare look at the Civil War from the point of view of one of the 400 women who disguised themselves as male soldiers. Neverhome comes as a refreshing new take on a subject we all think we know: the Civil War. Hunt, a graduate of the MFA program at the Jack Kerouac School of Disembodied Poetics at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, and a faculty member in the University of Denver’s creative writing program, has written several other laudable novels, among them Indiana, Indiana, and Kind One. But with Neverhome, he hit it out of the park. The book was quite favorably reviewed in the Sunday Book Review of the New York Times, being named as an Editor’s Choice. His protagonist/narrator is Gallant Ash, AKA Constance Thompson. Before the Civil War, Constance is living in rural Indiana, married to Bartholomew Thompson. As the novel unfolds through flashbacks, we learn that theirs is a marriage of two gender-ambiguous individuals. Certainly, neither meets the stereotype of what a “real man” or a “true woman” should be according to 19th-century ideals. Bartholomew is gentle and soft, where Constance is the firm leader in their marriage and most definitely the one who would head out to war. As Constance/Ash says, Bartholomew was “made out of wool and I was made out of wire.” As the war gets underway, Constance enlists, taking the name of Ash. In a memorable scene near the beginning of the novel, he/she is dubbed “Gallant Ash” and is known by that moniker for the remainder of his service in the Union Army. When I read Neverhome, the story definitely drew me in. Would Gallant Ash pass as a male soldier? How would he/she handle physical necessities? And how would his/her courage stand the trials of the war? Adding to my interest in the novel was the fact that it is modeled loosely on Homer’s Odyssey. As I became aware of that structural element, I began to look for the ways Hunt would play on that epic of a warrior trying to make his way home. But to me, Gallant Ash’s voice was even more compelling than the story. The dialect Laird Hunt creates is rarely heard and is completely captivating. Anyone who knows my work knows that I absolutely love dialect done well. Whether it’s Huck Finn’s rural Missouri dialect or Granny Younger’s rhythmic speech in Lee Smith’s Oral History, Mrs. Todd’s coastal Maine accent in Sarah Orne Jewett’s The Country of the Pointed Firs or Kate Chopin’s capturing of Cajun dialect in Bayou Folk, I love authors who help us hear the way Americans from all regions speak. Until I read Neverhome, I hadn’t thought of rural folks from Indiana as having a dialect – but Hunt brings Gallant Ash’s manner of speaking to life so well that I found it almost impossible to put the book down. And how Gallant Ash spins a yarn! From the first page of this first-person narrative, I was hooked. Hunt says that “the seed for Neverhome was planted . . . when my wife bought me a copy of An Uncommon Soldier: The Civil War Letters of Sarah Rosetta Wakeman.” You can learn more about “Lyons” Wakeman and the hundreds of women who fought on both sides of the Civil War by visiting the Civil War Trust website. See also the Smithsonian’s interview with Bonnie Tsui, who wrote She Went to the Field: Women Soldiers in the Civil War. You’ll also find DeAnne Blanton’s three-part article for the National Archives interesting and compelling. And if you want more, read the book Blanton wrote with Lauren M. Cook, They Fought Like Demons: Women Soldiers in the Civil War. A reading group guide to Neverhome provides additional insight and questions for consideration. Want to get a taste of Neverhome? There’s a lengthy preview at the publisher’s website. If you’re like me, you’ll want to get a copy of the book so you can hear all of Gallant Ash’s story. Visit thestoryweb.com/hunt for links to all these resources and to watch as Laird Hunt reads a scene in which Gallant Ash encounters another woman disguised as a soldier.  

StoryWeb: Storytime for Grownups
090: "Mary Chesnut's Civil War"

StoryWeb: Storytime for Grownups

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 6, 2016 25:50


This week on StoryWeb: Mary Chesnut’s Civil War. In her book on the American Civil War, Mary Boykin Chesnut, the wife of a Confederate general, describes a woman seeking a pardon for her husband: “She was strong, and her way of telling her story was hard and cold enough. She told it simply, but over and over again, with slight variations as to words – never as to facts. She seemed afraid we would forget.” This passage is but one of many in the book that signals Chesnut’s desire to tell the story of the South during the Civil War. She wants to document history so that her readers won’t forget. At the same time, she wants to record more than just the facts of history, by telling her story over and over again artfully. Thirty years ago, I first encountered Chesnut’s writing and fell in love (total love!) with her firsthand, play-by-play accounts of the Civil War. Chesnut lived in or visited various locations throughout the South, most notably Montgomery, Alabama, Columbia, South Carolina, and Richmond, Virginia, where she came into regular contact with the Jefferson Davises and the Robert E. Lees. In every location, she opened her home to others as a social gathering place. Visiting did not end for Chesnut and the other gentile Southern ladies of her community, but now their conversations turned to war. It was widely known throughout the community that Chesnut kept a detailed diary about her society’s comings and goings and the ladies’ conversations. Because she had had a ringside seat to the Confederacy, friends pressed her to publish the diary after the war. From 1881 to 1884, she worked on a version for publication. She deleted and moved sections, added dialogue and other novel-like detail to create a hybrid of diary, memoir, autobiography, and even to some extent, novel. She wove together accounts of her own experiences with stories that others have told her and created an anthology of anecdotes about members of the Confederate society, a crazy quilt of Civil War lore. Chesnut writes, “History reveals men’s deeds – their outward characters but not themselves. There is a secret self that hath its own life ‘rounded by a dream’ – unpenetrated, unguessed.” What she attempted to give us in her revision was the “unpenetrated, unguessed” “secret self” of the women in the Confederacy. To be sure, her diary gives us an intimate glimpse into the history of the day – the official, public activities of the men of the Confederacy – but it also brings to vivid life the stories and concerns of the women of the Confederacy. Her revised diary is filled with hundreds of pages of women’s talk, gossip, and conversation, suggesting that to understand the true story of the Confederacy one need only listen more attentively to women’s voices. Unfortunately, when Chesnut died in 1886, her manuscript was unfinished. A heavily edited and abridged version was published in 1905 as A Diary from Dixie. Gone are the scenes, the dialogue, much of the story Chesnut tried to bring to life in her 1880s revision. Fast forward to 1981. Eminent Southern historian C. Vann Woodward decided to resurrect the original diaries, creating the Pulitzer-Prize-winning volume, Mary Chesnut’s Civil War. This book is, quite simply, amazing – long and rambling but amazing! Woodward has been praised for meticulously bringing to life an historical account that otherwise would have been lost. He has also been criticized for not honoring Chesnut’s authorial intent. Though I have some misgivings about Woodward’s decision to reinsert passages Chesnut clearly meant to cut, I nevertheless love the more thorough eavesdropping I get to do when reading his version. Suffice it to say, if you want a gripping account of the Civil War from the perspective of the Confederacy, read Mary Chesnut. If you want to learn more about the ideal of the “Southern lady” (the white upper-class Southern lady on her pedestal), read Mary Chesnut. And if you just plain want to listen in on other people’s conversations, read Mary Chesnut. Should you read A Diary from Dixie or Mary Chesnut’s Civil War? Despite my quibbles with Woodward’s editing, I’d recommend reading his version. It’s full, lively, dynamic – and if you are a Civil War buff or a fan of Southern history, you’ll be in heaven! Stay tuned next week for another take on the Civil War, this one also from a woman’s perspective. Laird Hunt’s novel Neverhome features an Indiana woman who disguises herself as a soldier and fights for the Union Army. Listen now as I read Mary Boykin Chesnut’s diary entries from April 1861. These excerpts – which describe the beginning of the Civil War when the Confederates fired on Fort Sumter in South Carolina – are taken from Mary Chesnut’s Civil War (edited by C. Vann Woodward and published in 1981). --- April 12, 1861. Anderson will not capitulate. --- Yesterday was the merriest, maddest dinner we have had yet. Men were more audaciously wise and witty. We had an unspoken foreboding it was to be our last pleasant meeting. Mr. Miles dined with us today. Mrs. Henry King rushed in: “The news, I come for the latest news – all of the men of the King family are on the island” – of which fact she seemed proud. While she was here, our peace negotiator – or envoy – came in. That is, Mr. Chesnut returned – his interview with Colonel Anderson had been deeply interesting – but was not inclined to be communicative, wanted his dinner. Felt for Anderson. Had telegraphed to President Davis for instructions. What answer to give Anderson, etc. He has gone back to Fort Sumter, with additional instructions. When they were about to leave the wharf, A.H. Boykin sprang into the boat, in great excitement; thought himself ill-used. A likelihood of fighting – and he to be left behind! --- I do not pretend to go to sleep. How can I? If Anderson does not accept terms – at four – the orders are – he shall be fired upon. I count four – St. Michael chimes. I begin to hope. At half-past four, the heavy booming of a cannon. I sprang out of bed. And on my knees – prostrate – I prayed as I never prayed before. There was a sound of stir all over the house – pattering of feet in the corridor – all seemed hurrying one way. I put on my double gown and a shawl and went, too. It was to the housetop. The shells were bursting. In the dark I heard a man say “waste of ammunition.” I knew my husband was rowing about in a boat somewhere in that dark bay. And that the shells were roofing it over – bursting toward the fort. If Anderson was obstinate – he was to order the forts on our side to open fire. Certainly fire had begun. The regular roar of the cannon – there it was. And who could tell what each volley accomplished of death and destruction. The women were wild, there on the housetop. Prayers from the women and imprecations from the men, and then a shell would light up the scene. Tonight, they say, the forces are to attempt to land. The Harriet Lane had her wheelhouse smashed and put back to sea. --- We watched up there – everybody wondered. Fort Sumter did not fire a shot. --- Today Miles and Manning, colonels now – aides to Beauregard – dined with us. The latter hoped I would keep the peace. I give him only good words, for herwas to be under fire all day and night, in the bay carrying orders, etc. Last night – or this morning truly – up on the housetop I was so weak and weary I sat down on something that looked like a black stool. “Get up, you foolish woman – your dress is on fire,” cried a man. And he put me out. It was a chimney, and the sparks caught my clothes. Susan Preston and Mr. Venable then came up. But my fire had been extinguished before it broke out into a regular blaze. --- Do you know, after all that noise and our tears and prayers, nobody has been hurt. Sound and fury, signifying nothing. A delusion and a snare. Louisa Hamilton comes here now. This is a sort of news center. Jack Hamilton, her handsome young husband, has all the credit of a famous battery which is made of RR iron. Mr. Petigru calls it the boomerang because it throws the balls back the way they came – so Lou Hamilton tells us. She had no children during her first marriage. Hence the value of this lately achieved baby. To divert Louisa from the glories of “the battery,” of which she raves, we asked if the baby could talk yet. “No – not exactly – but he imitates the big gun. When he hears that, he claps his hands and cries ‘Boom boom.’” Her mind is distinctly occupied by three things – Lieutenant Hamilton, whom she calls Randolph, the baby, and “the big gun” – and it refuses to hold more. Pryor of Virginia spoke from the piazza of the Charleston Hotel. I asked what he said, irreverent woman. “Oh, they all say the same thing, but he made great play with that long hair of his, which is always tossing aside.” --- Somebody came in just now and reported Colonel Chesnut asleep on the sofa in General Beauregard’s room. After two such nights he must be so tired as to be able to sleep anywhere. --- Just bade farewell to Langdon Cheves. He is forced to go home, to leave this interesting place. Says he feels like the man who was not killed at Thermopylae. I think he said that unfortunate had to hang himself when he got home for very shame. Maybe fell on his sword, which was a strictly classic way of ending matters. --- I do not wonder at Louisa Hamilton’s baby. We hear nothing, can listen to nothing. Boom, boom, goes the cannon – all the time. The nervous strain is awful, alone in this darkened room. “Richmond and Washington ablaze,” say the papers. Blazing with excitement. Why not? To use these last days’ events seem frightfully great. We were all in that iron balcony. Women – men we only see at a distance now. Stark Means, marching under the piazza at the head of his regiment, held his cap in his hand all the time he was in sight. Mrs. Means leaning over, looking with tearful eyes. “Why did he take his hat off?” said an unknown creature. Mrs. Means stood straight up. “He did that in honor of his mother – he saw me.” She is a proud mother – and at the same time most unhappy. Her lovely daughter Emma is dying in there, before her eyes – consumption. At that moment I am sure Mrs. Means had a spasm of the heart. At least, she looked as I feel sometimes. She took my arm, and we came in. --- April 13, 1861. Nobody hurt, after all. How gay we were last night. Reaction after the dread of all the slaughter we thought those dreadful cannons were making such a noise in doing. Not even a battery the worse for wear. Fort Sumter has been on fire. He has not yet silenced any of our guns. So the aides – still with swords and red sashes by way of uniform – tell us. But the sound of those guns makes regular meals impossible. None of us go to table. But tea trays pervade the corridors, going everywhere. Some of the anxious hearts lie on their beds and moan in solitary misery. Mrs. Wigfall and I solace ourselves with tea in my room. These women have all a satisfying faith. “God is on our side,” they cry. When we are shut in, we (Mrs. Wigfall and I) ask, “Why?” We are told: “Of course He hates the Yankees.” “You’ll think that well of Him.” Not by one word or look can we detect any change in the demeanor of these negro servants. Laurence sits at our door, as sleepy and as respectful and as profoundly indifferent. So are they all. They carry it too far. You could not tell that they hear even the awful row that is going on in the bay, though it is dinning in their ears night and day. And people talk before them as if they were chairs and tables. And they make no sign. Are they stolidly stupid or wiser than we are, silent and strong, biding their time? So tea and toast come. Also came Colonel Manning, A.D.C. – red sash and sword – to announce that he has been under fire and didn’t mind. He said gaily, “It is one of those things – a fellow never knows how he will come out of it until he is tried. Now I know. I am a worthy descendant of my old Irish hero of an ancestor who held the British officer before him as a shield in the Revolution. And backed out of danger gracefully.” Everybody laughs at John Manning’s brag. We talked of St. Valentine’s Eve; or, The Maid of Perth and the drop of the white doe’s blood that sometimes spoiled all. The war steamers are still there, outside the bar. And there were people who thought the Charleston bar “no good” to Charleston. The bar is our silent partner, sleeping partner, and yet in this fray he is doing us yeoman service. April 15, 1861. I did not know that one could live such days of excitement. They called, “Come out – there is a crowd coming.” A mob indeed, but it was headed by Colonels Chesnut and Manning. The crowd was shouting and showing these two as messengers of good news. They were escorted to Beauregard’s headquarters. Fort Sumter had surrendered. Those up on the housetop shouted to us, “The fort is on fire.” That had been the story once or twice before. --- When we had calmed down, Colonel Chesnut, who had taken it all quietly enough – if anything, more unruffled than usual in his serenity – told us how the surrender came about. Wigfall was with them on Morris Island when he saw the fire in the fort, jumped in a little boat and, with his handkerchief as a white flag, rowed over to Fort Sumter. Wigfall went in through a porthole. When Colonel Chesnut arrived shortly after and was received by the regular entrance, Colonel Anderson told him he had need to pick his way warily, for it was all mined. As far as I can make out, the fort surrendered to Wigfall. But it is all confusion. Our flag is flying there. Fire engines have been sent to put out the fire. Everybody tells you half of something and then rushes off to tell something else or to hear the last news. Manning, Wigfall, John Preston, etc., men without limit, beset us at night. In the afternoon, Mrs. Preston, Mrs. Joe Heyward, and I drove round the Battery. We were in an open carriage. What a changed scene. The very liveliest crowd I think I ever saw. Everybody talking at once. All glasses still turned on the grim old fort. Saw William Gilmore Simms, and did not recognize him in his white beard. Trescot is here with his glasses on top of the house. --- Russell, the English reporter for the Times, was there. They took him everywhere. One man got up Thackeray, to converse with him on equal terms. Poor Russell was awfully bored, they say. He only wanted to see the forts, etc., and news that was suitable to make an interesting article. Thackeray was stale news over the water. --- Mrs. Frank Hampton and I went to see the camp of the Richland troops. South Carolina had volunteered to a boy. Professor Venable (The Mathematical) intends to raise a company from among them for the war, a permanent company. This is a grand frolic. No more. For the students, at least. Even the staid and severe-of-aspect Clingman is here. He says Virginia and North Carolina are arming to come to our rescue – for now U.S.A. will swoop down on us. Of that we may be sure. We have burned our ships – we are obliged to go on now. He calls us a poor little hot-headed, headlong, rash, and troublesome sister state. General McQueen is in a rage because we are to send troops to Virginia. There is a frightful yellow flag story. A distinguished potentate and militia power looked out upon the bloody field of battle, happening to stand always under the waving of the hospital flag. To his numerous other titles they now add Y.F. Preston Hampton in all the flush of his youth and beauty, his six feet in stature – and after all, only in his teens – appeared in lemon-colored kid gloves to grace the scene. The camp, in a fit of horseplay, seized him and rubbed them in the mud. He fought manfully but took it all naturally as a good joke. Mrs. Frank Hampton knows already what civil war means. Her brother was in the New York Seventh Regiment, so roughly received in Baltimore. Frank will be in the opposite camp. --- [No date.] Home again. In those last days of my stay in Charleston I did not find time to write a line. And so we took Fort Sumter. We – Mrs. Frank Hampton etc., in the passageway of the Mills House between the reception room and the drawing room. There we held a sofa against all comers. And indeed, all the agreeable people South seemed to have flocked to Charleston at the first gun. That was after we found out that bombarding did not kill anybody. Before that we wept and prayed – and took our tea in groups, in our rooms, away from the haunts of men. Captain Ingraham and his kind took it (Fort Sumter) from the battery with field glasses and figures made with three sticks in the sand to show what ought to be done. Wigfall, Chesnut, Miles, Manning, etc., took it, rowing about in the harbor in small boats, from fort to fort, under the enemies’ guns, bombs bursting in air, etc. And then the boys and men who worked those guns so faithfully at the forts. They took it, too – their way. Old Col. Beaufort Watts told me this story and many more of the jeunesse dorée under fire. They took it easily as they do most things. They had cotton-bag bombproofs at Fort Moultrie, and when Anderson’s shot knocked them about, someone called out, “Cotton is falling.” Down went the kitchen chimney, and loaves of bread flew out. They cheered gaily, “Breadstuffs are rising.” Willie Preston fired the shot which broke Anderson’s flagstaff. Mrs. Hampton, from Columbia, telegraphed him, “Well done, Willie!” She is his grandmother, the wife or widow of General Hampton of the Revolution, and the mildest, sweetest, gentlest of old ladies. It shows how the war is waking us all up.    

Treyf Podcast
07 None Is Too Many

Treyf Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2015 42:49


On this episode: we discuss the institutional Jewish community's response to the ongoing migration crisis, talk about the fight against BDS on Canadian campuses, and try to be more clear about when we're being sarcastic. We reflect on the Jewish left's response to recent repression of BDS Quebec, and debate the ethics of not feeding pets on Yom Kippur. We're then joined by Sozan Savehilaghi to talk about No One Is Illegal's new multimedia project Never Home, as well as Canada's role in the global crisis of migration. Show Notes: https://www.treyfpodcast.com/2015/10/07/on-this-episode-we-discuss-the-institutional/