Podcasts about Benjamin Franklin

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

American polymath and a Founding Father of the United States

  • 1,985PODCASTS
  • 3,134EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 12, 2022LATEST
Benjamin Franklin

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Benjamin Franklin

Show all podcasts related to benjamin franklin

Latest podcast episodes about Benjamin Franklin

REELTalk with Audrey Russo
REELTalk: LTC Allen West of ACRU, LTG Rod Bishop of STARRS, author of The Bodies Of Others Naomi Wolf and Comedian Matt Nagin

REELTalk with Audrey Russo

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 140:47


Joining Audrey for this week's REELTalk - The late great economist Milton Friedman once said: “Inflation is made in Washington because only Washington because only Washington can create money and any other attribution to other groups is wrong. Consumers don't produce it. Producers don't produce it. Oil imports don't produce it. What produces it too much government spending and too much government creation of money and nothing else.” The Democrats clearly went counterintuitive on this when their BBB bill, now the Inflation Reduction Act, was created. Was that intentional? We'll hit this with LTC ALLEN WEST, Exec. Dir. of ACRU! Plus, There's a concerted effort by the Democrat Marxists in our government to weaken and demoralize our Armed Forces and damage our military readiness threaten our national security. Will anyone stop this effort to endanger our lives? We'll discuss this with the Chairman of STARRS, LTG ROD BISHOP! And, George Orwell once wrote: "The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it." the auhor of the new bestseller The Bodies of Others, NAOMI WOLF knows and will share! PLUS, we'll get a little comedic perspective from comedian and author MATT NAGIN! In the words of Benjamin Franklin, "If we do not hang together, we shall surely hang separately." Come hang with us...

CrossPolitic Studios
The Enlightenment In America [Heavy Lifting with Uncle Gary]

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 30:51


Enlightenment influences in early American history were tempered by an understanding that the world was created, as Benjamin Franklin believed, and the ability to reason was inherent in being created in the image of God. Ethics reflect God’s moral attributes such as love, goodness, and kindness. Without God, none of these attributes are rationally possible.

Sharon Says So
166. Ben Franklin: Beyond the Squeaky Clean Reputation

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 27:52 Very Popular


Today, on Sharon Says So, Sharon talks about one of the most famous American historical figures: Benjamin Franklin. The history books are not wrong about the incredible accomplishments Benjamin Franklin made during his lifetime. He was a man with an unparalleled mind and an electric personality. He was a champion of charitable causes and really good at making strategic political connections. But he was also a man who undervalued his family and made some questionable personal life choices. Listen in to find out more. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WABE Tech Cast
Remix: Ken Burns on Ben Franklin, plus fighting election disinformation

WABE Tech Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 32:19


On this episode of WABE Tech Cast remix, we listen back to our conversation with filmmaker Ken Burns about his PBS documentary Benjamin Franklin, including Franklin's contributions to the future of technology and science, and the formation of the United States. Plus, in this mid-term election year, we look at what big tech is doing to fight disinformation. See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Opperman Report
Dr. Feelgood: The Shocking Story of the Doctor Who May Have Changed History by Treating and Drugging JFK, Marilyn, Elvis, and Other Prominen

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 66:58


Dr. Feelgood: The Shocking Story of the Doctor Who May Have Changed History by Treating and Drugging JFK, Marilyn, Elvis, and Other Prominent Figures Doctor Max Jacobson, whom the Secret Service under President John F. Kennedy code-named “Dr. Feelgood,” developed a unique “energy formula” that altered the paths of some of the twentieth century's most iconic figures, including President and Jackie Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, and Elvis. JFK received his first injection (a special mix of “vitamins and hormones,” according to Jacobson) just before his first debate with Vice President Richard Nixon. The shot into JFK's throat not only cured his laryngitis, but also diminished the pain in his back, allowed him to stand up straighter, and invigorated the tired candidate. Kennedy demolished Nixon in that first debate and turned a tide of skepticism about Kennedy into an audience that appreciated his energy and crispness. What JFK didn't know then was that the injections were actually powerful doses of a combination of highly addictive liquid methamphetamine and steroids. Author and researcher Rick Lertzman and New York Times bestselling author Bill Birnes reveal heretofore unpublished material about the mysterious Dr. Feelgood. Through well-researched prose and interviews with celebrities including George Clooney, Jerry Lewis, Yogi Berra, and Sid Caesar, the authors reveal Jacobson's vast influence on events such as the assassination of JFK, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Kennedy-Khrushchev Vienna Summit, the murder of Marilyn Monroe, the filming of the C. B. DeMille classic The Ten Commandments, and the work of many of the great artists of that era. Jacobson destroyed the lives of several famous patients in the entertainment industry and accidentally killed his own wife, Nina, with an overdose of his formula. Skyhorse Publishing, along with our Arcade, Good Books, Sports Publishing, and Yucca imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. Our list includes biographies on well-known historical figures like Benjamin Franklin, Nelson Mandela, and Alexander Graham Bell, as well as villains from history, such as Heinrich Himmler, John Wayne Gacy, and O. J. Simpson. We have also published survivor stories of World War II, memoirs about overcoming adversity, first-hand tales of adventure, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

The Opperman Report'
Dr. Feelgood: The Shocking Story of the Doctor Who May Have Changed History by Treating and Drugging JFK, Marilyn, Elvis, and Other Prominen

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 66:58


Dr. Feelgood: The Shocking Story of the Doctor Who May Have Changed History by Treating and Drugging JFK, Marilyn, Elvis, and Other Prominent Figures Doctor Max Jacobson, whom the Secret Service under President John F. Kennedy code-named “Dr. Feelgood,” developed a unique “energy formula” that altered the paths of some of the twentieth century's most iconic figures, including President and Jackie Kennedy, Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra, and Elvis. JFK received his first injection (a special mix of “vitamins and hormones,” according to Jacobson) just before his first debate with Vice President Richard Nixon. The shot into JFK's throat not only cured his laryngitis, but also diminished the pain in his back, allowed him to stand up straighter, and invigorated the tired candidate. Kennedy demolished Nixon in that first debate and turned a tide of skepticism about Kennedy into an audience that appreciated his energy and crispness. What JFK didn't know then was that the injections were actually powerful doses of a combination of highly addictive liquid methamphetamine and steroids.Author and researcher Rick Lertzman and New York Times bestselling author Bill Birnes reveal heretofore unpublished material about the mysterious Dr. Feelgood. Through well-researched prose and interviews with celebrities including George Clooney, Jerry Lewis, Yogi Berra, and Sid Caesar, the authors reveal Jacobson's vast influence on events such as the assassination of JFK, the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Kennedy-Khrushchev Vienna Summit, the murder of Marilyn Monroe, the filming of the C. B. DeMille classic The Ten Commandments, and the work of many of the great artists of that era. Jacobson destroyed the lives of several famous patients in the entertainment industry and accidentally killed his own wife, Nina, with an overdose of his formula.Skyhorse Publishing, along with our Arcade, Good Books, Sports Publishing, and Yucca imprints, is proud to publish a broad range of biographies, autobiographies, and memoirs. Our list includes biographies on well-known historical figures like Benjamin Franklin, Nelson Mandela, and Alexander Graham Bell, as well as villains from history, such as Heinrich Himmler, John Wayne Gacy, and O. J. Simpson. We have also published survivor stories of World War II, memoirs about overcoming adversity, first-hand tales of adventure, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

The Swyx Mixtape
[Weekend Drop] Coding Career Chat - The Operating System of You

The Swyx Mixtape

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 76:01


Show notes and referenced links: https://twitter.com/swyx/status/1553456558264164356Old talk version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IzK4IxHv3W0Join the Coding Career Community: https://learninpublic.org/Follow for future spaces: https://twitter.com/Coding_CareerTranscript[00:00:00] Chad Stewart: I think we should set up the whole thing first in case, people might be coming off the street and they don't necessarily know exactly about the chapter of the book. I definitely think you should talk a little bit about that first. [00:00:10] swyx: I do opinion introduce it. Yeah. Yeah.[00:00:13] That'd be great. Do you wanna give it a shot? I wanna see what what your take on it is. Oh, okay. Yeah, sure. I'll give it a shot. So, [00:00:20] Chad Stewart: So pretty much the idea. Well, so first of all the, currently the chapter actually is at the end of the book. And a lot of you get a lot of, the, you get a lot of other information before you get to this chapter.[00:00:32] And the kind of idea is that, all that other information is important. It's great. But if you don't necessarily know how to implement. Then, yeah, it's not particularly useful. And so my understanding, you of took the idea of hairs, things that that you could use to start implementing some of these things.[00:00:53] And then one of the things that actually really enjoyed really liked I read over the chapter again, just to to refresh myself, was the idea of not everything to use all the time. You have tactics which you use whenever they come up, then you have strategy. Which you use, like you use a little bit more often.[00:01:13] I don't remember what the third one is, but it is like levels of when you use them principles. Yes. Principles. Thank you. When you use them often. So the chapter resonated with me mostly because of a lot of the things that you were talking about is like habits and like laying the foundation for success.[00:01:30] Part we talked about it in the Mito last week in terms of keeping yourself physically healthy, but just also, it's just generally your habits, both your physical habits, like learning, expanding your knowledge, networking, interacting with people it's just having that foundation laid out so that, leveraging the other topics of the book was is what you call.[00:01:53] It was easier. I know we had that, this kind of discussion about about maybe putting it earlier in the book, but that's the reason why I decided, Hey, maybe this would be the first thing to talk about because this is something that, we talk up in the industry, but not really, yeah. So just wanted to talk about [00:02:11] swyx: anyways. Yeah. That's a great recap. Yeah, that's fantastic recap. Okay. Job done. Thank you everyone. Yeah. Wow. And you didn't even I didn't even tell you I was gonna ask you anyway. I just love hearing about it from other point of view.[00:02:23] But yeah, you can see how it's weird to put it at the front of the buzz. I have to go through and set up all the context first, which is like 39 chapters of random shit. And then but, and then I come in at the end with a really strong chapter. Right. But I think my reflection is like, Imagine you would hand it the golden book of advice.[00:02:42] Like maybe my book is like not the golden book of advice, but maybe someone else's book in book of advice. Can you convert that advice into results and the chances are, is it's no, because it's not really, you're not really lacking for advice. You're really lacking for systems to implement that effectively in your career, in your life.[00:03:03] Right? To actually put things in action and follow through on them. It's not ideas, it's execution, it's not motivation, it's discipline. And so like it's really boring blocking and tackling stuff. But then I felt like if I did not talk then everything I, everything else I talk about is a complete waste because like this that's the real sustainable advantage.[00:03:24] I think for sure, I was very influenced by atomic habits. Like you can have all the fancy trading strategies that you want, but ultimately, your net worth is a trailing indicator of your financial habits. Did you save enough? and, did you did you did you put did you pay down the interest rate on the things that you're supposed to pay down first before chasing the investment in other categories?[00:03:48] And I definitely feel like, when people give high level career advice, they tend to overstep in terms of the high stakes, the very dramatic, the very flashy, the very sexy, or very smart sounding ideas. And there's just the boring, like eat of vegetables, versions of the ideas. Isn't talked about enough when actually it is the predominant.[00:04:08] Thing to get right. So, yeah. Oh, go ahead. Go ahead. Sorry. I cut you off. Oh, no, I see you also join on your personal, so, I'm talking to two CHADS. Oh [00:04:15] Chad Stewart: yeah. One that's a duck and one that's an actual person. Yeah. No, so I would, I, so I do agree with you. But, and I guess it's I try not to say too much about the, on, on like you're delivering the chapter as opposed to the chapter's contents itself.[00:04:30] But like I do agree that, like the thing that everybody's interested in, like you said, the gold as you put it is definitely. The, what you call it the flashy advice, the, this is how you negotiate your salary. These are the technologies that you choose, as opposed to the eat, your vegetables as you call it version is, get up every day and code, get up every day and read tech, tech news, or get up every day and network, specifically the phrase network, where network is just this bland, instruction that you're, that [00:05:02] swyx: everybody gives, know, which network what you supposed to do when people say I'm gonna get up to date end network.[00:05:06] What is that? I [00:05:08] Chad Stewart: have no clue. I just, I say it all the time. And then I sit down and okay, what am I supposed to do? Ha [00:05:15] swyx: oh, but so my version of that right. Is to learn in public. Right? And I know, this, so, like it's weird to come to, to reach out, to let's, here's an unenlightened version of networking, which is.[00:05:26] You're just, you're gonna go out there and you're gonna look for some industry mentor and you're gonna cold email them and say, please, can you be my mentor? Which is an unspecified job of indeterminate length for no money. So good luck. But if you learn the public you're putting your interests out there, you're you progress out there and people can help you with specific dimensions and you can build your network that way by building up assets of value that you exchange for something else.[00:05:50] And I think that's a really positive some way to network and I highly encourage people [00:05:54] Chad Stewart: to do that. Yeah, no, I definitely agree. I definitely agree. And I guess like that's like the going back to the operating system of you is like the more kind of boring part, because that is something that you have to do all the time, it's the grind, right?[00:06:11] Like everybody is trying to tell you to grind, but they don't necessarily tell you. You know why it's important and they don't tell you that it gets boring. Well, I guess it's implied that it gets boring, but, but yeah okay. You know what, I'm just going to say that. I think anyways, you think [00:06:26] swyx: what [00:06:26] Chad Stewart: kind?[00:06:27] Yeah. What do you think? No, I was just like, I just, as I was thinking, I just hit a roadblock in my head and I just like, yeah, no. [00:06:33] swyx: Okay. That's an action cancellation, when you're playing fighting games and you're doing something and you're like, oh, Nope. oh, you on the path I want to go down.[00:06:44] Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. So, there's two things. One is keeping going through the daily grinds having good habits, letting them compound part of that is, your physical body, part of that is your mental. Your mental storage space, so, we talk about sleep.[00:07:00] We talk about building a second brain and then the third section is building a scheduler which is how do you take on multiple tasks and multitask prioritize them and then try not to drop any tasks. I think that's a very foundational skill, I'll talk about that. But the last bit I really which is to keep your kernel alive, which is the process zero, the kernel that, the process that schedules other processes.[00:07:23] And for me or for most developers that is some concept of drive, right. If you lose your drive, you burn out. And I think something that maybe a lot of people don't discuss is yeah, like there's a lot of burnout in the industry and that's of game over You talk about the differences between lasting in this industry five years versus 50 years, like it's basically, do you have a love for programming?[00:07:43] Do you have a reason that you do what you do? And I think I tend to try to remind people that it is not about chasing money. It's not just about chasing money. Money's good. But there, there can also be a higher purpose to the things that we work on. [00:07:56] Chad Stewart: I definitely agree. And I guess of going down the it's not about chasing money, it's not, so I guess my thing is, it's less about, you want to chase the thing that interests you.[00:08:08] You know what I mean? Like I, and I think that's something that like, especially in the industry, we do a really good we do a really good job of telling people that these are the things that are important and pushing up the things that they are interested in, yeah. So say, like for instance, you're just a front end Devrel and you love doing UI UX, but everybody just convinces you that UI UX is not the thing to do by the way.[00:08:33] I'm just picking this because probably because I'm most related to it, not necessarily the situation, but just the anyways. But yeah, like this is your thing, but everybody tells you, oh, you really need to get into the cloud. No something else, right? Like it's backend engineering and you do that and you get good at it, but it's not the thing like that will eventually lead to burnout as well.[00:08:58] Like it's really, at least my understanding of burnout is really when there's like the reward that you're getting for the actions that you're doing, don't match with the rewards that you want. That's probably a bad description of it, but yeah you know what you're getting versus what you actually want.[00:09:18] If those things don't align and they don't align for long enough, then you know, you just don't want to do it anymore. You're not getting properly rewarded. Yeah. For the things that [00:09:27] swyx: you're doing. Yeah. That's that's the burnouts phase. I feel like I had more to share that, but I always like to turn into a discussion, where this is an open discussion.[00:09:36] If people want to raise their hands and talk about, any of these concepts the, from the physical, to like the brain stuff to scheduling and to burnouts, we can always have that open . actually got some feedback from one of my previous spaces that apparently people can't really raise their hands until they're invited.[00:09:52] I'm not sure how this works. [00:09:54] Chad Stewart: Yeah, I'm not necessarily sure. Either. Like usually, so like you have a request button for people that are new to spaces, you have the request button and then that will tell us that you're you want to come up and then we can bring you up and then you can like, raise your hands and stuff like that.[00:10:10] I also want to point out I forgot to, to say this, but we have a link as well for a Slido. So say for instance, you actually do have a question and you don't want to necessarily come on stage. It's you can go to the Slido and just ask your question there and monitoring that. So the link to the Slido, if you notice that there's a tweet at the top of this space, we call it jumbotron.[00:10:34] The tweet has that link to that slack. Ah, there it is. Test [00:10:38] swyx: question anonymous. Yeah, that was me. That was. Oh, you see, [00:10:42] Chad Stewart: it's anonymous. You're supposed to not let anybody know. Oh, right, right, right. [00:10:47] swyx: Okay. Whoop . [00:10:49] Chad Stewart: Yeah. So feel free to do that as well. But yeah, this is this kind of an open ended que even though spaces are ne not necessarily, I guess you have to cultivate that, but yeah, this is a open ended space.[00:11:02] So if you have any questions, feel free to, to jump up and ask them, just ask them however you want. Like even feel free to to tweet at the tweet. [00:11:12] swyx: And I'll monitor that as well. This new chat feature in in Twitter. So we can try that out. Okay. So maybe I'll put it this way. Yeah. One thing.[00:11:21] One thing, one thing I wanted to offer is I think that there's an there's an image that I think you said in your recap resonated with you a lot, which is that we have principles, strategies, and tactics. We talk about the sort of three levels of applications that we offer or that we think about principles are always on.[00:11:40] Chad Stewart: Are you still there? [00:11:41] swyx: I feel like Shawn. Yeah. So strategies are like big apps. You constantly run them. Right. And you always all your datas in them. So you take your time to choose. It's like slack or discord notion of OneNote. F sketch is like a big, bigger decision, but tactics are like utilities.[00:11:55] So they're one off you, you picked them up when you need them and you drop them when you're done. So, and I really one of the big breakthroughs was really. Seeing that it align to your job strategies, align to your career and principles, align to human life. And that's the individual scale at which each of these things operate.[00:12:15] And to me, that was like when I realized that I was like, oh, okay. Each of these things apply on different time scales. And part of the joy of being human is, or having operated, have to operate all these things at once. [00:12:25] Chad Stewart: Yeah. That's really interesting, actually. Never really. I mean, I have thought about it, but not necessarily to that level of, like you said, the utilities are the things that you pick up really quickly and you leverage really quickly.[00:12:38] And then, like it's, I've just never thought about it in that kind of timescale that I thank you. I really appreciate, I'm really happy. [00:12:45] swyx: This is recording. I'm like in general I, I actually feel like there's a lot of things we can steal from computer science to run like the rest of our lives because.[00:12:54] It's and this is not a new thing. And there's a book called that tries to take a stab at this, but I think doesn't go far enough. Like one of the things that I did not end up writing about was how we do hyper parameter tuning for machine learning. And it turns out that there is a perimeter that you can tweak to essentially say how excited you should be by progress.[00:13:21] If you make some progress, how much more aggressive should you be? I think it's the alpha perimeter, but I mean, it doesn't really matter what you call it. If you tune it too high, if you tune it higher, you'll learn faster. Because if you have, if you try something, you have initial bit of success, then you're like, okay, screw it.[00:13:35] I'm gonna do 10 X more, whatever I just did. And then you're like, okay, I have 20 X more success. All I'm gonna put a hundred X more than whatever I just did. And then you find that there's a usually converge on a, some local global minimum. Minimum is a good thing in machine learning. And, but I also find there's some grads in which you can overshoot by being too excited about stuff.[00:13:54] And the fact that you have this result in machine learning that you can apply to normal human learning is actually fascinating. So I, I feel like, basically what I wanna do is take computer science learnings and apply their analogies to life. So I don't know if I lost you there [00:14:09] Chad Stewart: no.[00:14:09] I'm so I'm trying to kind imagine that as well. No, I'm just I'm listening. I'm trying, you know what, I'm not gonna lie. Some of it did go over my head [00:14:17] swyx: but it's very thorough. I feel I need to draw it out, but like at the same time, that's the point of podcasts or Twitter spaces, you can just mouth blog, the stuff that.[00:14:26] You don't dare to write down cuz it's not fully . [00:14:28] Chad Stewart: Right. And then not only that you can kinda get people's opinions on it. So like I would, so my immediate thought is that yeah, you you want to tune that, but I would also say you're not let to necessarily get it perfect. And it's just like about being constantly improving.[00:14:46] Yeah. Or, so you don't want to, you don't want to chase perfection because you chase perfection and you're never gonna get anything done. Whereas it's this is good enough for now. And then when you either have time or when you want to, at some event you decide to make improvements.[00:15:02] Right? Yeah. And the thing is you want to make improvements, but you don't want to make improvement often too much and you don't want to make improvements too little, [00:15:12] swyx: Yeah. So, so we have a principle, right? Good enough is better than best. Stop looking for things that are best because that involves obsessing over benchmarks, carrying what influencers think, keeping up with everything new.[00:15:25] And when you obsess with good enough, you turn from the external facing point of view to the internal painting. Point of view, you focus on what you need done. You focus on what you need, well, and you focus on what you enjoy and once you hit good enough, move on. And I feel like that's a fundamentally healthier with life, I guess.[00:15:41] Yeah. Yeah definitely agree. Question. Oh, so thanks for, so whoever submitted that Slido that is our first submission. So we do have a Slido pinned to the top of the thingy, the space. Yeah. Twitter should just build this instead of building like co tweeting or or like the hot take reaction button or whatever that is which I'm also very.[00:16:03] Kind of miff that I didn't get, but whatever, like it's just real, it's just like a really weird feature. Nobody wants to run that company going on. There's no adults supervision going on in, in that company. So the question is, what are your favorite calendar hacks. Do you have any chats?[00:16:19] Chad Stewart: I don't know, so, okay. I guess, let me think. Man, because my whole calendar strategy is, I don't even know if I wanna call it a hat, but so something that I do is that I will make a calendar event. I don't know if it's a hat, but I'll make a calendar event. And I always make the calendar.[00:16:35] I always make the event also happen like at 8:00 AM in the morning so that, my day starts and it's oh, okay, I have this is the stuff that I want to do today. And then it will tell me obviously when the event is going to actually happen. And so I set an alarm on my phone for that time, but I set it for the, for 10 minutes before, and then I just hit the snooze button.[00:16:56] I don't know if that's helpful, , but like it, I'm just like it. I very rarely miss meetings because of that whole setup, [00:17:01] swyx: yeah know. Yeah. That's super smart. I wanna offer the operating systems analogy, right. Which is amazing. We, for someone like me, I, I never really did an operating systems course, but I just I pulled up, I watched some lectures and I pulled up some texts on that and just read the basic, overview of stuff.[00:17:20] There are scheduling algorithms for processes and it, and one of these I wish I could show an image here. I can't really show an image. So there are three main things that you wanna have, right? You wanna have a single source of truth to store all the queues that you're on the task uses that you're accumulating.[00:17:36] You wanna be able to prioritize, so you need some kind of garbage collection slash planning period. And then you need to batch work. So you reduce context switching. So, the first algorithm. Is basically just process scheduling queues. And I'm just gonna read from this slide. It says process migrates among the queues throughout this slide.[00:17:52] So, I have an image here of what a CPU does to do scheduling or what an operating system does is do scheduling has a ready queue in IO Q and it waits for child execution and it waits for interrupts. And those are. Analogous to the types of things that can come into and out of our operating system and the next task, I think is really interesting.[00:18:11] There most job pool systems have a long term scheduler versus a short term scheduler. So you can, you have a long term storage of jobs. You pop some off into a ready queue for your CPU, which is. To process. And that goes from long term to short term. And once your short term scheduling is done, you put the, put it back into either your exit or if you can't finish it, you put it back into a waiting queue.[00:18:34] That's just such a really good analogy for the stuff that you have to do long-term versus the short term and to manage it really well. There's more than that. There's like other decisions. There's also ways to decide about scheduling. So for example, you can design by requirements, you scheduling criteria, you wanna maximize CPU that utilization and you wanna maximize throughput.[00:18:53] In other words, you wanna maximize, the amount of resources that you're, that you've utilizing, and you wanna maximize the amount of work that you're doing. You wanna minimize turnaround time. You wanna minimize waiting time. You wanna minimize response time. In other words, like when people rely on you, you want to have your operating system work and in such a way that they get response in some kind of minimum as LA.[00:19:12] All of these are just like very reasonable requirements if to design for, but because we don't really design our own operating system, we, the emergent property is that, well, sometimes I take two months to reply to an email cuz , cuz I'm still working on this. But I think having.[00:19:26] Desirable properties and then working backwards, scheduling algorithm is, can really help. There are, there's a whole like library of them. I'm just gonna read some out for people to search there's round, rubbing round Robin scheduling, shortest job, first shortest, remaining time priority scheduling first come first serve.[00:19:46] And then the most complex one, which is multi-level Q scheduling. Those are the in terms of my sort of research. Those are the scheduling algorithms that I researched. I don't know. Does any of those appeal to you? ? [00:19:58] Chad Stewart: It's hard for me because I'm trying to imagine like literally the process, and as you were mentioning, like you have a lot of the kind of images I'm trying to imagine.[00:20:06] A lot of the [00:20:06] swyx: processes it's got for audio only medium. Maybe I'll tweet it out and then I'll attach it to the, I was [00:20:14] Chad Stewart: about to say the same thing. I was about to say the same thing. It's [00:20:16] swyx: just okay. Yeah. No. Go ahead. Go ahead. Yeah. Well, I'm just like, I think like whatever this is we should research the, like scheduling the philosophy of scheduling or the algorithms of scheduling are not limited to CPUs are not limited to operating systems.[00:20:30] Like we could just use them for ourselves. Why don't we use them for ourselves? That seems right.[00:20:38] that seems weird. So, so yeah, I mean, that's my essential assertion and I've been researching this for a while. I've got one more, but if no one, and obviously if anyone has like comments on scheduling systems that work for them you can jump on in. So, you want to work on all these prioritization.[00:20:53] There's a really good article from Sarah ner. It's basically on prioritizing how she works on that. She used to be my boss at nullify. And she says lately I've been working on grouping similar tasks. For example, meetings should happen in succession because it's easier for me to jump from one to another than it is having an hour in between.[00:21:12] I'm more keen to communicate with others on Monday when I'm getting the lay of the land towards the end of the week, my energy is higher. If I'm dedicated to coding, especially if I've allotted uninterrupted time. So essentially what she's telling you is like she's observed herself, what she prefers to do during the week.[00:21:26] And then she's allocated her calendar accordingly. And I saw that I worked with her. I worked for her and Thursday was her. And blocked day to, to work on individual projects. And Monday was the was meeting day. And I definitely think some of 'em are batching actually helps with scheduling because of contact switching and also adapting your own task to whenever you feel like you're most, you're most attuned to finishing them.[00:21:48] So, I thought it was really useful. The article, I think is CSS trick.com/prioritizing still one of the best prioritizing articles I've ever read. I should be tweeting this up, but like, where do I attach it? Do I attach it? [00:21:59] Chad Stewart: So when you tweet something it's weird, when you tweet something, you have to go and then you click the share button in the tweet.[00:22:07] And one of the, one of the options is this. And then you'd be able to put it up in the jumbotron, but it's funny that you mentioned that cuz there is an actual question here that was talking about how do you keep from changing focus too quickly? And I think you did a good job of, of talking about that to be quite honest with you, like act I would even go as far to say that's something that I struggle with even though to be fair.[00:22:33] I'm actually fairly good at context switching, but I never I really think about my week I'm like the furthest I would go is like my day. Like I'll just organize my day in a sense, and I don't necessarily organize my entire week in terms of my level of energy throughout the week.[00:22:52] Oh yeah. It's just always this assumption that my, my level of energy is going to be the same unless an event happens, [00:22:59] swyx: so the most opinionated advice I've been given. So, now that I'm a manager. Is it's weird to have opinions on day of the week. Like what you should do on the day of the week.[00:23:09] It's like they be the same as Friday. Obviously not cuz like Friday, you're like close to weekend. But they're like schedule your one-on-ones earlier in the week because if you need to bump them, you can bump them later and it's still the same week and I'm like, wow, to have such strong opinions on this.[00:23:24] This is is pretty special. So I think that's definitely true. We have Fridays at air by as well. So I think that's, that can be really helpful. And yeah, just scheduling focus time for shipping long projects and then scheduling, scheduling, meeting times together.[00:23:36] I think definitely is very useful for for batching. No, I definitely agree. [00:23:40] Chad Stewart: Oh, sorry. Go ahead. I cut you off. [00:23:42] swyx: Well, calendar there. There's one person saying calendar hacks, right? I think I would be remiss. I didn't mention the ultimate calendar hack. If you do a lot of external. You should use ly.[00:23:52] I uses cow, which is a ly competitor. It's basically the same price, same it's got slightly different features. It's got slightly nicer design and it's by Derek Reimer. Who's a indie hacker. So I just choose this indie hacker that I know compared to a $4 billion giant. But yeah, I think the stigma around can Lee has gone away despite what some venture capitalists mentioned.[00:24:13] And it really saves time scheduling, with the email ping pong of what type available, if you're three times that might work for you, so yeah, that, I guess, as far as hacks go, I think that's a big one. [00:24:23] Chad Stewart: Yeah. I definitely agree. I, which is funny.[00:24:26] I don't even use it as much something I've seriously been contemplating mostly cause I had a lot of people kind reach out, but yeah, I definitely agree with that. So something I also, which I actually struggled with, I would also like kind having just one place to view your entire calendar.[00:24:42] Yeah. So if you have a personal calendar, right. Because you may have a work email, like that is also a big deal as well, just so that, you, don't schedule something when you just simply couldn't see that you had another event, even if it's just like I have two calendars now, one for work and then one for my personal thing, and for whatever reason, it just says busy, doesn't say the actual event, that definitely has been like big [00:25:06] swyx: help as well.[00:25:06] You can tweak that into settings. So yeah, I have it set up so that my personal reflects onto my work and yeah, I try to manage, sometimes I get double booked, which is very annoying, but I mean, it works. I wish Gmail would make it more native. Cuz sometimes I have lesser use emails for business stuff. And sometimes those have calendar events. it starts to break down after a while. yeah. Yeah. Oh, go ahead. Calendar hacks. Well, so there's, there is an app called I think it's k.com. It's a, it's one of those YC sort of superhuman for calendar apps. I haven't personally used it, but if I just wanna mention it, cuz it always is in the mix when someone else is talking about this.[00:25:46] Oh, it looks like they got a corporate notion. Oh, not too long ago. Last last month. Interesting. That is either positive or negative. They didn't mention the price. Interesting. [00:25:57] Chad Stewart: That's like the exact, they do exact same as, I don't know, [00:26:00] swyx: to see it's an IDK, but if they were yeah.[00:26:03] Whatever. Anyway, I think I applaud them for trying. I think there are a lot of people also trying to do AI scheduling for for your calendar. So if you just plug it in, they will try to find the best slots for you and optimize your meetings. I haven't really heard from anyone who's used that positively, but I think there are all these people trying to do time block planning for you.[00:26:21] I tried AKI flow for a while, which is a really good time block planning app. It was just a bit too resource intensive for me. And I've given them that sort of performance feedback. Ah, okay. I wanted to throw before we get off this calendar hacking, cuz that there's been a couple other questions that came in on the Slido before we get off the calendar hacking I wanted to go through what I got from calendar port.[00:26:40] So for those who. County Park's fairly famous. So it, I, first of all, I find this his distribution strategy. Very interesting. He very famously does not use social media. But he just writes really good content and then lets other people on social media tell others about him. So I feel like in doing this on this space, I'm of doing his bidding.[00:26:59] It's weird, but it's just a good idea. So I'm just gonna share it. So, he has a podcast. So counterpoint is the, is a computer science professor, but also an author. He wrote deep work, which a lot of people know him for. And he has a podcast called deep S where he goes a little bit more into the ideas behind his book, by the way, every book should have a podcast.[00:27:17] Every book should have a community because then you can engage more with the ideas. It makes you reading much more worthwhile. That's why I do this unity thing. But anyway, so, he actually imple, he actually came up with a genius implementation of how to get control of your time.[00:27:32] It's I think a lot of the scheduling comments and ideas, especially the stuff that we just said, it's oh yeah. I've read it uncles like these. And I, my life hasn't really materially changed cause I don't really have a game plan to implement them in my life. And so he gave it a, he gave it a shot.[00:27:45] He actually did a Dave Ramsey style list of baby steps. Like a seven step plan to. Get control of your life. And I think this is episode 180 4 for people who want to listen to it. I have it clipped on my own mix tape. If you wanna go to Swyx mix tape, or you can go to his podcast but I'll just give you a preview for those listening of this, because I just thought it was so good.[00:28:08] And I thought it was so well matched. The scheduling analogy that we are setting up for the operating system of you. And I just, I cannot think of anything better because he'll even sequenced it correctly all, so let me just get into it. And then we'll talk about the meta. So the first step outta seven is time block planning, give every minute a job, right?[00:28:23] It's no use piling up task in your to-do list. Because you don't ever have a plan for when you're actually gonna do it. So you're just gonna accumulate a giant back level to-do list. You're gonna feel guilty about yourself, and then you're gonna eventually start over and have a new list because your oldest filled up with too much.[00:28:38] So time block plan is basically saying, use your calendar as your to-do list. I have about this, that I can go back and pin, but I think it just makes a lot of sense. If you don't have a plan for setting aside time to do a thing, then you don't have a plan to do it at all. Great.[00:28:50] So I, yeah, I, which is like super brutal, right? I just I mean, it's a lot of work, but I'll put things like read, article on, in a five minute, 10 minute block on my calendar. And that would actually work. I'm pinning it now to the channel. If for those who have never heard of time block planning he has a book, I think he's called time block planner.com.[00:29:08] If you like to, every productivity influencer eventually sells you. A journal of blank pages, right? Whether it's the bullet journal guy, whether it's like the, the time block planning guy, everyone's like, how can we sell you a book of blank, empty pages and make you pay like 23 bucks for it.[00:29:25] But I think it's, , it's worth it. But this, I mean, it's not really about, obviously it makes more money elsewhere, but I just think it's funny in the evolution of influencers, like eventually you shall grow up to either sell your own burgers. If you're Mr. Beast or you shall sell your own productivity planner.[00:29:40] So, so that's the first part of seven, which is time block planning. I think that is a really good baseline to get into the habit of planning out your day consciously and. Making sure that you have space to do the things that you sign up to do and to drop or schedule elsewhere, and the things that you don't have time to do.[00:29:58] Then the second thing is to set up task boards. I think this is biggest Trello a bunch of boards keep track of every task. And in other words, you need to stop drop, right? Like anytime anyone has any expectations on you or you sign up to do anything needs to go somewhere, needs to go in a trusted place, needs to go somewhere, cross platform that you'll see it and you'll address it.[00:30:15] You won't just leave it hanging. And for him, like one, what the value add for him here was he actually gave suggestions on what passports to have, because I think you can have way too many. And that starts to be really really unmanageable as well. So he has four, he has this week, he has ambiguous, he has major projects and he has waiting to hear back.[00:30:35] And I like, I really liked that last one waiting to hear back, which means let's say I do a task this week. And I'll do it. And usually it depends on someone else. Right? Usually I'm like, I'm sending email and I'm like, all, this is long-term project and I'm done with, it goes off my board. And then let's say the other person drops my task.[00:30:50] I don't have a process to go two months later, I go Hey, wasn't I, well, they're supposed to get an email for this and stuff to gets dropped and doesn't get done. So you move a task once you're done with it to waiting to hear back column if you're relying on someone else. And I think I think that's a really fascinating system that that sets this up.[00:31:06] But you realize like this is the first time you start to intersect between long-term planning and short-term planning. The time block plan is for your individual day and the long the task board is for your, your weak plus minus you. Two to three weeks. And I think that makes a lot of sense.[00:31:20] In other words there, there are a lot of things where you cannot use your calendars, your to-do list, cuz like you don't particularly have a time to do them when so you just set up a task board and then and when you do your weekly planning, that's when you move your task board into your calendar, your daily calendar and you set aside that stuff that you sign up to do that makes just a ton of sense.[00:31:38] I, I, when I looked at this, I was like, oh yeah. I mean, out of all the productivity systems that I've seen, like all them were too complex. I couldn't really keep up with that, but I can do these two steps. The third step is full capture. So for him and this is very much a getting things done GTD which is the.[00:31:56] Manual of the of the productivity industry. It's by David Allen. David Allen is a podcast where he airs the entire audio of his GTD workshops, where people pay thousands dollars to list to it. And I've been of going through it. It's really super long, but his examples are super good and it's all free.[00:32:12] So why not? If you want to, if you wanna, if you're interested in getting things done and who the hell is not interested in getting things done it's such an fantastic name. I wish I thought of it. Third step is full capture it. By the end of every day, every obligation has to be out of your head in a trusted system.[00:32:26] What are your trusted systems? There are three trusted systems that he has. One is your email inbox. Two is your calendar. Three is your task board. It should, nothing should exist in your memory because you, your memory's unreliable and you will forget. And you and so I just think like establishing this as a harder task role, it's just such a good thing, because then you have a clear mind to have your personal life.[00:32:45] To enjoy yourself to do go do whatever, because you can pick it up again when you get back to work, but otherwise, how do you enable work life separation? If you're thinking about work while you're still in the rest of your life, like you need to unload. And it's of like a weird operating system thing where, you know, when you spin down your container or whatever, you wanna save your state.[00:33:03] And I think those trusted systems are super. I'll go through the last four really quickly. Four is your weekly plan. So going from daily to weekly at the beginning of each week, build your plan for the week block time for your critical things and make your daily time block plan.[00:33:15] Five is your strategic plan. So now by by stage four outta seven so let me recap. The four first is time block plan two is set up task boards. Three is full capture. Four is weekly plan. So by stage four, outta seven, you should have your week in order. Like every. You should have a plan for that week.[00:33:31] You should you should be much in a much more productive phase in your life because you, or at least know, what's going on. You're being proactive about your time. Five is your spend setting your vision for your professional life on a court annual basis, five year basis, 10 year, 20 year, 30 or 40 year.[00:33:46] And it then eventually feeds into your weekly plan. So this is much more strategic thinking. Six is automate and eliminate. So this, like he leaves the automation step all the way to the end. So basically saying I will source it to an executive assistant if I want to I will reduce the round of context switching by trying to batch stuff like this is off, we talked about with Sarah ner will say no to things that we've signed up for.[00:34:05] And when I look at the totality of everything I want to do, this just is like priority number seven and add to it. So. Let's just not beat around the Bush. I'm just gonna say no to this. Right. And leaving and stepping away from stuff is the most high leverage thing you can possibly do, because that gives you more time to focus on the things that really matter to you.[00:34:22] And yeah, I mean that, that is so brutal, but it's still clear. And then finally seven out of the seven step he says, go for it. Like basically once you have control of your time, take more ambitious projects at big swings because that's the way to build a fantastic career. So, what do you think the seven step plan?[00:34:37] Chad Stewart: No, that's pretty, so, I alright to be, I was trying to absorb as much of that as possible. Like definitely. What was it for me personally, I have the biggest issue with like I do. I have a lot of things that kind of live in my head and I try to put as much of it as I. In places as possible, but to be quite honest, a lot of it still lives in my head, same, and so definitely that's the thing that resonated with me the most. The second thing to be quite honest also is giving once you have everything, when you see like the priority of things that you have, no, being strong enough to be like, look, this is just not going to get done.[00:35:18] I can't get this done. And to just freeing up your time, because I'm definitely one of those people that will be like, Hey, can you do this? Yes. And I will grit my teeth. Yes. And do it anyway. And I just don't have a lot of time for myself. Like me personally, I'm trying to learn more system design stuff because that's my interest.[00:35:39] And I find that I do a lot of my system design stuff at nine 30 at night when I'm trying to get to bed at 10, you know what I mean? Yeah. And I'm like struggling through it and I, I keep up the habit I'm doing it, but, I don't feel like I'm retaining anything, but at the very least I'm keeping up the habit, like it's, that's wasted in my opinion or potentially right.[00:36:01] Because I don't retain anything. So definitely just I don't have the time to do this, please, [00:36:08] swyx: you're gonna have to figure that out. This is the fine art of making time, which is fantastic. Okay. So yeah. So first of all I, and I had, I got a little bit better about this over the past two years.[00:36:17] So you must have an app in your phone that you can just dump notes to yourself. It's, it must be offline first. It must sink every. And you must trust it kinda completely. Right. So for me, it's my second brain. Which I use obsidian for and sings the GitHub. So I know if I ever lose it, if if anything, any data ever corrupts, I can just go to GitHub.[00:36:37] And I think you can use notion for that. You can use things, you can use apple notes. Doesn't really matter. There's this meme, actually, this week, you saw that meme, right? The apple notes meme. It's the tools for thought people you start on with the low IQ people using apple notes, and then the mid IQ people start using.[00:36:54] I don't know, Rome research and obsidian, the things . And then the really high IQ people just back to using apple notes again. I think that kind of makes sense for sure. Jack Dorsey talks about his to-do list and he keeps it in apple notes. And if that guy can run his life on apple notes, why can't you[00:37:11] So I mean, not that I hold him up to be like the Paragon of, of human being, but you can't deny that he's been successful. Right? Right. He has a don't do and don't list. I feel like I clipped this before, but I'm really gonna have trouble pulling it up because I clipped this a long time ago.[00:37:29] Maybe I'll just Jack Dorsey, maybe I'll oh, no, I don't have that. Jack Dorsey don't list. Yeah, won't do list. Okay. Okay. Yeah. It's just Google Jack Dorsey. Won't do this. He talks about this in 2018. And I just thought he's just fantastic. Oh, here's this here? He says, okay. It's apple notes.[00:37:45] Oh my God. Okay. He says today, do meditate, workout, tweet, aggression, read, write, consider, follow up. Won't do alcohol, just decided on, he just has a list of like stuff that he just won't do. And, it looks like he's so, he's just always every single day, he just wants to not do alcohol.[00:38:04] And I think that's a super useful question. And then for and then he falls, he finishes off his day with daily questions. What truth did I discover? What am I grateful for? And who did I help? I, this reminds me of actually Benjamin Franklin. Like at the end of his day, he would talk about what good I, what good did I do in my day today?[00:38:20] Like how did I benefit humanity? And I think like having that reflection and consciously living towards. Some small set of purposeful goals, like really helps to align yourself. [00:38:30] Chad Stewart: Definitely agree. As you were say, as you were saying, all of that, the first thing that kind of run to me was atomic habits.[00:38:37] And how one of the stories that the author told was James clear. One of the stories that he told was how he had a friend who was trying to lose weight. And one of the questions she would ask herself is what would a healthy person do? And that effectively became the guide the guide for her.[00:38:57] Not necessarily her life, but her weight loss goals is that she would just always ask that question and it made it more of an intrinsic motivator for her. I, I know in the book he has like levels of, I don't know if it's motivation, but it's like where you want.[00:39:11] To get the drive, to push yourself to do habits. And you have things that's you, your ex, when you have an external motivators, like you want money, you want fame or you want something to pull you towards it. And then when you like the, what he's getting at is you should be more intrinsically motivated where it's you want to be pushed by an idea.[00:39:32] And then that idea is the way you think about you both approaching the world in a sense, yeah. So I, that was like the thing that kind of run out to me as you are, as you're going through the list, it's also very interesting that he that Jack Dorsey takes the time to be grateful.[00:39:48] I feel like that's something that we tend to be very forgetful about, is just like a lot of the times where we're in a very privileged position. Like not to say that everybody is in a great position, but we're a lot of times we're in a very privileged position and is just like being grateful for all the things that we already have, while still trying to achieve more.[00:40:07] It's just interesting that he has that. [00:40:10] swyx: Yeah. Have you, have I read you my favorite quote on motivation and intrinsic pharmacists. Okay. Let me attach it to the tweet so that other people can read along. I read this four years ago and it really. Has guided a lot of my career choices as well.[00:40:25] By then, so I've just pined it up for those following along. And it's from Dan Pink's drive and he calls it extrinsic promises, destroy intrinsic motivation. As children, we are driven by our inner desires to learn, to discover to help others. But as we grow, we are programmed by society to need extrinsic motivations.[00:40:43] We take out the trash, we study hard, we work tirelessly, we'll be rewarded with friendly praise, high grades, and good paychecks slowly. We lose more and more of our intrinsic motivation because extrinsic promises destroy intrinsic motivation. And I'm just like, wow. Yeah, like how much do I, not how much do I do anymore?[00:41:01] Or don't do because no, one's paying me to do it. So I don't do it. And and how different is that from kids who are like, yeah, this looks fun. Let's just go do it. Let's just write out, [00:41:10] Chad Stewart: yeah, no, it's, to be honest with you, I would even go as far as to say that The way I do everything is I guess it's chasing that original kind of ideal of this is just something interested in doing, and I'm just like, I'm just trying to put position my life in a place where it's I can get back to maybe not necessarily reacting oh, this is interesting.[00:41:29] I want to attempt this, but I have all of these other things I have to do, I have all of these other responsibilities or just things that I said that I, well, I guess, responsibilities. So I was just trying to getting back to that, but yeah, it's. Yeah, [00:41:43] swyx: definitely. Cool. Cool, cool.[00:41:45] Did we talk about what keeps you, so we're going back to questions on Slido. Let's finish these out. There's three more questions. What keeps you from changing focus too quickly? Do we talk about that? Yes, that was like things we talked about. That's cool. It's cool. If anyone has has follow up questions, obviously feel free to chat.[00:41:59] Let's go with some more can you share some examples of how you specifically implement operating schedule OS scheduling concepts into how you design your week advances task and doing, thank you. Yeah, so, I think we talked a little bit about the planning phase for, if you, so I listened to the manager tools podcast, and I listen to county reports podcast, and mostly you wanna do your planning on.[00:42:20] Monday morning, you only plan a week out. Right. And part of that is going to be determined for you. You have weekly standing meetings, try to have one-on-ones earlier in a week. And then towards the end of the week, try to do what they call a 15, what they call a 15 five writeup, which is essentially sum up the week in 15 minutes so that you yourself or your manager can look back and track like what, your progress and how you think your week ran.[00:42:46] We have a limited amount of these things, and I think it's incumbent upon us to not let every week go by business as usual going feeling three outta five, instead of a four outta five or 505, like you wake up too many times in the same day, in the same week and are not excited about what you're doing, then we need to start changing that.[00:43:02] Right. So I think for me, that. Well, one thing that I'm part in particularly working on right now in terms of operating, scheduling, operating schedule concepts it's very much the queue thing, right? So I tweeted out earlier it's pinned up here on, on the tweet stream, but having those task boards are basically, which are basically task queues is exactly how an operating system would work.[00:43:23] And you need some sort of scheduling algorithm to prioritize them and take them off of task use into your short term task list, which is the linear sequential list of things you're gonna do throughout your day. EV every single one of us has 24 hours. We hopefully work eight, I don't know, eight to 10 hours a day.[00:43:37] And that's all we have, right? So we have to make the most of what we do there. So, the way that we translate task list to our calendar is essentially the scheduling problem. And I think that, the whole analogy of, what is an operating system, but a general. Way to run a bunch of applications and applications generate tasks.[00:43:55] And we're running those tasks on limited hardware. That is that hardware is our bodies is our time. So it's an optimization problem. We study this algorithm extensively in operating systems. It's time to apply it to. Our own time. [00:44:09] Chad Stewart: so I have a quick question. What happens when you have say for instance, I guess an emergency, yeah. A task comes out of nowhere. It needs to get done. I guess now that I'm thinking about as literally, as I was talking about it, I was reminded of one of Greg's tweets that he mentioned [00:44:27] swyx: GGE he's Hungarian [00:44:28] Chad Stewart: GGE. Thank you. Thank you so much. I've had no idea how to pronounce his name. I know GGE yeah.[00:44:33] GGE one of his, [00:44:35] swyx: try his last name. If you wanna challenge. Yeah, I'm good. [00:44:37] Chad Stewart: Nah, I'm not trying to advise myself, [00:44:39] swyx: but yeah. [00:44:40] Chad Stewart: One of, one of his tweets that he mentioned as a, as an engineering manager, which is essentially, everybody comes and says, oh, we need to get this task done right now.[00:44:49] I hold too much into it because I actually still want to ask the question, but like, how do you not, yeah. How do you how have you dealt with the, the reactionary tasks that come? What, how do you, how have you sorted that out? [00:45:02] swyx: Okay. When emergencies happen. Right. First of all I don't know.[00:45:04] I don't feel like I have that many emergencies. So maybe I'm not that experienced. If anyone else has more experience, more advice, please jump in Jay. You're always a good in our sessions. You're always a good source of advice and wisdom. So now feel free to jump in on that one. I think most things are movable.[00:45:23] And if you just tell people in a very reasonable tone Hey, we had this prior commitments, but this other thing came up and here's why I have to drop you. They'll understand. I think the fortunate thing about being in knowledge work is that usually not firm deadline that you cannot move for valid reasons.[00:45:37] I think just having clear communication and knowing what commitments you've made, being able to ping back essentially have a webhook on your commitments and say Hey, like I gotta job you. I, I got this other thing going on. I think that's the fine way to do it. Yeah. I guess [00:45:51] Chad Stewart: it is like you have to have, you also have to have that level of, I don't know, because I feel like I have the opposite effect where it's just Hey, I have something really important I need to do.[00:46:00] And then the person's yeah, I'm the most important thing. Why aren't you doing it? But [00:46:03] swyx: I'll say one. Yeah, sorry. Having slack is really good, right? You don't wanna run a 100% utilization, just like saying any any cloud service, any I don't know, cluster of any data center. It is actually a bad idea to run.[00:46:16] Try to run your your app, your applications, or your server cluster at a hundred percent utilization at base load. You want to have some slack, you wanna maybe run it 60% so that when bikes happen, you have the ability to absorb at least a little bit of emergency workload. So I, I do think that's true.[00:46:32] That's obviously not what you wanna hear as an employer, to have your people slacking around for some time. But I do think if you are a knowledge worker, if you're a creative worker in particular we should work like lions instead of cow. Right. We should sprint. We should hunt. And then we should laser around waiting for the next big hit.[00:46:50] Whereas for cows, you're just constantly grazing. And so we are not factory workers. We're not, we're not on an assembly line. Humans have, hot streaks and cold streaks and hopefully we just have, better hot streaks than we have cold. But I do think that someone on slack is important.[00:47:03] Chad Stewart: So I'm I'm not at derail the entire conversation, but when you said slack, I was literally like, oh wow. Slack the application. I'm sorry. I just had to make that joke. [00:47:13] swyx: but [00:47:13] Jay Massimilano: pretty Kathy Sierra said something. Yeah. Hey, this is Jay [00:47:17] swyx: that similar, right. Let me introduce Jay. Jay is one of the I don't know what he's doing in our community, but like he's one, like by far way more experienced than any one of us in software.[00:47:26] And he's, yeah, he's one of the biggest source of advice. So I'm super happy that you hear man. [00:47:30] Jay Massimilano: Well, yeah I learned a ton from this from the coding career meetup and I'm, I love that it's I've learned a ton, so it's, that is it's. I think it's, I've learned more than what I've said for sure.[00:47:42] So on, on the topic that you're mentioning about that you'll have to be like lions, Kathy Sierra I think it's in somewhere she's published a while ago. She said only in, in the tech industry, you are expected to. So if you're in medicine, you get to practice what you do is called a practice, right?[00:48:02] So you, and even if you do carpentry or anything, there's always throw away work. You practice, you train for a bit and. You do something new, right. But only in our industry, we expect you pick up a new tool and deploy that to production. Like without any gap or without any element for throwing things away.[00:48:19] Right. There is, there's just now we are not allowed or at least it's just been culturally, not common for us to for a company to allow us to experiment and throw things away. If you start with a new tool, it needs to be you have to take it to production. And maybe a lot of her problems are because of not allowing for throwing things away, work away.[00:48:37] Right. But and she says like in medicine, literally what they do is called practice. But not, that's not the case in ours. So there has to be a lot of learning and I think like when you say lions, it's like, You learn, you compress all your learning digested, and then when you're ready to P your, what exactly you're doing and it's, the output is professional.[00:48:58] And at least in real world, when I, the work that I've seen that we have done when we pick on pick up new technologies and so on is it's usually we implement it wrong. The first version that goes out is, and it hurts customers and not right. And it so yeah, when I when I heard the line thought that's what came to me, what Kathy Sierra said, you need to back more.[00:49:20] swyx: Yeah. Is that any is so Kathy Sarah left the tech before I joined. Okay. She was harassed off of the tech. I. Is that a book? How do you come across her work? She she had a hype, [00:49:32] Jay Massimilano: Head rush. I think her [00:49:33] swyx: blog rush head first [00:49:35] Jay Massimilano: head rush. Let [00:49:37] swyx: me look up. She used to write the head first books. That's how I know her.[00:49:40] Yeah, that, that [00:49:41] Jay Massimilano: is she wrote a blog on headrush dot hype ad.com. It was one of the first blogs I read when I bought my computer. So it's not online anymore. [00:49:50] swyx: Typepad no, I found it. I found it. Oh yeah. Head address that Typepad [00:49:53] Jay Massimilano: yeah, that's a it's it's still online. That's great. Yeah, it's, A's a well up information [00:49:58] Chad Stewart: probably should tweet it and so we can [00:50:00] swyx: post it up here as well.[00:50:01] I'm adding into my thread. So if anyone's following along there is pin tweets at the top of this space and I've just been taking notes. Just cuz what, cuz I love show notes. I love giving. Homework[00:50:14] you guys know that, right? That's awesome. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, Kathy, the other thing that, that Kathy is famous for is the fire flower, right? The there's the picture of the Mario this picture, the fire flower. And then there's a picture of fire, Mario. Yeah. And most vendors or most entrepreneurs try to sell the fire flower when actually users wanna be the fire Mario.[00:50:32] Right. [00:50:33] Jay Massimilano: And I don't know I really miss her. She was one of those who mixes, who I think her LA her most recent book was, is called badass. Yeah. And I that's her jam. Like she, she really care thinks about how to deliver something. Like how creating an impact on the person who is consumed who is using work like, and her advice is around.[00:50:54] For creators, how to make impactful work, how to do impactful work. So, and yeah, I think anyone who has, if you have not heard it I'm sure a lot of people here have never heard [00:51:06] swyx: yeah. I mean, it looks like she stopped blogging in 2007. So this is a long while ago. Yeah. [00:51:10] Jay Massimilano: She was she was docked and someone harassed her.[00:51:14] Yeah. Yeah. And she had leave the scene and yeah, I wish we couldn't have her [00:51:19] swyx: back. Yeah same here. But maybe maybe I'll request this from you, Jay. Because you are very familiar with her work. I love a thread of the best of Kathy Sierra, just write that.[00:51:29] Is he still here? He's just dropped out. [00:51:31] Chad Stewart: Twitter spaces being Twitter spaces. [00:51:32] swyx: Oh man. Oh man. I just made a big ass to him and then he dropped out. Ah, I mean the space is recorded, so it you're still hack. I [00:51:44] Jay Massimilano: had a time limit on my iPhone for one hour Twitter.[00:51:46] swyx: Anyway yes. No, so no, I was basically asking you since you're the Kathy Sarah expert. Can you do a best of Kathy Sierra so that other people can benefit? I, yeah, [00:51:55] Jay Massimilano: I will definitely write one. For sure. [00:51:57] swyx: Just do a Twitter thread. Just go here's like top five things you need to read.[00:51:59] Yes. Yeah. Cool. See content idea, right? Yeah. and it's really not that hard. Like people are interested in like superlative, like best of worst off first time, last time whenever. Yeah. There [00:52:11] Jay Massimilano: are other folks who are also close to her maybe than even know her personally Ryan singer, who used to be at base camp.[00:52:15] swyx: Wait, is he no longer at base cap? He's no longer at base after [00:52:18] Jay Massimilano: the a year ago. [00:52:20] swyx: Oh yeah. I thought he was one of those. Okay. Okay. Yeah. [00:52:25] Jay Massimilano: Oh yeah. So he's no longer at base camp. [00:52:26] swyx: Yeah. Yeah. [00:52:27] Jay Massimilano: He also speaks very highly for like in his work. He Heights are. [00:52:33] swyx: Cool. Well, you can do the same. Yeah, sure.[00:52:35] Yeah. Cool. Cool, cool. So, yeah. [00:52:37] Chad Stewart: Yeah, so I actually wanted to ask, I mean, I think this is one of the, one of the last questions was how do you manage emails? Do you have something like K screener or something like that? I guess wanted to point that out there. Oh [00:52:50] swyx: man. Can I just say I paid the $99 for hay and it was very disappointing.[00:52:57] It's supposed to be fast. It's supposed to be like a new invention of email, whatever. And it was so slow. Every key press took like a second to resolve. I don't know what people's experiences were here, but I was in Singapore at the time and it just didn't have Singapore service or something, but it was just unacceptably slow.[00:53:14] But the screening I thought was interesting. I think it's over, maybe over-optimized for screening things out. I used superhu I've just canceled it. Because I think superhuman, the thing about superhuman is fantastic. Local productivity with shortcuts and offline syncing, right? That is what you want for the fastest possible interaction with your email.[00:53:34] And you've got nice scheduling. They've got nice, learning curve as well as they'll rewards you for reaching inbox zero. Something that they suck at, which I need is filters. It's to set up filters to say all these patterns of email, they come in, I want to go tag them here, archive them, delete them, do whatever.[00:53:51] Right. And they haven't implemented that in four years of existence. So I just, I got tired of waiting and paying, $300 a year for this one missing functionality. And I'm going back to Gmail.[00:54:01] Chad Stewart: How oh, so how do you, I guess, how long have you been using Gmail? I guess how long have you been since you've returned to Gmail? Cause I wanted to pick your brain on some of the [00:54:11] swyx: stuff that you do with Gmail now. Oh, I mean, yeah. I mean, well, I never really left, but guess I'm back on Gmail now.[00:54:17] Yeah. Not too long like a few weeks. I've like I've given superhuman a try twice. One once when my employer paid for it and then two on my own. But I, it just I need filters. I need to be able to easily set up filters and everything else. Like I, the keyboard shortcuts you can get in Gmail as well.[00:54:33] Like I used, I didn't co justify like paying 300 something for, slightly faster email. [00:54:37] Chad Stewart: I hear you. I dunno. I feel left off the loop cause I'm just mostly I don't know. I just, I don't know, like more recently I've been getting a ton of like work emails, cause like I get a lot of notifications from GitHub and like it was ridiculously [00:54:53] swyx: no don't get, yeah leave GitHub notifications outside email, just, leave it inside a GitHub and then, check it whenever you're doing code stuff, but otherwise don't, I think those GitHub was the first thing, one of the first notifications streams that turned off I'll say yeah, make extensive of filters.[00:55:08] Snippets are really useful. Like Bigham, like pre baked replies to everything. Instant shows can help a little bit. And that's when you BCC some, you take someone off to BCC and then you promote up the two list. All those things like having memorizing the keyboard shortcuts, like everyone's working on some version of that.[00:55:24] I think there's a, the, there's some former Gmail engineers who spun out and are making their own take on what a better Gmail could look like. I think it's called shortcut. I haven't tried, I haven't like I've, I haven't mentally on my list to try them. Yeah. I mean, like base is fine.[00:55:39] Just use filters wisely use snippets and I think you're use, use the key

REELTalk with Audrey Russo
REELTalk: MG Paul Vallely of Stand Up America, LTG Thomas McInerney, CBNNews Senior Reporter Dale Hurd and Recording Artist Steve Camp

REELTalk with Audrey Russo

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 141:00


Joining Audrey for this week's REELTalk - The United States was built by the family farm. Sure, the Founding Fathers had a bit to do with setting up the national government, but it was the family farm that set up the agricultural infrastructure that has served our country all the way to the present. Then why is the government, who is paid to serve the people, trying to destroy our backbone? We'll hit this and more with CBNNews Senior Reporter DALE HURD! Plus, Truth cannot fail. If we share the Truth, we save a nation. BUT, if we fail to share the Truth with a broken people, we cause that nation to fail. Isn't that what we're now experiencing? We'll hit this with Recording Artist STEVE CAMP! And, Two years of undeniable devastation for Western civilization by the CCP and the WEF in concert. Have we had enough? Are we awake and ready to fight? We'll explore this with Major General PAUL VALLELY! Plus, The Biden regime has done more damage to our Republic and faster, on the inside, than any enemy could accomplish attacking us on the outside. We'll discuss this and more with LT General THOMAS McINERNEY! In the words of Benjamin Franklin, "If we do not hang together, we shall surely hang separately." Come hang with us...

Street Theater- A Conspiracy Theory Podcast
Benjamin Franklin and the Hellfire Club Secret Society

Street Theater- A Conspiracy Theory Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 12:00


Benjamin Franklin and the Secret Society of the Hellfire ClubLet's talk about the bones found beneath one of his properties and whether or not it was connected to the Hellfire Club.References Used for This Video:https://www.fi.edu/blog/declarationhttps://historyhustle.com/the-hellfire-club/https://historyhustle.com/the-hellfire-club/https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/why-was-benjamin-franklins-basement-filled-with-skeletons-524521/https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Join,_or_DieImages from:Getty Imageshttps://www.inc.com/erik-sherman/daylight-savings-time-bug-you-thank-a-benjamin-franklin-prank.htmlhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Join,_or_DieCheck them out and RESPECTFULLY post your comments. #history #secretsocieties #entertainment

Not So Secret Societies
Electricity, Frequencies, Black Boxes & Demonic Entities

Not So Secret Societies

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 72:13 Very Popular


What does it really mean to be star-struck, illuminated, or electrified? Join us in this episode as we uncover the electrifying secrets behind frequencies, lightning, and electricity.  Follow along with us as we connect electricity, energy, 5G, black boxes, and demonic entities.In this episode, we uncover the untaught history behind Benjamin Franklin's infamous kite experiment and discuss what really happened to fellow inventor Nikola Tesla.  Hear Kara's personal tale about the dangerous combination of psychedelics, astral projection, mind-melding, and following unknown frequencies into the spirit world.  In this episode, we crush podcaster, DMT handler, and controlled opposition Joe Rogan.Download our latest live event The Ultimate Crush Couples Edition on our website: notsosecretsocieties.comFind us: notsosecretsocieties.com & @notsosecretsocitiesFind Amy: biblicalguidance.net & Instagram @eyesontheright4.0Find Kara:  KaraMosher.com & Instagram @herecomestroublexo

Ignorant and Uninformed
EpiDose 535- Certainties In Life

Ignorant and Uninformed

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2022 31:05


Death? Taxes? Pain? Suffering? Evil? The heat death of the universe? Man, can you imagine what the back taxes and penalties are on 13,000,000,000 years?!  *** Topic - Nothing is certain but death and taxes - they say - well, Benjamin Franklin, specifically. Did he get that right? What else could be added to the [...]

Out of the Hourglass
Episode 120: Values & Culture ~Excerpts from the Job Site Leadership Training~

Out of the Hourglass

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 26:20


This week we're featuring an excerpt from our Job Site Leadership Workshop - one of the most requested development courses that we offer here at Nolan Consulting Group. Facilitated by NCG Managing Partner Brian Nolan, and Conal Mulreany, Field Supervisor at Nolan Painting & Field Consultant at NCG, this workshop is designed to provide Production Management leaders with the critical awareness of each leg of the Operational Stool: Employee Management, Customer Management & Job Management. This particular excerpt begins with an element that impacts the culture of the field environment - values. Do your employees understand the values of your company - are they living those values in the workplace? The discussion also taps into the power of emotional intelligence. As a leader and manager of people, how do you respond to situations - both positive and negative? Are you aware of the impact your words have? To quote Benjamin Franklin, "Remember not only to say the right thing in the right place at the right time but far more difficult still, to leave unsaid the wrong thing at a tempting moment." Brian and Conal are passionate about this topic, and no matter what industry you are in, this discussion will impact your leadership.

Revolution 250 Podcast
The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin with Gordon S. Wood

Revolution 250 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 36:54


Benjamin Franklin was the most famous American of his day.  But he became famous as a subject of the British Empire, and he believed in the Empire.  How did he become an American?  For our 100th episode, we talk with Gordon Wood, author of The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin,,  and many other books on the Revolutionary era, about this most fascinating and most elusive of the founders.  It is always a pleasure to talk with Gordon Wood,  the Alva Way University Professor and Professor of History emeritus at Brown,   who joined us for our first episode in 2020.

Insightful Principles
IP #113 Top 3 Books Every Entrepreneur Should Read

Insightful Principles

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 14:25


Chapter Titles:00:00-01:18 iTrust Capital (Open A Crypto IRA)01:18-04:45 How To Win Friends & Influence People- Dale Carnegie 04:45-06:04 Buzzsprout (Start a Podcast) 06:04-06:43 Summary of Dale Carnegie Book 06:43-08:45 Quirky (Genius of Breakthrough Innovators Who Changed The World)- Melissa A. Schilling 08:45-09:50 Ledger (Safely Secure Your Crypto Assets) 09:50-11:40 Summary of Quirky 11:40-14:25 Cashflow Quadrant- Robert Kiyosaki In this podcast, Kevin detailed 3 books every entrepreneur should read. How to Win Friends & Influence People by Dale Carnegie shows how to interact with people in business. Entrepreneurship is a people business and if you can learn how to deal with people's emotions and their behavior's, you will be able to tailor your product or service around the best interest of your client. The next book mentioned was Quirky by Melissa A. Schilling. This one explains the remarkable story of the traits, foibles, and genius of breakthrough innovators who changed the world. The stories highlighted were Elon Musk, Nikola Tesla, Steve Jobs, Albert Einstein, Benjamin Franklin, Marie Curie, Thomas Edison, & Dean Kamen. The third book and a notable favorite is the Cash Flow Quadrant by Robert Kiyosaki. The concept of the book is 4 different ways to produce income. Those are an employee, self-employed, business owner, & investor. A majority of the population are employee's & self-employed, they have no leverage. They exchange their time for money. The business owners & investors have leverage. They have a system in place and their money works for them. These books are helpful for setting the foundation when it comes to your entrepreneurial journey!Sponsors:Buzzsprout, the best way to start a podcast!https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1305358Safely secure your crypto with Ledger, the largest crypto hardware wallet! https://shop.ledger.com/?r=aa519baed9caInvest in crypto through a tax advantage retirement account with ITrust Capital!https://itrustcapital.com/referral100?utm_source=partner&utm_medium=youtube&utm_campaign=partner850&oid=10&affid=850Show email & contact info:Email: insightfulprinciples@gmail.comLinkTree: https://linktr.ee/insightfulprinciplesSocial Media:Instagram & TikTok: @insightfulprinciplesTwitter: @insightprinplesLinkedIn: Kevin Jenkins Clubhouse: @kevnjenkins#insightful #principles #books #business #entrepreneur Support the show

Consejo Financiero
Episodio 241 - La felicidad humana no es suerte, se basa en pequeñas cosas que pasan todos los días

Consejo Financiero

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 27:05


La felicidad es quizás el objetivo más perseguido por la raza humana a través de los tiempos. De hecho la felicidad es uno de los más altos ideales incluidos en muchas constituciones del mundo. En ese orden de ideas, ¿cómo podríamos definir la felicidad? Bueno, pues buscando una definición, podríamos decir que la felicidad es una emoción que se produce en una persona cuando llega a un momento de bienestar o ha conseguido ciertos objetivos que le realizan como individuo, aunque cada persona puede tener su propio significado sobre qué significa la felicidad para ella. Sea lo que sea signifique la felicidad para cada uno de nosotros, ésta es algo que se construye día a día, no como producto del azar o un golpe de suerte. Y esto es precisamente lo que Benjamin Franklin trato de expresar cuando dijo: “La felicidad humana generalmente no se logra con grandes golpes de suerte, sino con pequeñas cosas que ocurren todos los días” Bueno, pues he traído este tema al podcast tomando como base esta sabia frase para que analicemos de una parte ¿cuáles son esas cosas que realmente nos hacen felices y como podríamos construirlas a partir de esas pequeñas cosas que ocurren todos los días? ¡Empecemos! Y si quieres ver más contenidos de valor para tus finanzas personales, ve a www.consejofinanciero.com

Sleepy
213 – The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

Sleepy

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 33:02 Very Popular


Zzz. . . doze off to a sleepy reading from "The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin" zzz To be a part of making the show, just go to patreon.com/sleepyradio and donate even a dollar a month, and have your name read in the opening credits of the next show. Thanks zzz

Disney Dunces
National Treasure

Disney Dunces

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 66:42


Hey, did you know that Benjamin Franklin was a known grave robber? It's true. You should look up that letter where he eloquently lists the reasons why old women are far more superior sexually to their younger counterparts. It boils down to them having to try harder because they are no longer beautiful, are super grateful for it, and don't worry about how they look because “as in the dark all cats are grey.” Oh, and their vaginas don't age as fast as their faces because science. Anyway, enjoy these idiots talking about a significantly less interesting Benjamin Franklin for a while. Ya, that's who Nicholas Cage plays, Benjamin Franklin Gates. I just learned that, and now I like this movie even less. It's time to steal the Declaration of Independence, National Treasure!

REELTalk with Audrey Russo
REELTalk: Celebrity Chef Andrew Gruel, Dr. Steven Bucci of the Heritage Foundation and author of A Few Bad Men Major Fred Galvin

REELTalk with Audrey Russo

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 116:25


Joining Audrey for this week's REELTalk - The sign of a leader and an adult is the ability to admit failure and make efforts to correct the damage. That sign is not only absent from the current regime, but they show indifference toward the harm their policies continue to produce against the innocent. We'll discuss this with Dr. STEVEN BUCCI of the Heritage FDN! Plus, As America's small business tries to return to a semblance of normal, is the current government attempting to make that impossible? We'll hit this and more with Celebrity CHEF ANDREW GRUEL! And, Has the Military corrected the failure and betrayal of leadership of which too many in the ranks have been a victim? We'll hit this with author of A Few Bad Men, Major FRED GALVIN! In the words of Benjamin Franklin, "If we do not hang together, we shall surely hang separately." Come hang with us...

Productized
109. Roshan Gupta: from MIT to Google, the importance of storytelling and the future of tech

Productized

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 120:27


In this episode, João was speaking to Roshan Gupta, Group Product Manager at Google. Roshan has an extensive experience in the software industry, having started as Software Engineer and now working in Product for the past 15 years. After graduating from MIT, he has worked in companies like Oracle, Yahoo, Facebook and Google. Besides being a successful PM, Roshan is also a father, a traveller, and a passionate storyteller. Time notes: [0:15] Introduction of Roshan [0:55] The story of moving to Lisbon from the USA, travelling with kids and falling in love with Portugal [5:53] Portuguese tech and startup ecosystem  [8:00] Ambitions and a master plan for the career [12:28] Experience of working in software engineering and lessons learner [16:00] Going back to study after starting the career and different perspectives [18:00] Job at Oracle and difference with the first job experience. [22:40] Evolution of work in a team and involving everyone in the decision making [24:58] Growing the passion for product management while still working on software engineering [29:25] Learning to become a good PM and defining a product manager role [39:00] Dividing time for different roles of product manager [48:28] Balancing being available with managing to do everything there is to do [52:44] What influenced the change of companies and marriage [57:00] The impact of organisational changes on day-to-day work in teams  [01:12:18] Moving from Facebook to Google and learning from Marc Zuckerberg [01:21:30] The most inspiring leader was the first manager at Zaplet   [01:24:00] Built teams as the best achievement of being a product manager and being an umbrella for the team [01:01:53] Landing job at Facebook and doing the homework before approaching them [01:29:50] Dealing with ambiguity and developing comfort around it [01:34:55] The innovation that will come to life that people are not ready to see, fearing innovation and the future of Metaverse  [01:45:05] The best and the worst innovation is the internet  [01:47:30] Importance of networking as a PM  [01:49:50] A skill that no one teaches us is how to frame and create a story as a storyteller [01:50:57] Coffee meeting with historical figures would be with Benjamin Franklin or Leonardo da Vinci  [01:54:45] Recommendations PRODUCTION This podcast was hosted by João Moita from Product Weekend, with sound edited by Miguel Sousa and production help by Productized, André Marquet and Evelina Bogdiun.

GOD: An Autobiography, As Told to a Philosopher - The Podcast, S1
85. Reader And Listener Responses | Series: What's On Your Mind [Part 7]

GOD: An Autobiography, As Told to a Philosopher - The Podcast, S1

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 48:09


Scott and Jerry read comments and responses to God: An Autobiography, As Told To A Philosopher. Jenny, Patricia, and Tamara share their experiences with God, connected in the theme of spiritual living- in openness and connection to God. Is it time for you to share your story and experience with God?Listen to real spiritual experiences and possibly miracles from regular listeners (not theologians, saints, or gurus) who offer profound spiritual teachings through their experiences with God in the relatable drama and setting of everyday life.Share your story; you don't need a reason- a complex problem, a deep insight, suffering, or spiritual experience. Just get quiet, commune with God, and trust your journey's spiritual nudges and whispers.We want to hear from you! Is Carl Sagan only presenting the tip of the iceberg in understanding the world? How would Benjamin Franklin respond to our modern ability to fly from the United States to Paris in hours? What is your story? We want to hear from you! Share your experience: questions@godanautobiography.com Read- God: An Autobiography, As Told To A Philosopher.Listen- Dramatic Adaptation of God: An Autobiography, As Told To A Philosopher____Related Episodes: [Series: What's On Your Mind]  Part 6- 80, Part 5- 76, Part 4- 72, Part 3- 67, Part 2- 63, Part 1- 59Related Content: [Video] Why Did God Pick Me To Talk To?; Does He Have Your Attention Yet?God: An Autobiography | Facebook | Instagram | Twitter | YouTube | 

Because Jitsu Podcast
Safetyism - In a Culture of Comfort

Because Jitsu Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 71:36


Growing up in the easiest, safest and most comfortable society in human history has it's perks. But, as we've seen over the last couple years, the love or need of that safety can quickly lead to a perpetual cycle of trading freedoms for it to people who promise the world. To paraphrase Benjamin Franklin: "Those who are willing to trade freedom for safety deserve neither." ----- Check out the Substack to find companion articles for each episode including this one at the link below! https://thesocialdisorder.substack.com/

New Books in Christian Studies
Thomas S. Kidd, "Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father" (Yale UP, 2017)

New Books in Christian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 63:22


Renowned as a printer, scientist, and diplomat, Benjamin Franklin also published more works on religious topics than any other eighteenth-century American layperson. Born to Boston Puritans, by his teenage years Franklin had abandoned the exclusive Christian faith of his family and embraced deism. But Franklin, as a man of faith, was far more complex than the “thorough deist” who emerges in his autobiography. As Thomas Kidd reveals in Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale University Press, 2018), deist writers influenced Franklin's beliefs, to be sure, but devout Christians in his life kept him tethered to the Calvinist creed of his Puritan upbringing. Thomas Kidd is Research Professor of Church History at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo., and a Senior Research Scholar at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/christian-studies

New Books in Religion
Thomas S. Kidd, "Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father" (Yale UP, 2017)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 63:22


Renowned as a printer, scientist, and diplomat, Benjamin Franklin also published more works on religious topics than any other eighteenth-century American layperson. Born to Boston Puritans, by his teenage years Franklin had abandoned the exclusive Christian faith of his family and embraced deism. But Franklin, as a man of faith, was far more complex than the “thorough deist” who emerges in his autobiography. As Thomas Kidd reveals in Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale University Press, 2018), deist writers influenced Franklin's beliefs, to be sure, but devout Christians in his life kept him tethered to the Calvinist creed of his Puritan upbringing. Thomas Kidd is Research Professor of Church History at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo., and a Senior Research Scholar at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

The 1% Podcast hosted by Shay Dalton
The Expectation Effect: How Your Mindset Can Transform Your Life with David Robson

The 1% Podcast hosted by Shay Dalton

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 69:20


Our guest on today's episode is someone that has undertaken some really interesting and quite unique work, culminating in his latest book ‘The Expectation Effect: How Your Mindset Can Transform Your Life'. David Robson hails from a background in scientific research and writing, but through two very different books he has delved into how expectations and our experiences in life generally are being unconsciously shaped by our brain.    He describes how our own expectations and beliefs – however irrational – influence our health, happiness and our survival. He also speaks about how to revolutionise your thinking and make wiser decisions.   Drawing on the latest behavioral science and historical examples from Socrates to Benjamin Franklin, David demonstrates how we can apply our intelligence more wisely, identify bias and enhance our rationality.

New Books in Intellectual History
Thomas S. Kidd, "Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father" (Yale UP, 2017)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 63:22


Renowned as a printer, scientist, and diplomat, Benjamin Franklin also published more works on religious topics than any other eighteenth-century American layperson. Born to Boston Puritans, by his teenage years Franklin had abandoned the exclusive Christian faith of his family and embraced deism. But Franklin, as a man of faith, was far more complex than the “thorough deist” who emerges in his autobiography. As Thomas Kidd reveals in Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale University Press, 2018), deist writers influenced Franklin's beliefs, to be sure, but devout Christians in his life kept him tethered to the Calvinist creed of his Puritan upbringing. Thomas Kidd is Research Professor of Church History at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo., and a Senior Research Scholar at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
Thomas S. Kidd, "Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father" (Yale UP, 2017)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 63:22


Renowned as a printer, scientist, and diplomat, Benjamin Franklin also published more works on religious topics than any other eighteenth-century American layperson. Born to Boston Puritans, by his teenage years Franklin had abandoned the exclusive Christian faith of his family and embraced deism. But Franklin, as a man of faith, was far more complex than the “thorough deist” who emerges in his autobiography. As Thomas Kidd reveals in Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale University Press, 2018), deist writers influenced Franklin's beliefs, to be sure, but devout Christians in his life kept him tethered to the Calvinist creed of his Puritan upbringing. Thomas Kidd is Research Professor of Church History at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo., and a Senior Research Scholar at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Biography
Thomas S. Kidd, "Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father" (Yale UP, 2017)

New Books in Biography

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 63:22


Renowned as a printer, scientist, and diplomat, Benjamin Franklin also published more works on religious topics than any other eighteenth-century American layperson. Born to Boston Puritans, by his teenage years Franklin had abandoned the exclusive Christian faith of his family and embraced deism. But Franklin, as a man of faith, was far more complex than the “thorough deist” who emerges in his autobiography. As Thomas Kidd reveals in Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale University Press, 2018), deist writers influenced Franklin's beliefs, to be sure, but devout Christians in his life kept him tethered to the Calvinist creed of his Puritan upbringing. Thomas Kidd is Research Professor of Church History at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo., and a Senior Research Scholar at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/biography

New Books in American Studies
Thomas S. Kidd, "Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father" (Yale UP, 2017)

New Books in American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 63:22


Renowned as a printer, scientist, and diplomat, Benjamin Franklin also published more works on religious topics than any other eighteenth-century American layperson. Born to Boston Puritans, by his teenage years Franklin had abandoned the exclusive Christian faith of his family and embraced deism. But Franklin, as a man of faith, was far more complex than the “thorough deist” who emerges in his autobiography. As Thomas Kidd reveals in Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale University Press, 2018), deist writers influenced Franklin's beliefs, to be sure, but devout Christians in his life kept him tethered to the Calvinist creed of his Puritan upbringing. Thomas Kidd is Research Professor of Church History at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo., and a Senior Research Scholar at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/american-studies

New Books in History
Thomas S. Kidd, "Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father" (Yale UP, 2017)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 63:22


Renowned as a printer, scientist, and diplomat, Benjamin Franklin also published more works on religious topics than any other eighteenth-century American layperson. Born to Boston Puritans, by his teenage years Franklin had abandoned the exclusive Christian faith of his family and embraced deism. But Franklin, as a man of faith, was far more complex than the “thorough deist” who emerges in his autobiography. As Thomas Kidd reveals in Benjamin Franklin: The Religious Life of a Founding Father (Yale University Press, 2018), deist writers influenced Franklin's beliefs, to be sure, but devout Christians in his life kept him tethered to the Calvinist creed of his Puritan upbringing. Thomas Kidd is Research Professor of Church History at Midwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Kansas City, Mo., and a Senior Research Scholar at Baylor University's Institute for Studies of Religion. Schneur Zalman Newfield is an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Borough of Manhattan Community College, City University of New York, and the author of Degrees of Separation: Identity Formation While Leaving Ultra-Orthodox Judaism (Temple University Press, 2020). Visit him online at ZalmanNewfield.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Shower Thoughts
HOT Tub HOT Takes: Splish Splash

Shower Thoughts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 51:41


Benjamin Franklin mansplains the theology of support animals and comedians… join us for a chaotic energy episode with guess stars Josh, Zachary, and Jacob.

Echoes of History
Behind the Legends - EP5: Benjamin Franklin

Echoes of History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 18:13


As the only person to have signed the Declaration of Independence in 1776, Treaty of Alliance with France in 1778, Treaty of Paris in 1783, and U.S. Constitution in 1787, Benjamin Franklin remains in history as perhaps the most important Founding Fathers of the United States. And this even though he never ruled, earning him the title of "the only president of the United States who was never president of the United States". But behind the politician lies a great man of science responsible for a variety of inventions, starting with the lighting rod. Texts: Abdelhakim Rezgui, Clément LesaffreHost: Danny WallaceProduction: Axelle Gobert, Clément LesaffreProduction assistant: Aimie FaconnierRecording: Théo AlbaricMixing and editing: Adrien Le Blond, Jimmy BardinInternational coordination: Martin StahlOriginal music: David SpinelliPre-existing music: Music from Assassin's Creed Rogue Original Game Soundtrack / Composed by Elitsa Alexandrova / Published by Ubisoft Music Publishing / Courtesy of Ubisoft MusicIllustration: © Ubisoft Entertainment. All Rights Reserved.Executive producers: Lorenzo Benedetti, Louis Daboussy, Benoit DunaigreUbisoft: Etienne Allonier, Aymar Azaizia, Etienne Bouvier, Leslie Capillon, Julien Fabre, Louis Raynaud, Justine Villeneuve An original Ubisoft series, produced by Paradiso Media If you like this podcast, subscribe and leave us lots of ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐ ! And to share this episode it's easy : https://lnk.to/echoesofhistorySee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Path to Liberty
Benjamin Franklin’s Articles of Confederation

Path to Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 34:28


In July 1775, Benjamin Franklin introduced a formal plan for uniting the colonies - “The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.” He read it to the Second Continental Congress nearly a year before the Declaration of Independence and the first drafts of what became our first constitution, the Articles of Confederation. The post Benjamin Franklin's Articles of Confederation first appeared on Tenth Amendment Center.

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed
The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour: Kevin Slack, Kurt Schlichter, & Christopher Busch

The Ricochet Audio Network Superfeed

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022


TOPICS: Benjamin Franklin as statesman, Kurt Schlichter’s new book, & Willa Cather’s frontier themes Host Scot Bertram talks with Kevin Slack, Associate Professor of Politics at Hillsdale College, to conclude a three-part series on Benjamin Franklin, focusing this time on Franklin as statesman. Kurt Schlichter of Townhall joins us to discuss his new book WE’LL […]

REELTalk with Audrey Russo
REELTalk: Author of The Red Thread Diana West, Major General Paul Vallely of Stand Up America and author and columnist Andrew McCarthy

REELTalk with Audrey Russo

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 117:36


Joining Audrey for this week's REELTalk - ”People attain absolute equality only in the graveyard, and if you want to turn your country into a gigantic graveyard, go ahead, join the socialists.” A quote from Vladimir Bukovsky is a Russian-born human rights activist, a writer, and a neurophysiologist, he is celebrated for his part in the campaign to expose and halt the political abuse of psychiatry in the Soviet Union. He spent a total of 12 years in the psychiatric prison-hospitals, labor camps, and prisons of the Soviet Union. He saw what was coming for us…is it too late to heed his words? We'll discuss the connections to today's situation with author of The Red Thread, DIANA WEST! Plus, Is there a concerted effort underway to undermine our Military and therefore our national security and leave us vulnerable to enemies such as the CCP? We'll get answers with MG PAUL VALLELY of Stand Up America! PLUS, The recent rulings from the SCOTUS are not being received well from the party of lawlessness, aka the Democrat party. Will they finally be forced to respect the US Constitution? We'll discuss this with bestselling author ANDREW McCARTHY! In the words of Benjamin Franklin, "If we do not hang together, we shall surely hang separately." Come hang with us...

The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour
Kevin Slack, Kurt Schlichter, & Christopher Busch

The Radio Free Hillsdale Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 48:10


TOPICS: Benjamin Franklin as statesman, Kurt Schlichter's new book, & Willa Cather's frontier themes Host Scot Bertram talks with Kevin Slack, Associate Professor of Politics at Hillsdale College, to conclude a three-part series on Benjamin Franklin, focusing this time on Franklin as statesman. Kurt Schlichter of Townhall joins us to discuss his new book WE'LL BE BACK: THE FALL AND RISE OF AMERICA. And Christopher Busch, Professor of English at Hillsdale, continues his discussion of American writer Willa Cather, speaking of the frontier themes in her work.

The Thomas Jefferson Hour
#1504 Talking Philadelphia

The Thomas Jefferson Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 53:30 Very Popular


In June, Clay Jenkinson was invited to give an endowed lecture on the humanities at the Library Company of Philadelphia, America's first successful lending library and oldest cultural institution. It was founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin. We discuss that lecture and Alexander von Humboldt, as well as the amazing artifacts Clay saw while in Philadelphia. Mentioned on this episode. Subscribe to the Thomas Jefferson Hour on YouTube. Support the show by joining the 1776 Club or by donating to the Thomas Jefferson Hour, Inc. You can learn more about Clay's cultural tours and retreats at jeffersonhour.com/tours. Check out our merch.  You can find Clay's books on our website, along with a list of his favorite books on Jefferson, Lewis and Clark, and other topics. Thomas Jefferson is interpreted by Clay S. Jenkinson.

2000 Books for Ambitious Entrepreneurs - Author Interviews and Book Summaries
364[Productivity] The Secret to Ben Franklin's Success | The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin

2000 Books for Ambitious Entrepreneurs - Author Interviews and Book Summaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 2:18


How to do 2 days of work in 1 day without working a minute longer than usual (FREE Masterclass): https://2000books.com/super  

Secure Freedom Minute
Will younger Americans ”keep” our republic?

Secure Freedom Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2022 1:00


All other things being equal, we now know the answer to Benjamin Franklin's famous admonition about whether we'll be able to “keep” our constitutional republic. New polling data suggests that, unless something dramatic changes among a generation or two of younger Americans, in due course, we will surrender our sovereignty, freedoms and country to new management. According to a Heartland Institute-Rasmussen survey, a majority of us in the 19-39 age cohort want the United Nations to be responsible for safeguarding our civil rights. That would be the end of the Constitution bequeathed to us by Franklin and the other Founders. Instead of individuals we elect and who are, therefore, supposed to be accountable to us, we would be ruled by foreigners – most of whom, like the Chinese Communist Party, hate freedom. Are you willing to let that happen to America? This is Frank Gaffney.

Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American Revolution
E174: Nancy Rubin Stuart: Benjamin Franklin's Unconventional Marriage to Deborah Read

Dispatches: The Podcast of the Journal of the American Revolution

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 25:58


This week our guest is author Nancy Rubin Stuart. Despite his impressive actions, Benjamin Franklin's public role took a terrible toll on his marriage to Deborah Read. For more information visit www.allthingsliberty.com. 

Journey Church Eva
Freedom, Pt.3

Journey Church Eva

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 75:00


How we became a free nation, and what is needed to stay free. Notes: 2. Show Video: (Senator John Hawley – UC Berkeley law professor Khiara Bridges) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ITYfyB6M4IM o Psalm 33:12 (NKJV) o Psalm 33:12 (AMP) 3. The National Monument to the Forefathers. 4. FAITH 5. “It is impossible to govern the world without God and the Bible.” – George Washington 6. MORALITY 7. LAW 8. EDUCATION 9. “The only foundation for a useful education in a republic is to be laid in religion. Without this there can be no virtue, and without virtue there can be no liberty, and liberty is the object and life of all republican governments.” – Benjamin Rush, Founding Father and signer of the Declaration of Independence 10. LIBERTY 11. “They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety.” – Benjamin Franklin, Founding Father and signer of the Declaration of Independence Need prayer? Send your prayer requests to: journeychurcheva.com/prayer To give to Journey: journeychurcheva.com/give To contact us: life@journeychurcheva.com

REELTalk with Audrey Russo
REELTalk: Exec. Dir. of ACRU LTC Allen West, Congressional Candidates for NY14 Tina Forte and Recording Artist Steve Camp

REELTalk with Audrey Russo

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 123:27


Joining Audrey for this week's REELTalk - Our Border situation is getting worse, if that's even possible. Is it clear now that this was a planned assist by the Biden regime to overrun our nation? We'll hit this and more with LTC ALLEN WEST, Executive Director of American Constitutional Rights Union! Plus, The Democrats, and their communist policies, are making it clear who the best people are for office come November. They had been busy grabbing our most precious rights beginning with the Bill of Rights. Are we paying attention? We'll hit this and more with Congressional Candidate for NY-14 TINA FORTE! And, the unconstitutional ruling that was responsible for the death of almost 70 million Americans has been overturned. Is the fight for life over or has it moved closer to home? We'll discuss this and more with Dove Award nominated Recording Artist STEVE CAMP! In the words of Benjamin Franklin, "If we do not hang together, we shall surely hang separately." Come hang with us...

You Can Mentor
155. Pillars of Mentoring: The Three Levels of Teaching

You Can Mentor

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 43:37


"Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn."  Benjamin Franklin said these words about what it takes to actually impart knowledge on someone.  In mentoring, these words prove true.  These words also point to each of the three levels involved in teaching something to another person: the head, the heart, and the hands.  But what does it mean to teach something at each of these levels?  Zach is back this week with John Barnard from Middleman Ministries to talk through what it looks like to teach your mentee at each of these levels, and why each is important.Reach out to John:john@middleman-ministries.orgCheck out Middleman Ministries:https://www.middleman-ministries.orgPurchase the You Can Mentor book:  You Can Mentor: How to Impact Your Community, Fulfill the Great Commission, and Break Generational Cursesyoucanmentor.com 

Newt's World
Episode 433: Founding Fathers' Week – Benjamin Franklin

Newt's World

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 8, 2022 52:55


The lives of these men are essential to understanding the American form of government and our ideals of liberty. The Founding Fathers all played key roles in the securing of American independence from Great Britain and in the creation of the government of the United States of America. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sal and Chris Present: Hey Babe!
Secret Impractical Jokers PUNISHMENT with Andrew Santino | Sal Vulcano & Chris Distefano Present: Hey Babe! | EP 84

Sal and Chris Present: Hey Babe!

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 63:13 Very Popular


Hey Babe! is a podcast where comedians Chris Distefano and Sal Vulcano share stories and have fun. Let your hair down & come hang out with the BABES! This week the babes are LIVE FROM JOEY ROSES!!! They are joined by comedian  @Andrew Santino  from  @Bad Friends  Shout out Hotels Tonight! Booking hotels day of is freedom. Sal has a nightmare experience at a hotel on the road. Chris loves going on impulsive trips with no plans. Pack a book bag and GO BABES! Is over planning a bad thing? Sal talks a bout a brutal punishment they can never get on air for Impractical Jokers. Shout out Megabus! Are you pro or anti vestibule? Benjamin Franklin woulda got MURKED on Shark Tank. Clean versions of music on radio STINK. A man saves his own father after a heart attack. Chris got pulled over for driving crazy. Andrew talks about his friendship with Patrick Mahomes II. Andrew has been going on adventures around the world! Peaches used to mean something else. Prostate exams are LIT FAM. Bobby Lee walked out of the new Jurassic Park movie. Top Guns secret message. HEY BABE! Support the sponsors to support the show shipstation.com code heybabe blenderseyewear.com code heybabevip betterhelp.com/heybabe butcherbox.com/heybabe code heybabe Follow The Show! Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/heybabepod/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/heybabepod Support the sponsors to support the show https://linktr.ee/Nopreshnetwork Follow The Show! Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/heybabepod/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/heybabepod Chris Distefano Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/chrisdcomedy/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/chrisdcomedy Website - https://www.chrisdcomedy.com/ Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/user/chrisdcomedy/videos Sal Vulcano Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/salvulcano/ Twitter - https://twitter.com/SalVulcano Website - https://salvulcanocomedy.com/ Our Producer @TheHomelessPimp https://www.instagram.com/thehomelesspimp/ https://twitter.com/homelesspimp?lang=en #Comedy #ChrisDistefano #SalVulcano #HeyBabe #Podcast    

The Lance Wallnau Show
Benjamin Franklin's Invisible Friend

The Lance Wallnau Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 25:27 Very Popular


In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt
The Great American Vaccine Debate (with Ken Burns)

In the Bubble with Andy Slavitt

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 4, 2022 47:22


On this Fourth of July holiday, we're returning to a favorite episode with filmmaker Ken Burns about his latest documentary, “Benjamin Franklin.” When he wasn't busy taming electricity, Franklin was encouraging inoculations to combat the smallpox pandemic of the 18th century. He bitterly regretted not inoculating his 4-year-old son, Francis, who died from smallpox in 1736. Andy talks to Ken about Franklin's role during the outbreak, how he balanced his libertarian views with scientific and public health reasoning, and whether Franklin would support a COVID-19 vaccine mandate if alive today. Keep up with Andy on Twitter @ASlavitt. Follow Ken Burns on Twitter @KenBurns. Joining Lemonada Premium is a great way to support our show and get bonus content. Subscribe today at bit.ly/lemonadapremium.  Support the show by checking out our sponsors! Click this link for a list of current sponsors and discount codes for this show and all Lemonada shows: https://lemonadamedia.com/sponsors/ Check out these resources from today's episode:  Watch Ken Burns' documentary, “Benjamin Franklin”: https://www.pbs.org/kenburns/benjamin-franklin/ Watch this extended scene on inoculation that did not make it into the final film: https://www.pbs.org/kenburns/unum/playlist/innovation#benjamin-franklin-inoculation Order free at-home COVID-19 tests through the USPS: https://special.usps.com/testkits Order Andy's book, “Preventable: The Inside Story of How Leadership Failures, Politics, and Selfishness Doomed the U.S. Coronavirus Response,” here: https://us.macmillan.com/books/9781250770165 Stay up to date with us on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram at @LemonadaMedia.  For additional resources, information, and a transcript of the episode, visit lemonadamedia.com/show/inthebubble. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk
479: David Rubenstein - Interviewing Billionaires, Using Humor To Connect, & The Future Of America

The Learning Leader Show With Ryan Hawk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 59:51 Very Popular


Text Hawk to 66866 to become part of "Mindful Monday." You, along with 10's of thousand of other learning leaders, will receive a carefully curated email from me each Monday morning to help you start your week of right... Full show notes at www.LearningLeader.com Twitter/IG: @RyanHawk12      https://twitter.com/RyanHawk12 Guest: David M. Rubenstein is Co-Founder and Co-Chairman of The Carlyle Group, one of the world's largest and most successful private investment firms. Established in 1987, Carlyle now manages $325 billion from 26 offices around the world. David is the host of The David Rubenstein Show: Peer-to-Peer Conversations on Bloomberg TV and PBS and Bloomberg Wealth with David Rubenstein on Bloomberg TV; and the author of The American Story: Conversations with Master Historians, a book published by Simon & Schuster in 2019, How to Lead: Wisdom from the World's Greatest CEOs, Founders, and Game Changers, a book published in 2020, and The American Experiment: Dialogues on a Dream, a book published in 2021. Notes: How David defines success - “Other people tell you that what you've done is useful. They admire you. And you help people.” David's goals: Don't do anything to get in public trouble Give away the bulk of his money 4 Key Decisions David made that helped him: Going to law school Working in the Carter White House Starting the Carlyle Group Becoming a philanthropist Why The Carlyle Group? "I fell in love with building something from scratch." "Great ideas don't come from people who are busy." Why does David enjoy interviewing leaders? It gives him an opportunity to follow his intellectual curiosity How does he prepare for his interviews? Reads their books Gets help from a research assistant Digests all the material Writes questions Looks for humor opportunities Humor breaks the tension and produces a common bond "John Kennedy had a great sense of humor." David has lent his home in Nantucket to President Biden. Benjamin Franklin said, "it's a republic if you can keep it." Republics are not easy to keep. David had the opportunity to invest in Facebook when Mark Zuckerberg was in college... But he said no. The keys to the Wright Brother's Success -- Tons of books in their house growing up Their inquisitive nature Their passion to prove a point Commonalities of excellent leaders: Vision Determination - must walk the walk Influence others Communication skill Humility Highly ethical Doesn't need all the credit Higher goals than just money “Persist – don't take no for an answer. If you're happy to sit at your desk and not take any risk, you'll be sitting at your desk for the next 20 years.” "What do most people say on their deathbed? They don't say, 'I wish I'd made more money.' What they say is, 'I wish I'd spent more time with my family and done more for society or my community." "Moneymaking was never anything to me. I was happy never making money; I just was happy doing things I liked. But I fell into the money thing. I now don't feel guilty about it, but I am determined to give away the bulk of it and enjoy doing it." "Anybody who gives away money is mostly looking at things where they think they can make a difference. I'm trying to help people who helped me, educational institutions that helped me with scholarships, or organizations that were very useful to me in growing up." "It's clear to me that when you do private equity well, you're making companies more efficient and helping them grow and become more profitable. That success means our investors - such as public pension funds - benefit, which contributes to the economic wealth of society." "I regard food as fuel. I am not a brunch person." Life and Career advice: Find something you enjoy Experiment Read Keep an open mind

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History
332 Experiences of Revolution: Occupied Philadelphia

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 63:03 Very Popular


What was everyday life like during the American War for Independence? In honor of the Fourth of July, we'll investigate answers to this question by exploring the histories of occupied Philadelphia and Yorktown, and how civilians, those left on the home front in both of those places, experienced the war and its armies.  These episodes will allow us to see how the war impacted those who remained at home. They will also allow us to better understand the messy confusion and uncertainty Americans experienced in between the big battles and events of the American Revolution.  This first episode investigates everyday life in British-occupied Philadelphia. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/332 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes Episode 050: Marla Miller, Betsy Ross & The Making of America Episode 149: George Goodwin, Benjamin Franklin in London Episode 175: Daniel Mark Epstein, The Revolution in Ben Franklin's House Episode 208: Nathaniel Philbrick, Turning Points of the American Revolution Episode 245: Celebrating the Fourth Episode 277: Whose Fourth of July? Episode 306: The Horse's Tail: Revolution & Memory in Early New York City Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

StarTalk Radio
A Key & A Kite: StarTalk Live! With Benjamin Franklin

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 64:05 Very Popular


How does lightning work? On this episode, Neil deGrasse Tyson and comic co-host Chuck break down the legendary science and inventions of Benjamin Franklin, live with chief editor of The Benjamin Franklin Papers, Ellen Cohn and Benjamin Franklin himself!NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/a-key-a-kite-startalk-live-with-benjamin-franklin/Thanks to our Patrons Andrew Herron, Bhargava Kandada, and Mark Roop for supporting us this week.Photo Credit: Hansueli Krapf, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons