Podcasts about Central Europe

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Region of Europe

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Central Europe

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Best podcasts about Central Europe

Latest podcast episodes about Central Europe

IDM Podcast
Education Cannot Wait!

IDM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 30:46


When a crisis hits, schools are a safe space for children as a driver for hope and dreams. When the Covid-19 pandemic hit, every school had to introduce remote learning. And when the war hit Europe two years later, Ukrainian students and teachers had to adapt again. In times of war, classrooms remain a place where children find a sense of stability and process trauma. However, disparities have long existed regarding education. Depending on financial status, location and country of residence, not every child has access to schooling equally. How have Ukrainian pupils and teachers been adapting to both the pandemic and the war? Lana Chubakha, an English primary school teacher from Kyiv, shares her experience with Emma Honteberie (IDM). Our guest's recommendation: The Harry Potter novel series by J.K Rowling and the Harry Potter film series. CEE - Central Europe Explained is a podcast series produced by the Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe, powered by Erste Group. Guest: Lana Chubakha, Primary English School Teacher and Founder of the volunteer project Pan Ravlenko. Host: Emma Hontebeyrie, Research Associate IDM Production and editing: Emma Hontebeyrie, Research Associate IDM See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Our Curious Amalgam
#168 Is Antitrust Really Apolitical? Autocracy, Populism, and Antitrust

Our Curious Amalgam

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 35:29


Tumultuous political change, including the rise of populism, has been one of the key trends of the past decade. How do the shifting political winds affect antitrust, the largely technocratic domain some consider to be apolitical? University of Warsaw Professor Maciej Bernatt joins Christina Ma and Sergei Zaslavsky to discuss the interrelationship between rising autocracy and populism in Central Europe (and other parts of the world) and competition policy and enforcement. Listen to this episode to learn how political change in Poland and Hungary has affected the antitrust world, and what lessons antitrust enforcers and practitioners can draw from this experience. With special guest: Maciej Bernatt, University of Warsaw Related Link: Maciej Bernatt's book, Antitrust and Populism (enter the code BERNATT22 at checkout for a 20% discount)  Hosted by: Sergei Zaslavsky and Christina Ma

Good Morning BSS World
#63 Let's talk about BPO in Romania. Let's talk about Valoris

Good Morning BSS World

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 23:47


The BPO World is full of great business destinations and full of great service providers. Today, I take you for the journey to Central Europe, to Romania. In episode 63 of Good Morning BSS World podcast together with my guest – Alexandra Fus, who is an Operations Manager in Valoris – we discuss about Romania as the BPO destination as well as we focus a little bit more on her company.From this episode you will find out what are the most popular cities in Romania, where the BPO centres are located. You will also know what type of BPO services are being run in Romania as well as what foreign languages are used to provide state of the art outsourcing services. If you are interested in global presence of BPO industry, this episode of Good Morning BSS World podcast is for you.Uhh, by the way – if you'd like to get more information about Alexandra, about Valoris or Romania, here are some useful links:Alexandra Fus on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/alexandra-fus-08b79417/Valoris web page - https://valoris.ro/Valoris LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/company/valoris-center/Invest Romania web page - http://investromania.gov.ro/web/****************************My name is Wiktor Doktór and I run Pro Progressio Club https://klub.proprogressio.pl - it's a community of many private companies and public sector organizations that care about the development of business relations in the B2B model. In the Good Morning BSS World podcast, apart from solo episodes, I share interviews with experts and specialists from global BPO/GBS industry.If you want to learn more about me, please visit my social media channels:YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/c/wiktordoktorHere is also link to the English podcasts Playlist - https://bit.ly/GoodMorningBSSWorldPodcastYT LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/wiktordoktor Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/wiktordoktor You can also write to me. My email address is - wiktor.doktor (@) proprogressio.pl****************************This Podcast is supported by Patrons:Marzena Sawicka (https://www.linkedin.com/in/marzena-sawicka-a9644a23/), Przemysław Sławiński (https://www.linkedin.com/in/przemys%C5%82aw-s%C5%82awi%C5%84ski-155a4426/), Damian Ruciński (https://www.linkedin.com/in/damian-ruci%C5%84ski/) Szymon Kryczka (https://www.linkedin.com/in/szymonkryczka/)Grzegorz Ludwin (https://www.linkedin.com/in/gludwin/). You also can join Patrons of Good Morning BSS World. Here are two links to do so:Patronite - https://patronite.pl/wiktordoktor Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/wiktordoktor Or if you liked this episode and would like to buy me virtual coffee, you can use this link https://www.buymeacoffee.com/wiktordoktor - by doing so you support the growth and distribution of this podcast.

Lounging with a Thought
Kafka - Representations & Meanings

Lounging with a Thought

Play Episode Listen Later May 7, 2022 8:57


#TarekOsman, #Kafka Kafka - Representations & Meanings https://tarekosman.com A quick, concise view of what makes Franz Kafka an important voice, not just in the early 20th century, in Central Europe - but beyond that time and place.

IDM Podcast
Envisioning Ukraine's Regional Future

IDM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 26:09


Four days after the Russian invasion of Ukraine, President Volodymyr Zelenskyy signed an official application for EU membership. Fast-tracking the application was discussed in certain circles, however such a procedure does not exist. Facing this impossibility, questions arose regarding the regional future of Ukraine and the recovery of the country after the war will finally end. Which challenges must we consider when it comes to Ukrainian accession to the EU? How can macro-regional strategies such as the EUSDR strengthen short-term perspective for regional future in post-war Ukraine? Sebastian Schäffer (IDM) and Nadija Afanasieva (UIIP), discuss amongst others these questions following their co-written policy paper about the European regional future of Ukraine. Our Policy Paper: A European (Regional) Future for Ukraine, Nadija Afanasieva and Sebastian Schäffer, April 2022. Our guest recommandations: Hey Hey Rise Up, Pink Floyd's and Andriy Khlyvnyuk of Boombox, April 2022. CEE - Central Europe Explained is a podcast series produced by the Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe, powered by Erste Group. Guest: Nadija Afanasieva, Director of the Ukrainian Institute for International Politics (UIIP)Host: Sebastian Schäffer, Managing Director IDM Production and editing: Emma Hontebeyrie, Research Associate IDM See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Hog Sty
It's Just Business Ep 131 - NFL power moves and scraps for the other leagues

The Hog Sty

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 56:09


We start out talking about a series of NFL flexes as it enters Draft Week. This includes expanded PR around the schedule release, Christmas day games and their quest to create headlines 12 months of the year. From there what is left for the other leagues as they battle for the leftovers? We look at the NHL's increased interest in Northern and Central Europe and the Golden State Warriors new production company. We end by holding our noses and look at the latest in Dan Snyder news.

Democracy in Question?
Assessing the 2022 Hungarian Parliamentary Elections

Democracy in Question?

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 28:58


Guests featured in this EpisodeGábor Tóka, Senior Research Fellow in the Vera and Donald Blinken Open Society Archives in Budapest.  A sociologist by training, he has published more than 60 articles on electoral behaviour, public opinion, political parties and democratic consolidation in edited volumes, political science and sociology journals. He is also the author of Post-Communist Party Systems: Competition, Representation, and Inter-Party Cooperation (Cambridge University Press, 1999), and has co-edited The Europeanization of National Polities (Oxford University Press, 2012). GLOSSARYWhat is Fidesz, the Hungarian political party ?(00:1:20 or p.1. in the transcript) Fidesz, by name of Federation of Young Democrats–Hungarian Civic Alliance, is a centre-right Hungarian political party. Fidesz (the Federation of Young Democrats) was founded in 1988 as an anticommunist party that promoted the development of a market economy and European integration.  Initially, membership was restricted to those age 35 and younger, though this restriction was eliminated in 1993. In 1995 the party appended the name Hungarian Civic Party to its shortened form (altered to Hungarian Civic Alliance in 2003). Fidesz had its first notable success in 1990, when candidates associated with a coalition of which Fidesz was a member won mayoralties in a number of cities. In elections to the National Assembly, Fidesz won 22 seats. In 1997 members of a Christian Democratic group that had dissolved joined Fidesz in the National Assembly, enabling the joint group to form the largest bloc. The following year Fidesz became the single largest party in the National Assembly. After some eight years of Socialist rule, Fidesz, capitalizing on Hungary's ongoing economic problems after the country's economic collapse in 2008, swept back into power in the parliamentary elections of April 2010, winning more than two-thirds of the seats. Fidesz and its junior electoral coalition partner, the Christian Democratic People's Party, repeated that feat in 2014 and again in 2018 and 2022, with Orbán returning as prime minister each time. Source:  What is The Visegrad Group? (00:22:12 or p.5 in the transcript) The Visegrad Group (V4) is an informal regional format of cooperation between the four Central European countries: Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary, which are not only linked by neighbourhood and similar geopolitical situation but above all by common history, traditions, culture, and values.The idea behind the Group was to intensify cooperation in building democratic state structures and free market economies and, in the long term, to participate in the process of European integration. The date of its creation is 15 February 1991, when the Presidents of Poland and Czechoslovakia, Lech Wałęsa and Václav Havel, and Prime Minister of Hungary József Antall signed a joint declaration on the objectives and conditions of cooperation in the Hungarian town of Visegrad.Since 2004, all V4 countries have been members of the European Union, and the Visegrad Group provides a forum for exchanging experiences and working out common positions on issues relevant to the future of the region and the EU.In addition to European issues, V4 cooperation focuses primarily on matters concerning Central Europe, exchange of information, and cooperation in culture, science, education and youth exchanges. Priority areas include expanding transport infrastructure and strengthening energy security in the region. Source:  Democracy in Question? is brought to you by:• Central European University: CEU• The Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: AHCD• The Podcast Company: Novel Follow us on social media!• Central European University: @CEU• Albert Hirschman Centre on Democracy in Geneva: @AHDCentreSubscribe to the show. If you enjoyed what you listened to, you can support us by leaving a review and sharing our podcast in your networks! 

Visegrad Insight Podcast
'War Selfies' Continue in Kyiv Amidst Security Concerns

Visegrad Insight Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 34:03


Incumbent President Emmanuel Macron wins a second term, eyes now on the parliamentary elections and its impact on the future of Central Europe. Ruling Slovenian Democratic Party led by PM Janša, conceded and was defeated by Robert Golob and his Freedom Movement. "War selfies" meetings continue in Ukraine. NATO countries meet in Germany to discuss Ukraine's long-term security needs, at the outset of Russia establishing more control on Southern Ukraine. Orban to amend constitution for the 10th time to expand emergency powers. In the second part of the podcast, Petr Čermák, a Researcher at the Charles University in Prague, highlights the upcoming EU Presidency of the Czech Republic and its priorities towards the Western Balkans. This podcast is part of the Visegrad Insight's Western Balkans Futures project that is supported by the International Visegrad Fund. Also participating in the project: Albanian Institute for International Studies (Albania), Belgrade Fund for Political Excellence (Serbia), EUROTHINK – Center for European Strategies (North Macedonia), Institute for Foreign Affairs and Trade (Hungary), Prague Security Studies Institute (Czechia), Slovak Foreign Policy Association (Slovakia). Speakers: Wojciech Przybylski (Editor-in-chief), Miles R. Maftean (Editorial Director), and Tetiana Poliak-Grujić (Project Manager).

Transformation Leaders
Hartmut König (CTO Central Europe bei Adobe) im Gespräch mit René Esteban

Transformation Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 37:33


What's next, Adobe?Adobe Produkte kennt und nutzt vermutlich jeder Mensch, der mit einem Computer arbeitet. Die Produkte sind weltweit im Einsatz, in vermutlich jedem Haushalt, jedem Unternehmen. Also: wie und was kann man hier noch optimieren? Von Hartmut König, Chief Technology Officer Central Europe bei Adobe erfahren wir, wie man den hidden Champion zum Pionier der Digitalisierung entwickelt. Wenn Sie sich schon einmal gefragt haben, wie die Transformation des globalen Vertriebsmodells funktioniert und was dies für Auswirkungen hat – auch, welche Chancen dies zutage fördert: René Esteban erfährt hier von Hartmut, wie die bekannten Produkte von Adobe nun neue Kundengruppen erschließen – und wie man die eigentlich kennenlernt. Was Adobe gemacht hat, das ist der richtig große Wurf. Kundenorientierung, Kommunikation, Change als Chance – die Geschichte einer inspirierenden „Love Brand“!

GROW B2B FASTER
Ep 53: +50% growth as a $1 Billion Company - how does MongoDB pull it off?

GROW B2B FASTER

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 44:29


There's a Reason why MongoDB Manages to Retain Growth of Over 50% as a $1 billion in annualized revenue company in the Tech Market.Oliver Wedell, Regional VP for Central Europe at MongoDB lets Sammy in on the keys to their success in today's GROW B2B FASTER Show.What's in it for you:1. How being an open source company helps MongoDB accelerate growth and sell more2. Why a focus on demand generation in B2B sales is the way to successful sales3. Why direct sales is Mongo DB's main way of winning clients as a B2B tech company4. How MongoDB successfully leverages LinkedIn for their sales pipeline generation5. How MongoDB tackles the challenges of qualifying opportunities by using MEDDICAbout OliverOliver is the regional vice president for Central Europe at MongoDB. He leads the Central Europe sales team and is responsible for MongoDB in Germany. There are about 20 account managers in his organization who take care of the customers in Germany. In his free time he likes running, to enjoy nature and fresh air, alongside to his busy job.About MongoDBMongoDB is the leading modern, general purpose database platform, designed to unleash the power of software and data for developers and the applications they build. Headquartered in New York, MongoDB has more than 33,000 customers in over 100 countries. The MongoDB database platform has been downloaded over 240 million times and there have been more than 1.5 million registrations for MongoDB University courses.About the host SammySammy is a former management consultant and now helps partners and managing directors in the consulting industry drive social marketing & sales via LinkedIn.The goals of his company SAWOO:1. Establish thought leadership2. Build sustainable relationships with decision makers within the target group3. Attract leads and increase salesFeel free to get in touch with Sammy via LinkedIn or email sammy.gebele@sawoo.io if you want to learn more... Shownotes OliverFind Oliver on LinkedIn(https://www.linkedin.com/in/oliverwedell/)Olivers' company MongoDB(https://www.mongodb.com/)Olivers' book recommendations: The Qualified Sales Leader – John McMahon (https://amzn.to/3JfNTsg)The Infinite Game - Simon Sinek (https://amzn.to/35Sl9s3)Olivers' favourite business leaders:John McMahon on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnmcmahon1/)Simon Sinek on LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/in/simonsinek/)

IDM Podcast
Stakeholders or spectators?

IDM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 34:53


Covid-19 has been part of our everyday life for more than 2 years now. Although young people have been less threatened by Covid-19 in terms of physical well-being, they were more likely than older groups to experience financial and housing insecurity, unemployment and mental health problems. Now as states are trying to recover from the pandemic, we want to take a closer look at the role of young people in this process.Are they spectators or stakeholders? Are their needs and voices included in national strategies and policy-making processes? Malwina Talik (IDM) discusses those questions with her guest Milena Stosic from the OSCE Mission to Serbia. Our guest recommandations: The book: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference by Malcolm GladwellThe painting: What Freedom! by Ilya RepinReference(s) mentioned in the program: Research Summary: The Influence of the Covid-19 Pandemic on the Life of Young People in Serbia - KOMSEuropean Council of Foreign Relations: Europe's Invisible DividesEurofound: Impact of Covid-19 on Young People in the EU LinkedIn Group: Fostering more inclusive societies: youth engagement in policies, processes and programmes CEE - Central Europe Explained is a podcast series produced by the Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe, powered by Erste Group. Guest: Milena Stosic from the OSCE Mission to Serbia - once a youth activist and representative, psychologist, #youthmainstreaming pioneer and feminist.Host: Malwina Talik, Research Associate IDM Production and editing: Emma Hontebeyrie, Research Associate IDM See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

History Extra podcast
The Jagiellonians: the dynasty that shaped central Europe

History Extra podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 45:59


Natalia Nowakowska reveals the story of the Jagiellonians – one of the most successful dynasties that many people have never even heard of. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she discusses how they rose from pagan tribal origins in Lithuania to become one of the biggest Catholic dynasties in Europe, with an expansive empire and a legacy that can still be felt today. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Savor
Silence of the Lamb Cakes

Savor

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 30:46


Around Easter, lamb-shaped cakes, candies, and butter sculptures grace tables around Central Europe and beyond. Anney and Lauren dig into the sticky science and history of lamb-shaped treats. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Uncommon Decency
58. Franco-Hungarian Post-Election War Room [BONUS]

Uncommon Decency

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 52:41


In numerous ways, Hungary and France couldn't be more different from one another. Hungary is a landlocked set of hills and plains in south Central Europe, flanked to the North and East by the Carpathian mountain range, and to the West and South by the Drava river. It is a meagre remnant of its former self, having lost two thirds of its territory in the 1920 Trianon Treaty upon losing the First World War. France is a hexagon almost seven times the size, bathed by the Atlantic ocean and the Mediterranean sea. The contrast is even starker in demography than in geography. France is a rapidly aging and growingly childless society, its replacement of successive generations increasingly assured by vast waves of immigration, primarily from south and eastern Europe in the interwar period, and then from former colonies in the the Maghreb and Subsaharan Africa after World War II. Hungarian nationhood, meanwhile, has often dovetailed with descending from the Magyar tribes that first settled into the former Roman province of Pannonia nearly a millennia ago. But for all of their substantial differences, the elections held in these two countries over the past ten days have imparted similar lessons about the challenge of incumbency, the appeal of populism, the impact of international wars and the temptation to shoehorn complex events into readily-baked, cliché narratives. In Hungary, Prime Minister Viktor Orbán campaigned on his sound economic record and on keeping his country out of the Russo-Ukraine war. He was re-elected to serve a fourth consecutive term, his Fidesz party gaining a two thirds supermajority in Parliament. Emmanuel Macron, meanwhile, seems similarly fated for re-election on April 24th after securing a larger gap between his share of the vote and Marine Le Pen's than in the last first-round five years ago. This week, we sit down with our regular US-based co-host Julian Graham to unpack the takeaways from these two races. As always, rate and review Uncommon Decency on Apple Podcasts, and send us your comments or questions at @UnDecencyPod or undecencypod@gmail.com. Please consider supporting the show through Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/undecencypod.

The Business of Esports
216. Office Hours: SK Gaming Hotel Partnership

The Business of Esports

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 4:38


In this episode of Office Hours, with our host William “The Professor” Collis, The Professor discusses SK Gaming partnering with the NH Hotel Group of Central Europe. Also, The Professor revisits Coca-Cola's soft drink for gamers!

Changing Character of War
The Strategies of Small States: Safeguarding Autonomy and Influencing Great Powers

Changing Character of War

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 44:56


Dr Hillary Briffa looks at what characterises small states, their challenges, and the strategies they utilise to overcome these. She argues that small states can very successfully protect their autonomy and security, and exert considerable influence. When major powers clash, or grow more competitive, the historical record shows that small states are the first to be buffeted by the actions of their larger counterparts. Small states do not set the international agenda. This means that if the fears of a breakdown of the rules-based order are well-founded, it will have profound implications for their security. Thus, these actors must look within their own armoury – at the tactics and strategies available to them, within certain bounds – and consider how much leverage they can exert within the context in which they operate. Can small states do anything more than move swiftly to avoid being trampled when elephants collide? This talk will examine the strategies pursued by small states to safeguard their autonomy (including ‘strategic hedging' and ‘seeking shelter'); as well as innovative means of projecting influence (ranging from the harnessing of multilateralism to bind great power behaviour, to serving as ‘smart states' in the international system). Today, increasing antagonism between great powers is already creating serious dilemmas for smaller international actors, and this is likely to intensify in the near future. However, the ability of small states to strategically navigate risk and influence the behaviour of Great Powers means that they can be expected to adapt to these changes. As small states navigate a fading rules-based order, this talk will argue that they have several time-tested strategies in reserve. Dr Hillary Briffa is a Lecturer in National Security Studies and the Assistant Director of the Centre for Defence Studies in the Department of War Studies at King's College London, where she read for her Ph.D, asking whether small states can have a grand strategy. She is also a founding member of the Centre for Grand Strategy at King's, where she serves as the research lead for the Climate Change and International Order portfolio. Previously, she has taught courses across the spectrum of global politics, international relations, defence, foreign policy, security and strategy at the Royal College of Defence Studies, the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, University College London, Birkbeck University of London, and Queen Mary University of London. Beyond academia, she served as Malta's official Youth Ambassador to the Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) for three years, and worked at the Malta High Commission to the UK throughout Malta's tenure as Commonwealth Chair-in-Office. After running peace-building projects in Eastern and Central Europe, in 2015 she was appointed an Associate Fellow of the Royal Commonwealth Society, and in 2016 became a recipient of the U.S. State Department's inaugural Emerging Young Leaders award.

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
2.73 History of the Mongols: Golden Horde #14

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 27:16


  With the devastating invasion of the Emir Temür, better known as Tamerlane, in 1395, the Golden Horde had suffered a grievous wound. Its armies were dealt crushing defeats; its Khan Toqtamish was sent fleeing for his life; and the major cities of the Horde had all been sacked by the Timurids. The Horde was now held together with a  wish and prayer, and in the hands of the powerful lord Edigü. Today in our final episode on the Golden Horde, we take you through its slow breakup in the century after Tamerlane's attack. I'm your host David, and this is Kings and Generals: Ages of Conquest.   We should note that the fall of the Golden Horde was not a single moment or event. 1380, 1395, 1480 or 1502 are not simply switches where the Golden Horde ceased to exist. Rather, it was a centuries long process, with edges of the empire breaking away or being reclaimed, while multiple claimants for power fought each other and sometimes succeeded in reunifying parts or all of the khanates. Rather than a sudden collapse, it was more like waves ebbing to and fro with the tide, and as they withdraw, they pull back a bit further each time, only to in time not return at all.   The Golden Horde of the fifteenth century was a very different beast from the one Öz Beg had ruled in the early fourteenth century. Steadily, though not immediately the cities of the steppe along rivers like the Volga diminished in size and were largely abandoned. Even Sarai, thoroughly sacked by Tamerlane, remained the nominal capital and continued to be fought over for generations. The overland international trade networks which had once so enriched the Jochid khans dried up as the route across Asia became too dangerous, and the merchants who still made the trek were redirected elsewhere. Rounds of bubonic plague still struck on occasion, and with the end of the medieval warm period, the steppe environment itself steadily became less accommodating with colder winters and less productive grasslands. It was not the end to animal husbandry or even agriculture in the steppe, but it was no longer the great, organized system enjoyed by the Jochids in their heyday. Political instability marked the region accordingly; whereas from Batu until the 1360s the Jochid Khans had maintained peace throughout the steppes, now rival claimants raided or invaded each other, at times annually. While Tamerlane did not end the Golden Horde, his attack aggravated and worsened these problems. The ten years of relative peace Toqtamish had overseen as khan had simply not been long enough to recover from the previous two decades of troubles, and now each problem reared its ugly head once more.   After Tamerlane's withdrawal in 1396, he left the state reeling in his wake. Toqtamish Khan had survived, but his armies were broken. Tamerlane had installed a new khan, Quyurchuq, a son of Urus Khan, but Quyurchuq had little authority without Tamerlane's presence. Edigü, a non-Chinggisid lord and leader of the Manghit peoples, quickly maneuvered Quyurchuq Khan out of the way, and installed his own puppet, a distant relation of Toqtamish named Temür Qutlugh. Edigü was a wily figure, a skilled politician and one of the wealthiest, most powerful lords within the Golden Horde. Long had he fought Toqtamish, first alongside Urus Khan, and then alongside Tamerlane. Once Tamerlane began to withdraw from the Horde for the final time, Edigü promptly betrayed him and began gathering his own forces to overthrow Tamerlane's puppet.    Edigü, as a non-Chinggisid, could not claim the title of khan himself. But by making the khans dependent on him for power and military support, Edigü could hold real authority over the realm. As beylerbeyi,  Edigü commanded immense influence among the qarachu families; that is, the non-Chinggisid military elite, those generally bore the title of beğ (pronounced as bey). Every khan that Edigü would enthrone had to confirm Edigü as beylerbeyi, the bey of beys; which Khan Temür Qutlugh promptly did. This gave  Edigü an institution position akin to vizier or commander-in-chief, “advising” the khan to do exactly what  Edigü wished. In turn the khan continued to function in a more ceremonial role and remained official head-of-state, and his name continued to be minted on coinage. No matter how powerful Edigü might be, in the steppes the prestige of Chinggisid rulership was too strong to be cast aside, and attempting to rule in his own right would have presumably resulted in open rebellion against him. Almost two hundred years since Chinggis Khan's death, his spectre still loomed large over Asia.   Edigü and Temür Qutlugh's confirmation took place not a moment too soon, for Toqtamish and his sons were in the midst of collecting forces to retake the khanate. Assisted by the Grand Duke of Lithuania, Vytautas the Great, Toqtamish and his Lithuanian allies invaded the Golden Horde in 1399, only to be defeated but Temür Qutlugh Khan and Edigü at the Vorskla  River in 1399. The battle solidified Edigü's dominance, with Vytautas' army annihilated, many Lithuanian princes killed and both Vytautas and Toqtamish sent fleeing for their lives. Though Toqtamish continued to seek the throne until his death in 1406, it was clear that Edigü was too strong to be ousted so quickly. And lest Temür Qutlugh Khan have grown too haughty after such a victory, he died in unclear circumstances soon after the battle. Edigü then enthroned Temür Qutlugh's brother, Shadi Beğ, as khan.   Under Edigü's stewardship, efforts were made to stabilize the Golden Horde. He retook Khwarezm after Tamerlane's death, often raided the Rus' principalities and laid siege to Moscow in 1408, sparing the city in exchange for a ransom of 3,000 rubles. Some economic recovery is indicated from the restarting of mints in some of the Horde's major cities. A considerable quantity of coinage entered the markets, some of it quite high quality, a sign of Edigü's effort to jump-start the economy. To help legitimize himself in light of his lack of Chinggisid credentials, Edigü made himself the standard bearer of Islamization of the remainder of the nomadic population, continuing the process begun by Özbeg. He went as far as to claim descent from the sufi shaykh  Baba Tükles, a mythical figure who in popular legend had converted Özbeg to Islam. As in turn Baba Tükles was supposed to be descended from the Caliphs, this gave Edigü an ancient, if almost entirely fictitious, pedigree. Still, descent from the successors of Muhammad was useful when portraying oneself as an almighty Muslim monarch and a champion of Islam.    But powerful as Edigü was, his might was not supreme. His puppet khan Shadi Beğ did not enjoy being a puppet and sought to remove Edigü from the scene. Learning of the plot, Edigü routed and chased Shadi Beğ from the Horde. He then enthroned Shadi Beğ's nephew, Bulad, a son of the late Temür Qutlugh. This relationship was likewise fraught; according to the Rus' Nikonian Chronicle, Edigü had to rush to lift his siege of Moscow when he learned that Bulad had grown irate at Edigü. When Bulad died in 1410, Edigü then enthroned Bulad's brother Temür. Khan Temür proved even less amenable to Edigü, for upon becoming khan Temür refused to confirm Edigü as beylerbeyi, the institution which gave Edigü his power. Edigü's supporters abandoned him as Temür sought to capture him, his armies pursuing Edigü to Khwarezm. Nearly was Edigü's life forfeit, until he was saved by an unlikely source; Jalal al-Din, known to the Rus' as the Zeleni Sultan, and a son of the late Toqtamish Khan. Jalal al-Din had aided Duke Vytautas of Lithuania against the Teutonic Order at the famous battle of Grünwald in 1410, and in turn for his support was provided troops to assist him in reclaiming the Horde. While Temür Khan's armies had Edigü under siege in Khwarezm, the khan himself was killed by Jalal al-Din bin Toqtamish. News of it reached Temür Khan's generals, who lost heart and dissipated while Jalal al-Din was enthroned as Khan in Sarai, inadvertently saving Edigü's life.   After years of dreaming for the position and restoring his family to honour, Jalal al-Din Khan had accomplished his greatest desire, and could begin the hunt for Edigü… until he was murdered by his brother, Qibaq, in October 1412.  Another brother, Kerim Berdi, took the throne, while Qibaq, backed by Vyautas of Lithuania, challenged him for it. The only thing which had held these brothers together had been their father and the quest for the throne; with the throne now theirs, they tore themselves apart for it.    The 1410s and 20s went on in this fashion, highly reminiscent of the tumultuous 1360s and 70s. Kerim Berdi killed Qibaq in battle, only for both Edigü and Vytautas to declare new khans. Vytautas had another of Toqtamish's sons, Jabbar Berdi, declared khan in Vilnius, while Edigü chose another Tuqa-Temürid, Chekre. Cherke seized Sarai, only for Jabbar Berdi to kill Kerim Berdi, take Sarai and chase out Edigü's candidate. And that situation lasted until one of Kerim Berdi's sons, Sayyid Ahmad I, was declared khan and threw out Jabbar Berdi. And the pattern continued, with Vytautas and Edigü both declaring new khans immediately upon learning the news. This went on until 1419, when one of the last of Toqtamish's sons, Kadir Berdi, and Edigü himself, were finally killed in battle.   The 1420s proved no better in the aftermath of Edigü's death. A man named Muhammad was enthroned as Khan, but his identity in uncertain, and could possibly be a number of notable Chinggisids who bore the name. In the 1420s the khan in Sarai became just one khan amongst several, and so passed a bewildering number of khans, the order and lengths of the reigns of which are a continuous subject of debate. While more ambitious khans dreamed of reinvigorating the Horde, the borders of the state broke away, with the Timurids, for instance, retaking Khwarezm. The situation stabilized slightly over the 1430s as three main powers emerged; east of the Ural river, Abu'l Khayr Khan, founder of the Uzbek Khanate; Küchük Muhammad Khan, a grandson of Temür Qutlugh, in the Volga steppe, and Sayyid Ahmed II Khan, another Tuqa-Temürid, west of the Don River. Küchük Muhammad's nearly twenty year reign, from 1435-1459, is when scholarship begins to call the state the Great Horde, to distinguish it from its neighbours, the newly emerging successor khanates.        While Küchük Muhammad is usually designated the most ‘legitimate' khan of the Golde Horde, at least in scholarship, each of the competing khans in these years saw themselves as the actual ruler of the Horde. Each tended to demand the Rus' princes pay tribute to them, a source of much confusion and fear for the Rus', who watched closely the political developments. The Rus' were not idle spectators or skillfully playing off the khans, for they spent much of these years locked in their own lengthy civil wars. The Grand Prince, Vasili II Vasilivich, still had to flee his capital due to Mongol attacks, and was even captured by troops of Ulugh Muhammad Khan. Regularly, the Rus' still paid annual tribute to the Khan of the Great Horde.   But even the relatively calm 1430s were no salve for the unity of the Horde, and the fragmentation continued, with both the emergence of more Chinggisid and non-Chinggisid polities. Kazan, in the lands of the Volga Bulghars, became an independent realm under the heirs of Ulugh Muhammad Khan, who had been khan of the Golden Horde until his ouster in 1438. Along the Ural River emerged the Nogai Horde under the sons of Edigü. As Edigü's sons belonged to the Manghit clan, the ruling strata of the Nogai Horde, you will sometimes see this Horde called the Manghit yurt or ulus. North of the Nogais emerged a proper Khanate of Sibir, or Siberian Khanate, ruled by a branch of the Shibanids. In 1459 on the death of Küchük Muhammad, Khan of the Great Horde, he sought to divide the khanate between his sons Mahmud and Ahmad. But Ahmad soon chased out Mahmud, who fled to Hajji Tarkhan, modern Astrakhan at the Volga Delta. Mahmud and his sons turned Astrakhan into their powerbase, and in turn its own independent khanate. In the far east, the newly emerged Uzbek Khanate fell into internal fighting after the death of Abu'l Khayr Khan, which led to a group of young princes breaking off and founding the rival Kazakh Khanate in the 1450s. In 1442, Crimea and the surrounding steppes came under the rule of Sayyid Ahmad II Khan's nephew, Hajji Giray, establishing the Crimean Khanate's long ruling Giray Dynasty. Hajji Giray, and his son Mengli Giray, dedicated their lives to the hatred of the heirs of Küchük Muhammad, whose line monopolized the position of Khans of the ever declining Great Horde. For over twenty years, Hajji Giray fought repeatedly with Küchük Muhammad's son, Ahmad Khan. Ahmad enjoyed few successes; his alliance with Poland against the Crimean Khan brought little help, while the Nogais and other khanates and Hordes bordering him raided his lands, splitting his attention in every direction. His situation was further hampered with the obstinence of the new Grand Prince of the Rus', Ivan III of Moscow.    Ivan III brought Moscow out of its lengthy period of civil war, and renewed the drive to dominate  the other principalities. Like his predecessors, Ivan III had recognized the overlordship of the Khan. But he also recognized the reality of the situation, for he maintained diplomacy with the other emerging khans, particularly the Crimean.  From the 1440s onwards there had been gaps in the deliverance of Rus' tribute to the Horde,  becoming ever more spotty upon Ivan's official ascension in 1462, culminating in 1471 when Ivan ceased the payment of tribute altogether. Ahmad Khan frequently sent messengers to Ivan demanding the resumption of the tribute, or for Ivan to come and reaffirm his submission in person. The ever more frustrated Ahmad Khan, surrounded and beleaguered by powerful rivals, needed this Rus' tribute. His first march on Moscow in 1472 was aborted, and ordered another attack on Ivan in 1480 in cooperation with his Polish ally, King Casimir IV. Ivan III did not back down, and sent his army to repel the khan. The two foes faced off across the Ugra River over the summer and into the autumn of 1480. Khan Ahmad waited in vain for Casimir, who never arrived. Arrows were shot, arquebuses were fired; Ivan worried the river would soon freeze and allow Ahmad free passage, but Ahmad retreated first, downtrodden his ally had failed to show. His son Murteza raided Moscow territory as they withdrew, and Ahmad was murdered the next year.       So ended the Great Stand on the Ugra River, a much overemphasized staring contest. Only centuries later did chronicles see it as an epoch in the independence of the Rus'. It did not directly affect either parties' standing, and to contemporaries was simply another scuffle amidst hundreds. Twenty years later after the Ugra stand, Ivan sent a message to Ahmad's son and successor, Shaykh Ahmad Khan, inquiring about resuming their earlier relationship in the midst of a fierce round of struggle with Lithuania. From 1474 to 1685, Moscow sent annual tributes, under the name of pominki, to the Crimean Khans. But raids and attacks by the khans were no longer as devastating as they had once been, with the expansion of better defensive networks by the Rus', including more stone fortifications and ever-improving firearms technology. Seemingly, the armies of the Khans no longer came with such overwhelming forces, and the chronicles which once spoke of Toqta's brother Duden handily destroying 14 cities across Rus', begin to describe the Rus' repelling or pursuing Tatar raiders. Assaults on cities, such as Ahmad's brother Mahmud Khan's failed siege of Ryazan' in 1460, were beaten back with heavy losses on the part of the attackers. In other cases, the Khans fell prey to other khans; Mahmud's 1465 attack on Rus' was intercepted by an army of the Crimean Khan Hajji Giray, who often allied with Moscow against the Great Horde. The khans of the Horde no longer enjoyed a monopoly on military power. Instead of masters of the steppe, they were now members within a political system, facing off with rivals of comparable power, while their own might had shrunk considerably. The khan could no longer unilaterally oppose his will.        After Ahmad Khan's death in 1481, his sons attempted to act as co-rulers but were soon at each other's throats, further weakening the Great Horde while their rivals grew in might. Shaykh Ahmad bin Ahmad Khan emerged the victor. While he had aspirations of reuniting the Horde, his efforts proved futile. Shaykh Ahmad Khan's reign proved to be one of disaster. His cousin in Astrakhan openly defied him; Ivan III of Moscow allied with Mengli Giray of Crimea against the Great Horde. In an effort to outflank Moscow and Crimea, Shaykh Ahmad sought to restore the military alliance with Lithuania, but no great support ever came of it. Rounds of plague and bad seasons further harmed the Horde's cities, pasture lands and crops; harsh winters and poor grazing resulted in the deaths of thousands of horses almost every year of the 1490s. Famine weakened his forces, destroyed his herds and caused thousands to flee to neighbouring khanates. By the start of the sixteenth century Shaykh Ahmad was desperate, and in winter 1501 he led his underfed and weakened army in one last gamble, seeking to push west of the Dnieper for greener pasture. But he was trapped in a vicious snowstorm, and cut off from the rest of his forces. His demoralized army suffered for months, and began to trickle off to the territory of the Crimean Khan, Mengli Giray. Shaykh Ahmad suffered his own personal losses; already depressed from the failure of the Lithuanians to arrive, Shaykh Ahmad watched the last of his brothers fall ill and die.  As Mengli Giray summoned the entirety of his forces to crush the khan, Shaykh Ahmad's will finally broke when his own wife abandoned him with much of his family and most of his remaining troops— to join Mengli Giray. When Mengli Giray met Ahmad near the Dnieper in June 1502, the Khan of the Great Horde, who in the time of Özbeg was allegedly capable of raising 300,000 men, was caught with a paltry 20,000. Chased from the field, his palace ordu looted, Shaykh Ahmad Khan spent the rest of his life on the run, and spent much of his last twenty years in Lithuania a political prisoner. So, according to traditional scholarship, did the humiliating career of the final Khan of the Great Horde end, and traditionally 1502 serves as the end date for the Golden Horde.       However, in recent decades this view has been challenged. Historians like Leslie Collins have demonstrated thoroughly how after 1502 Mengli Giray dramatically grew in strength and began to style himself as Great Khan of the Great Horde; a claim recognized in diplomacy by his Ottoman overlord, the Rus', the Poles and the Lithuanians. What is now argued is that, to contemporaries, the Great Horde did not end in 1502; the throne was simply taken by another branch of the dynasty, as it had so many times before. Absorbing the remnants of the Great Horde's lands, troops and wealth, the power of the Crimean Khans grew considerably as they expanded eastwards into the former heart of Shaykh Ahmad Khan's realm. By the 1520s under Mengli's son, Mehmed, their influence stretched past the Volga as they put candidates onto the thrones of Kazan and Astrakhan. In a sense, the Horde was briefly reestablished. However, Mehmed was killed by Nogais in 1523, who then raided as far as Crimea, precipitating years of internal fighting for the Crimean throne and leading to the Ottomans taking greater control over the Crimean succession. Meanwhile without a common enemy in the form of the Great Horde the Crimean alliance with Moscow quickly frayed. The Princes of Moscow, now masters of Rus', were eager to gain access to the Volga trade, and take advantage of the weakness of the Volga Khanates, particularly under Ivan IV and his crusade-minded advisers. In 1552 the first khanate, Kazan, fell to Ivan's armies; Astrakhan followed in 1554.  It is Ivan IV, by the way, who is popularly known as Ivan Grozny, or Ivan the Terrible, and who in 1547 took the imperial title of Tsar, a derivation of Latin Caesar. During the dominance of the Golden Horde, Tsar had been the title reserved for the Khans, whereas the Rus' princes were knyaz. What Ivan was signalling, in a way, was that the now the Prince of Moscow had replaced the Jochid khan as master of the Rus'.       The powerful Crimean Khan Devlet I Giray sought to halt Moscow's expansion, with yearly raids and in 1571, even succeeded in capturing and burning down Moscow. This brief victory was followed by a humiliating defeat at Molodni the next year. The Crimean Khans reluctantly ceded control of the former eastern lands of the Golden Horde to Moscow. This last campaign proved to be the final great success of steppe armies over the Rus'. In the following decades, the Russian Tsardom soon stretched deep into Siberia. The continuous warfare of the fourteen and fifteenth centuries, coupled with epidemics and environmental stresses, left for the Russians nothing but depopulated, weakened khanates to pick off one by one; only to the south, in the great steppe, did the Crimean Khans armies stop Russian expansion; an expansion halted, as much as anything, by logistical difficulties in crossing the steppe, and threat of Ottoman support for the Crimean Khanate, rather than any military capability on the part of the Crimeans. Though the Crimean Khanate launched continuous raids on the southern frontier of Muscovy, Lithuania, Poland and assisted the Ottomans in campaigns into Eastern and Central Europe, they were no longer unassailable. Raids sent on Moscow's order, or undertaken by the fiercely Cossack hosts who now roamed the steppes, now penetrated into the Crimean peninsula itself.   Still, they clung on. Over the 1700s the Russian Empire steadily encroached and isolated Crimea, while Ottoman support became ever more tepid. Only in 1783 was the Crimean Khanate finally annexed by Empress Catherine the Great, shortly after the Russians had essentially ended its political independence. The final Crimean Khan, Şahin Giray, was executed a few years later by the Ottomans. When the Kazakh Khanates were finally dissolved by the Russians in the following century, so with them went the last vestiges of the Golden Horde, and the Mongol Empire.        So ends our history of the Golden Horde, and in turn the Mongol Empire. Be sure to turn in next week as we wrap up our series on the Chinggisid empire, and leave you with considerations for the start of our next series, so be sure to subscribe to the Kings and Generals Podcast to follow. If you enjoyed this and would like to help us continue bringing you great content, consider supporting us on patreon at www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. This episode was researched and written by our series historian, Jack Wilson. I'm your host David, and we'll catch you on the next one.

LIVE LOVE CREATE Podcast
Psybient.org Podcast -40- Sunduo - From West to East

LIVE LOVE CREATE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022 106:49


Psybient.org Podcast episode -40- Sunduo - From West to East visit visit @ www.psybient.org and for more episodes @ www.soundcloud.com/gagarinproject/sets/psybient-org-podcast ! Full tracklist, necessary project links and description below

ArchaeoAnimals
Where in the World? Part One: The Zooarchaeology of Europe - Ep 45

ArchaeoAnimals

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 60:18


Welcome to episode one of a miniseries focusing on the zooarchaeology of various world regions. This episode is centred around European zooarchaeology, focusing on the natural history and anatomy of the most prominent wild and domesticated species. Tune in for curious animal introductions, waterfowl collections and musings on Pliny the Elder. Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code ANIMALS. Click this message for more information. For rough transcripts of this episode go to www.archpodnet.com/animals/45 Links Bartosiewicz, L. (2005). Worked elk (Alces alces L. 1758) antler from Central Europe. From Hooves to Horns, from Mollusc to Mammoth—Manufacture and Use of Bone Artefacts from Prehistoric Times to the Present. Tallin: Tallinn Book Printers Ltd, 339-50. O'Regan, H.J. (2018), The presence of the brown bear Ursus arctos in Holocene Britain: a review of the evidence. Mam Rev, 48: 229-244. https://doi.org/10.1111/mam.12127 Pate, F., Henneberg, R., & Henneberg, M. (2016). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope evidence for dietary variability at ancient Pompeii, Italy. Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry, 16(1), 127-133. - Richter, J. (2005). Selective hunting of pine marten, Martes martes, in Late Mesolithic Denmark. Journal of archaeological science, 32(8), 1223-1231. Robinson, M.A., Domestic burnt offerings and sacrifices at Roman and Pre-Roman Pompeii, Italy. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 11, 93-9. (2002) Wigh, B. (1998) Animal bones from the Viking town of Birka, Sweden. In E. Cameron (ed.) Leather and Fur: Aspects of Medieval Trade and Technology, 81–90. London, Archetype Publications Ltd Contact Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed
Where in the World? Part One: The Zooarchaeology of Europe - Animals 45

The Archaeology Podcast Network Feed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 60:18


Welcome to episode one of a miniseries focusing on the zooarchaeology of various world regions. This episode is centred around European zooarchaeology, focusing on the natural history and anatomy of the most prominent wild and domesticated species. Tune in for curious animal introductions, waterfowl collections and musings on Pliny the Elder. Interested in learning about how to use X-Rays and similar technology in archaeology? Check out the linked PaleoImaging course from James Elliot! Connect with James on Twitter: @paleoimaging Start your own podcast with Zencastr and get 30% off your first three months with code ANIMALS. Click this message for more information. For rough transcripts of this episode go to www.archpodnet.com/animals/45 Links Bartosiewicz, L. (2005). Worked elk (Alces alces L. 1758) antler from Central Europe. From Hooves to Horns, from Mollusc to Mammoth—Manufacture and Use of Bone Artefacts from Prehistoric Times to the Present. Tallin: Tallinn Book Printers Ltd, 339-50. O'Regan, H.J. (2018), The presence of the brown bear Ursus arctos in Holocene Britain: a review of the evidence. Mam Rev, 48: 229-244. https://doi.org/10.1111/mam.12127 Pate, F., Henneberg, R., & Henneberg, M. (2016). Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope evidence for dietary variability at ancient Pompeii, Italy. Mediterranean Archaeology and Archaeometry, 16(1), 127-133. - Richter, J. (2005). Selective hunting of pine marten, Martes martes, in Late Mesolithic Denmark. Journal of archaeological science, 32(8), 1223-1231. Robinson, M.A., Domestic burnt offerings and sacrifices at Roman and Pre-Roman Pompeii, Italy. Vegetation History and Archaeobotany 11, 93-9. (2002) Wigh, B. (1998) Animal bones from the Viking town of Birka, Sweden. In E. Cameron (ed.) Leather and Fur: Aspects of Medieval Trade and Technology, 81–90. London, Archetype Publications Ltd Contact Alex FitzpatrickTwitter: @archaeologyfitz Simona FalangaTwitter: @CrazyBoneLady Alex's Blog: Animal Archaeology Music "Coconut - (dyalla remix)" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_2UiKoouqaY Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Victory in Parliamentary Election for Viktor Orban

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 5:28


Amanda Coakley, journalist covering Central Europe, on Hungary's parliamentary election results.

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson
David Chesky's Mice War; Plant Based Beauty Products; The Sandwich Generation with Dr. B and Linda Corley; The Continental

Passport Mommy with Michelle Jerson

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 38:11


As part of major effort to teach young children, especially in these turbulent times, about the absurdity of war and the futility of violence, "The Mice War, " a heartfelt animated feature film created by Grammy-nominated composer and lyricist David Chesky, is now available for viewing on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Mice-War-Gregory-Jbara/dp/B07BXY2SL2.From cosmetics to personal care products, sustainable, plant-based biology solutions are the way of the future. Michael A. Carr is the President and Chief Executive Officer, Calyxt and Dr. Travis Frey is the chief technology officer. Calyxt, a plant-based synthetic biotechnology company, is taking a new strategic direction focused on engineering synthetic biology solutions.Dr. Arthur Bregman and Linda Corley are back with the "Breakdown with Dr. B." This week they speak about the Sandwich Generation. It's not easy to be a caregiver. Worry, stress and sleepless nights are a common occurrence for the one who is caring for the sick and the elderly. The stress is compounded for the "sandwich generation" which describes a generation of young- to middle-aged adults who are “sandwiched” between caring for their aging parents, while also raising their own children. Dr. B. talks with Psychologist Teddy Tarr about navigating through finances and overseeing medical care while not forgetting to take care of yourself while juggling various generations that rely on your attention. bregmanmd.com“The Continental”, a new quarterly literary review, features the best writings of Central Europe and North America for a U.S. market. The writings explore hot button topics such as prejudice and faith. Sandor Jaszberenyi, editor in chief of “The Continental”. Sandor is also a war correspondent who is traveling for this interview to the U.S. from the Ukraine front lines.

通勤學英語
每日英語跟讀 Ep.K335: 普京更大的恐懼可能在於波蘭

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 24, 2022 4:15


每日英語跟讀 Ep.K335: Ukraine? Putin's Bigger Fear May Lie in Poland   Tomasz Czescik, a Polish archaeologist and television journalist, walks his dog each morning through a forest near his home here on NATO's eastern flank, wandering along the edge of a green chain-link fence topped with razor wire. 波蘭考古學家和電視記者 Tomasz Czescik 每天早上都會​​帶著他的狗穿過他家附近的森林,這裡位於北約東翼,沿著頂部是鐵絲網的綠色鏈環柵欄的邊緣徘徊。 He enjoys the fresh air and morning quiet — until loudspeakers on the other side of the fence, strung with “Keep Out” signs in Polish, English, German and Russian, start blasting “The Star-Spangled Banner” at high volume. 他喜歡清新的空氣和清晨的寧靜——直到另一邊的擴音器柵欄的一側,掛著波蘭語、英語、德語的“Keep Out”標誌和俄羅斯人,開始大音量播放美國國歌“星條旗”。 “I don't know anyone who has ever been inside there,” Czescik said, pointing across the fence toward a cluster of haze-shrouded buildings in the distance. “我不知道有誰去過裡面,”切西克說,越過柵欄指向一簇被陰霾籠罩的建築物在遠處。 The fence is the outer perimeter, guarded by Polish soldiers, of a highly sensitive U.S. military installation, expected to be operational this year, which Washington insists will help defend Europe and the United States from ballistic missiles fired by rogue states like Iran. 圍欄是由波蘭士兵守衛的外圍外圍敏感的美國軍事設施,預計今年投入使用,華盛頓堅稱,這將有助於保護歐洲和美國免受伊朗等流氓國家發射的彈道導彈的攻擊。 But for President Vladimir Putin of Russia, the military base in Poland and another in Romania are evidence of what he sees as the threat posed by NATO's eastward expansion — and part of his justification for his military encirclement of Ukraine. The Pentagon describes the two sites as defensive and unrelated to Russia, but the Kremlin believes they could be used to shoot down Russian rockets or to fire offensive cruise missiles at Moscow. 但對於俄羅斯總統弗拉基米爾·普京來說,波蘭的軍事基地和羅馬尼亞證明了他認為的威脅北約東擴——以及他為軍隊辯護的部分理由包圍烏克蘭。五角大樓將這兩個地點描述為防禦性的,與俄羅斯無關,但克里姆林宮認為它們可用於擊落俄羅斯火箭或向莫斯科發射進攻性巡航導彈。 As he threatens Ukraine, Putin has demanded that NATO reduce its military footprint in Eastern and Central Europe — which Washington and European leaders have refused to do. Putin has been fuming about U.S. missiles near Russia's border since the Romanian site went into operation in 2016, but the Polish facility, located near the village of Redzikowo, is only about 100 miles from Russian territory and barely 800 miles from Moscow itself. 普京威脅烏克蘭,要求北約削減軍力在東歐和中歐的足跡——華盛頓和歐洲領導拒絕了。普京一直對附近的美國導彈感到憤怒自羅馬尼亞站點於 2016 年投入運營以來的俄羅斯邊境,但位於 Redzikowo 村附近的波蘭工廠距離距俄羅斯領土 100 英里,距莫斯科僅 800 英里。 “Are we deploying missiles near the U.S. border? No, we are not. It is the United States that has come to our home with its missiles and is already standing at our doorstep,” Putin said in December at his annual news conference. “我們是否在美國邊境附近部署導彈?不,我們不是。它是帶著導彈來到我們家的美國 站在我們家門口,”普京在去年 12 月的年度新聞中說會議。 Beata Jurys, the elected head of Redzikowo, said she had never been inside the facility, installed on the grounds of a former Polish air force base and a shuttered civilian airport. But the finger-pointing by Moscow and Washington has made her village a potential target in the event of war. Redzikowo 的民選負責人 Beata Jurys 說她從來沒有進去過該設施安裝在前波蘭空軍基地的場地上和一個關閉的民用機場。但是莫斯科的指責和華盛頓已將她的村莊作為發生戰爭的潛在目標。 “If something happens," she said, "we will be the first to know, unfortunately.” “如果發生什麼事,”她說,“不幸的是,我們將是第一個知道的。” Source article: https://udn.com/news/story/6904/6125264

IDEAS IN ACTION | USC's Podcast Series
Crisis Briefing: The Russian Invasion of Ukraine

IDEAS IN ACTION | USC's Podcast Series

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 72:47


The USC Global Policy Institute, Department of Political Science and International Relations, the Max Kade Institute for Austrian-German-Swiss Studies and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures present a crisis briefing on the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Listen to a distinguished panel of six experts discuss the ongoing conflict, what it means for the world and what may happen next. With Russia's invasion, negotiation talks in Belarus, the EU and NATO on standby, the U.S. on high alert and the world watching, the Ukraine-Russia conflict is at the forefront of the public mind. Speakers: USC professor and former Soviet Union expert Robert English; USC Kade Institute Director and Central Europe expert Paul Lerner; Slavic Languages Post-Doc Fellow Andrzej Brylak; European Academy of Public Diplomacy Director Katarzyna Pisarska; USC professor and Russia and Poland expert Tom Seifrid; and USC professor and human rights lawyer Steve Swerdlow.

FIVE MINUTE NEWS
Russia demands Ukrainian forces surrender in Mariupol.

FIVE MINUTE NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 7:30


Russia demands Ukrainian forces surrender in Mariupol. Ukrainian refugees testing limits of capacity in Central Europe. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas hospital for infection. You can subscribe to Five Minute News with Anthony Davis on YouTube, with your preferred podcast app, ask your smart speaker, or enable Five Minute News as your Amazon Alexa Flash Briefing skill.  Subscribe, rate and review at www.fiveminute.news  Five Minute News is an Evergreen Podcast, covering politics, inequality, health and climate - delivering independent, unbiased and essential world news, daily. 

Cauldron - A History Of The World Battle By Battle
Battle of Svolder 9 September, 999 or 1000 AD

Cauldron - A History Of The World Battle By Battle

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 17, 2022 56:42


The first cycle of episodes in the Cauldron re-boot featured exclusively battles from antiquity and the truly ancient world. This next cycle will see us hop in the imaginary time machine and fast forward from the sandy beach outside of Troy, zooming past the rise and fall of a dozen or more empires, from Persia to Athens to Alexander to Carthage and finally to the powerhouse that was Rome. For a thousand years Rome, in one of its many fashions, ruled much of Modern Europe, and then came the barbarian hordes, plague, rapid and incurable inflation, and a whole myriad of other factors that led to the great city's fall. With the dying of the light that was Rome, Europe descended into what was once called the Dark Ages, a time in which life was as cheap as it had ever been. Now, most scholars agree that things weren't nearly as bleak or “Dark” as they used to seem, but when Europe pretty rapidly went from a unified centralized singularity to a shattered constellation of smaller petty kingdoms things certainly became more interesting. A good mark for the beginning of the Early Middle Ages or the Late Antiquity Period is the Huns burning their way through Central Europe and the fall of Rome itself to the Visigoths. We dive into the Huns in one of the earliest episodes so check that out if you want. Both the Early Middle Ages or the Late Antiquity Period are accepted terms used by scholars in lieu of the Dark Ages, which is a bit less fun and dramatic, even if it is more accurate. From roughly 400-500ad to 1000-1100ad these Early Middle Ages were a period of upheaval and change for Europe. A time of turmoil and faith, war and famine, kings and priests. Which, after writing that I realized, is pretty much every period in European and likely World history. But our story today comes in at the tail end of the Early Middle Ages, when the age of the Viking was all but over and the Age of the Knight and Castle was about to begin. Let's go back to Late Antiquity, to the steel blue waters of the Baltic Sea, where two lines of Long Ships entangled in a desperate struggle, the winner lives, the loser drowns. Let's go back to September 9, 999/1000A.D., the Age of the Viking and the Battle of Svolder. Music by DopeBoysSources Upon RequestFollow Along On Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, and TikTokAs Always - Rate/Review/SubscribeAnd Thanks For Listening!

Monster Fuzz
Aliens Holidaying in Central Europe

Monster Fuzz

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 14, 2022 81:16


Isn't Europe great? Sure we all love Spain and Italy over here in Western Europe. Sun, sea and senoritas (or senores) In fact the only thing that could make them better would be legalized weed and aliens! Hang on the weed is already legal in Spain? And aliens are stopping football matches in Italy…patreon.com/monsterfuzzlinktr.ee/monsterfuzz

The O'SHOW
#491 | Emmanuel Enime

The O'SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 13, 2022 56:21


Emmanuel Enime is a preacher based in Central Europe. Emmanuel talks about his upcoming character training exercise, Singing In Public, about getting rid of mental fog, preparing your character, so that you can endure the difficult times in life, with joy. “Joy is very important because it is one of the antidotes to mental fog. Mental fog affects everything you do in this life, even your ability to Sing In Public. Many things contribute to mental fog. To include, but not limited to: fear, doubt, anxiety, faulty planning, faulty goal setting, Unforgiveness, perfectionism, pride, self-guilt, lust, jealousy, trust issues, accepting the mental fog of others, etc.” - Emmanuel Enime

A History of Europe, Key Battles
65.2 Napoleon's Conquest of Central Europe, and the Peninsular War

A History of Europe, Key Battles

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 11, 2022 27:19


The French invade Prussia and capture its capital Berlin, and then move into Poland and take Warsaw. Napoleon and Tsar Alexander then agreed the Treaties of Tilsit. The greatest resistance to French dominance comes from the Spanish, aided by the British under the command of the Duke of Wellington.www.patreon.com/historyeuropewww.historyeurope.netMusic from Beethoven - Symphony Nr 5, courtesy of www.musopen.orgPicture: Charles Meynier - Entrée de Napoléon à Berlin, 27 Octobre 1806 See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

New Books in Anthropology
Vassilis Petsinis, "National Identity in Serbia: The Vojvodina and a Multi-Ethnic Community in the Balkans" (I.B. Tauris, 2019)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 58:48


In his book, National Identity in Serbia: Vojvodina and a Multiethnic Society between the Balkans and Central Europe (I.B. Tauris, 2019), Vassilis Petsinis analyses the evolution of Vojvodina's identity over time and the unique pattern of ethnic relations in the province. Although approximately 25 ethnic communities live in Vojvodina, it is by no means a divided society. Intercultural cohabitation has been a living reality in the province for centuries and this largely accounts for the lack of ethnic conflict. Vassilis Petsinis explores Vojvodina's intercultural society and shows how this has facilitated the introduction of flexible and regionalized legal models for the management of ethnic relations in Serbia since the 2000s. He also discusses recent developments in the region, most notably the arrival of refugees from Syria and Iraq, and measures the impact that these changes have had on social stability and inter-group relations in the province. Vassilis Petsinis is a Senior Research Fellow in Comparative Politics at the Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies (University of Tartu, Estonia) within the frame of the Horizon 2020 POPREBEL international project. He is a political scientist with an expertise in European Politics and Ethnopolitics specializing in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Christian Axboe Nielsen is associate professor of history and human security at Aarhus University in Denmark. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books Network
Vassilis Petsinis, "National Identity in Serbia: The Vojvodina and a Multi-Ethnic Community in the Balkans" (I.B. Tauris, 2019)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 58:48


In his book, National Identity in Serbia: Vojvodina and a Multiethnic Society between the Balkans and Central Europe (I.B. Tauris, 2019), Vassilis Petsinis analyses the evolution of Vojvodina's identity over time and the unique pattern of ethnic relations in the province. Although approximately 25 ethnic communities live in Vojvodina, it is by no means a divided society. Intercultural cohabitation has been a living reality in the province for centuries and this largely accounts for the lack of ethnic conflict. Vassilis Petsinis explores Vojvodina's intercultural society and shows how this has facilitated the introduction of flexible and regionalized legal models for the management of ethnic relations in Serbia since the 2000s. He also discusses recent developments in the region, most notably the arrival of refugees from Syria and Iraq, and measures the impact that these changes have had on social stability and inter-group relations in the province. Vassilis Petsinis is a Senior Research Fellow in Comparative Politics at the Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies (University of Tartu, Estonia) within the frame of the Horizon 2020 POPREBEL international project. He is a political scientist with an expertise in European Politics and Ethnopolitics specializing in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Christian Axboe Nielsen is associate professor of history and human security at Aarhus University in Denmark. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Sociology
Vassilis Petsinis, "National Identity in Serbia: The Vojvodina and a Multi-Ethnic Community in the Balkans" (I.B. Tauris, 2019)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 58:48


In his book, National Identity in Serbia: Vojvodina and a Multiethnic Society between the Balkans and Central Europe (I.B. Tauris, 2019), Vassilis Petsinis analyses the evolution of Vojvodina's identity over time and the unique pattern of ethnic relations in the province. Although approximately 25 ethnic communities live in Vojvodina, it is by no means a divided society. Intercultural cohabitation has been a living reality in the province for centuries and this largely accounts for the lack of ethnic conflict. Vassilis Petsinis explores Vojvodina's intercultural society and shows how this has facilitated the introduction of flexible and regionalized legal models for the management of ethnic relations in Serbia since the 2000s. He also discusses recent developments in the region, most notably the arrival of refugees from Syria and Iraq, and measures the impact that these changes have had on social stability and inter-group relations in the province. Vassilis Petsinis is a Senior Research Fellow in Comparative Politics at the Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies (University of Tartu, Estonia) within the frame of the Horizon 2020 POPREBEL international project. He is a political scientist with an expertise in European Politics and Ethnopolitics specializing in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Christian Axboe Nielsen is associate professor of history and human security at Aarhus University in Denmark. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Political Science
Vassilis Petsinis, "National Identity in Serbia: The Vojvodina and a Multi-Ethnic Community in the Balkans" (I.B. Tauris, 2019)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 9, 2022 58:48


In his book, National Identity in Serbia: Vojvodina and a Multiethnic Society between the Balkans and Central Europe (I.B. Tauris, 2019), Vassilis Petsinis analyses the evolution of Vojvodina's identity over time and the unique pattern of ethnic relations in the province. Although approximately 25 ethnic communities live in Vojvodina, it is by no means a divided society. Intercultural cohabitation has been a living reality in the province for centuries and this largely accounts for the lack of ethnic conflict. Vassilis Petsinis explores Vojvodina's intercultural society and shows how this has facilitated the introduction of flexible and regionalized legal models for the management of ethnic relations in Serbia since the 2000s. He also discusses recent developments in the region, most notably the arrival of refugees from Syria and Iraq, and measures the impact that these changes have had on social stability and inter-group relations in the province. Vassilis Petsinis is a Senior Research Fellow in Comparative Politics at the Johan Skytte Institute of Political Studies (University of Tartu, Estonia) within the frame of the Horizon 2020 POPREBEL international project. He is a political scientist with an expertise in European Politics and Ethnopolitics specializing in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Christian Axboe Nielsen is associate professor of history and human security at Aarhus University in Denmark. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

Rudolf Steiner Audio
CW 225: Three Perspectives of Anthroposophy: Lecture 5: Community Building in Central Europe (Dornach, 7 July 1923) by Rudolf Steiner

Rudolf Steiner Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 32:24


ChinaEconTalk
How Eastern Europe Sees China and The War in Ukraine

ChinaEconTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 38:25


Matej Šimalčík, Executive Director of the Central European Institute of Asian Studies, joins from Bratislava to discuss:The reception of BRI in Eastern and Central Europe 10 years onHow the war will accelerate changes in opinion towards ChinaJordan and Matej reminiscing about Pohoda, the greatest music festival on the planet (my writeup from 2015 https://medium.com/@jordanschneider/pohoda-the-world-s-greatest-music-festival-675f3da2ae24)This conversation was recorded Feb 27th. Outtro music (a slovak banger): gleb - Zešlach Crunk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMxLdOQns_o Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

ChinaTalk
How Eastern Europe Sees China and The War in Ukraine

ChinaTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 38:25


Matej Šimalčík, Executive Director of the Central European Institute of Asian Studies, joins from Bratislava to discuss:The reception of BRI in Eastern and Central Europe 10 years onHow the war will accelerate changes in opinion towards ChinaJordan and Matej reminiscing about Pohoda, the greatest music festival on the planet (my writeup from 2015 https://medium.com/@jordanschneider/pohoda-the-world-s-greatest-music-festival-675f3da2ae24)This conversation was recorded Feb 27th. Outtro music (a slovak banger): gleb - Zešlach Crunk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aMxLdOQns_o Get bonus content on Patreon See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

.think atlantic
Hawks over Central Europe

.think atlantic

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2022 41:32


In this episode of .think atlantic, IRI's Thibault Muzergues is joined by Jiri Kozak and Mantas Adomėnas -- Deputy Ministers of Foreign Affairs in the Czech Republic and Lithuania, respectively -- to talk about foreign policy changes in Central and Eastern Europe, including the region's response to Russia's undergoing invasion of Ukraine. What has changed in Czech and Lithuanian foreign policy since their new governments took office, and why? What relation does contemporary conservative foreign policy have to neoconservatism? What role can Central and Eastern European countries play in countering Russian aggression? How has Lithuania fared against Chinese economic coercion and what lessons can other CEE countries take from the experience? Listen for answers to these questions and more in this special timely episode. While you're here, remember to check out IRI's recent report on candidate selection called “Standing Out from the Crowd,” including a chapter written by Adomėnas, on iri.org. Find Jiri Kozak on Twitter @Kozakj Find Mantas Adomėnas on Twitter @Adomenas Find Thibault Muzergues on Twitter @tmuzergues Find .think atlantic on Twitter @ThinkAtlantic Find IRI on Twitter @IRIglobal

Business of Beverages
1.26 A Touch of Glass - Marty Duffy explores why glassware plays a pivotal role in how we enjoy our beers, wines and spirits.

Business of Beverages

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 6, 2022 57:15


Come to Leuven with us! We're hosting a 2 day BizBevPod Live event all about Belgian Beer on May 25th -27th with: live interviews with world class industry guests, exclusive brewery tours, beer pairings, brasserie visits, panel discussions and networking events. Places have just opened for booking. Just drop us a mail at BizBevPod@Gmail.com and we'll share details.Back to the episode... In this episode you'll learn how the glass you choose for your drink can make a world of difference to you and your customer's experience. We get practical advice on designing, branding and storing glassware for spirits, wines and beers. Will and Foxy talk to Marty Duffy, from Glencairn Crystal, makers of the most famous whisk(e)y glass in the world. With decades of experience in the world of whiskies and cocktails Marty now lends his expertise to the wold of premium glassware. We learn how the shape of your glass can affect the appearance, aroma and taste of your drink and how it can work wonders for your brand. We describe our favourite glasses and recount stories of how and  why we make our choices. We also mention the wine glass company Riedel if you want to get some visuals for what we're discussing. For our Desert Island Drink we are privileged to speak to Mirco Wolf Wiegert founder of Fritz Kola. Mirco and his co founder were students hanging out in a dorm in Hamburg in 2002 when they struck upon the idea of waking up the CSD monopoly with their own creation. In one of the most remarkable underdog successes of the 21st century, Fritz Kola is now a major European CSD company, with over 300 employees in Central Europe and showing "Big Red" exactly how to grow an edgy, authentic and truly purposeful brand.Plus we Foxy shocks the entire world by recommending that you drink your Guinness from a wine glass, whilst Will get's sentimental about his Granny's "good room".Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/BizBevPod)

Jewish Policy Center
Video: Central Europe, Nationalism and Russia

Jewish Policy Center

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 3, 2022


The unified nationalist stand taken by Ukrainian citizens in the face of the Russian invasion has been widely admired around the world. Yet nationalism, broadly defined, has been an object of disdain and condemnation among the elites of the United States and Western Europe. Countries closest to the borders of the former Soviet Union view […]

Aurora Energy Research Podcast
EP.108 Impact of Russia-Ukraine war on European gas markets with Aurora experts Hanns & Anise

Aurora Energy Research Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 17:42


This week, we have a special episode on Energy Unplugged in which our experts discuss the ongoing crisis in the European energy sector and the impact of Russia-Ukraine war on the European gas markets. Our Head of Commissioned Projects in Central Europe, Hanns Koenig is joined by Anise Ganbold who leads our research team for Commodities and Hydrogen. Anise and the team have been looking for the past couple of weeks into this topic and have been producing a couple of reports. One report which has been released this week examines how a drop in available Russian gas export capacity, or supply, to Europe affects the European supply mix. More details can be found at: https://auroraer.com/insight/impact-of-ukraine-russia-conflict-on-european-gas-markets/ Anise and Hanns discuss: • A retrospective of what happened in the European gas market over the past few weeks • The European reliance on Russian gas and coal • The increase in gas and power prices and the impact on gas supply and demand

New Books in Eastern European Studies
Lili Zách, "Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904–1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Eastern European Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 46:19


Lili Zách is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English Studies at ELTE (Eötvös Loránd University) in Budapest and has previously taught at Maynooth University (Ireland). She received her MA Degrees in History and Irish Studies in 2006 from the University of Szeged, Hungary. In 2010 she completed a Diploma Course in Irish Language and completed her PhD at the National University of Ireland, Galway in 2016. In this interview, she discusses her new book Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021), which investigates Irish perceptions of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and its small successor states Offering a unique account of identity formation in Ireland and Central Europe, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 explores and contextualizes transfers and comparisons between Ireland and the successor states of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It reveals how Irish perceptions of borders and identities changed after the (re)birth of the small states of Austria, Hungary and Czechoslovakia and the creation of the Irish Free State. Adopting a transnational approach, the book documents the outward-looking attitude of Irish nationalists and provides original insights into the significance of personal encounters that transcended the borders of nation-states. Drawing on a wide range of official records, private papers, contemporary press accounts and journal articles, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 bridges the gap between historiographies of the East and West by opening up a new perspective on Irish national identity. Aidan Beatty is a historian at the Honors College of the University of Pittsburgh Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/eastern-european-studies

New Books in Intellectual History
Lili Zách, "Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904–1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in Intellectual History

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 46:19


Lili Zách is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English Studies at ELTE (Eötvös Loránd University) in Budapest and has previously taught at Maynooth University (Ireland). She received her MA Degrees in History and Irish Studies in 2006 from the University of Szeged, Hungary. In 2010 she completed a Diploma Course in Irish Language and completed her PhD at the National University of Ireland, Galway in 2016. In this interview, she discusses her new book Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021), which investigates Irish perceptions of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and its small successor states Offering a unique account of identity formation in Ireland and Central Europe, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 explores and contextualizes transfers and comparisons between Ireland and the successor states of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It reveals how Irish perceptions of borders and identities changed after the (re)birth of the small states of Austria, Hungary and Czechoslovakia and the creation of the Irish Free State. Adopting a transnational approach, the book documents the outward-looking attitude of Irish nationalists and provides original insights into the significance of personal encounters that transcended the borders of nation-states. Drawing on a wide range of official records, private papers, contemporary press accounts and journal articles, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 bridges the gap between historiographies of the East and West by opening up a new perspective on Irish national identity. Aidan Beatty is a historian at the Honors College of the University of Pittsburgh Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/intellectual-history

New Books Network
Lili Zách, "Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904–1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 46:19


Lili Zách is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English Studies at ELTE (Eötvös Loránd University) in Budapest and has previously taught at Maynooth University (Ireland). She received her MA Degrees in History and Irish Studies in 2006 from the University of Szeged, Hungary. In 2010 she completed a Diploma Course in Irish Language and completed her PhD at the National University of Ireland, Galway in 2016. In this interview, she discusses her new book Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021), which investigates Irish perceptions of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and its small successor states Offering a unique account of identity formation in Ireland and Central Europe, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 explores and contextualizes transfers and comparisons between Ireland and the successor states of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It reveals how Irish perceptions of borders and identities changed after the (re)birth of the small states of Austria, Hungary and Czechoslovakia and the creation of the Irish Free State. Adopting a transnational approach, the book documents the outward-looking attitude of Irish nationalists and provides original insights into the significance of personal encounters that transcended the borders of nation-states. Drawing on a wide range of official records, private papers, contemporary press accounts and journal articles, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 bridges the gap between historiographies of the East and West by opening up a new perspective on Irish national identity. Aidan Beatty is a historian at the Honors College of the University of Pittsburgh Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in German Studies
Lili Zách, "Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904–1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in German Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 46:19


Lili Zách is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English Studies at ELTE (Eötvös Loránd University) in Budapest and has previously taught at Maynooth University (Ireland). She received her MA Degrees in History and Irish Studies in 2006 from the University of Szeged, Hungary. In 2010 she completed a Diploma Course in Irish Language and completed her PhD at the National University of Ireland, Galway in 2016. In this interview, she discusses her new book Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021), which investigates Irish perceptions of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and its small successor states Offering a unique account of identity formation in Ireland and Central Europe, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 explores and contextualizes transfers and comparisons between Ireland and the successor states of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It reveals how Irish perceptions of borders and identities changed after the (re)birth of the small states of Austria, Hungary and Czechoslovakia and the creation of the Irish Free State. Adopting a transnational approach, the book documents the outward-looking attitude of Irish nationalists and provides original insights into the significance of personal encounters that transcended the borders of nation-states. Drawing on a wide range of official records, private papers, contemporary press accounts and journal articles, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 bridges the gap between historiographies of the East and West by opening up a new perspective on Irish national identity. Aidan Beatty is a historian at the Honors College of the University of Pittsburgh Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/german-studies

New Books in History
Lili Zách, "Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904–1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe" (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 2, 2022 46:19


Lili Zách is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English Studies at ELTE (Eötvös Loránd University) in Budapest and has previously taught at Maynooth University (Ireland). She received her MA Degrees in History and Irish Studies in 2006 from the University of Szeged, Hungary. In 2010 she completed a Diploma Course in Irish Language and completed her PhD at the National University of Ireland, Galway in 2016. In this interview, she discusses her new book Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945: Conceiving the Nation, Identity, and Borders in Central Europe (Palgrave Macmillan, 2021), which investigates Irish perceptions of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and its small successor states Offering a unique account of identity formation in Ireland and Central Europe, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 explores and contextualizes transfers and comparisons between Ireland and the successor states of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. It reveals how Irish perceptions of borders and identities changed after the (re)birth of the small states of Austria, Hungary and Czechoslovakia and the creation of the Irish Free State. Adopting a transnational approach, the book documents the outward-looking attitude of Irish nationalists and provides original insights into the significance of personal encounters that transcended the borders of nation-states. Drawing on a wide range of official records, private papers, contemporary press accounts and journal articles, Imagining Ireland Abroad, 1904-1945 bridges the gap between historiographies of the East and West by opening up a new perspective on Irish national identity. Aidan Beatty is a historian at the Honors College of the University of Pittsburgh Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

Keen On Democracy
Maciej Kisilowski & Inna Melnykovska on the West's Moral Failure in the Ukrainian Invasion

Keen On Democracy