Podcasts about Confederacy

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Latest podcast episodes about Confederacy

Brigham Young Money
#112 – A Confederacy of Cancellations feat. Mark Agee

Brigham Young Money

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 104:43


This week, we're back and we've brought in our dear friend, Mark Agee, as reinforcements. We start things off with our thoughts on the return of The Delta Center, the Millers' continued legacy, and more. In the Hell Lines this week, Greg takes us through what's been going on, including the Utah legislature reining their terror upon vulnerable people, "George Santos" and his love for dogs, and other lovely stuff. And finally, the boys reminisce about one of our favorite trends: conservatives cancelling miscellaneous foods, appliances, and sneakers in the name of defending this great country. And, of course, cover the dangers of becoming too attracted to spherical candy. Follow Mark on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MarkAgee Sub to us on Patreon for extra episodes and discord access: patreon.com/brighamyoungmoney And keep rockin' in the free world, friends.

Kings and Generals: History for our Future
3.32 Fall and Rise of China: Taiping Rebellion #9: Li Hongzhang and the Anhui Army

Kings and Generals: History for our Future

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 38:31


Last time we spoke the Qing dynasty was looking dreadful. More and more peoples were flocking to the Taiping, as the European forces were humiliating the Qing government. Yet the more independent figure of Zeng Guofan and his Xiang army was making headway with its siege of Anqing, so much so it forced the shield king to depart from Nanjing to meet the enemy on the field. The foreign community had not completely lost its faith in the Taiping and sent envoys to see what relations could be made. Then the grand pincer attack of the Taiping kings failed horribly and they were unable to stop the Xiang army from capturing Anqing. Nanjing was now threatened yet again and it seemed no headway was being made with the foreigners to earn their support. Can the Taiping come back from such defeats? #32 This episode is The Taiping Rebellion part 9: Li Hongzhang and the Anhui Army   Welcome to the Fall and Rise of China Podcast, I am your dutiful host Craig Watson. But, before we start I want to also remind you this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Perhaps you want to learn more about the history of Asia? Kings and Generals have an assortment of episodes on history of asia and much more  so go give them a look over on Youtube. So please subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry for some more history related content, over on my channel, the Pacific War Channel where I cover the history of China and Japan from the 19th century until the end of the Pacific War. On August 22nd of 1861, Emperor Xianfeng died at the age of 30. The probable cause of his death was tuberculosis, but many romanticize it as him dying of shame and disgrace, never returning to Beijing. I think his rampant abuse of opium may have contributed also. Zeng Guofan received the news on September 14th and had this to write “Heaven has collapsed, the earth is split open. My emperor, from the time he came to the throne until today, over the course of twelve years, never knew a day when he wasn't consumed by worry over our dangers. Now Anqing is finally conquered, and the longhairs have begun to weaken. It looks as if the war has reached a turning point. But my emperor did not live long enough to hear the report of victory, so his dejection and melancholy will follow him into eternity. What a terrible agony that is for me, and for all of his ministers.” Xianfeng had died after just 11 years of rule and to make matters worse, the throne was supposed to go from father to son, but Xianfeng was notably infertile. In spite of spending almost his entire time with a harem of 18 concubines and wives for years, Xianfeng had managed to only father one son. This son in 1861 was 5 years of age. Hong Rengan began to preach and boast about the situation. “Xianfeng left behind a little demon who is several years old and will find it difficult to continue the demon rule. This is precisely the time for us to seize the opportunity to uphold Heaven, and render ourselves not unworthy in our role as heroes of the world.” Confidence in the dynasty was crumbling, many of the elites within Beijing began to compare the previous Qing emperors' reigns to the current situation. Yet while many of these elites lamented about how the dynasty was in decay, none offered any remedy to the situation, much like our politicians today ahah.    As much as Beijing was in disarray, the Taiping were in no position to march upon it, afterall they had just lost Anqing. However the death of Xianfeng reinfigerated the Taiping nonetheless. Chen Yucheng and the remnants of his battered army were cut off in northern Anhui while Li Xiucheng was marching east into Zhejiang province. Zhejiang at this time held around 26 million people and Li Xiucheng planned to conquer the province and gain further independence from Hong Rengan. Hong Rengan did not want Zhejiang province, well at least not at this time, what he wanted was for the Taiping to consolidate and take back Anqing. Control over the Yangtze region was the key to his strategy of consolidating a southern empire and for that Anqing was a major component. He began to beg Li Xiucheng sending letters from Nanjing to turn his army back around to smash Zeng Guofan. “the Yangtze has been described as a serpent, with its head at Hubei, its body in Anhui, and its tail in Jiangnan. We don't have Hubei, and if we let go of Anhui as well, the serpent will be sundered, and the tail won't survive for long on its own.” To all of this Li Xiucheng simply replied that Anqing was a hopeless cause and that he would not leave Zhejiang. Hong Rengan was livid, but what could he really do. Now the way Hong Rengan described the Yangtze as a serpent, was something Zeng Guofan also ascribed to. Both men understood the enormous advantage Wuchang and Anqing presented; they both controlled vast regions of agriculture. But along the eastern coast, particularly the port cities held enormous wealth and this is what attracted Li Xiucheng to Zhejiang. As a result of him taking forces into Zhejiang, now the overall momentum of the Taiping strategy skewed to the east.   Hong Rengan had changed after his military disaster at Tongcheng. He was more bitter, angry that the foreigners would not support their cause. And the second he had left Nanjing, the Hong brothers had done everything they could to belittle him. One major thing they did was take away the need for Hong Rengans seal to forward information to the Heavenly Kings, thus taking the mediator monopoly from him. This also came at a time Hong Xiuquan's son was older and sitting in on important meetings, learning the ropes. The Heavenly son was gradually becoming more important than Hong Rengan, he was no longer the undisputed second in command of the movement. Despite this, Hong Rengan still remained in charge of foreign relations and much of the administration of Nanjing. While Hong Rengan was out of Nanjing, a ton of setbacks had occurred. The worst were the demands imposed upon the Taiping by Admiral Hope and Parkes, that the Taiping must stay at least 30 miles away from Shanghai and other treaty ports such as Hankou and Wuchang.   The new 5 year old heir to the Qing dynasty was the son of one of Xiangfeng's concubines, a pretty Manchu woman named Yehonala. She gave birth to the boy at the age of 20 and since he was the sole male this made her status rise as she was the mother of a soon reigning emperor, a rank that compared to that of being the wife of the emperor. Her title became known as Empress Dowager, and she is quite infamous in modern Chinese history, her name since becoming the Empress Dowager became Cixi. She is often compared to Queen Victoria, as both would be the most powerful women of the 19th century. When Xianfeng died, he issued an edict naming his 8 closest Manchu advisers as regents for his son. Traditionally when a new emperor was too young to rule, power was entrusted to regents or family members until the emperor became old enough. With the boy being 5 years of age, the regents could expect to rule over the empire for at least a decade, not a bad gig. Many of these regents hated the Europeans and dreamed of breaking the treaties. Yet Prince Gong, who many thought was too soft on the foreigners, sought a plan to appease the foreigners by creating a office of foreign affairs, so that in the meantime all the strength of the Qing empire could be brought down upon the Taiping.   Now the only check to the powers of the new regents was the pair of Empress Dowagers, Cixi and the Xianfengs widow . Before his death he had given them each an imperial seal. While all edict would be composed by the regents, the Dowager empresses would hold veto powers using their seals. The widow proved compliant to the regents from the offset, but Cixi did not follow the regents without question. She began to assert her independence and threatened to withhold approval for some of the regents' policy decisions, creating a tension between the 8 male regents and the mother of the emperor. The tensions came to a head in late October when Xianfeng's remains were finally brought back to Beijing. In the grand funeral procession, 124 bearers carried the dead Emperor and at their head was Sushun the top ranking regent. The two dowager empresses traveled with a forward party escorting the young emperor in a closed palaquin. The empresses would have a single day in the capital before Sushun would get there and they quickly went to work.   The empresses met with Prince Gong immediately, using their private guards to thwart some of the other regents who were with them from preventing the audience. Some of the regents even tried to stop the boy emperor from meeting with Prince Gong, but Prince Gong had become quite popular in Beijing, having been the only one who stayed to do anything to help the city when the foreigners attacked, thus the population, and more importantly the Beijing guards stopped the regents forces. It also turns out Cixi had spent weeks secretly meeting with Prince Gongs brother at the hunting retreat in Rehe and they formed a plan. Prince Gong accompanied the empresses into Beijing making sure the regents were nowhere near them. Then Prince Gong read out an edict in the emperors name using the empress dowagers seals, charging Sushun and the other regents of treason, who could have seen that one coming. A detachment of Manchu guards led by Prince Gongs brother rode out to confront Sushun, arresting him and the other regents. They were accused of causing a war with Britain and France by misleading the late Emperor Xianfeng with treacherous advice. They were blamed for the kidnapping of Harry Parkes and other envoys, breaking faith with the foreign community and provoking Elgin to march on the capital. They also prevented the emperor against his will from returning to Beijing and faked the Emperor's will to make them regents, this is some real game of thrones shit right here.    The trail was quick, as you would imagine, and within a week the regents were found guilty of all charges, gasp. 5 of them were striped of their rank and banished to the western frontier. The 3 most powerful regents, Sushun, Duanhua and Zaiyuan were sentenced to death, but in display of compassion, Cersei Lanister, I mean Empress Dowager Cixi, no idea how I mixed up those two figures, I see what you did Mr. George R Martin, Cixi granted Zaiyuan and Duanhua the privilege of strangling themselves with silk, but it turned out to be a symbolic gesture as they were hung in a dungeon. For Sushun who proved to be her true rival, he was beheaded in public on November 8th in a cabbage market. Now edicts proclaims empress dowager Cixi would quote “should in person administer the government and by assisted by a counselor or counselors, to be chosen from among the princes of the highest order, and immediately allied to the throne”. Thus Empress Dowager Cixi with Prince Gong as her chief adviser became the new ruler of the Qing dynasty.    Now coming back to a point I made quite awhile back, I think during the first episode of the series, Karl Marx predicted in 1853 that the Taiping rebellion would cripple British trade in China and he was quite wrong, at least initially. Ironically, the civil war severed the internal trade networks within China causing merchants to dramatically look to external trade thus booming British trade. Figures rose about 30 percent from 1860-1861, but then another large event unfolded, another civil war, this time in America. Britain was thus trapped between two large civil wars. British commerce relied heavily upon both these nations. The United States, aka King Cotton in the south, provided the cotton for British textiles, which they sold in the far east. ¾'s of Britain cotton came from the US south and because of the tricky political situation now Britain could not afford to deal with those southerners lest they get caught up in the civil war. Now until the cotton dried up from the US, Britain was able to undersell the Chinese domestic cotton market, but with the outbreak of the war, the prices rose too high and now the Chinese were not buying their stuff. British exports dropped dramatically, causing textile factories to shut down. Cotton was just one part of the conundrum, because alongside it, the Americans consumed around 2/3rd of the green tea purchased by British merchants from China. Thus the British tea and textile trade was being torn to bits.   There was one gleaming light of hope however. The new treaty ports in China offered some new opportunities. The British could trade between the ports, especially those along the Yangtze river. Hell the internal trade networks were shattered as a result of the civil war, but the British enjoyed steamship power along the rivers and the ability to go freely from port to port. Now Britain sought profit, to do so they needed to expand the Chinese markets, and this meant doing some business with the Taiping who held some of the good ports. Until now Britain had avoided open relations with the Taiping. Now on May 13th of 1861 Britain announced recognition of the confederacy meaning Britain would treat the south as a separate government contending for power and not a lawless rebellion. This meant Britain could loan money and purchase arms and supplies for the Confederacy. To the merchants in China this seemed to be the ideal situation that should be adopted there. Many called for treating the Taiping the same as the confederacy, hell the confederacy was recognized after mere months, while the Taiping had been around for 10 years. The house of commons debated the matter and after long a tedious back and forths it was decided the neutrality stance must be sustained, given however that the Taiping did not hinder British trade within the provinces they controlled.   Meanwhile Li Xiucheng's army was running rampant in Zhejiang province, taking the capital of Hangzhou in December of 1861 after over 8 weeks of siege. The city had 2.3 million inhabitants and it proved quite easy to starve them out. Li Xiucheng had his men fire arrows with messages into the city stating the people would not be harmed and would be given the choice to join the Taiping or be left to leave freely. As one Qing commander at Hangzhou put it “Because the Loyal King issued orders not to harm the people, the people didn't help fight against him … Thus, none of the people suffered at the hands of the longhairs, and they all turned around and blamed the Imperials for their afflictions.” Thus the Manchu garrison burnt themselves alive while Qing officials slit their throats, but the common people went unmolested, nice for a change. It also seems Li Xiucheng took notice of the horrifying atrocities performed by Zeng Guofan at Anqing and wanted to earn the high ground with the commoners by pointing out how terrible the Manchu were. He even let the Manchu and Qing officials in Hangzhou go free, though as I said many took the alternative path of suicide.    Hangzhou was the capital and lynchpin of Zhejiang province, an enormous blow to the Qing. But there was another city that was significant, Ningbo, a treaty port, on the other side of Hangzhou bay, and just due south of Shanghai. To go from Ningbo to Hangzhou by land was around 200 miles, roughly double the distance of that by ship. The Qing forces at Shanghai hoped Ningbo's close proximity would mean the foreigners might defend the city as well. But Bruce stamped that down pretty quick sending word to the consul of Ningbo that if the Taiping were to attack, the BRitish would not get involved. He also told Admiral hope “I do not think we can take upon ourselves the protection of Ningpo, we should not display British naval power near that city lest we get compromise ourselves in this civil contest”. Admiral Hope seems to have seen things differently as upon learning in may of 1861 that the Taiping were going to march on Ningbo, he dispatched Captain Roderick Dew in the 14 gunship Encounter to dissuade the rebels. Captain Dew was also told to try and make contact with any Taiping commanders nearest to Shanghai and to relay the same type of messages Parkes had when it came to Hankou. “Point out to the commander that the capture and destruction of the town of Ningpo would be extremely injurious to British trade and that he should desist from all hostile proceedings against the town. Don't commit yourself to the necessity of having recourse to force, but do remind him of what took place last year at Shanghai”.   After giving the veiled threat to the Taiping Captain Dew went into Ningbo and told the Qing officials to mount every possible defense they could. Dew was told by Hope that under no circumstances could he open fire on the Taiping, it really was just a bluff. But Hope also asked Dew to investigate Ningbo and figure out the quote “amount of auxiliary european force which you think sufficient for its defense”. It seems the real politik at play was this. Both Admiral Hope and Frederick Bruce were planning ahead for what they assumed would be a major policy change. Both men expected their government to change its mind and wanted to be ready at a whims notice to defend any British interests from the Taiping. But in essence as you can see their actions were also drawing in conflict with the Taiping, the old self fulfilling prophecy. Both men did not want to see the Qing overthrown by the Taiping, because they seemed the worse choice as far as trade was concerned. All the customs duties from treaty ports were being used by the Qing to pay the reparations to the British for the second opium war, ahaaaaa there it really is. If the Taiping took a port, well the British could expect no return, but to prop up the Qing meant an endless cash flow. Nonetheless the Taiping represented a large threat, the British simply did not have enough forces to defend all their interests for the meantime they had to play a sort of ballet between the Taiping and Qing.   Captain Dew ended up bringing 12 large cannons from the British armory at Shanghai and installed them on Ningpo's walls, figuring if it was not British manning them, well that didnt breach neutrality. But low and behold the Qing officials did not lift a finger to help defend the city, and why would they, if they made the situation worse perhaps the British would become more involved. When the Taiping approached Ningpo, the city emptied, well all those who could flee did. On November 26th the Taiping were 30 miles off from Ningpo and by December 2nd just a days march when the British sent a party to parley with them. The British pleaded for the Taiping to give the city one more week before assaulting it and they agreed to this for some unknown reason. On december 9th, 60,000 Taiping advanced in 2 columns towards the city gates as Taiping naval units rowed over to scale the walls from the sea. It was a relatively peaceful conquest as just about all Qing officials had fled prior. Of course the usual looting was done, but very little murders were performed. The French, American and British officials came to Ningpo to talk to the Taiping demanding they respect their trade privileges and the Taiping commanders agreed enthusiastically offering to execute anyone who dared lift a finger on any foreigner.  Thus for the Taiping this was an incredible victory and one step closer to establishing good relations with the foreigners.    1862 was a year of many unknowns for China, both Beijing and Nanjing were re-forming themselves and no one could accurately predict how the war would go. Zeng Guofan was building up his Xiang army now using Anqing as an HQ. His power base was now Anhui province. To the east, Li Xiucheng controlled Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces, nearly a quarter of China's yearly income came from these combined territories. After grabbing Ningbo, the only logical step forward was, Shanghai. It was a gleaming gem, unbelievable revenues could be earned by its control. The past 2 years had shown Li Xiucheng that the British simply would not pay the Taiping proper recognition nor respect and so he sought to finally do something about it. Li Xiucheng began to prepare his army to return to Shanghai, this time not so lightly armed. Li XIucheng was never one to believe the foreigners could have ever been won over in the first place and now Hong Rengan's authority was widely diminished in Nanjing, as for out here in the east it was honestly Li Xiucheng's show.    As for the British, Ningbo seemed to not be trading much at all since the Taiping came, Anqing had fallen to Zeng Guofan and all the meanwhile Bruce was sending reports back home of endless Taiping atrocity stories whenever they took cities, most were fabricated. Bruce was trying to make parliament see that the stance of neutrality would eventually lead to the death of British trade. Harry Parkes also traveled back to Britain who would have a lot to say to the public about his time in China, his mistreatment afterall was the rationale for the burning of the summer palace. The very last deed he performed before sailing off was a last ditch attempt to stop the Taiping from approaching Shanghai, which they refused. In fact the negotiations had gone so terribly, one of Admiral Hope's commanders threatened to attack the rebels if they dared come near Shanghai.   Back to Zeng Guofan, he finally had Anqing, but now he faced the daunting need for more and more men. By taking Anqing he now gained the vast territory around it, holding tens of millions of people spreading towards the east. The Taiping still controlled many towns in northern Anhui and Chen Yucheng was in full retreat going downstream towards Nanjing. Everything east of Nanjing was pretty much a hopeless cause. Zeng Guofan's men were exhausted, they spent basically a year besieging Anqing, many wanted to go back home, morale was low. Zeng Guofan began to rebuild in Anqing using his own men as laborers. Under his direction they rebuilt the confucian academy and examination hall, repaired the walls and restored the markets. Next he set up relief stations to help the famine stricken population and helped them restore the agricultural output of the region. He also sent his brother Guoquan back to their homelands of Hunan to recruit another 6000 Hunanese soldiers, because the next push was going to be against Nanjing. Now Zeng Guofan was taking a bit of a risk sending his brother to do such a thing. There was a coup going on in Beijing, the Cixi Cersei Lannister one I spoke of, he did not know what the outcome was going to be from said coup and his actions could be judged as anti Qing since he was gaining more and more power independently from Beijing. Zeng Guofan already had a growing number of critics within Beijing who saw him as a growing threat to the central government. Thus he simply dispatched word back to the capital stating he needed to gather as many forces as he could to be able to march upon Nanjing to ride the dynasty of the Taiping menace. But this was all a facade, in order to actually defeat Nanjing, it had to be strangled from supplies, similar to ANqing. Yet Chen Yucheng loomed around in northern Anhui, and he was still yet to consolidate all of southern Anhui. He would need to take vast territory in southern Anhui towards Hangzhou in Zhejiang province and this would require colossal forces. But a strategy formed in his mind, he envisioned 3 separate armies attacking in unison: one from Anqing going east downriver to Nanjing; another led by Zuo Zongtang would march through Jiangxi into Zhejiang to smash Hangzhou; the last would march through Jiangsu and fight towards Suzhou and then Nanjing. But such feats required vast amounts of men, and he was beginning to think his homelands of Hunan were being drained dry of youthful men. Thus he cast aside his conservative methods for the first time and began to cast a wider net, he was going to trust a non Hunanese man to help him in his endeavors, one of my favorite figures in modern Chinese history, Li Hongzhang. Li Hongzhang was 38 years old at this time, a scholar from Anhui province and he was asked to help form a new provincial militia that could supplement Zengs Hunanese one. Just like Zeng Guofan, Li Hongzhang was a Hanlin scholar, an elite who scored top of the examination system. He was 11 years younger to Zeng Guofan, his father literally passed the Jinshi examination in Beijing in the same group as Zeng Guofan in 1838. The two men became close early on, when Li arrived in Beijing in 1844, fresh from passing his provincial examination, it was Zeng Guofan who agreed to serve as his teacher to help prepare him for the Jinshi, which he passed with distinction in 1847. They were tied by friendship through Li's father, making Zeng Guofan something like an uncle to him, but even more than that, Zeng Guofan was his teacher and mentor. Within the Confucian culture, a student and teacher were akin to a son and father.   Despite such close ties, it took Zeng Guofan a long time to come to the point where he would trust Li Hongzhang with his own army. Zeng Guofan knew the man was brilliant, he also knew he was ambitious. Li's older brother served on Zeng Guoan's staff, but when Li Hongzhang came to Zeng Guofan's military HQ in Hunan in 1858 looking for employment he was turned away. He was not just turned away, he was literally ignored for over a month. Yes Li spent a month hanging around until he got so frustrated he demanded Zeng Guofan given him a answer, which Zeng did, through an aid with some sarcasm he said to Li “perhaps the Hunan army was a bit to shallow a beach in which to harbor so large a ship as Li”. What Zeng was doing and would continue to do for a few years was to break Li's arrogance. He did this by various means, such as having guards drag Li literally out of bed if he ever overslept. Zeng was trying to toughen the man up, to test his grit. Li for his part hung in there, trying to convince Zeng of his loyalty and humility. They got in fights of course and this led Li to leave for a time, but by 1862 their relationship was solid and Zeng either through his trust in the man or in desperation entrusted him with basically being his second. Now there were some negatives to all of this. Zeng Guofan had very experienced military commanders at this point, much more experiences than Li Hongzhang, but Zeng Guofan was a scholar more than anything else and he valued Li Hongzhangs hanlin scholarship above all else.   In early 1862, Li Hongzhang began to form a regional militia using the same model as the Xiang army, which would be known as the Anhui army. He performed the same type of recruitment scheme, going first to his home district, forming companies of troops from the same homes to serve officers who they had connections to. Several thousand Anhui commoners were brought to Anqing by February to begin training under the guidance of veteran officers of the Xiang army. This new army would have the same structure, same training and for all intensive purposes was a mirror image of the Xiang army. The only real difference was that Li Hongzhang took orders from Zeng Guofan whom was supposed to be taking orders from Beijing but was increasingly becoming more and more independent. Empress Dowager Cixi and Prince Gong basically had no choice, but to allow Zeng Guofan his autonomy, because he was proving to be one of the very few commanders capable of dealing defeats to the Taiping. In November they issued edicts appointing Zeng Guofan as the governor-general and imperial commissioner of Anhui, Jiangsu and Jiangxi alongside military control over Zhejiang. This was some pretty crazy stuff, he basically controlled 4 of the richest and most densely populated provinces.    Zeng Guofan received the news of his new appointments at the same time as the news of what occurred during the coup, he was pretty surprised to say the least. Control over Zhejiang was a miserable part of the news, as it was literally being attacked with Hangzhou and Ningbo falling. He was a bit overwhelmed by it all and wrote in his diary “This power is too great, my stature will be too high, and my undeserved reputation has outgrown itself. This terrifies me to the extreme.” Despite his anxiety over it all, Zeng Guofan set to work and basically ordered his subordinates to perform a complete takeover of the civil administration of eastern China. Zeng Guofan's top subordinates became the individual governors of each province under him with Li Hongzhang receiving Jiangsu, Zuo Zongtang Zhejiang and two other proteges taking Jiangxi and Anhui. Now Zeng Guofan was able to redirect tax revenue from the provinces under his control, meaning he could hire and supply more troops.    I would like to take this time to remind you all that this podcast is only made possible through the efforts of Kings and Generals over at Youtube. Please go subscribe to Kings and Generals over at Youtube and to continue helping us produce this content please check out www.patreon.com/kingsandgenerals. If you are still hungry after that, give my personal channel a look over at The Pacific War Channel at Youtube, it would mean a lot to me. Emperor Xianfeng was dead and Empress Dowager Cixi was in charge. Zeng Guofan was making a ton of progress, but there simply was not enough men so he had his student Li Hongzhang form a new Anhui army.  

America at War
142 The Civil War: The War Comes to An End

America at War

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 34:39


We have reached the penultimate episode of our series on the Civil War. We briefly touch on the surrender of the Confederate field armies but devote most of our time to looking at issues related to the winners and loosers of the war. It is fair to say that Lincoln won the war, but lost the peace. We don't explore all of the issues that led to the defeat of the Confederacy, but we concentrate on the sailient points. Take a listen! Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

Intersectional Insights
The Savior Complex and the Persecution Complex

Intersectional Insights

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2023 52:04


Olivia and Raven are back with a discussion about white savior syndrome, Western saviorism, and the persecution complex of Christians and conservatives in the US. -- Email us! isquaredhello@gmail.com. | Follow us!  Instagram https://www.instagram.com/isquaredpodcast/ | Twitter @I_squaredpod https://twitter.com/I_SquaredPod | Facebook page http://www.fb.me/ISquaredPod -- Episodes Referenced: United Daughters of the Confederacy, and Upholding White Supremacy https://isquared.podbean.com/e/united-daughters-of-the-confederacy-and-upholding-white-supremacy/ | Blind People React to Visual Art https://isquared.podbean.com/e/blind-people-react-to-visual-art/ | The Black Church's Role in Black Liberation https://isquared.podbean.com/page/2/ --- Learn More! A Savior No One Needs: Unpacking and Overcoming the White Savior Complex https://www.healthline.com/health/white-saviorism#examples | The Evangelical Persecution Complex https://www.leoweekly.com/2022/05/the-evangelical-persecution-complex-and-the-christian-academy-of-louisvilles-homophobic-assignment/

Joe Madison the Black Eagle
It's Time To Abolish Confederate Heroes Day

Joe Madison the Black Eagle

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 15:08


Texas State Representative Jarvis Johnson is demanding an end to Confederate Heroes Day, a state holiday that glorifies slave owners like Jefferson Davis and Robert E. Lee.

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast
Confederate Monuments as Part of Myth America

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 40:22


Dr. Karen Cox shows us the complex history of Confederate Monuments in the US, and what has actually happened during this recent period of removal. Professor Buzzkill himself was floored to hear how many monuments still exist, and about the complicated ways in which some monuments have been removed. Her work as part of the new book, Myth America, is not to be missed! Episode 494.

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show
Biblical Reasoning Relative Border Security

The Garrett Ashley Mullet Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 58:51


In Luke 11:14-23, Jesus answers a muttering in relation to his casting out a demon, and thereby allowing a man who was mute to speak, that he was casting out demons by the prince of demons. This is a significant passage in several ways. For starters, the fact of maligning the character and motivations of Jesus, by wild speculation that he is in league with evil, is an exceedingly wicked way to respond, instead of celebration and worship, to the Son of God making a man free and whole again who had been oppressed to that point. Another interesting thing is that this passage is what Abraham Lincoln famously referenced as president, in relation to the Civil War, as the Union and Confederacy squared off, over the issues of slavery and the rights of individual states to permit or regulate the institution as they saw fit, whatever the federal government had to say. "Every kingdom divided against itself is laid waste, and a divided household falls." I note that nowhere has it been argued, at least in my hearing, that Lincoln was taking this passage out of context, or applying it inappropriately, to the national situation. On the contrary, 'Honest Abe' is universally lauded for applying the principle inherent to what Jesus asserted. But other principles can be mined for meaningful application, including, again, to national politics from how Jesus answered the charge, that the source of his power was Beelzebul. For instance, what Jesus says about a strong man guarding his home has relevance for securing national borders. "When a strong man, fully armed, guards his own palace, his goods are safe; but when one stronger than he attacks him and overcomes him, he takes away his armor in which he trusted and divides his spoil." Friends, Romans, countrymen. Lend me your ears. This passage can teach us much about the self-evident appropriateness of defense against plunderers, when it is in our power to provide for such, as well as the consequences of not. That is, if you are not a strong man who guards your palace, you will be disarmed and despoiled by a stronger who desires your goods for themselves. Moreover, this is part of the reason why a house divided against itself cannot stand, since such a case might see a conspiracy form to ally with the stronger man who comes from outside to plunder. This, to my way of thinking, is a fair summation of President Joe Biden's treatment of security failures, which his administration has deliberately and consistently caused, on the border between the United States and Mexico. To those who would say that it is not loving for a Christian to argue for border security, I rejoin that it is not unloving for a husband and father to secure his house against lawless men. Nor either is it unloving for a national government to secure the borders. While honorable men might want to come to our country, and that to provide for and protect their own families better here than where they came from, the exact reasons which commendably motivate those men must also make them understand that the people they are trying to protect their households from in their native lands must not be let in here, or else there will be no advantage to either them or us. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/garrett-ashley-mullet/support

Galveston Unscripted | VisitGalveston.com
The Civil War Battle of Galveston | January 1, 1863

Galveston Unscripted | VisitGalveston.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 4:35


The battle of land and sea was short, with most of the casualties on the Union side. The Confederacy captured the Harriet Lane at Kuhn's Wharf. The Westfield struck a sandbar near modern-day Pelican Island and was intentionally destroyed by its commander to prevent the vessel from being captured and used by the Confederacy. The Battle of Galveston.  Follow Galveston Unscripted on Spotify or Apple Podcasts! More history content on Visit Galveston!Galveston Unscripted What is Galveston Unscripted?

3 Books With Neil Pasricha
Chapter 119: Steve Toltz on refining writing rituals and raising ravenous readers

3 Books With Neil Pasricha

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 114:28


What is your favorite novel?   It's a hard question. A big question! A question that makes most people hmmm for a while before they get to an answer. If they get to an answer! But I think I know mine. My favorite novel is A Fraction of a Whole by Steve Toltz.   First, the book came to me in an interesting way. I walked into wonderful indie bookstore Type on Queen Street West in downtown Toronto a couple days before my wedding to Leslie. I was looking for a good book to take on my honeymoon. (Insert obvious joke: "You wanted to read on your honeymoon?" But yes. I did. We did!)   I spent two or three hours with incredible bookseller Kalpna who painstakingly picked book after book off the shelf working through my way-too-long list of criteria: the book couldn't be too heavy, it couldn't be too *physically* large, but it also had to last the trip because I only had one tiny bag so, you know, it had to simultaneously be fairly dense. And it had to be fiction. And it had to be fast-paced. And it would be good if it was funny. And, and, and...   Well, Kalpna (bless her) kept pulling books off the shelves and I kept doing The First Five Pages Test to check every book for pace, tone, rhythm, style, and language. I must have flipped through a few dozen books before I ended up with A Fraction of a Whole by Steve Toltz. A book I'd never heard of! By a guy I'd never heard of!   Why? Well, the first sentence pulled me in: “You never hear about a sportsman losing his sense of smell in a tragic accident and for good reason; in order for the universe to teach excruciating lessons that we are unable to apply in later life, the sportsman must lose his legs, the philosopher his mind, the painter his eyes, the musician his ears, the chef his tongue.” I kept reading and it just took off from there. Piles of accolades littered across the jacket helped too: “Shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize”, "Finalist for The Guardian First Book Award", "Deserves a place next to The Confederacy of Dunces" (Wall Street Journal), "Soars like a rocket!" (LA Times), "A comic masterpiece!" (Ottawa Citizen) and on and on...   I fell deep into Steve's Toltz's absurd world of endless turns and surprise pearls of wisdom and spent years since then trying to land this interview with him! He is a deep and focused writer who is well off social media and doesn't do "the rounds" so it took some time. I emailed him some of my favorite lines from his books, sat in the front row to hear him speak at the International Festival of Authors, and waited -- just waited! -- for his next novel to come out so I could try again. And now it finally has...   Steve Toltz was born in 1972 in Sydney, Australia and he is the Man Booker-shortlisted award-winning novelist of three books including A Fraction of the Whole (2008), Quicksand (2016), and his newest Here Goes Nothing (2022). I personally recommend starting with A Fraction of the Whole because it was so deeply affecting to me and many folks I've recommended it to, but all three contain his wholly original sideways genius that constantly amazes and surprises.   Steve has lived in Montreal, Vancouver, New York, Barcelona, Paris, and Los Angeles and worked as a cameraman, telemarketer, security guard, private investigator, teacher, screenwriter, and, well, a lot more. I'm not sure he's right but he says in this interview: "If you want to become a novelist you sort of have to be a loser for a while.”   I was so excited to talk to Steve Toltz and we go deep on many things including: fear of death, Woody Allen, writing by hand in two-hour chunks, finding your voice, anonymity and success, Russian Literature, how to avoid quitting, how to start big projects, raising readers, books for boys, and, of course, the incredible Steve Toltz's 3 most formative books.   It is my privilege, pleasure, and honor to share this conversation. As always, I'll be in your left ear, Steve will be in your right, and we pull up a chair between us for you to come on in...   Let's flip the page into Chapter 119 now…   What You'll Learn: What does fear of death make us do? What are the different ways authors develop character in a novel? What is the value of a reading list? What is the connection between Woody Allen and Russian Literature? What misconceptions do we have about classical literature? What is Steve's writing process? What is the power of writing by hand? What does it mean to write with your subconscious? What is a writer's voice? How do writer's deal with anonymity and success? How do we not quit big projects? How can we learn to accept criticism? How do we separate the art from the artist? How do you raise a reader? What are the best books for young boys? How can we reclaim our focus?   You can find show notes and more information by clicking here: https://www.3books.co/chapters/119   Leave us a voicemail. Your message may be included in a future chapter: 1-833-READ-A-LOT.     Sign up to receive podcast updates here: https://www.3books.co/email-list    3 Books is a completely insane and totally epic 15-year-long quest to uncover and discuss the 1000 most formative books in the world. Each chapter discusses the 3 most formative books of one of the world's most inspiring people. Sample guests include: Brené Brown, David Sedaris, Malcolm Gladwell, Angie Thomas, Cheryl Strayed, Rich Roll, Soyoung the Variety Store Owner, Derek the Hype Man, Kevin the Bookseller, Vishwas the Uber Driver, Roxane Gay, David Mitchell, Vivek Murthy, Mark Manson, Seth Godin, Judy Blume and Quentin Tarantino. 3 Books is published on the lunar calendar with each of the 333 chapters dropped on the exact minute of every single new moon and every single full moon all the way up to 5:21 am on September 1, 2031. 3 Books is an Apple "Best Of" award-winning show and is 100% non-profit with no ads, no sponsors, no commercials, and no interruptions. 3 Books has 3 clubs including the End of the Podcast Club, the Cover to Cover Club, and the Secret Club, which operates entirely through the mail and is only accessible by calling 1-833-READ-A-LOT. Each chapter is hosted by Neil Pasricha, New York Times bestselling author of The Book of Awesome, The Happiness Equation, Two-Minute Mornings, etc. For more info check out: https://www.3books.co  

Buckets & Tea NBA Show
Seeing the Good in the Bad - Confederacy of Dunks

Buckets & Tea NBA Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:25


Season 10, Episode 275 RAPTORS: It's hard to find things to build off in a whac-a-mole type season, but there were some good things happening in that Indiana loss. What has looked good lately? Has Vision 6'9" failed? NBA: The Nuggets and the Celtics had a 45 minute delay because Time Lord dunked the ball too hard and the rim wasn't even. Ladders and levelers were involved. What is a similarly unpredictable and hilarious delay you could see feasibly happening in an NBA game and how would it be solved? Zach Edey is a fun college story of a 7'4" Toronto kid who could get drafted high. We love good stories on this pod. What current NBA player has a cool story that isn't talked about enough? With Chris Dart and Kevin Dowse! We're off again for Freddie's honeymoon. We'll be back January 25th! Can't wait to catch up on an interesting few weeks for the Raps. Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here. Raptors Talk @ the Rivoli tickets here! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
Seeing the Good in the Bad - Confederacy of Dunks

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:25


Season 10, Episode 275 RAPTORS: It's hard to find things to build off in a whac-a-mole type season, but there were some good things happening in that Indiana loss. What has looked good lately? Has Vision 6'9" failed? NBA: The Nuggets and the Celtics had a 45 minute delay because Time Lord dunked the ball too hard and the rim wasn't even. Ladders and levelers were involved. What is a similarly unpredictable and hilarious delay you could see feasibly happening in an NBA game and how would it be solved? Zach Edey is a fun college story of a 7'4" Toronto kid who could get drafted high. We love good stories on this pod. What current NBA player has a cool story that isn't talked about enough? With Chris Dart and Kevin Dowse! We're off again for Freddie's honeymoon. We'll be back January 25th! Can't wait to catch up on an interesting few weeks for the Raps. Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here. Raptors Talk @ the Rivoli tickets here! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Preble Hall
Two Rival Spies and the Secret Plot to Build a Confederate Navy

Preble Hall

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 51:53


Alex Rose's free Substack newsletter on historical intelligence: Spionage  https://alexanderrose.substack.comWebsite: www.alexrose.comTwitter at @AlexRoseWriter

Battles Of The American Civil War

The bloodiest day in American history. The battle of Antietam had a combined tally of 22,717 dead, wounded, or missing, the largest single day losses of the war and fifth highest casualty battle of the war. With a win, it turned the Union war effort around and led to Lincoln issuing the Emancipation Proclamation and ended any hopes the Confederacy had of France and Britain taking their side in the war. Get this show AD FREE and EARLY on patreon! patreon.com/bangdang

Threads From The National Tapestry: Stories From The American Civil War
057 - The Life Of Jefferson Davis: First and Final Confederate President

Threads From The National Tapestry: Stories From The American Civil War

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 81:50


About this episode:  There are some sixteen accounts about the life of the President of the Confederacy. Unlike his counterpart, Abraham Lincoln, this President, from the perspective of most historians, has not fared well.  Brittle, ill-tempered, one who held grudges, possessed poor political skills.  In short, a second-rate leader who loved bureaucracy and was unable to grow with responsibility.  When asked why the Confederacy lost the war, Southern-born David Potter, a professor of history at both Yale and Stanford Universities, commented that this Chief Executive should shoulder much of the blame.  Writing some two decades ago, another historian and biographer, William Cooper, Jr., wrote that we should look at a man from his time and not condemn him for not being a man of our time.  Though that seems to fly in the face of current sensitivities and agendas, that is what we, now, shall attempt to do. This is the story of a man, like Robert E. Lee, who is a marquee figurehead for a short-lived nation whose Constitution supported states' rights and slavery.  A man subjected to the bolts of lightning flung his way for being its elected leader.  This is the story of the first and only President of the Confederate States of America, Jefferson F. Davis.     ----more----   Some Characters Mentioned In This Episode: Joseph Davis Franklin Pierce Howell Cobb William L. Yancey Leonidas Polk Braxton Bragg   For Further Reading: Jefferson Davis, American by William J. Cooper, Jr.   Get The Guide: Want to learn more about the Civil War? A great place to start is Fred's guide, The Civil War: A History of the War between the States from Workman Publishing. The guide is in its 9th printing.   Producer: Dan Irving   Thank you to our sponsor Bob Graesser, Raleigh Civil War Round Table's editor of The Knapsack newsletter and the Round Table's webmaster at http://www.raleighcwrt.org  

Story in the Public Square
Ty Seidule on Challenging the Myth of the Lost Cause of the Confederacy

Story in the Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 28:12


History and memory are two different things, one is built on facts and documents and the other is built on tradition, myth and politics. Ty Seidule dissects the history of the American Civil War and the legacy of the myths it spawned about the cause of the war. Seidule retired from the U.S. Army as a brigadier general after 36 years of service. Seidule was then appointed Vice Chair of the National Commission on Base Renaming by Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin in 2021. He has served as Professor Emeritus of History at West Point for two decades, is a visiting professor at Hamilton College and a New American fellow. Seidule is passionate about stopping the spread of misinformation about American history, especially the Civil War. His Southern upbringing contributed to his great reverence for Robert E. Lee and a misguided understanding of the Civil War. Through years of reflection and study of history, his opinion on the issue has changed significantly and he now uses his platform to deconstruct the narrative that Lee was a hero and challenges the idea that Confederate soldiers were underdogs fighting for a noble cause. Seidule asserts that the Civil War was unequivocally about the South's resistance to the abolishment of slavery and ignoring this history continues to cause harm. He has published numerous articles, books and videos on the topic, including his latest book, “Robert E. Lee and Me: A Southerner's Reckoning with the Myth of the Lost Cause,” which was published this year.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hashtag History
EP 120: The United Daughters of the Confederacy (with Stephanie and Tux from Beyond Reproach)

Hashtag History

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 60:48


This week on Hashtag History for our Season Finale, we have the wonderful Stephanie and Tux from Beyond Reproach on the show to discuss the United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Lost Cause mythology. Follow Hashtag History on Instagram @hashtaghistory_podcast for all of the pictures mentioned in this episode. Citations for all sources can be located on our website at www.HashtagHistory-Pod.com. You can also check out our website for super cute merch! You can now sponsor a cocktail and get a shout-out on air! Just head to www.buymeacoffee.com/hashtaghistory or head to the Support tab on our website! You can locate us on www.Patreon.com/hashtaghistory where you can donate $1 a month to our Books and Booze Supply. All of your support goes a long ways and we are endlessly grateful! To show our gratitude, all Patreon Supporters receive an automatic 15% OFF all merchandise in our merchandise store, bonus Hashtag Hangouts episodes, a shoutout on social media, and stickers! THANKS FOR LISTENING! - Rachel and Leah

Citation Needed
Sherman's March to the Sea

Citation Needed

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 35:47


Sherman's March to the Sea (also known as the Savannah campaign or simply Sherman's March) was a military campaign of the American Civil War conducted through Georgia from November 15 until December 21, 1864, by William Tecumseh Sherman, major general of the Union Army. The campaign began with Sherman's troops leaving the captured city of Atlanta on November 15 and ended with the capture of the port of Savannah on December 21. His forces followed a "scorched earth" policy, destroying military targets as well as industry, infrastructure, and civilian property, disrupting the Confederacy's economy and transportation networks. The operation debilitated the Confederacy and helped lead to its eventual surrender. Sherman's decision to operate deep within enemy territory without supply lines was unusual for its time, and the campaign is regarded by some historians as an early example of modern warfare or total war. Our theme song was written and performed by Anna Bosnick. If you'd like to support the show on a per episode basis, you can find our Patreon page here.  Be sure to check our website for more details.

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
We're Going Streaking - Confederacy of Dunks

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 54:31


Season 10, Episode 274 RAPTORS: This is now the 3rd biggest losing streak in the Masai era. How will Masai and Bobby respond to this ongoing slump? We've all been Raptors fans for a long time. There's been years of some real opaque darkness. We end up talking about our darkest moments as fans of this franchise! NBA: The Grizzlies posted a video where they do a big walk to a song they love before every game. What other teams should do a bit of a tunnel dance? What player is having the best redemption year so far? With Adam Christie and Dan Galea! This is our final pod of the year. Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays! We'll see you in the New Year. Thanks for listening and supporting us! Keep your chins up! Raps will figure this out. Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dead Cat
'This Monolithic Other That Is Acting in Some Dark Confederacy Against What Is True and Good in the World' (w/Antonio García Martínez)

Dead Cat

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 77:00 Very Popular


On last week's Dead Cat episode with ex-Facebook security chief Alex Stamos, we spent a lot of time trying to steel man the free speech moderation crowd's argument — even though none of us seemed to hold it ourselves. The other week, we had Jason Calacanis on the show but he didn't want to talk about Elon Musk. This week, finally we have someone on the podcast who is a defender of the so-called free speech regime and is also willing to talk to skeptical journalists about it on air. Antonio García Martínez, the author of Chaos Monkeys and startup CEO, came on the show. On his Substack The Pull Request, he defended the free speech argument in April — before Musk acquired Twitter. (I've written that no one, Musk included, was plausibly going to govern social media under a free speech standard so invoking free speech is a pure marketing ploy. I think that position has been vindicated by Musk's recent actions.) More broadly, García Martínez, or AGM as he is widely known, is someone who has pushed back against the tech media and leftwing employees. With Dead Cat co-host Tom Dotan, we set out to make sense of the culture war between tech “builders” and reporters. Give it a listenRead the automated transcript Get full access to Newcomer at www.newcomer.co/subscribe

Power Station
Here in the heart of the confederacy some forward-looking folks worked to put teeth in a law intended to stop discrimination

Power Station

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 32:59


Every civil rights law enacted in America is preceded by a past we have not fully reckoned with. The Civil Rights Act of 1968, following the assassination of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr, was an antidote to the racism embedded in state and national policy making, from segregationist zoning laws to bank and insurance redlining. Known as the Fair Housing Act, it prohibits discrimination in housing based on race, religion, and national origin, later expanded to include gender as a protected class. After its passage, community members in Virginia strategized to make it enforceable. They landed on testing to demonstrate how white and Black families with the same means experienced disperate treatment and results when applying for apartment or bank loans. These forward-thinking volunteers launched Housing Opportunities Made Equal of Virginia in 1971, now led by civil rights lawyer Thomas Okuda Fitzpatrick. He champions those who have been discriminated against, including on grounds of newly protected categories in Virginia: disability, sexual orientation, and source of funds. HOME advances systemic change in industry practices through education and legal action. And Tom reminds us that making headway on all social movements starts with ensuring justice in housing.         

The Road to Now
Uncivil Christmas: The Civil War & Christmas in Williamsburg w/ Carson Hudson

The Road to Now

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 50:10


Bob & Ben speak w/ historian Carson Hudson, whose program “Uncivil Christmas” tells of life in Williamsburg, Virginia during the years of the Civil War. Carson explains the politics and culture of the era, the major role that music played in uniting (and dividing) Americans during the war, the challenges of understanding how people in the past experienced war, and the ways that the Civil War still looms large in American culture today. Carson Hudson is Educational Program Developer at Colonial Williamsburg and a specialist in the history of war and music history. He is the author of multiple books on Williamsburg history, including Hidden History of Civil War Williamsburg (The History Press, 2019). To attend one of Carson's site tours, visit www.Colonial Williamsburg.com. This is a rebroadcast of episode #155, which originally aired on December 23, 2019. The original episode was edited by Gary Fletcher. This reair was edited by Ben Sawyer.   This episode was edited by Gary Fletcher.

Raiders of the Podcast
A Confederacy of Dunstes

Raiders of the Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2022


    This week- teenage rebellion and racism.      Jay takes the bus 2-hours each way to get a better education so he can fulfill his dream of carpet bombing the Middle East for the US Navy. Nicole is a Congressman's daughter in the middle of a pretty average teenage rebellion with an added layer of unaddressed trauma. When they get together... stuff happens... kinda... and a lesson is learned... sorta... Crazy/Beautiful.     Kazuma is searching for his lost sister. He finds help from Mako, leader of the girl gang The Alleycats. Unfortunately, he arrives just hours before Baron, leader of the Eagles, decides to rid the town of its mixed race population. Will Kazuma find his sister? Will Baron succeed? Where will Mako and the Alleycats stand when caught between the two? Stray Cat Rock: Sex Hunter.     Also Dave jumps into the Holidays, Kevin Hallmarks the days, and Tyler joins the local Reign in Hell Deer biker gang to burn all festive festoonery.    Join us, won't you?  Episode 288- A Confederacy of Dunstes

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
Panic at the Three Throw - Confederacy of Dunks

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 64:29


Season 10, Episode 273 RAPTORS: It's panic season. Maybe it's the Tampa year and things are about to fall apart or maybe it's last year and everything is fine. Where is the optimism for Raptors fans right now? The Boston Celtics were having a disaster season and then they traded for Derick White and everything changed. Is there a Derick White style trade for the Raps? NBA: The league just changed a bunch of its award names to famous players. What are some new awards that need to be created? Which team is the most exciting right now? With Katie Heindl and Antony Hall! Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

History Unplugged Podcast
Failed Futures: The Confederacy Had Colossal Plans After the Civil War to Spread Slavery Across the Globe And Become Fabulously Wealthy

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 58:57


Confederate leaders were nothing if not dreamers. They did not merely want to maintain slavery in a quiet corner of the world and hold onto antiquated traditions. They saw themselves as true progressives that would lead a neo-feudal order, becoming massively wealthy with trade, and dominate the Western Hemisphere.In the antebellum era, leading Southern politicians, diplomats, clerics, planters, farmers, manufacturers, and merchants preached a transformative, world-historical role for the Confederacy, persuading many of their compatriots to fight not merely to retain what they had but to gain their future empire. Impervious to reality, their vision of future world leadership provided a vitally important, underappreciated motivation to form an independent Confederate republic.Today's guest is Adrian Brettle, author of Colossal Ambitions: Confederate Planning for a Post-Civil War World. We explore how leading Confederate thinkers envisioned their postwar nation—its relationship with the United States, its place in the Americas, and its role in the global order. While some Confederate commentators saw wartime industrialization as pointing toward a different economic future, most Confederates saw their society as revolving once more around coercive labor, staple crop production, and exports in the war's wake.We can't know what would have happened if the Confederacy had a chance to implement their plans. But when we put ourselves in their shoes, seeing how they drew up plans for a future that was extremely plausible, we understand better the mindset of the leaders of the Confederacy at one of the most important moments in American history.

Chatter on Books
Kate Anderson Brower – “Elizabeth Taylor: The Grit and Glamour of an Icon”

Chatter on Books

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022 63:16


Don and Petie Kladstrup – “Champagne Charlie: The Frenchman Who Taught Americans to Love Champagne.” COB has a double header.  Wash Post editor and writer and author of the Miss America history “There She Was,” Amy Argetsinger joins David and Torie.  They break down Christmas movies and books and the women crushing best sellers lists. Award winning journalists who love wine, baseball and France, Don and Petie Kladstrup, zoom in from Paris to share “Champagne Charlie,” the remarkable story of the 1850s Frenchman who stormed America, drove sales and almost died when charged with spying for the Confederacy. Then a COB fave, Kate Anderson Brower, returns with “Elizabeth Taylor: The Grit and Glamour of an Icon,” the extraordinarily comprehensive authorized biography of the legendary icon whose life as mother, wife, actress and activist is so much more than you knew.

Off-Leash Arts
Author-Columnist-Political Commentator Steve Phillips: How We Win the Civil War

Off-Leash Arts

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2022


Steve Phillips suspected there would be no “red wave” in November. One of the most astute political thinkers of our time, he showed us, in his book Brown is the New White: How the Demographic Revolution Created a New American Majority, that people of color in combination with progressive whites comprise the majority in this country, a majority that put a Black man in the White House twice. In his new book, How We Win the Civil War: Securing a Multiracial Democracy and Ending White Supremacy Forever, he sheds light on the forces that seek to undermine our democracy, drawing a straight line from the Confederacy to Donald Trump, and illuminates the path forward by highlighting the organizations and individuals whose sustained efforts have transformed the political landscape in Georgia, Arizona, and beyond. In this conversation, Steve shares his core motivation for writing this book, which he describes as a culmination of his life's work up to this point. We also discuss his writing routine, the surprises he uncovered in his research, and the examples, past and present, that inspire him to continue the fight.

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
Can't Find a Rhythm - Confederacy of Dunks

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 54:49


Season 10, Episode 272 RAPTORS: Fred has been struggling since he came back from his flu. Where should the concern level be at with Fred? This Raps team is .500 and can't seem to find a rhythm. They've yet to win three or lose three in a row. What's the key to gaining some momentum? NBA: The Sacramento Kings "light the beam." What other teams need to do some fun post-game celebrations? There is always conversation about who should "blow it up." Who is your "don't panic and stay the course" team? Special guests from the Raptors Republic multiverse: The man they call Mac from Runnin' Off The Screen and Cathryn Naiker from Buckets and Tea! Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

History Unplugged Podcast
Failed Futures: The Post-War Plans of Alexander the Great, the Confederacy, and the Soviet Union that Never Happened

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2022 1:56


This is a preview of an upcoming series on this podcast that looks at the detailed post-war plans from generals and heads of state that never came about because said leaders either died or lost their war. Alexander the Great was said to have plans to launch conquest along the Mediterranean all the way to Spain and send naval expeditions around Arabia and Africa. The Confederacy wanted to dominate global trade and fortify slavery in the Western Hemisphere. The Soviet Union always had plans to spread communism around the globe. We will look at each of these plans in detail, not so much to speculate "what if" but to understand the mindsets of these people in question.

Betrouwbare Bronnen
312 - Schurend verleden - over cancelculture, politiek en geschiedenis

Betrouwbare Bronnen

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 91:04


In Leiden moest een schilderij van ‘sigaren rokende witte mannen' (het universiteitsbestuur in 1974) weg en in Riga bliezen ze een 80 meter hoge betonnen Sovjet-obelisk op. Vladimir Poetin stal onlangs uit de Oekraïense stad Cherson het lijk van Grigory Potjomkin en de ruiterstandbeelden van Robert E. Lee verdwijnen uit ‘the Old South'. Jaap Jansen en PG Kroeger duiken in deze editie van Betrouwbare Bronnen in de complexe vraagstukken rond 'schurend verleden' en 'schuldige plekken'.De felle discussie in Odessa over het magnifieke beeld van tsarina Catharina II bewijst tenminste één ding: het verleden is eigenlijk nooit passé. Tegelijkertijd wil Cherson de doodskist terug van haar stichter, de geliefde generaal van diezelfde vorstin. Deze innerlijke contradicties geven wel aan hoe lastig en ingewikkeld de debatten kunnen zijn over wat we in onze tijd nu wel en niet uit het verleden willen erkennen, meedragen en doen vergeten. En kan dat überhaupt, vergeten?PG analyseert dat er vaak drie motieven aan de orde komen in zulke discussies over pijn of ongemak uit het verleden. Het eerste is de behoefte eerbewijzen aan tirannen en hun handlangers niet meer te accepteren. Daar zijn pregnante voorbeelden van. Van het verwijderen van de opgebaarde Jozef Stalin aan het Rode Plein en het opblazen in Praag van het grootste standbeeld ooit in Europa tot het verwijderen van het praalgraf van dictator Francisco Franco. Daarom ook zijn in Duitsland vele Hindenburgpleinen en straten verwijderd, maar staan de Bismarckmonumenten nog overeind.Het tweede motief is dat van het wegnemen van een eenzijdige, soms zelfs fictieve monumentalisering van aspecten en imago's uit het verleden. Daarom strijkt men in de vroegere Confederacy in Amerika nu de 'Stars and Bars'-vlaggen, werd Batavia Jakarta en kreeg Karl Marx Stadt in de DDR na de 'Wiedervereinigung' zijn oude naam Chemnitz terug.Het derde motief is de wens een nieuwe, eigen identiteit op te poetsen, zowel in positieve als in negatieve zin: dít zijn we of dát zijn we niet. Ziedaar waarom ze aan de Leidse universiteit dat schilderij meenden te moeten verwijderen. Ze kenden er historie noch betekenis van. PG vertelt over twee van de daarop geschilderde mannen met rookwaren, die hij beide goed kende!Bij dit derde motief zien we hoe Berlijn de paradeplaats van het DDR-regime verving door een herbouwd paleis, maar twee standbeelden van communistische denkers slechts een beetje verplaatste. Hierbij speelt ook de discussie rond de beelden van Comte de Richelieu in Odessa en dat van zijn opdrachtgeefster, de tsarina. Om dit motief draait het ook als we discussiëren over een 'Zeeheldenbuurt', een 'Indische buurt' en een 'Transvaalbuurt'. En ondertussen struikelen we daar over Stolpersteine…PG sprak er al eens over met Vaira Vike-Freiberga. En op dit terrein is ook het denken van de Duitse historica Aleida Assmann behulpzaam. In een gesprek met PG wees zij op het belang en de noodzaak dat de herinnering aan de ene tirannie die aan een andere niet mag relativeren en ook niet mag trivialiseren. Bovendien moeten wij hierbij een al te eurocentrische blik proberen te vermijden. Dat bleek ook al uit het gesprek in de aflevering met Simon Sebag Montefiore. Het verleden is dan ook nimmer voorbij!***Deze aflevering is mede mogelijk gemaakt met donaties van luisteraars die we hiervoor hartelijk danken. Word ook vriend van de show!Heb jij belangstelling om in onze podcast te adverteren of ons te sponsoren? Dat zou helemaal mooi zijn! Stuur voor informatie een mailtje naar adverteren@dagennacht.nl***Hieronder nog meer informatie. Op Apple kun je soms niet alles lezen. De complete tekst vind je altijd hier***Verder luisteren311 - De wereld volgens Simon Sebag Montefiore300 - Ethische politiek: het bijzondere Nederland met zijn 'moreel hoogstaande opvattingen'259 - De omgevallen boekenkast: leestips van PG!246 - Kuifje, Kafka en Klompé: de nieuwe eurobiljetten!231 - Geschiedenis als politiek wapen185 - De Amerikaanse Burgeroorlog (1): Black Lives Matter en George Floyd, hoe de burgeroorlog op de VS nog altijd zijn stempel drukt228 - De Amerikaanse Burgeroorlog (2): hoe Abraham Lincoln onvoorbereid de strijd in ging263 - De Amerikaanse Burgeroorlog (3): de overwinning van Abraham Lincoln en Ulysses Grant253 - Poetins bizarre toespraak: hoe de president de geschiedenis van Oekraïne herschrijft138 - In het voetspoor van Amerikaanse Presidenten in Nederland105 - 75 jaar bevrijding: Dagelijks leven in Nazi-Duitsland65 - 'Vroeger was alles beter', PG Kroeger: nostalgie als strategie en politiek wapen58 - PG over 70 jaar China, de Volksrepubliek van Mao, Deng en Xi40 - PG en de geniale broers Von Humboldt13 - PG Kroeger over liberalen, volkscultuur en Stalin***Tijdlijn00:00:00 – Deel 100:44:54 – Deel 200:54:19 – Advertentie voor De Binnenkamer + Deel 301:31:00 – Einde Zie het privacybeleid op https://art19.com/privacy en de privacyverklaring van Californië op https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture
William Cross on Winslow Homer / Looking Long, Finding Grace in Crisis, and Painting Truth to Power

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 3, 2022 65:29


[Help us reach our $25,000 end of year goal! Give online to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture today.]We often think that telling the truth only applies to words. But American painter Winslow Homer (February 24, 1836 – September 29, 1910) told the truth in pencil, water color, and famously, oil paintings. Coming of age in antebellum America, starting his artistic career as the Civil War began, and dramatically painting truth to power during the complicated and failed Reconstruction era—Winslow Homer looked long and hard at America in its moral complications and struggle toward justice. But he also looked long and hard at the natural world—a harsh, sometimes brutal, but nonetheless ordered world. Sometimes red in tooth and claw, sometimes shining rays of grace and glory upon human bodies, Homer's depiction of the human encounter with the world as full of energy and full of spirited struggle, and therefore dignity.William Cross is author and biographer of Winslow Homer: American Passage—a biography of an artist who painted America in conflict and crisis, with a moral urgency and an unflinching depiction of the human spirit's struggle for survival and search for grace.  As a consultant to art and history museums, a curator, and an art critic and scholar, when Bill sees the world, he's looking long for beauty and grace, and often finding it in art. In this conversation, Bill Cross and I discuss the morally urgent art and perspective of Winslow Homer. We talk about the historical context of American life before, during, and after the Civil War. Including the role of Christianity and religious justification of the Confederacy and the institution of slavery. Bill comments on the beautiful and bracing expression of Black life in Winslow Homer's work—truly radical for the time. But Homer's work goes beyond human social and political struggles. We also discuss the role of nature in his work—particularly the human struggle against the power and indifference of the ocean and the wild, untamed animal kingdom.Throughout, you might consider referencing each of the paintings we discuss, all of which are available in the show notes and can be found online for further viewing and reflection.Show NotesGive toward the Yale Center for Faith & Culture $25,000 matching campaign. Donate online here, or send a William R. Cross, Winslow Homer: American Passage (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2022)Winslow Homer: CrosscurrentsPaintingsClick below for painting referencesPrisoners from the Front (1866)The Brush Harrow (1866)Dressing for the Carnival (1877)Visit from the Old Mistress (1876)The Gulf Stream (1885)Fox Hunt (1893)About William CrossWilliam R. Cross is an independent scholar and a consultant to art and history museums. He served as the curator of Homer at the Beach: A Marine Painter's Journey, 1869–1880, a nationally renowned 2019 exhibition at the Cape Ann Museum on the formation of Winslow Homer as a marine painter. He is the chairman of the advisory board of the Yale Center for Faith and Culture. Cross and his wife, Ellen, the parents of two grown sons, live on Cape Ann, north of Boston, Massachusetts.About Winslow Homer: American PassageThe definitive life of the painter who forged American identity visually, in art and illustration, with an impact comparable to that of Walt Whitman and Mark Twain in poetry and prose—yet whose own story has remained largely untold.In 1860, at the age of twenty-four, Winslow Homer (1836–1910) sold Harper's Weekly two dozen wood engravings, carved into boxwood blocks and transferred to metal plates to stamp on paper. One was a scene that Homer saw on a visit to Boston, his hometown. His illustration shows a crowd of abolitionists on the brink of eviction from a church; at their front is Frederick Douglass, declaring “the freedom of all mankind.”Homer, born into the Panic of 1837 and raised in the years before the Civil War, came of age in a nation in crisis. He created multivalent visual tales, both quintessentially American and quietly replete with narrative for and about people of all races and ages. Whether using pencil, watercolor, or, most famously, oil, Homer addressed the hopes and fears of his fellow Americans and invited his viewers into stories embedded with universal, timeless questions of purpose and meaning.Like his contemporaries Twain and Whitman, Homer captured the landscape of a rapidly changing country with an artist's probing insight. His tale is one of America in all its complexity and contradiction, as he evolved and adapted to the restless spirit of invention transforming his world. In Winslow Homer: American Passage, William R. Cross reveals the man behind the art. It is the surprising story of a life led on the front lines of history. In that life, this Everyman made archetypal images of American culture, endowed with a force of moral urgency through which they speak to all people today.Production NotesThis podcast featured William R. CrossEdited and Produced by Evan RosaHosted by Evan RosaA Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/aboutSupport For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give

Nantucket Atheneum Podcast
The Bonds, The Mitchells & The Dawn of Time: The Shocking Truth Behind Maria's Discovery of the Comet

Nantucket Atheneum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 13:30


If you do a Google image search for Maria Mitchell, one of the top results will be a portrait of her elegantly dressed, seated, and looking though a telescope. This image romanticizes and perpetuates the story of Maria as a lone astronomer on a distant island discovering a comet and being the first woman awarded the gold medal from the King of Denmark. But like most success stories, it's not nearly that simple.Credits:This has been a production of the Nantucket Atheneum. Written, edited and narrated by Janet Forest Special thanks to the Atheneum's Reference Library Associate Jim Borzilleri and Historian and Deputy Director of the Maria Mitchell Association Jascin Leonardo Finger for their research and insights.Voice of Alexander Dallas Bache performed by Andrew Cromartie.Resources and additional information:•Click HERE for an image of the Bonds' American Method Device. Source: Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Department of the History of Science, Harvard University• More on the fraying of the relationship between the Bonds and the US Coast Survey (USCS)The 1851 Exhibition marked a turning point in Bache's relationship with the Bonds. Bache had previously considered the Bonds as overly compliant towards Airy and the Liverpool Observatory during their longitude work for the USCS, and now he quietly began looking for an alternative to the Harvard College Observatory (HCO).  The situation worsened when George Bond got into a scientific fight with several of Bache's allies around 1854; a few had Harvard and USCS/Nautical Almanac connections, and almost all were part of the "Lazzaroni" group headed by Prof. Agassiz at Harvard.  When the Lazzaroni pushed the creation of the National Academy of Sciences in early 1863, George Bond was conspicuously excluded.That said, most of Bache's attempts to cut out the Bonds ended in failure. HCO and Bond & Sons kept innovating and improving their products, and the HCO continued to be a significant "default" latitude point for North America.   It was only ten years later, with the start of the Civil War, that Bache finally succeeded. Matthew Maury, the head of the US Naval Observatory joined the Confederacy, and a Bache ally took over the USNO. The Nautical Almanac moved to Washington, and coastal survey work ended, leaving the HCO isolated and underfunded. Most of the HCO's assistants enlisted for the Union, and George Bond, now widowed and working almost alone, gave up coffee and newspapers to help cut costs. The HCO was still doing important work and was critical to the success of Bond & Sons, but the center of gravity had shifted to the latter, now run by Richard Bond and John Clinch. The Nantucket Atheneum is located at 1 India Street in Nantucket, MA.You can visit us online at www.nantucketatheneum.org 

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
A Reformat of a Role Player - Confederacy of Dunks

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 55:15


RAPTORS: Boucher has been incredibly consistent as the Raptors 6th man this year. Are there other role players out there reformatting their game like Boucher? Pascal is back and so are the vibes. Thad and Juancho started over Scottie and Gary and we saw some funky lineups. As the team gets healthier, what is your ideal rotation? NBA: The league is all-in on betting. What are some other revenue streams the league should consider? The quarter mark of the season has been reached. Which team has improved the most? With Imman Adan and Pat Ronan! Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

America at War
140 The Civil War: Sherman's March Through The Carolinas

America at War

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 20:35


In our last full episode devoted to the western theater, we know turn our attention to Sherman's next act, his march through the Carolina's. When he completed his march across Georgia, the thought was to reunite with Grant. Instead, Sherman wanted to march through the heart of the Carolina's to the border of Virginia. Imperiling Lee's supply line. Grant agreed to the idea. Sherman marched through the heart of the Confederacy, further wrecking the fragile Confederate economy, and driving morale down to the bottom of the barrel. Despite Jefferson Davis naming Robert E. Lee General-in-chief of the Confederacy, it was too little, too late. The end of the war was in sight. Take a listen! Have a question, comment, or compliment? Contact us at americawarpodcast@gmail.com. You can also leave comments and your questions on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/americaatwarpodcast/. Thanks for listening!

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
Non-Injury Worries to Ponder - Confederacy of Dunks

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 53:28


Season 10, Episode 270 RAPTORS: So far, the negative thru-line of the year has been injuries with only Koloko and O.G. playing every game. Other than injuries, what about this squad is worrisome? Herbie Kuhn was recently celebrated by the Midland Cultural Centre. What is something that we could add to Herbie's in-game repertoire? NBA: What's the biggest NBA story line that no one is talking about? Former Raptor Yuta Watanabe is lighting it up. Which player on a new team is performing the best? A capella stings and more, with Chris Walder and Alan Shane Lewis! Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Underground Over the Air
Episode 44 - The Jared Radke Thanksgiving Special

Underground Over the Air

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 93:07


THIS WEEK in the Monadnock Region, a VERY SPECIAL EPISODE (VSE) celebrating Thanksgiving with the only Monadnock Underground writer to ever receive a content complaint, Duke of Atlantic City JARED RADKE. This turned into a remarkably personal, intimate episode filled with wild stories you do NOT want to miss. Also, we are pleased to UPDATE everyone that Rachel's stolen Subaru has been FOUND! (But it's probably a total loss) (Jared's Fall 2022 Season piece ran today on M/U - find it here: https://www.monadnockunderground.com/the-devastating-day/) What follows is ROLLICKING RIDE discussing the issues of the day and the matters that haunt us and make us grateful in this wonderful life we all have. * Does anybody remember the Wikipedia Oracle (Jared teaches us all a game we can STILL play) * We talk about the vagaries of the writing process (special guest appearance from another M/U award-winning FAVORITE, Rachel Mussenden) * What is appropriate for children to read? Especially impressionable teens - should we keep them away from the YA?? (The answer is yes, how about Catch-22, Vonnegut, Confederacy of Dunces??) * We talk about the wonders (?) of Atlantic City (and Chris tells some legally questionable stories which fortunately are past the statute of limitations) * The dangers of road rage (some people get calmer as they get older, some go another way) * Traditional Thanksgiving topics like strip clubs and sports gambling (and the merits of various cigarette brands) * Brief discussion of the NH Executive Council (blowing the minds of New Jersey residents everywhere) * Connections between that weird Croydon gaming preserve and the Bohemian Grove (and the chicken of Boston Market) * New Jersey politics might be more interesting (dare we say) * Why is Chris wearing the captain hat? Check out Monadnock Underground's Fall 2022 season: www.monadnockunderground.com/tag/fall2022season/ Contact us: Hate mail and information about how to send us your awesome calendar photos: diloreto@monadnockunderground.com Submissions: submit@monadnockunderground.com Advertising/Sponsorship: zoe@monadnockunderground.com www.gomonadnock.com/ www.monadnockunderground.com/ This episode was produced by Sound Lord Chad Patterson of Studio 117. GO TO Studio 117 - www.studio117.net/ - for ALL your mixing, mastering, and recording needs in 2022 AND BEYOND. He is a hero. PLUS he's got a band now and you can BOOK THEM: www.facebook.com/DownByTen/

Key Battles of American History
Bonus Episode - The New Mexico Campaign in the Civil War

Key Battles of American History

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 25:20


In early 1862, a Confederate force consisting mainly of Texans launched an invasion of the New Mexico territory. After a quick and largely unopposed march, they ran into a Union force defending the territory. Would the Confederates succeed in their quest to make New Mexico part of the Confederacy, or would the Union defenders drive them away? Listen to this special bonus episode, and you will find out!

Mysteries at the Museum
Outlaw Shoes, Astrochimp, Message in a Bottle

Mysteries at the Museum

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 42:41


At the Carbon County Museum in Wyoming is a pair of men's Oxford shoes. What role did they play in one of the most gruesome tales of the Wild West? The National Museum of the US Air Force in Dayton, Ohio is home to one object that cannot fly: a miniature spacesuit. What happened to the unconventional space pioneer who wore it? In the archives of The Museum of the Confederacy in Virginia is a coded wartime message, found inside a glass bottle. What does this message in a bottle say, and who wrote it?For even more Mysteries at the Museum, head to discovery+. Go to discoveryplus.com/mystery to start your 7-day free trial today. Terms apply.

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
Early Season Injury Grind - Confederacy of Dunks

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 57:23


Season 10, Episode 269 RAPTORS: The team is 3-3 without Pascal so far. Of the non-injured players, who has been the most impressive and who has been the most underwhelming? The Raptors play a really aggressive style of defense. Is there any chance this is contributing to injuries and fatigue? NBA: If you had to recast NBA's TNT with three current NBA players and an Ernie, who would you choose? Whimpering for Wemby: By seasons end, which teams will actually be tanking for Wemby/Scoot? With Kevin Dowse and Matt McCready. Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast
"Wayward Sisters, Depart in Peace" Winfield Scott: Quote or No Quote?

Professor Buzzkill History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 7:54


General Winfield Scott famously advised Lincoln to let the "wayward sisters" of the Confederacy "depart in peace." Or did he? Was it that simple? And what does this quote's context tell us about political divisions nowadays? Episode 486

Red Star Radio
The Reluctance of the Bourgeoisie - Red Star Daily #20

Red Star Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2022 60:02


In this episode of the bulleting I look at the rotten propagandistic coverage of the Russian withdrawal from Kherson and the perpetual role of ex-Trotskyites as neo-cons and pet empire intellectuals. The bulk of the episode though is taken up with an examination of the way in which the Russian bourgeoisie are acting bears some similarities to the reluctance of the English bourgeoisie to actually take the war against the king seriously. I also discuss the similar process that went on in the American civil war with the refusal of the US capitalists to commit seriously to the war against the Confederacy until 3 years of war had gone by. Outro Music is 'One of These Days' by Pink Floyd Episode Artwork is 'Voroshilov and Members of the Revolutionary Military Council' by the Soviet Artist Gennady Ivanovich Prokopinsky

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
Projecting a November Without Siakam - Confederacy of Dunks

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 59:19


Season 10, Episode 268 RAPS: Last year the Raptors went 8-6 without Siakam. Is that a fair expectation for this year or should fans expect more? Chemistry is a weird thing. What about this squad's chemistry has been surprising so far? NBA: Which Non-American celebrity or pair of celebrities should buy an NBA team? Which team would they buy and what's the vibe? Which team coming out of the gates slowly is going to get it together and be good? With Sean Woodley and Chili Johnson! Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?!
HISTORY LESSONS: Glory (1989)

Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022


CLICK TO SUBSCRIBE ON YOUR FAVORITE PODCATCHER CONTENT WARNING: Discussion of slavery, racism, flogging and whipping, war, death, violent death, Civil War, Confederacy, white savior tropes. Our next history lesson comes from the Civil War, told through the perspective of one of the first black regiments to fight against the Confederacy. And as far as history movies go, this one actually manages to do a great job of capturing the nature, if not all the details, of the subject it's portraying. More importantly, though, a then-new Edward Zwick took helm of a story that hadn't been told on screen - that of the black men, free and former slaves, who took up arms to fight against the South in the hopes of freedom. And both he and screenwriter Kevin Jarre do it in such a thoughtful, earnest way, that even when the movie falls into cliches, it's only because the history and the story are that powerful. At its core, this is a movie about men in war, living complex lives with complex histories, and coming together, in one horrible yet powerful moment, to fight for a common cause. And that message resonates no matter who's watching this film. Load your rifles as fast as you can as we continue our History Lessons series with 1989's Glory on Macintosh & Maud Haven't Seen What?! You can email us with feedback at macintoshandmaud@gmail.com, or you can connect with us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. Also please subscribe, rate and review the show on your favorite podcatcher, and tell your friends. Intro and outro music taken from the Second Movement of Ludwig von Beethoven's 9th Symphony. Licensed under an Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Hong Kong (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0 HK) license. To hear the full performance or get more information, visit the song page at the Internet Archive. Excerpt taken from "Closing Credits" from the original motion picture soundtrack to the film Glory, conducted and composed by James Horner. © 1989 Tri-Star Pictures, Inc. Excerpt taken from the film Glory is © 1989 TriStar Pictures, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Excerpt taken from the film All Quiet on the Western Front is © 1930 Universal Pictures Corporation. Renewed 1958 Universal Pictures Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

The Dustin Gold Standard
The Dustin Gold Nugget 56: If You Live In The South You Can Believe You Still Live Under The Confederacy, But It's Just Not So. The Same Rings True For The Republic.

The Dustin Gold Standard

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 22:40


In Episode 56 of "The Dustin Gold Nugget," Dustin briefly discusses energy certificates, the World Economic Forum's 8 predictions for 2030, the circular economy, and how property works under the technocracy. It's time to face reality. Once you know the truth, you can have hope for the future. True hope, not meaningless false hope. Join the discussion and get the ad-free video version of this podcast: Paine.TV/gold Follow Dustin on Twitter: Twitter.com/dustingoldshow and Twitter.com/hackableanimal Get involved with the Telegram discussion: https://t.me/dustingoldshow Join in on live audio conversations: https://wisdom.app/dustingoldshow Ask a question and get a 60-second answer from me: https://wisdom.app/dustingoldshow/ask Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic
Hot From Three - Confederacy of Dunks

The Rapcast by Raptors Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 62:33


Season 10, Episode 267 RAPTORS: The raps finish a tough October with a 4-3 record. What's the best thing about this team right now other than Pascal? So far the Raptors have been incredible from 3. Is this going to last? NBA: What player had the best Halloween costume? If you had to work on a costume concept for a player, who would it be and what would their costume be? Conspiracy antisemitism, Nash gets fired and he might be replaced by Udoka. Where do we start with the tire fire that is the Brooklyn Nets? With Jamar Hinds and Daniel Stolfi! Creative Commons licensing credits for each episode can be found here Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

New Books in African American Studies
Jeremi Suri, "Civil War by Other Means: America's Long and Unfinished Fight for Democracy" (PublicAffairs, 2022)

New Books in African American Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2022 57:17


In 1865, the Confederacy was defeated, but the military victory did not end the tensions of the war or signal acceptance of a new, more equal nation. In Civil War by Other Means: America's Long and Unfinished Fight for Democracy (PublicAffairs, 2022), Jeremi Suri argues that, instead, efforts to bolster white supremacy began immediately. The big questions and conflicts of the Civil War lingered, continuing to cause other types of conflict among Americans. From conflicting interpretations of Abraham Lincoln's assassination by John Wilkes Booth to postwar riots to contested elections and stymied presidential agendas, Suri shows how the battles of the Civil War continued in other forms in the decades after the military conflict ended. Suri argues that, in fact, competing visions of democracy, freedom, and race still evident today have their roots in this period. In this episode of the podcast, Suri, who is the Mack Brown Distinguished Professor for Global Leadership, History, and Public Policy at the University of Texas at Austin, discusses this historical moment, what led him to research and write about it, and what it means for understanding the current challenges facing American democracy. Christine Lamberson, PhD, is a historian. Her research focuses on 20th century U.S. legal, political, and cultural history. She's currently working on a book manuscript about the role of violence in shaping U.S. political culture in the 1960s and 1970s. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/african-american-studies

The Scathing Atheist
506: Putting the Tool in Tool Man Edition

The Scathing Atheist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 60:00 Very Popular


In this week's episode, a New York politicians will put his moneyshot where his mouth is, Marjorie Taylor Greene supports the North in the Civil War by accident, and we'll learn that the ritual knife of satanism is a pumpkin carver. --- To make a per episode donation at Patreon.com, click here: http://www.patreon.com/ScathingAtheist To buy our book, click there: https://www.amazon.com/Outbreak-Crisis-Religion-Ruined-Pandemic/dp/B08L2HSVS8/ To check out our sister show, The Skepticrat, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/the-skepticrat To check out our sister show's hot friend, God Awful Movies, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/god-awful-movies To check out our half-sister show, Citation Needed, click here: http://citationpod.com/ To check out our sister show's sister show, D and D minus, click here: https://danddminus.libsyn.com/ To hear more from our intrepid audio engineer Morgan Clarke, click here: https://www.morganclarkemusic.com/ --- Headlines: Brooklyn Yeshiva to pay back millions in fraudulent payments from government: https://onlysky.media/hemant-mehta/hasidic-school-fraud-scheme-millions-in-penalties/ Preacher running for NJ town council compared LGBTQ people to rapists: https://onlysky.media/hemant-mehta/david-paszkiewicz-kearny-preacher-town-council-lgbtq-people-rapists/ Lauren Boebert says the LAST DAYS are upon us: https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2022/10/lauren-boebert-says-last-days-upon-us/ Lauren Boebert demands cutting State Department funds over tiny grant for drag show: https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2022/10/lauren-boebert-demands-cutting-state-department-funds-tiny-grant-drag-show/ An atheist candidate made a sex tape to boost his election platform: https://onlysky.media/hemant-mehta/mike-itkis-atheist-congress-sex-tape-boost-election-platform/ County considers noise ordinance just to shut Greg Locke up: https://onlysky.media/hemant-mehta/greg-locke-noise-ordinance-church-so-loud-wilson-county/ Marjorie Taylor Greene tried to honor the Confederacy but failed spectacularly: https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2022/10/marjorie-taylor-greene-tried-honor-confederacy-failed-spectacularly/ Trump considering MTG as 2024 running mate:  https://www.lgbtqnation.com/2022/10/donald-trump-considering-marjorie-taylor-greene-2024-running-mate/ --- This Week in Misogyny: WaPo highlights problems of Catholic hospitals: https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2022/10/10/abortion-catholic-hospitals-birth-control/ Catholic podcaster urges women to remain in abusive relationships: https://onlysky.media/hemant-mehta/catholic-podcaster-urges-women-to-stay-in-abusive-relationships/

The Federalist Radio Hour
Brian Kilmeade On The Left's Selective History

The Federalist Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 29:55


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Brian Kilmeade, co-host of Fox News Channel's "Fox & Friends," joins Federalist Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss his new book "The President and the Freedom Fighter: Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Their Battle to Save America's Soul."You can find Kilmeade's book here: https://www.briankilmeade.com/the-president-and-the-freedom-fighter

Bill Whittle Network
A Confederacy of Dunces: The Declining Mental Ability of Democratic Party Leaders & Candidates

Bill Whittle Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 27:21


From Joe Biden, Nancy Pelosi and Kamala Harris, to Pennsylvania Senate candidate John Fetterman, the Democratic Party seems vulnerable to the declining mental ability of its leaders and candidates. Bill Whittle and Alfonzo Rachel produce two new episodes of The Virtue Signal thanks to our producers — the Members at https://BillWhittle.com Explore the full archive of The Virtue Signal : https://billwhittle.com/category/shows/the-virtue-signal/

The Federalist Radio Hour
Inside The Fascinating Life And Career Of Grover Cleveland

The Federalist Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 47:43


On this episode of The Federalist Radio Hour, Troy Senik, former White House speechwriter and co-founder of Kite & Key Media, joins Federalist Culture Editor Emily Jashinsky to discuss his book "A Man of Iron: The Turbulent Life and Improbable Presidency of Grover Cleveland" and explain how Cleveland's time in the White House offers helpful context for the current political climate. You can find Senik's book here: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/A-Man-of-Iron/Troy-Senik/9781982140748