Podcasts about The Paris Review

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Latest podcast episodes about The Paris Review

Thresholds
Sam Lipsyte

Thresholds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 39:11


Sam Lipsyte (No One Left to Come Looking For You) joins Jordan to talk about giving up on punk rock, rediscovering a passion for writing, and the revelation that if you realize nobody cares, then you can do the thing that makes you happy. MENTIONED: Dungbeetle Riverbank State Park John Cheever Galaxie 500 Sam Lipsyte's latest novel is No One Left to Come Looking For You. He is the author of the story collections Venus Drive and The Fun Parts and four novels: Hark, The Ask (a New York Times Notable Book), The Subject Steve, and Home Land, which was a New York Times Notable Book and received the Believer Book Award. His fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and Best American Short Stories, among other places. The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, he lives in New York City and teaches at Columbia University. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Environmental Studies
Jeff Fearnside, "Ships in the Desert" (Santa Fe Writer's Project, 2022)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:27


Many of us have likely seen photos of the Aral Sea, and the rusted Soviet-era ships, sitting in the desert with no water in sight. The Aral Sea is now just 10% of its former volume, shrinking down from what was once the fourth-largest body of inland water in the world, after what writer Jeff Fernside calls “one of the worst human-caused environmental catastrophes.” Jeff traveled to the region as a Peace Corps volunteer. Afterward, he turned his experiences into an essay collection, Ships in the Desert (Santa Fe Writers Project: 2022), where Jeff writes about the families he met, his thoughts on missionaries, and his visit to the Aral Sea, where he saw “a fleet of rusting Soviet fishing ships, hammer and sickle still clearly discernible on many, sitting bolt upright in desert sands as if plowing through ocean waves.” Jeff Fearnside is the author of the short-story collection Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air (Stephen F. Austin State University Press: 2006), which won the 2005 SFWP Awards Program. He is also the author of the chapbook A Husband and Wife Are One Satan (Orison Books: 2021), winner of the Orison Chapbook Prize. His work has appeared in literary journals and anthologies such as The Paris Review, Los Angeles Review, Story, and many others. In this interview, Jeff and I talk about what inspired his essays, including what he saw in the barren Aral Sea. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Ships in the Desert. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Jeff Fearnside, "Ships in the Desert" (Santa Fe Writer's Project, 2022)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:27


Many of us have likely seen photos of the Aral Sea, and the rusted Soviet-era ships, sitting in the desert with no water in sight. The Aral Sea is now just 10% of its former volume, shrinking down from what was once the fourth-largest body of inland water in the world, after what writer Jeff Fernside calls “one of the worst human-caused environmental catastrophes.” Jeff traveled to the region as a Peace Corps volunteer. Afterward, he turned his experiences into an essay collection, Ships in the Desert (Santa Fe Writers Project: 2022), where Jeff writes about the families he met, his thoughts on missionaries, and his visit to the Aral Sea, where he saw “a fleet of rusting Soviet fishing ships, hammer and sickle still clearly discernible on many, sitting bolt upright in desert sands as if plowing through ocean waves.” Jeff Fearnside is the author of the short-story collection Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air (Stephen F. Austin State University Press: 2006), which won the 2005 SFWP Awards Program. He is also the author of the chapbook A Husband and Wife Are One Satan (Orison Books: 2021), winner of the Orison Chapbook Prize. His work has appeared in literary journals and anthologies such as The Paris Review, Los Angeles Review, Story, and many others. In this interview, Jeff and I talk about what inspired his essays, including what he saw in the barren Aral Sea. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Ships in the Desert. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

New Books in Central Asian Studies
Jeff Fearnside, "Ships in the Desert" (Santa Fe Writer's Project, 2022)

New Books in Central Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:27


Many of us have likely seen photos of the Aral Sea, and the rusted Soviet-era ships, sitting in the desert with no water in sight. The Aral Sea is now just 10% of its former volume, shrinking down from what was once the fourth-largest body of inland water in the world, after what writer Jeff Fernside calls “one of the worst human-caused environmental catastrophes.” Jeff traveled to the region as a Peace Corps volunteer. Afterward, he turned his experiences into an essay collection, Ships in the Desert (Santa Fe Writers Project: 2022), where Jeff writes about the families he met, his thoughts on missionaries, and his visit to the Aral Sea, where he saw “a fleet of rusting Soviet fishing ships, hammer and sickle still clearly discernible on many, sitting bolt upright in desert sands as if plowing through ocean waves.” Jeff Fearnside is the author of the short-story collection Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air (Stephen F. Austin State University Press: 2006), which won the 2005 SFWP Awards Program. He is also the author of the chapbook A Husband and Wife Are One Satan (Orison Books: 2021), winner of the Orison Chapbook Prize. His work has appeared in literary journals and anthologies such as The Paris Review, Los Angeles Review, Story, and many others. In this interview, Jeff and I talk about what inspired his essays, including what he saw in the barren Aral Sea. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Ships in the Desert. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/central-asian-studies

New Books Network
Jeff Fearnside, "Ships in the Desert" (Santa Fe Writer's Project, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:27


Many of us have likely seen photos of the Aral Sea, and the rusted Soviet-era ships, sitting in the desert with no water in sight. The Aral Sea is now just 10% of its former volume, shrinking down from what was once the fourth-largest body of inland water in the world, after what writer Jeff Fernside calls “one of the worst human-caused environmental catastrophes.” Jeff traveled to the region as a Peace Corps volunteer. Afterward, he turned his experiences into an essay collection, Ships in the Desert (Santa Fe Writers Project: 2022), where Jeff writes about the families he met, his thoughts on missionaries, and his visit to the Aral Sea, where he saw “a fleet of rusting Soviet fishing ships, hammer and sickle still clearly discernible on many, sitting bolt upright in desert sands as if plowing through ocean waves.” Jeff Fearnside is the author of the short-story collection Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air (Stephen F. Austin State University Press: 2006), which won the 2005 SFWP Awards Program. He is also the author of the chapbook A Husband and Wife Are One Satan (Orison Books: 2021), winner of the Orison Chapbook Prize. His work has appeared in literary journals and anthologies such as The Paris Review, Los Angeles Review, Story, and many others. In this interview, Jeff and I talk about what inspired his essays, including what he saw in the barren Aral Sea. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Ships in the Desert. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Fantastic History Of Food
Bonus Episode - Interview with Author, Dr. Lydia Moland

The Fantastic History Of Food

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 43:54


Hello and welcome to this very special bonus episode of The Fantastic History Of Food.Today, I'm breaking away from my usual format of pure storytelling to chat with the amazing author Lydia Moland.Lydia is so much more than simply an author, she is also a philosophy lecturer at Colby College in Maine, an institution that has been around for over 200 years.She has written for publications like The Paris Review, the Boston Globe, and the Washington Post to name but a few.We chat about her upcoming book all about an incredible woman by the name of Lydia Maria Child, who she was, why she is such an important figure in history, and what it was about her that drew Lydia to make her the subject of her book.

Thresholds
Heather Radke

Thresholds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 48:38


Heather Radke joins Jordan to talk about Butts: A Backstory, the playful invitation of the book's title, the general unruliness of bodies, and the joys of a JSTOR deep-dive. MENTIONED: Jodie Foster's Coppertone ad "Baby Got Back," Sir Mix-a-lot Elizabeth Alexander's "The Venus Hottentot" The Normman & Norma Statues Heather Radke is an essayist, journalist, and contributing editor and reporter at Radiolab, the Peabody Award­–winning program from WNYC. She has written for publications including The Believer, Longreads, and The Paris Review, and she teaches at Columbia University's creative writing MFA Program. Before becoming a writer, Heather worked as a curator at the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum in Chicago. For more Thresholds, visit us at www.thisisthresholds.com Be sure to leave us a review on your favorite podcast platform! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

How Long Gone
422. - Sofia Prantera

How Long Gone

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 67:09


Sofia is an Italian-born clothing designer and founder of one of our favorite streetwear lines, Aries. We spoke with her from her home in London about the polarizing effects of broth, what to do when asked to have a "digital coffee" with someone, a report from the front lines of the gas oven war, listen to us on the Straightio-Lab podcast, I just think it's funny the Paris Review talks about the same things we do, Sofia's son makes proper grime beats, if there's one thing Italians like, it's free streetwear, once you hit a certain age you just have to nap, there's a time and place to drive like an asshole, from raving in the 90s to taking her kids to Ibiza, her love of Skete Davidson, organic growth vs. LVMH, her plans for the flagship store in Soho, her top three prescription pills, and we close out with Bernie Madoff's Belgians. instagram.com/ariesarise twitter.com/donetodeath twitter.com/themjeans --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/howlonggone/support

Libro.fm Podcast
Interview with Neel Patel

Libro.fm Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023


On today's episode we sat down with author and screenwriter Neel Patel. Neel is the author of the novel 'Tell Me How to Be' and a collection of short stories titled 'If You See Me, Don't Say Hi'. READ FULL EPISODE TRANSCRIPT About Neel: Neel Patel is a screenwriter and author who grew up in Champaign, Illinois. His writing has appeared in Elle India, The Paris Review, on Buzzfeed.com, and more. His first book, If You See Me, Don't Say Hi, is a New York Times Book Review Editors' choice, an NPR Best Book of 2018, and has been optioned for television. He lives in Los Angeles, where he writes for TV and film. Use promo code: LIBROPODCAST when signing up for a Libro.fm membership to get an extra free credit to use on any audiobook. Listen to Neel's books: If You See Me, Don't Say Hi (Stories) Tell Me How to Be (A Novel) Books we discussed on today's episode: Leave the World Behind by Rumaan Alam Eileen by Ottessa Moshfegh My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite True Biz by Sara Novic The Alloy of Law by Brandon Sanderson Beware the Woman by Megan Abbott You Will Know Me by Megan Abbott Sisterhood of Sleuths by Jennifer Chambliss Bertman

LIVE! From City Lights
Tayi Tibble in Conversation with Tommy Orange (Opening Statement By John Freeman)

LIVE! From City Lights

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2023 65:11


Tayi Tibble in conversation with Tommy Orange, celebrating the publication of "Poukahangatus: Poems" by Tayi Tibble, published by Alfred Knopf. This live event took place in Kerouac Alley, between City Lights and Vesuvio Cafe, and was hosted by Peter Maravelis with an opening statement by John Freeman. You can purchase copies of "Poukahangatus: Poems" directly from City Lights here: https://citylights.com/poukahangatus-poems/ Tayi Tibble (Te Whānau ā Apanui/Ngāti Porou) was born in 1995 and lives in Wellington, New Zealand. In 2017, she completed a master's degree in creative writing from the International Institute of Modern Letters, Victoria University of Wellington, where she was the recipient of the Adam Foundation Prize in Creative Writing. Her second book of poetry, Rangikura, will be published in the United States in 2023. Tommy Orange is the PEN/HEMINGWAY AWARD WINNER and best selling author of the novel There,There. He is a graduate of the MFA program at the Institute of American Indian Arts. An enrolled member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Tribes of Oklahoma, he was born and raised in Oakland, California. John Freeman is the editor of Freeman's, a literary annual of new writing, and executive editor at Alfred A. Knopf. His books include "How to Read a Novelist" and "Dictionary of the Undoing," as well as "Tales of Two Americas," an anthology about income inequality in America, and "Tales of Two Planets," an anthology of new writing about inequality and the climate crisis globally. He is also the author of two poetry collections, "Maps" and "The Park." His work is translated into more than twenty languages, and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and The New York Times. The former editor of Granta, he teaches writing at New York University. He has a new collection of poetry, published by Copper Canyon Press, being released in the fall titled "Wind, Trees." This event was made possible by support from the City Lights Foundation: citylights.com/foundation

Haymarket Books Live
Freedom Dreams Episode 2 with Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor & Robin D.G. Kelley

Haymarket Books Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 87:34


Join Robin D.G. Kelley for the Freedom Dreams discussion series. The second discussion features Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor. Freedom Dreams is a classic in the study of the Black radical tradition that has just been released in a new 20th anniversary edition. In this live event series, Robin D. G. Kelley will explore the connections between radical imagination and movements for social transformation with pathbreaking artists and scholars. Speakers: Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is an award-winning scholar and public intellectual. Taylor is author of Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership, published in 2019 by University of North Carolina Press. Race for Profit was a semi-finalist for the 2019 National Book Award and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in History in 2020. She was named a Guggenheim Foundation Fellow and MacArthur Foundation Fellow in 2021. Her earlier book From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation won the Lannan Cultural Freedom Award for an Especially Notable Book in 2016. She is also editor of How We Get Free: Black Feminism and the Combahee River Collective, which won the Lambda Literary Award for LGBQT nonfiction in 2018. Taylor's scholarship examines racism and public policy, inequality, Black politics, radical politics and social movements in the United States, both in historical and contemporary contexts. Taylor is working on two projects, one that look at the dynamics of race, class and politics in the first generation after the Black social movements of the 1960s and a book that examines the Black radical tradition mediated through the life and politics of Angela Y. Davis. Taylor is a contributing writer at The New Yorker. Her writing has appeared in the Los Angeles Times, Boston Review, Paris Review, Guardian, The Nation and Jacobin, among others. She is a former Contributing Opinion Writer for The New York Times. Taylor has been named one of the hundred most influential African Americans in the United States by The Root. Essence Magazine named her among the top one hundred “change makers” in the county. She has been appointed as a Distinguished Lecturer for the Organization of American Historians by the Organization of American Historians. For eight years, Taylor was a professor in the Department of African American Studies at Princeton University. She is the Leon Forrest Professor of African American Studies at Northwestern University. Robin D.G. Kelley is Professor and Gary B. Nash Endowed Chair in U.S. History at UCLA. He is the author of Hammer and Hoe, Race Rebels, Freedom Dreams: The Black Radical Imagination, and Thelonious Monk: The Life and Times of an American Original, among other titles. His writing has been featured in the Journal of American History, American Historical Review, Black Music Research Journal, African Studies Review, New York Times, The Crisis, The Nation, and Voice Literary Supplement. Join the upcoming events in the Freedom Dreams Series: https://www.eventbrite.com/cc/freedom-dreams-with-robin-dg-kelley-1288129 Watch the live event recording: youtu.be/BBoQI9HU1rk Buy books from Haymarket: www.haymarketbooks.org Follow us on Soundcloud: @haymarketbooks

Contain Podcast
140. - Survivance / Did The CIA Fund Good Art - Dominique Althoff

Contain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 84:26


w/ Ojibwe musician & researcher Dominique Althoff of Black Seed Journal on indigenous post-nihilism, going from prison to UC Berkeley, and the question of whether the CIA contributed to good art... #Political assassinations, code talking, Peter Matthiessen, the Paris Review, and the CIA, Ghost Dance origins of Wounded Knee, the 1880 outlawing of ceremonial gift-giving, Black Twilight Circle, the Scorpions' ‘Wind of Change'...Gerald Vizenor & Survivance, what would Adorno say about hyperpop, the Russian nihilist movement, Clastres and the projection of Nietzsche onto indigenous anthropology, Hitler's fascination with American Indians, Indigenous Anarchy, & more. "Nihilism was a position we were put it...it's a position to overcome" "The field of intelligence is wide open right now" Consider supporting the show featuring full archive & projects by subscribing here

Art · The Creative Process
Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “Suddenly a Knock on the Door”

Art · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 47:26


Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023."And I think that from a young age I've kind of learned that there are good stories, great stories, but none of them is your story. And that you have to kind of make up your own story, not feel just good enough kind of picking up one. And it doesn't matter if it's about Flat Earths or some conspiracy or wanting to clear the world of plastic or going vegan. So just this idea of joining some kind of boy scouts or wearing some kind of uniform or supporting some sports club and saying, Okay, now I don't have to think, I'm the New York Knicks fan! So if they win, I'm happy. If they lose, then I'm sad. I think that there is something, both with my mother and my father, being Holocaust survivors, being orphaned, basically, they had to seek the narrative. They didn't inherit one. It's not like my parents always said, You do like this, you know, and then you can either do what your parents said or rebel against them. It's this idea of What the hell do I do? And I'm looking Outside and Inside to find my narrative, to find my ethics, to find my values.”www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast Photo credit: Lielle Sand

Music & Dance · The Creative Process
Etgar Keret - Author - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Transdisciplinary Artist

Music & Dance · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 47:26


Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023."For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue. When I do a video dance for a Japanese audience or a sci-fi comedy for a French audience then I do try to think about if I want to shock the audience at a certain moment. I think that the same things that would shock a French person would not necessarily shock an Israeli or a Japanese person, you know? I think that what's funny is that for a lot of people, the fact that my TV show The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) is very extreme, but in Israel when they watched it, they never thought it was extreme. They said it was very funny, but because the Israeli reality is much more extreme, so the idea of people shouting at each other or breaking a wall or punching each other or doing weird stuff, the French said, 'Oh, it's over the top.' In Israel, they felt that it was just like the way things are. So it's very, very interesting.""Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects."www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast Photo credit: Lielle Sand

Music & Dance · The Creative Process
Highlights - Etgar Keret - Transdisciplinary Artist - Author - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director

Music & Dance · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue. When I do a video dance for a Japanese audience or a sci-fi comedy for a French audience then I do try to think about if I want to shock the audience at a certain moment. I think that the same things that would shock a French person would not necessarily shock an Israeli or a Japanese person, you know? I think that what's funny is that for a lot of people, the fact that my TV show The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) is very extreme, but in Israel when they watched it, they never thought it was extreme. They said it was very funny, but because the Israeli reality is much more extreme, so the idea of people shouting at each other or breaking a wall or punching each other or doing weird stuff, the French said, 'Oh, it's over the top.' In Israel, they felt that it was just like the way things are. So it's very, very interesting.""Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects."Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcastPhotos:Outside - a video dance by Etgar Keret and Inbal PintoThe Inconsistent Pedaler, Keret in collaboration with Pilobolus Dance Company, Photo by Grant Halverson

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process
Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “Suddenly a Knock on the Door”

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 47:26


Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023."I really feel that if there is something about art that I seek - I think people use art for many things - it's really some kind of a belief that we can transcend. I mean, if I try to kind of see it as some kind of a substitute for a religion. You know, religion tells us that there's something out there. There's somebody watching us, somebody doing something. And I think that for me, many times good art says there is something beyond our understanding that exists, and there is a way to get a step closer to it. Maybe not to unveil it, but we can get there. There is something about both my parents, but I think especially my mother, it's as if the horrible circumstances that they lived through being Jews in the Holocaust, my mother losing her entire family - it was horrible and traumatic, but it was almost like a very extreme human experiment. And it created something. It's like many times when you put somebody in extreme situations, and most of the time he will crush or she will crush, but sometimes, a superhero will be born. And there is something about my parents, when I came to work on the exhibition about my mother Inside Out, I realized there is something about her that was so unique that it could not have been achieved in normal times. Because the thing that happened with my mother was that, when the war started, she was five years old. When the war ended, she was 11 years old. By the time she was about 10, all the people that she had known before the war had died. Her parents, her brother, her grandfather, her friends."www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast Photo credit: Lielle Sand

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process
Highlights - Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “The Seven Good Years”

Social Justice & Activism · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"I really feel that if there is something about art that I seek - I think people use art for many things - it's really some kind of a belief that we can transcend. I mean, if I try to kind of see it as some kind of a substitute for a religion. You know, religion tells us that there's something out there. There's somebody watching us, somebody doing something. And I think that for me, many times good art says there is something beyond our understanding that exists, and there is a way to get a step closer to it. Maybe not to unveil it, but we can get there. There is something about both my parents, but I think especially my mother, it's as if the horrible circumstances that they lived through being Jews in the Holocaust, my mother losing her entire family - it was horrible and traumatic, but it was almost like a very extreme human experiment. And it created something. It's like many times when you put somebody in extreme situations, and most of the time he will crush or she will crush, but sometimes, a superhero will be born. And there is something about my parents, when I came to work on the exhibition about my mother Inside Out, I realized there is something about her that was so unique that it could not have been achieved in normal times. Because the thing that happened with my mother was that, when the war started, she was five years old. When the war ended, she was 11 years old. By the time she was about 10, all the people that she had known before the war had died. Her parents, her brother, her grandfather, her friends."Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Education · The Creative Process
Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “Suddenly a Knock on the Door”

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 47:26


Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023."For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue. When I do a video dance for a Japanese audience or a sci-fi comedy for a French audience then I do try to think about if I want to shock the audience at a certain moment. I think that the same things that would shock a French person would not necessarily shock an Israeli or a Japanese person, you know? I think that what's funny is that for a lot of people, the fact that my TV show The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) is very extreme, but in Israel when they watched it, they never thought it was extreme. They said it was very funny, but because the Israeli reality is much more extreme, so the idea of people shouting at each other or breaking a wall or punching each other or doing weird stuff, the French said, 'Oh, it's over the top.' In Israel, they felt that it was just like the way things are. So it's very, very interesting.""Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects."www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast Photo credit: Lielle Sand

Education · The Creative Process
Highlights - Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “The Seven Good Years”

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue. When I do a video dance for a Japanese audience or a sci-fi comedy for a French audience then I do try to think about if I want to shock the audience at a certain moment. I think that the same things that would shock a French person would not necessarily shock an Israeli or a Japanese person, you know? I think that what's funny is that for a lot of people, the fact that my TV show The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) is very extreme, but in Israel when they watched it, they never thought it was extreme. They said it was very funny, but because the Israeli reality is much more extreme, so the idea of people shouting at each other or breaking a wall or punching each other or doing weird stuff, the French said, 'Oh, it's over the top.' In Israel, they felt that it was just like the way things are. So it's very, very interesting.""Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects."Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process
Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “Suddenly a Knock on the Door”

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 47:26


Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023."There is something about both my parents, but I think especially my mother, it's as if the horrible circumstances that they lived through being Jews in the Holocaust, my mother losing her entire family - it was horrible and traumatic, but it was almost like a very extreme human experiment. And it created something. It's like many times when you put somebody in extreme situations, and most of the time he will crush or she will crush, but sometimes, a superhero will be born. And there is something about my parents, when I came to work on the exhibition about my mother Inside Out, I realized there is something about her that was so unique that it could not have been achieved in normal times. Because the thing that happened with my mother was that, when the war started, she was five years old. When the war ended, she was 11 years old. By the time she was about 10, all the people that she had known before the war had died. Her parents, her brother, her grandfather, her friends.So I think that there was something about my mother that she was a true rebel and an anarchist, not by choice, but by education. Because the fact that she grew up in a place in which you could not trust anyone or you could not trust the narratives in which basically the grownups that she met were not like my parents - who would help me navigate life - but they were like a kind of evil orphanage managers who would steal her food or who would try to molest her or do all those horrible things. So in that sense, she kind of relied on herself for a narrative...So it doesn't really matter so much what's out there, but what matters is how you experience it."www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast Photo credit: Lielle Sand

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process
Highlights - Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “The Seven Good Years”

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"There is something about both my parents, but I think especially my mother, it's as if the horrible circumstances that they lived through being Jews in the Holocaust, my mother losing her entire family - it was horrible and traumatic, but it was almost like a very extreme human experiment. And it created something. It's like many times when you put somebody in extreme situations, and most of the time he will crush or she will crush, but sometimes, a superhero will be born. And there is something about my parents, when I came to work on the exhibition about my mother Inside Out, I realized there is something about her that was so unique that it could not have been achieved in normal times. Because the thing that happened with my mother was that, when the war started, she was five years old. When the war ended, she was 11 years old. By the time she was about 10, all the people that she had known before the war had died. Her parents, her brother, her grandfather, her friends.So I think that there was something about my mother that she was a true rebel and an anarchist, not by choice, but by education. Because the fact that she grew up in a place in which you could not trust anyone or you could not trust the narratives in which basically the grownups that she met were not like my parents - who would help me navigate life - but they were like a kind of evil orphanage managers who would steal her food or who would try to molest her or do all those horrible things. So in that sense, she kind of relied on herself for a narrative...So it doesn't really matter so much what's out there, but what matters is how you experience it."Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcastImage credit: Inside Out exhibition at the Jewish Museum Berlin, photos by Roman Maerz

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society
Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “Suddenly a Knock on the Door”

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"And I think that from a young age I've kind of learned that there are good stories, great stories, but none of them is your story. And that you have to kind of make up your own story, not feel just good enough kind of picking up one. And it doesn't matter if it's about Flat Earths or some conspiracy or wanting to clear the world of plastic or going vegan. So just this idea of joining some kind of boy scouts or wearing some kind of uniform or supporting some sports club and saying, Okay, now I don't have to think, I'm the New York Knicks fan! So if they win, I'm happy. If they lose, then I'm sad. I think that there is something, both with my mother and my father, being Holocaust survivors, being orphaned, basically, they had to seek the narrative. They didn't inherit one. It's not like my parents always said, You do like this, you know, and then you can either do what your parents said or rebel against them. It's this idea of What the hell do I do? And I'm looking Outside and Inside to find my narrative, to find my ethics, to find my values.”Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcastPhoto credit: Lielle Sand

Film & TV · The Creative Process
Etgar Keret - Author - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director of “Jellyfish”, “The Middleman”

Film & TV · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 47:26


Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023."For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue. When I do a video dance for a Japanese audience or a sci-fi comedy for a French audience then I do try to think about if I want to shock the audience at a certain moment. I think that the same things that would shock a French person would not necessarily shock an Israeli or a Japanese person, you know? I think that what's funny is that for a lot of people, the fact that my TV show The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) is very extreme, but in Israel when they watched it, they never thought it was extreme. They said it was very funny, but because the Israeli reality is much more extreme, so the idea of people shouting at each other or breaking a wall or punching each other or doing weird stuff, the French said, 'Oh, it's over the top.' In Israel, they felt that it was just like the way things are. So it's very, very interesting.""Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects."www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast Photo credit: Lielle Sand

Film & TV · The Creative Process
Highlights - Etgar Keret - Author - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director of “Jellyfish”, “The Middleman”

Film & TV · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue. When I do a video dance for a Japanese audience or a sci-fi comedy for a French audience then I do try to think about if I want to shock the audience at a certain moment. I think that the same things that would shock a French person would not necessarily shock an Israeli or a Japanese person, you know? I think that what's funny is that for a lot of people, the fact that my TV show The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) is very extreme, but in Israel when they watched it, they never thought it was extreme. They said it was very funny, but because the Israeli reality is much more extreme, so the idea of people shouting at each other or breaking a wall or punching each other or doing weird stuff, the French said, 'Oh, it's over the top.' In Israel, they felt that it was just like the way things are. So it's very, very interesting.""Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects."Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Art · The Creative Process
Highlights - Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “The Seven Good Years”

Art · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"And I think that from a young age I've kind of learned that there are good stories, great stories, but none of them is your story. And that you have to kind of make up your own story, not feel just good enough kind of picking up one. And it doesn't matter if it's about Flat Earths or some conspiracy or wanting to clear the world of plastic or going vegan. So just this idea of joining some kind of boy scouts or wearing some kind of uniform or supporting some sports club and saying, Okay, now I don't have to think, I'm the New York Knicks fan! So if they win, I'm happy. If they lose, then I'm sad. I think that there is something, both with my mother and my father, being Holocaust survivors, being orphaned, basically, they had to seek the narrative. They didn't inherit one. It's not like my parents always said, You do like this, you know, and then you can either do what your parents said or rebel against them. It's this idea of What the hell do I do? And I'm looking Outside and Inside to find my narrative, to find my ethics, to find my values.”Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcastImage credit: Inside Out exhibition at the Jewish Museum Berlin, photos by Roman Maerz

The Creative Process Podcast
Highlights - Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “The Seven Good Years”

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue, it's a dialogue. Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects.Because my mom grew up in a period where they were excited about Nazi ideology and my mom knew this wasn't a good thing. So this idea of making up your own story instead of taking other people's stories was something that was very important. When I was a child, my mother didn't allow children's books in our home because she insisted on making up the stories for us. For her, basically, it was like the idea of reading us classics from a book was like ordering a pizza instead of cooking dinner. It meant that she didn't care about us. And she felt that because her parents told her bedtime stories in the ghetto where they had no access to books. And she saw how those people who were broken and angry and hurting could still find in their imaginations a brand new story that they made for somebody that they loved. So for her, it was this kind of generosity and something that could not be compared to, for example, buying Alice in Wonderland and reading it to somebody. You had to give more than that."Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process
Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “Suddenly a Knock on the Door”

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 47:26


Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023."I really feel that if there is something about art that I seek - I think people use art for many things - it's really some kind of a belief that we can transcend. I mean, if I try to kind of see it as some kind of a substitute for a religion. You know, religion tells us that there's something out there. There's somebody watching us, somebody doing something. And I think that for me, many times good art says there is something beyond our understanding that exists, and there is a way to get a step closer to it. Maybe not to unveil it, but we can get there. "There is something about both my parents, but I think especially my mother, it's as if the horrible circumstances that they lived through being Jews in the Holocaust, my mother losing her entire family - it was horrible and traumatic, but it was almost like a very extreme human experiment. And it created something. It's like many times when you put somebody in extreme situations, and most of the time he will crush or she will crush, but sometimes, a superhero will be born. And there is something about my parents, when I came to work on the exhibition about my mother Inside Out, I realized there is something about her that was so unique that it could not have been achieved in normal times. Because the thing that happened with my mother was that, when the war started, she was five years old. When the war ended, she was 11 years old. By the time she was about 10, all the people that she had known before the war had died. Her parents, her brother, her grandfather, her friends."www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast Photo credit: Lielle Sand

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process
Highlights - Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “The Seven Good Years”

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"I really feel that if there is something about art that I seek - I think people use art for many things - it's really some kind of a belief that we can transcend. I mean, if I try to kind of see it as some kind of a substitute for a religion. You know, religion tells us that there's something out there. There's somebody watching us, somebody doing something. And I think that for me, many times good art says there is something beyond our understanding that exists, and there is a way to get a step closer to it. Maybe not to unveil it, but we can get there. "There is something about both my parents, but I think especially my mother, it's as if the horrible circumstances that they lived through being Jews in the Holocaust, my mother losing her entire family - it was horrible and traumatic, but it was almost like a very extreme human experiment. And it created something. It's like many times when you put somebody in extreme situations, and most of the time he will crush or she will crush, but sometimes, a superhero will be born. And there is something about my parents, when I came to work on the exhibition about my mother Inside Out, I realized there is something about her that was so unique that it could not have been achieved in normal times. Because the thing that happened with my mother was that, when the war started, she was five years old. When the war ended, she was 11 years old. By the time she was about 10, all the people that she had known before the war had died. Her parents, her brother, her grandfather, her friends."Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

Books & Writers · The Creative Process
Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “Suddenly a Knock on the Door”

Books & Writers · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 47:26


Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023."For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue, it's a dialogue. Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects.Because my mom grew up in a period where they were excited about Nazi ideology and my mom knew this wasn't a good thing. So this idea of making up your own story instead of taking other people's stories was something that was very important. When I was a child, my mother didn't allow children's books in our home because she insisted on making up the stories for us. For her, basically, it was like the idea of reading us classics from a book was like ordering a pizza instead of cooking dinner. It meant that she didn't care about us. And she felt that because her parents told her bedtime stories in the ghetto where they had no access to books. And she saw how those people who were broken and angry and hurting could still find in their imaginations a brand new story that they made for somebody that they loved. So for her, it was this kind of generosity and something that could not be compared to, for example, buying Alice in Wonderland and reading it to somebody. You had to give more than that."www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast Photo credit: Lielle Sand

Books & Writers · The Creative Process
Highlights - Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “The Seven Good Years”

Books & Writers · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 14:36


"For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue, it's a dialogue. Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects.Because my mom grew up in a period where they were excited about Nazi ideology and my mom knew this wasn't a good thing. So this idea of making up your own story instead of taking other people's stories was something that was very important. When I was a child, my mother didn't allow children's books in our home because she insisted on making up the stories for us. For her, basically, it was like the idea of reading us classics from a book was like ordering a pizza instead of cooking dinner. It meant that she didn't care about us. And she felt that because her parents told her bedtime stories in the ghetto where they had no access to books. And she saw how those people who were broken and angry and hurting could still find in their imaginations a brand new story that they made for somebody that they loved. So for her, it was this kind of generosity and something that could not be compared to, for example, buying Alice in Wonderland and reading it to somebody. You had to give more than that."Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023.www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast

The Creative Process Podcast
Etgar Keret - Cannes Film Festival Award-winning Director - Author of “Fly Already”, “Suddenly a Knock on the Door”

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2022 47:26


Author, Screenwriter, and Director Etgar Keret is a recipient of the French Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres, the Charles Bronfman Prize, and the Caméra d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival for Jellyfish, which he directed with his wife Shira Geffen. Most recently, they created the TV mini series The Middleman (L'Agent Immobilier) starring Mathieu Amalric. His books include the short story collections Fly Already, Suddenly a Knock on the Door, and his memoir The Seven Good Years. Etgar's work has been translated into forty-five languages and has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review,The New York Times, and This American Life. A frequent collaborator with visual and performing artists, an exhibition inspired by his mother called Inside Out is currently showing at the Jewish Museum in Berlin until February 5th, 2023."For me, there is something about art, it's not a monologue, it's a dialogue. Some people, it doesn't matter who they speak to, they will speak in the same way they would speak to a five-year-old or to an intellectual or to somebody who doesn't speak the language very well. They would speak the same way and they don't care because this is what they have to say, but I think that the natural thing in the dialogue is really to look into the eyes of the person you speak to and see when he understands or when she doesn't understand or when she's moved or when he's angry. And basically out of that, kind of create your own language. And I think the same way that people are excited about learning and speaking different languages - because I think each language has different merits and different aspects.Because my mom grew up in a period where they were excited about Nazi ideology and my mom knew this wasn't a good thing. So this idea of making up your own story instead of taking other people's stories was something that was very important. When I was a child, my mother didn't allow children's books in our home because she insisted on making up the stories for us. For her, basically, it was like the idea of reading us classics from a book was like ordering a pizza instead of cooking dinner. It meant that she didn't care about us. And she felt that because her parents told her bedtime stories in the ghetto where they had no access to books. And she saw how those people who were broken and angry and hurting could still find in their imaginations a brand new story that they made for somebody that they loved. So for her, it was this kind of generosity and something that could not be compared to, for example, buying Alice in Wonderland and reading it to somebody. You had to give more than that."www.etgarkeret.comThe Middleman www.imdb.com/title/tt11523800www.jmberlin.de/en/exhibition-inside-out-etgar-kerethttps://etgarkeret.substack.comJellyfish http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0807721www.creativeprocess.info www.oneplanetpodcast.org IG www.instagram.com/creativeprocesspodcast Photo credit: Lielle Sand

Read Me to Sleep, Ricky
School Days, a poem by Richard Howard

Read Me to Sleep, Ricky

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 20:06


"School Days" is from Richard Howard's 2008 collection of poetry Without Saying. A distinguished poet, critic and translator, Richard Howard held a unique place in contemporary American letters. Howard was credited with introducing modern French fiction—particularly examples of the Nouveau Roman—to the American public; his translation of Charles Baudelaire's Les Fleurs du Mal (1984) won a National Book Award in 1984. A selection of Howard's critical prose was collected in the volume Paper Trail: Selected Prose 1965-2003, and his collection of essays Alone with America: Essays on the Art of Poetry in the United States since 1950 (1969) was praised as one of the first comprehensive overviews of American poetry from the latter half of the 20th century. First and foremost a poet, Howard's many volumes of verse also received widespread acclaim; he won the 1970 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for his collection Untitled Subjects. His other honors included the American Book Award, the Harriet Monroe Memorial Prize, the PEN Translation Medal, the Levinson Prize, and the Ordre National du Mérite from the French government. For many years, Howard was the poetry editor of the Paris Review.Known for his erudition and interest in the nature of artistic expression, Howard's poems are often dramatic monologues in which figures from history and literature speak directly to the reader. From Howard's first book, Quantities (1962), his approach to the dramatic monologue set him apart as a unique practitioner of contemporary poetry. Using voices from characters as disparate as Oscar Wilde, Walt Whitman, Henry James, and Orpheus among others, Howard's narrative monologues are darkly comic, laced with irony and sadness, and distinctly learned. Early books such as The Damages (1967) and Untitled Subjects (1969) saw Howard honing his skill with a wide range of subjects and voices. Frequently addressing the incommensurability of word and world, Barbara Fischer asserted in her review of Talking Cures (2003) that “in [Howard's] work's insistent writtenness and its collages of polyvocal quotation he reminds us that the immediacy of contact—vocal, erotic, somatic, sensory contact—is out of reach as soon as we write about it.”Howard's work in the 1970s and '80s continued to explore the use of monologue, dialogue, and other forms of the speaking voice in his poetry. In Two-Part Inventions (1974) and Fellow Feelings (1976), he creates imaginary conversations between historical persons, uncovering shared assumptions and emotions between himself and such writers as Walt Whitman and Charles Baudelaire. The poems of Misgivings (1979) are all addressed to the subjects of 19th-century photographic portraits, while those of Lining Up (1984) are the voices of artists and musicians. Speaking to Allen Wiggins of the Cleveland Plain Dealer, Howard explained that in his poems he tries to get “out of the way of voices, letting the voices speak through me and for me, and I have discovered that my own experience can be represented much better than it can be presented.” With his 10th book of poetry, Like Most Revelations (1994), Howard inhabits the voices of Edith Wharton and Walt Whitman, but he also offers elegies for friends who have died from AIDS and cancer. Support the showRead Me to Sleep, Ricky is hosted by Rick WhitakerContact: rickawhitaker@gmail.comhttps://readmetosleepricky.com

MFA Writers
Rerelease: Chibuihe Obi Achimba — Brown University

MFA Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 62:01


The podcast team is on winter break. Thanks for listening, friends. We wish you all a great end of the year. We'll be back with a new episode in two weeks. Chibuihe Obi Achimba sits down with Jared to talk about the anguish and extreme joy of transferring a poem from imagination to language, using writing to explore the impacts and losses of modernization and civil war in his home country of Nigeria, and the necessary balance between encouraging independence and fostering community in an MFA program. Chibuihe Obi Achimba grew up in southeastern Nigeria. He's a poet and essayist completing his MFA in Poetry at Brown University. Chibuihe's writing has appeared or is forthcoming in The New York Times, The Paris Review, Harvard Review, Poet Lore, and elsewhere. He is the Founding-Editor of Dgëku Magazine. He was awarded the 2021 St. Botolph Foundation grant and the 2021 Frontier Poetry Prize for New Poets. Find him at his website www.chibuihe.com. MFA Writers is hosted by Jared McCormack and produced by Jared McCormack and Hanamori Skoblow. New episodes are released every two weeks. You can find more MFA Writers at MFAwriters.com. This episode was requested by Shlagha Borah, Erika Walsh, Amy Peltz, James Jackson, and Sebastian. Thank you all for listening! BE PART OF THE SHOW — Support the show. —Leave a rating and review on Apple Podcasts, Podchaser, or Podcast Addict. — Submit an episode request. If there's a program you'd like to learn more about, contact us and we'll do our very best to find a guest who can speak to their experience. — Apply to be a guest on the show by filling out our application. STAY CONNECTED Twitter: @MFAwriterspod Instagram: @MFAwriterspodcast Facebook: MFA Writers Email: mfawriterspodcast@gmail.com

The Biblio File hosted by Nigel Beale
Michael Torosian on Photography & making Fine Press Photography Books

The Biblio File hosted by Nigel Beale

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 84:53


Michael Torosian has spent his life taking photographs, interviewing great photographers, and making fine press photography books. He's in the process of making another entitled Lumiere Press, Printer Savant and Other Stories to commemorate the establishment of the Lumiere Press Archive at the Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library in Toronto. It's full of life lessons and back-stories illuminating each of the twenty-two books he's published over the past four decades.    We sat down in his workshop, behind his house in Toronto, to talk about the book. Topics covered in this first installment of a two part conversation include: photography, bookmaking, relentless exploration, 'general aesthetics,' cultivating aptitudes, the blossoming of the photography market, Edward Weston, Aaron Siskind, decoding visual language, composition, respect, paying homage, the Ninth Street Show, Gordon Parks, learning as the key to existence, making every word count, the Paris Review's Writers at Work series, capturing the voice of the artist, the book as the medium of photography, and more. 

Poetry For All
Episode 55: Kay Ryan, Crib

Poetry For All

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 17:17


In this episode, we discuss Kay Ryan's "Crib," a brief poem that begins with an interest in the deep archaeology of language and shifts to a powerful meditation on theft, innocence, and guilt. "Crib" appears in The Best of It © 2010 by Kay Ryan. Used by permissions of Grove/Atlantic, Inc. For more on Kay Ryan and her work, you can visit the Poetry Foundation (https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/kay-ryan) website. Our favorite interview with Kay Ryan appears in the Paris Review (https://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/5889/the-art-of-poetry-no-94-kay-ryan).

Otherppl with Brad Listi
804. Sam Lipsyte

Otherppl with Brad Listi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 78:47


Sam Lipsyte is the author of the novel No One Left to Come Looking for You (Simon & Schuster). Lipsyte is the author of the story collections Venus Drive and The Fun Parts and four novels: Hark, The Ask (a New York Times Notable Book), The Subject Steve, and Home Land, which was a New York Times Notable Book and received the Believer Book Award. His fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and Best American Short Stories, among other places. The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, he lives in New York City and teaches at Columbia University. *** Otherppl with Brad Listi is a weekly literary podcast featuring in-depth interviews with today's leading writers. Launched in 2011. Books. Literature. Writing. Publishing. Authors. Screenwriters. Etc. Available where podcasts are available: Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, iHeart Radio, etc. Subscribe to Brad Listi's email newsletter. Support the show on Patreon Merch @otherppl Instagram  YouTube Email the show: letters [at] otherppl [dot] com The podcast is a proud affiliate partner of Bookshop, working to support local, independent bookstores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Big Table
Episode 45: Nicole Rudick on Niki de Saint Phalle

Big Table

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2022 35:20


Known best for her exuberant, often large-scale sculptural works celebrating the abundance and complexity of female desire, imagination, and creativity, Niki de Saint Phalle viewed making art as a ritual, a performance―a process connecting life to art. In this unconventional, illuminated biography, Nicole Rudick, in a kind of collaboration with the artist, has assembled a gorgeous and detailed mosaic of Saint Phalle's visual and textual works from a trove of paintings, drawings, sketches, and writings—many previously unpublished or long unavailable–that trace her mistakes and successes, her passions and her radical sense of joy.Born in France, Niki de Saint Phalle (1930–2002) was raised in New York and began making art at age 23. Along with her celebrated large-scale projects―including the Stravinsky Fountain at the Centre Pompidou, Golem in Jerusalem, and the Tarot Garden in Tuscany―Saint Phalle also produced writing and works on paper that delve into her own biography: childhood and her break with family, marriage to novelist Harry Mathews, motherhood, a long collaborative relationship with artist Jean Tinguely, and her productive years in Southern California.Nicole Rudick is a critic and an editor. Her writing on art, literature, and comics has been published in The New York Review of Books, the New York Times, The New Yorker, Artforum, and elsewhere. She was managing editor of The Paris Review for nearly a decade. She is the editor, most recently, of a new edition of Gary Panter's legendary comic Jimbo: Adventures in Paradise.In the interviewer's chair this episode is writer and curator Yann Perreau, who organized some exhibitions of works by Saint Phalle. Originally from Paris, Yann now lives in Los Angeles.Here's Yann Perreau discussing the life and work of Saint Phalle with writer, critic, and biographer Nicole Rudick. Reading by Nicole RudickMusic by Grace Jones

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 155 with Robert Jones, Jr., Exemplary Literary Citizen, Reflective Changemaker, and Founder of the Powerful Son of Baldwin Platform and Author of 2021 National Book Award Nominee, The Prophets

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2022 79:38


Episode 155 Notes and Links to Robert Jones Jr.'s Work       On Episode 155 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Robert Jones, Jr., and the two mainly discuss, among other things, the festive national Book Awards 2022, his early reading of comic books, his life-changing exposure to James Baldwin's work, his incredible Son of Baldwin platform, a dearth of representation for Black queer people that led him to write the book he wanted to read, the wonderful literary community and its inspiration for his work, and the work of art that is The Prophets, with its myriad standout lines, memorable characters, and structure that makes it a true classic and work of art.    Robert Jones, Jr., is the author of The New York Times bestselling novel, The Prophets, which won the 2022 Publishing Triangle Edmund White Award for Debut Fiction and the 2022 NAIBA Book of the Year Award for Fiction. It was also a finalist for the 2021 National Book Award for Fiction and was named a notable book by The New York Times and one of the best books of 2021 by Time, Entertainment Weekly, USA Today, NPR, The Boston Globe, and The Washington Post, among many others. His writings have been featured in The New York Times, Essence, and The Paris Review, as well as in the critically acclaimed anthologies Four Hundred Souls and The 1619 Project. Subscribe to his newsletter Witness at robertjonesjr.substack.com. Buy The Prophets   Join Witness, Robert Jones, Jr.'s Substack   Robert Jones, Jr.'s Website   July, 2022, from NPR's All Things Considered-“Son of Baldwin — a place for discussions of race, sexuality and gender — retires” 2021 Review of The Prophets from The Guardian-by Holly Williams: "The Prophets by Robert Jones Jr review – outstanding debut"     At about 7:10, Robert describes the incredible experience he had at the recent National Book Awards    At about 8:10, Robert outlines his early reading and writing influences, and the indelible mark left by comic books, libraries, and Wonder Woman   At about 11:30-15:50, Robert's response to Pete's question about representation in what Robert read growing up connects to ideas of connectedness and internalized and external ideas of queerness, acceptance, and inspiration for his own writing    At about 15:50, Robert discusses loneliness versus uniqueness and the ideas of “polic[ing] gender”   At about 18:40, Pete wonders about James Baldwin's impact on Robert-Robert talks about being introduced to Baldwin “rather late” but being swept away by “Here Be Dragons,” among many other of Baldwin's works, and how a quote from James Baldwin's brother in the documentary, The Price of the Ticket  was the catalyst for the Son of Baldwin platform   At about 22:35, Pete talks about how closely Son of Baldwin and James Baldwin have been linked in recent years, including an incorrect attribution of an important quote   At about 25:15, Robert lists and describes some of the countless people to whom he gives credit and love for their inspiration and encouragement, as seen in his book's extensive Acknowledgments    At about 27:50, Pete and Robert sing the praises of Kiese Laymon, and Robert speaks so highly of Kiese tremendous help in getting Robert and his book    At about 30:05, Robert talks about contemporary writers like Deesha Philyaw, Dawnie Walton, Maisy Card, Mateo Askaripour, Jason Mott, and Xochitl Gonzalez whose work thrills and inspires and challenges him, and he shouts out an outstanding upcoming 2023 book from Jamila Minnicks    At about 32:50, Robert gives background on research for The Prophets, the time spent writing it, and the seeds for the books that largely came from his university studies   At about 37:25, Robert responds to Pete wondering what Robert was able to do by making his book fiction and not nonfiction    At about 39:00, Robert and Pete discusses connections between the invasion of African countries by Europeans, and how the forced religiosity connects to an encroaching and new homophobia and white supremacy    At about 41:50, The two discuss Amos from The Prophets and the “conundrum” that he faces with regards to Isaiah and Samuel, as well as Amos' role as preacher and Christian convert, as well as connections to modern preachers   At about 45:25, the two discuss Isaiah and Samuel, the book's protagonists, and their love and their backstories and their shared knowledge of being alone and “loaded onto a wagon like stuff”   At about 47:55, Robert responds to historical ideas of homosexuality sometimes seen as a tool to disrupt Black communities and explains how Paul, the book's slavemaster, sees Isaiah and Samuel's relationship and a “threat to capitalism”   At about 50:40, The two connect the hypocrisy of Paul and his philandering and    At about 51:45, Pete cites the book's unique/Biblical structure and talks about the book's starting with “the ancestors”; he asks Robert about the “you” to whom the ancestors spr   At about 53:10, Robert describes a dream that was hugely influential and transformative for his book   At about 55:00, Robert discusses the ways in which Isaiah and Samuel are unified, and how they are rendered as distinct    At about 58:25, Robert talks about the importance of names for enslaved peoples and for the slave owners, and he talks specifically about Isaiah's original name, its significance, and its importance in his relationship with Amos   At about 1:01:00, Robert and Pete discuss tovo and toubab, Beninese and Wolof words, respectively, and their connections to early African encounters with European invaders   At about 1:02:35, the two discuss the book's parallel storyline that involves Isaiah's familial lineage in Kasongo, a mythical kingdom in Africa; Robert homes in on the vastly-different ideas of gender identity in pre-colonial Africa   At about 1:05:30, Pete wonders about the role of Timothy in the book and Robert expands upon ideas of rapists and rape   At about 1:07:45, Robert discusses sympathy and writing characters who are seemingly 100% detestable, and ideas of oppression and oppressors and their connections with Timothy, Ruth, James, and Paul    At about 1:11:00, Pete focuses on Paul's behavior and his rush to justify his evil behavior through the Bible and Christianity; a scene from the book involving Adam, Paul's son, is highlighted    At about 1:12:35, The two discuss a scene of degradation and Robert highlights it as a scene where a lot is happening behind the scenes/under the surface with the crafty Essie and Maggie    At about 1:14:00, Pete highlights the incredibly-skillful ways in which Robert homes in on individual stories to draw the reader's attention and sympathy/empathy   At about 1:15:20, Robert talks about an exciting upcoming project, a second novel     You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  Sign up now for The Chills at Will Podcast Patreon: it can be found at patreon.com/chillsatwillpodcastpeterriehl     Check out the page that describes the benefits of a Patreon membership, including cool swag and bonus episodes. Thanks in advance for supporting my one-man show, my DIY podcast and my extensive reading, research, editing, and promoting to keep this independent podcast pumping out high-quality content! This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.    Please tune in for Episode 156 with Namrata Poddar. Namrata writes fiction and nonfiction, serves as Interviews Editor for Kweli, and teaches literature and writing at UCLA. Her work has appeared in several publications including Poets & Writers, Literary Hub, Longreads, The Kenyon Review, and The Best Asian Short Stories. Her debut novel, Border Less, was a finalist for Feminist Press's Louise Meriwether Prize.    The episode will air on December 13.

Contain Podcast
137. Theory of a Short-Wave Trend - Olivia Kan Sperling

Contain Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 118:43


Theory of a Short-Wave Trend with author of Island Time and Paris Review editor Olivia Kan Sperling. Is newness a natural function of the idealized image of desire or the economy? The post-historical aesthetic of Balenciaga (giving way to recent controversies), computer programming: the language of the other, learning to code, the stylized relationship to the self (from BAP to Instagram), fashion's use of theory language, Island Time, Sarah Fucking Snyder, Technometry, long-wave trends, Lacan, tearing the fabric of reality, political economy, & more...fascinating convo, learned a lot! For full episodes support &

TPQ20
DOROTHEA LASKY

TPQ20

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2022 24:36


Join Chris in conversation with author and educator, Dorothea Lasky, about passions, process, pitfalls, and Poetry! DOROTHEA LASKY: I am the author of five full-length collections of poetry and one book of prose. My newest book is Animal (Wave Books). I am also the author of ROME (Liveright/W.W. Norton) and Milk, Thunderbird, Black Life, and AWE, all out from Wave Books. I co-wrote Astro Poets: Your Guides to the Zodiac (Flatiron Books, 2019) with the poet, Alex Dimitrov. I have also written several chapbooks, including Snakes (Tungsten Press, 2017) and Poetry is Not a Project (Ugly Ducking Presse, 2010). My writing has appeared in POETRY, The New Yorker, The Paris Review, The Atlantic, and Boston Review, among other places. I am a co-editor of Open the Door: How to Excite Young People About Poetry (McSweeney's, 2013) and the editor of the forthcoming Essays (Essay Press, 2021). --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/tpq20/support

The Maris Review
Episode 183: Heather Radke

The Maris Review

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 35:59


Heather Radke is an essayist, journalist, and contributing editor and reporter at Radiolab, the Peabody Award­-winning program from WNYC. She has written for publications including The Believer, Longreads, and The Paris Review, and she teaches at Columbia University's creative writing MFA Program. Before becoming a writer, Heather worked as a curator at the Jane Addams Hull-House Museum in Chicago. Book recommendations: The History of White People by Nell Irvin Painter Easy Beauty by Chloe Cooper Jones Let's Talk About Love by Carl Wilson Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Chills at Will Podcast
Episode 154 with Ian MacAllen: Versatile Writer and Creator, Student of Foods and Cultures, and Author of Red Sauce: How Italian Food Became American

The Chills at Will Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2022 73:35


Episode 154 Notes and Links to Ian MacAllen's Work       On Episode 154 of The Chills at Will Podcast, Pete welcomes Ian MacAllen, and the two mainly discuss topics and themes revolving around his book, Red Sauce: How Italian Food Became American. They talk about, among other things, parallels between Italian immigration patterns and Italian-American food, the evolution of Italian food from “exotic” and “foreign” to an American staple, red sauce in its many iterations as emblematic of this evolution, and slippery notions of “authenticity.”    Ian MacAllen is the author of Red Sauce: How Italian Food Became American, (Rowman & Littlefield, April 2022). He is a writer, editor, and graphic designer living in Brooklyn. He is Art Director at The Rumpus, a contributor at America Domani and The Chicago Review of Books, and a member of The National Book Critics Circle. His writing has appeared in Chicago Review of Books, Southern Review of Books, The Offing, 45th Parallel Magazine, Little Fiction, Vol 1. Brooklyn, and elsewhere. He tweets @IANMACALLEN and is online at IANMACALLEN.COM. Buy Red Sauce: How Italian Food Became American   Ian MacAllen's Website   “Power Ballin': How Italian Food Became American” From America Domani, November, 2022       At about 7:10, Pete and Ian do the requisite Italian-American thing of comparing family last names   At about 9:50, Ian recounts stories from his visit to his family's hometown in Bagnoli del Trigno, Molise, Italy   At about 11:45, Ian transitions into speaking of the slippery term, “authenticity,” especially with regards to Italian and Italian-American cuisine    At about 14:20, Pete references Gustavo Arellano's iconic Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered the US, and Ian mentions his recent read-the “fascinating” American Tacos: A History and Guide, by José Ralat   At about 17:00, Pete and Ian talk about al pastor tacos and their history as a microcosm of fusion    At about 17:50, Ian details his early reading and writing and inspirations, including “single-topic food books,” such as Mark Kurlansky's Salt    At about 19:50, Ian cites John Mariani's How Italian Food Conquered the World and its influence on him and the ways in which its focus differs from Ian's with his book; Ian furthers expands upon his book's philosophy    At about 22:40, The two discuss ideas of “pan-Italian” food and Molise as representative of regional dishes and the slipperiness of nailing down a dish's origins    At about 26:50, Pete cites the commingling of spaghetti and meatballs through an accident involving Rudolph Valentino, and Pete and Ian cite regional sauce and polpette recipes from their family's Italian roots   At about 31:35, Ian gives history on marketing “Italian food” in the days of heavy Italian immigration and highlights the relative newness of Italy as a unified country   At about 32:40, Ian discusses ideas of Italian food and its initial stereotyping as “foreign” and “dirty,” as well as later ways in which Italian food-spaghetti-was used as a paragon of “becoming American”   At about 35:20, Ian relates the telling story of his mother's interactions with her future mother-in-law and its implications about Italian food and its “integra[tion] into American culture” and the “golden age of Italian food” in the US post WWII   At about 38:50, Ira Nevin and his gas-fired oven are referenced as evidence of the convenience culture's influence on pizza and other Italian-American foods    At about 42:20, Pete and Ian discuss Ian's book's opening regarding some iconic scenes with Paulie Walnuts from The Sopranos, and this leads to Ian giving background on the fiery “sauce” vs. “gravy” debate   At about 45:35, Ian uses Stanley Tucci's life experiences as an example of the changes in the ways Italian food has been viewed by the American culture as a whole    At about 46:55, Ian discusses Starboard and Olive Garden, in a business dispute, and how the saga is emblematic of the slippery and sometimes-backward ideas of “authenticity”    At about 49:35, Ian discusses authenticity in terms of associazioni in Italy and beyond that certify pizza, and issues inherent    At about 51:30, Ian talks about “the end of the red sauce era” and the “evolution” of Italian food in America with regards to pasta primavera, alfredo, etc.    At about 54:25, Pete highlights the book's tracing the history of Italians and Italian-América foods and cucina povera and cucina ricci, leading to a fairly-recent embrace of Northern Italian food as more “authentic”   At about 58:00, Ian references penne alla vodka in Italy and Jennifer Lee's Fortune Cookie Chronicles in talking about foods from the “old country” being Americanized and then exported back to the homeland   At about 59:50, Lidia Bastanivich and Marcella Hazan's influences and their cooking connections to American food are cited    At about 1:01:00, Pete reads a probable thesis sentence from the book as the two discuss the “bounty” that awaited Italians upon immigration and the effects on their diets    At about 1:05:00, Ian cites the recent unification of Italy around the time of much immigration and how language/dialect barriers affected cookbooks and books on food   At about 1:07:45, Ian highlights East End Books, Bookshop.org, and I am Books as good places to buy his book   At about 1:09:10, Ian discusses a fun experience in selecting the book's cover     You can now subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts, and leave me a five-star review. You can also ask for the podcast by name using Alexa, and find the pod on Stitcher, Spotify, and on Amazon Music. Follow me on IG, where I'm @chillsatwillpodcast, or on Twitter, where I'm @chillsatwillpo1. You can watch other episodes on YouTube-watch and subscribe to The Chills at Will Podcast Channel. Please subscribe to both my YouTube Channel and my podcast while you're checking out this episode.  Sign up now for The Chills at Will Podcast Patreon: it can be found at patreon.com/chillsatwillpodcastpeterriehl     Check out the page that describes the benefits of a Patreon membership, including cool swag and bonus episodes. Thanks in advance for supporting my one-man show, my DIY podcast and my extensive reading, research, editing, and promoting to keep this independent podcast pumping out high-quality content! This is a passion project of mine, a DIY operation, and I'd love for your help in promoting what I'm convinced is a unique and spirited look at an often-ignored art form. The intro song for The Chills at Will Podcast is “Wind Down” (Instrumental Version), and the other song played on this episode was “Hoops” (Instrumental)” by Matt Weidauer, and both songs are used through ArchesAudio.com.    Please tune in for Episode 155 with Robert Jones, Jr., the New York Times-bestselling author of The Prophets and finalist for the 2021 National Book Award for Fiction. He has written for numerous publications, including the New York Times, Essence, and The Paris Review, and he is the  creator and curator of the social-justice, social-media community Son of Baldwin The episode will air on December 6.