Podcasts about minnesota duluth

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Best podcasts about minnesota duluth

Latest podcast episodes about minnesota duluth

Aspen Ideas to Go
BONUS: Can Robots Curb Loneliness?

Aspen Ideas to Go

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 12:18


Robots as caregivers? Meet “Pepper,” a robot that can tell a joke, recognize emotions and help people remember special times in their lives. Rebekah Romberg, of Colorado Public Radio, guides us through this fascinating talk with Professor Arshia Khan of the University of Minnesota Duluth. She spoke at Aspen Ideas: Health.Tell us what you think about this episode by taking this quick survey. 

Bulldog Insider Podcast
S5 E10: 'Sniper extraordinaire' Maggie Flaherty saving her best for last season at UMD

Bulldog Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2022 34:40


After missing much of the second half of the 2021-22 season — including the NCAA tournament, Frozen Four and national championship game — with a season-ending knee injury, Minnesota Duluth fifth-year senior defenseman Maggie Flaherty has done the exact opposite of easing back into the Bulldogs' lineup. Flaherty is having herself a career-season at UMD with seven goals in 16 games. That's tied with fellow fifth-year players Anneke Linser and Ashton Bell for the team-high. The seven goals also matches the total goals scored by Flaherty in the 114 games she played at UMD over the previous four seasons. Flaherty joins the Bulldog Insider Podcast this week to talk about her transition from dishing out "apples" to sniping goaltenders. We also cover a wide-range of topics from this weekend's series against Ohio State, last year's national championship game, the holidays and who is the "old soul" of this veteran Bulldogs squad. Bulldog Insider is co-hosted by Duluth News Tribune sports reporter Matt Wellens and My9 television voice of Bulldog hockey Zach Schneider. Episodes are edited and produced by Duluth News Tribune digital producers Wyatt Buckner and Dan Williamson. You can find more Bulldog hockey coverage at duluthnewstribune.com and more episodes of Bulldog Insider wherever you listen to podcasts. New episodes air every Thursday.

Minnesota Now
Anishinaabe author Linda LaGarde Grover on the power of stories to connect

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2022 9:17


Anishinaabe author Linda LaGarde Grover, Bois Forte Band, talks with host Cathy Wurzer about the power of stories to strengthen families and cultural connections. LaGarde is professor emeritus of American Indian Studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth and her latest book is called “Gichigami Hearts.”

The Rink Live
Weekend Rewind: Minnesota's No. 1 Again, Previewing SCSU vs. UND, National Championship Rematch

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2022 37:42


The Rink Live's Sydney Wolf, Mick Hatten, Matt Wellens and Brad Schlossman catch up on the weekend of college hockey after Thanksgiving. Wolf discusses an interesting weekend for the Gophers men's and women's hockey teams. Schlossman talks about North Dakota's win and tie with Bemidji State. Hatten reviews a weekend sweep for the St. Cloud State women. Wellens previews a couple of series where the teams have seen each other earlier this season: Minnesota Duluth men playing host to Colorado College and the UMD women playing host to Ohio State in a rematch of last season's national championship game. Hatten also talks about this weekend's home-and-home series for the SCSU women against St. Thomas and he and Schlossman talk about North Dakota playing SCSU in men this weekend at the Herb Brooks National Hockey Center. The panel also answers the question of what is the biggest need for the team you cover?   For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live.

The Rink Live
Weekend Rewind: Gophers & Huskies Sweep, UMD Picks Up Win At Western Michigan

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 32:14


The Rink Live reporters catch up on the weekend of college hockey action before Thanksgiving. Mick Hatten recaps St. Cloud State's road sweep at Colorado College, Matt Wellens tackles Minnesota Duluth's weekend split at Western Michigan. Jess Myers talks Minnesota's sweep at Michigan. Wellens also discusses the UMD women's team pounding Harvard by a combined score of 13-0 in a nonconference series. Myers recaps the shootout win and loss for the Gophers' women at Wisconsin. The panel also discusses what they are thankful for and what the teams that they cover are thankful for. For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live.

UMD NEWMAN CATHOLIC CAMPUS MINISTRY
11/20/22 A God You Cannot Control

UMD NEWMAN CATHOLIC CAMPUS MINISTRY

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2022 22:48


To support Ascension's free media, please click here! To find out more about how Ascension will use your gift, please click here! Are you interested in supporting the Catholic campus ministry at the University of Minnesota Duluth? Please click here! Would you like to watch the "Virtual Front Pew" Day of Thanks Livestream event? Click here! Homily from the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe. What do you do when you encounter a God you cannot control? We all have fears. Often, those fears lead us to either seize control or to cede control. But when we fear God and His call in our lives, we are called to choose trust over fear. We are called to choose obedience over control. Mass Readings from November 20, 2022t: 2 Samuel 5:1-3 Psalms 122:1-5Colossians 1:12-20 Luke 23:35-43

The Hockey News Podcast
THN American Pipeline Podcast: New York Rangers NCAA Rundown

The Hockey News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2022 31:51


This week on The Hockey News American Pipeline Podcast with Mike Stephens and Sydney Wolf: - Why isn't Penn State higher in the NCAA men's hockey polls? Sydney argues that they should be higher than sixth place after going 10-2 to start the season and splitting wins against No. 1 teams. - Is it time to hit the panic button for Minnesota Duluth fans? The Bulldogs are unranked for the first time since 2016 despite having plenty of talent. - Who are the players to watch for Team USA at the 2022 World Junior A Challenge in Cornwall, Ont. from Dec. 11 to 18? - An update on the University of Michigan and defenseman Steven Holtz, who was hospitalized and we hope gets better. - The New York Rangers are the NHL team profile of the week. Brett Berard's point-per-game pace helps him stand out among the other Rangers prospects in the NCAA. - The college team to watch is the RIT Tigers, who are 10-2 overall. Dustin Manz of American International College is the player to watch as he leads the country in faceoff wins and has 12 points in 14 games. - And more.

Bulldog Insider Podcast
S5 E9: The life of an NHL scout with former UMD captain Parker Mackay

Bulldog Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 29:13


After retiring from professional hockey early in his career due to injuries, former Minnesota Duluth captain Parker Mackay was looking to get into coaching. He even landed a job in the Alberta Junior Hockey League before getting a call asking if he'd be interesting in scouting for an NHL team. Now Mackay — who led the Bulldogs to back-to-back national championships in 2018 and 2019 — is in his second season as an amateur and college scout for the Boston Bruins, covering Western Canada and the United States. He's part of a growing group of recent UMD graduates from both the men's and women's programs who have joined the NHL scouting ranks along with Brigette Lacquette and Sidney Morin. Both are pro scouts with Lacquette working for the Chicago Blackhawks and Morin with the Carolina Hurricanes. Mackay joins this week's episode of Bulldog Insider to share how he got into scouting for an NHL team and what life is like on the road for a young scout like him. Bulldog Insider is co-hosted by Duluth News Tribune sports reporter Matt Wellens and My9 television voice of Bulldog hockey Zach Schneider. Episodes are edited and produced by Duluth News Tribune digital producers Wyatt Buckner and Dan Williamson. You can find more Bulldog hockey coverage at duluthnewstribune.com and more episodes of Bulldog Insider wherever you listen to podcasts. New episodes air every Thursday.

The Rink Live
How Injuries Are Affecting Teams So Far This Season

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 36:18


The Rink Live's Kirsten Krull, Mick Hatten, Matt Wellens, Jess Myers, and Brad Schlossman meet to catch up on the second weekend of November college hockey action. Hatten recaps St. Cloud State's Jekyll and Hyde series against Western Michigan, Schlossman reviews North Dakota getting swept at home by Denver, Wellens tackles Minnesota Duluth's weekend split with Nebraska Omaha. Myers talks Minnesota's home split with Penn State. Hatten and Wellens also discuss the Bulldogs sweeping the Huskies in women's hockey. Hatten talks about the historic win for SCSU over Minnesota in Andover. Myers gives a stick salute to St. Thomas for its sweep at Lindenwood. The group also does an open skate into more protocol penalties and cleaning up a shattered sheet of Plexiglass. The question of the week is how are the teams you cover being affected by injuries?   For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live.

The Huskies Warming House Podcast
Episode 137 - NCHC Officials Video Breakdown + NCAA, NCHC, WCHA Recap for Nov. 6-12, 2022 (Week 8)

The Huskies Warming House Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2022 107:30


Episode 137 - NCHC Officials Video Breakdown + NCAA, NCHC, WCHA Recap for Nov. 6-12, 2022 (Week 8) November 13th, 2022 St. Cloud, MN   YouTube: https://youtu.be/ODlCBVClZY4 Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-huskies-warming-house-podcast/id1499278131   Episode 137 of the CenterIceView News and Notes segment features a roundup of college and NHL news. First, it's the Huskies Illustrated Weekly Roundup (3:04), where guys talk all things Hall of Fame week and some other moving parts in the NHL. Next, the NCAA had some BIG10 swings, while our NCHC Roundup sees St. Cloud State Men's hockey's split against Western Michigan (18:36)? We also do a special LIVE VIDEO BREAKDOWN of the NCHC Officating on Friday night (35:04). The WCHA Women's weekend was filled with highs and lows, and St. Cloud State Women's hockey earned a HUGE victory over Minnesota before getting swept by Minnesota-Duluth (1:18:40). Later, the Minnesota Wild need Marco Rossi to get going (1:26:36). Finally, our Extra Ice session talks about how the SCSU Men's team is doing after 12 games and the Women's team over 15 games (1:35:52). All this and more in another week in the Den! As always, find us on Apple Podcasts, Podbean, Spotify, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Google Podcasts and Youtube + more. Visit us at huskieswarminghousepodcast.com, and check out our affiliate at centericeview.com. The latest news is on Twitter and Facebook @warminghouseden, and email us at @warminghousepodcast@outlook.com.

Bulldog Insider Podcast
S5 E8: Cancer free, Stejskal leads next generation of UMD goalies

Bulldog Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 39:04


A year ago this month, Minnesota Duluth goaltender Zach Stejskal went public with his diagnosis of testicular cancer. It triggered not only a wave of support for the Cohasset native, but a surge in donations for the Bulldogs' Movember campaign, which raises funds and awareness for men's physical and mental health issues. Stejskal is now cancer free, and leading a new group of Bulldogs goaltenders that includes senior transfer Matthew Thiessen and freshman Zach Sandy. He and his teammates are also once again raising funds and awareness for Movember by growing mustaches. Stejskal joins the Bulldog Insider Podcast this week to talk about all of that, and more. Bulldog Insider is co-hosted by Duluth News Tribune sports reporter Matt Wellens and My9 television voice of Bulldog hockey Zach Schneider. Episodes are edited and produced by Duluth News Tribune digital producers Wyatt Buckner and Dan Williamson. You can find more Bulldog hockey coverage at duluthnewstribune.com and more episodes of Bulldog Insider wherever you listen to podcasts. New episodes air every Thursday.

The Rink Live
SCSU coach talks about his team knocking off top-ranked Minnesota, his team's progress, coaching in China

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 31:20


Brian Idalski is in his first season as head coach of the Huskies (7-6), who have won five straight games going into this weekend's WCHA series against Minnesota Duluth (3 p.m. Friday, 2 p.m. Saturday, B1G+). Idalski talks about that big win, keys to his team already surpassing last season's win total (6), his coaching career and his Olympic experience as the head coach of the Chinese women's team. All of this and a lot more on this episode of The Rink Live podcast with Jess Myers and Mick Hatten. 

The Rink Live
Splits, Protocol Penalties, Video Reviews and More

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 34:55


The Rink Live's Kirsten Krull, Mick Hatten, Matt Wellens, Jess Myers, and Brad Schlossman meet to catch up on the first weekend of November college hockey action. Hatten recaps St. Cloud State's overtime win and loss at Denver, Schlossman reviews North Dakota's win and shootout loss at Omaha, Wellens tackles Minnesota Duluth's weekend split at Colorado College. Wellens also discusses the Bulldogs women dropping two to the University of Minnesota and helps preview UMD's series at St. Cloud State. Hatten talks about the second straight WCHA series sweep for SCSU at Bemidji State. Schlossman looks ahead to the series between Denver and North Dakota, the defending co-NCHC champions. The group also discusses more protocol penalties being called, the changing way that coaches are having to approach challenges and some of the frustrations that coaches are having. The question of the week for the reporters is to give an assessment of the goaltending for the respective teams that they cover. For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live.

The Rink Live
How SCSU junior got the nickname JoJo, the origins of her playing goalie and joking with the head coach

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 29:22


Huskies Hockey Insider podcast with goalie JoJo Chobak, who also talks about her decision to transfer from Minnesota Duluth, where her interest in hockey came from growing up in Chicago and more. 

Bulldog Insider Podcast
S5 E7: Bulldogs return from Europe to play in Premier Hockey Federation

Bulldog Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 34:28


This week on the Bulldog Insider Podcast, we're talking about the state of women's professional hockey. And unlike previous years, we didn't have to Zoom with players from seven time zones away to do so. A flood of players — from the U.S., Canada and Europe — have returned from European leagues to play in the Premier Hockey Federation this season, including a number of Minnesota Duluth alumni. There are five former Bulldogs playing on the Minnesota Whitecaps this season, and two — Sidney Morin and Sydney Brodt — joined the podcast this week to discuss the investments the PHF (formerly the National Women's Hockey League) has made to bring in the world's best players. Bulldog Insider is co-hosted by Duluth News Tribune sports reporter Matt Wellens and My9 television voice of Bulldog hockey Zach Schneider. Episodes are edited and produced by Duluth News Tribune digital producers Wyatt Buckner and Dan Williamson. You can find more Bulldog hockey coverage at duluthnewstribune.com and more episodes of Bulldog Insider wherever you listen to podcasts. New episodes air every Thursday.

The Rink Live
A Look At Unusual Penalties & Surprises From The First Month of the College Hockey Season

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 43:28


The Rink Live's Kirsten Krull, Mick Hatten, Matt Wellens, Jess Myers, and Brad Schlossman meet to catch up on the last weekend of October college hockey action. Hatten recaps St. Cloud State's home-and-home split with Bemidji State, Schlossman reviews North Dakota's Las Vegas loss to Arizona State, Myers discusses Minnesota's split at Ohio State and Wellens talks about Minnesota Duluth getting back on track with two wins over Cornell. Myers also discusses the WCHA series between the top two ranked women's teams (Ohio State and Minnesota), Wellens tackles a series split for the UMD women against visiting Wisconsin and Hatten talks about the home-and-home sweep for SCSU over St. Thomas. There were some more odd penalties called over the weekend to add to the season's collection. The question of the week is what were the surprises in college hockey's first month of the season?   Visit https://www.therinklive.com/ for more hockey coverage.

Remodeler Stories
Episode 60: Nick Adams of Heirloom Property Management

Remodeler Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 32:31


Help us welcome our guest for this week's show, Nick Adams! He's the Vice President of Heirloom Property Management out of Minnesota. Nick grew up in the twin cities and fell in love with Duluth and the North Shore while earning his B.A. in Business Administration from the University of Minnesota Duluth. His entry into rental property ownership was spurred through the help of Michael, President of Heirloom, and has allowed him to continue to invest in properties over the years. Nick brings many years of business and project management experience to Heirloom and when not at work he enjoys spending time outdoors with his family, mountain biking, and exploring Duluth's abundant parks.

Wisconsin Badgers Sports Network
10-28-22 UW W- Hockey at Minnesota Duluth

Wisconsin Badgers Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2022 138:22


Wisconsin Badgers Sports Network
UW W-Hockey vs. Minnesota Duluth 10-28-22

Wisconsin Badgers Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2022 124:12


Glass & Out
University of Minnesota-Duluth Head Coach Scott Sandelin: Competition in practice, being an "every-day-er" and building program success

Glass & Out

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 65:39 Very Popular


For this week's episode of the Glass and Out hockey podcast, it's our pleasure to be joined by three-time National Champion Scott Sandelin, Head Coach of the University of Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs. The Hibbing, Minnesota native is currently in his 23rd season with the Bulldogs. In that time, he's helped them become one of the top programs in college hockey, both in terms of wins, championships and moving players onto the National Hockey League. In 2011, the Bulldogs captured their first ever National Championship by defeating the Michigan Wolverines 3-2 in overtime. Then in 2018 and 2019, UMD became just the third school in NCAA history to win back-to-back National Champions. In total, Sandelin has led the Bulldogs to six NCAA Frozen Four Tournaments, three conference playoff Championships and finished a top of their conference nine times during the regular season. In 2004, Sandelin received the Spenser Penrose Award, presented to the top coach in college hockey and has twice has been named the head coach of Team USA at the World Junior Championships. As a player, Sandelin was a member of Team USA at the 1984 World Junior Championships, named Captain of the UND Fighting Sioux in both his Junior and Senior seasons, and was selected 40th overall by the Montreal Canadians at the 1982 NHL Entry Draft. He played 25 games in the NHL over a six-year professional career, before injuries forced him into retirement. In today's conversation, we'll discuss how to create healthy competition in practice, the definition of an ‘Every-Day-Er,'and why he's content with continuing to build on the success of the UMD program.

Bulldog Insider Podcast
S5 E6: Ringing the bell on leukemia with Will Francis

Bulldog Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 28:50


Minnesota Duluth sophomore defenseman Will Francis joined the Bulldog Insider Podcast this week to talk about his battle with leukemia and what it took to get back on the ice playing hockey at a high level. Francis shares what it's like to be an inspiration to others battling cancer and the fundraising he's doing for the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. The Bulldog Insider is co-hosted by Duluth News Tribune sports reporter Matt Wellens and My9 television voice of Bulldog hockey Zach Schneider. Episodes are edited by Duluth News Tribune digital producers Wyatt Buckner and Dan Williamson. You can find more Bulldog hockey coverage at duluthnewstribune.com.”

USCHO Weekend Review
Epic weekend at Minnesota, big sweeps for St. Cloud, Wisconsin, Denver: Season 5 Episode 5

USCHO Weekend Review

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 37:23 Very Popular


Hosts Jim Connelly (@jimmyconnelly), Derek Schooley (@derekschooley), and Ed Trefzger (@EdTrefzger) look at the games of the past weekend and the news of the week.This podcast is sponsored by DCU – Digital Federal Credit Union – at dcu.orgTopics include:• Epic weekend series in Minnesota between the Gophers and North Dakota• St. Cloud State improves to 6-0-0 with a two-game sweep of Minnesota State• Denver sweeps Providence in regulation and OT• Wisconsin sweeps Minnesota Duluth as Bulldogs lose four straight• Big upset in Orono as Maine shocks Quinnipiac on Saturday night, 4-0• Ivies will get underway this weekend• Having video is great, but what about a package for all of college hockey?• COVID is still quietly lingering in the background

The Rink Live
A look back at a crazy, rivalry-packed weekend of college hockey

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 33:55


The Rink Live's Kirsten Krull, Mick Hatten, Matt Wellens, Jess Myers, and Brad Schlossman meet to catch up on the opening of college hockey action. Hatten recaps St. Cloud State's homecoming sweep over Minnesota State University-Mankato and women's series between Huskies and Gophers. Wellens reviews the series sweep for Wisconsin at Minnesota Duluth and the women's series between Ohio State and Bulldogs. Schlossman and Myers discuss a couple of epic games that were decided in overtime between North Dakota and Minnesota. Wellens previews the Cornell at UMD men's series and the Wisconsin at Minnesota Duluth women's series. Schlossman discusses the unique game on Saturday between North Dakota and Arizona State in Las Vegas. Hatten previews the home-and-home series between SCSU and Bemidji State. Myers previews the Gophers at Ohio State for both men and women. Also, the reporters answer the question of which veteran player who is off to a slow start needs to get going for the teams that they cover.   For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live.

Wisconsin Badgers Sports Network
UW M-Hockey vs. Minnesota Duluth 10-22-22

Wisconsin Badgers Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 221:54


Wisconsin Badgers Sports Network
UW M-Hockey vs. Minnesota Duluth 10-21-22

Wisconsin Badgers Sports Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 172:43


Jesuitical
How Father Mike Schmitz balances a popular media ministry with being a college campus priest

Jesuitical

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 61:09


Podcast episodes and YouTube videos featuring Father Michael Schmitz rack up thousands, even millions, of views. His latest project, “The Bible in a Year,” has even made it to the top of the Apple Podcast charts since it debuted in 2021. But for students at the University of Minnesota Duluth, Father Mike isn't just another celebrity priest. He's their chaplain. This week, we talk to Father Mike about the big questions Catholics (and non-Catholics) on campus are asking today, the challenges and opportunities of ministering at a big state school and how he balances life in the public life and being present to his students. And in Signs of the Times, Zac and Ashley chat with Colleen Dulle about Inside the Vatican's latest deep dive into the synod on synodality. The global church has just finished up the listening phase of the synod and reports from at least 112 of the 114 bishops' conferences around the world are in. What have we learned so far from this yearlong consultation? And what comes next? Links from the show: Podcast: Synod reports from all over the world are in. What happens next? The Bible in a Year podcast Watch America's new documentary, People of God: How Catholic Parish Life is Changing in the United States What's on tap? An IPA that was not made in Father Mike's brother's brewery Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rink Live
Recapping a Turbulent Week of College Hockey, Previewing North Dakota-Minnesota + More Big Series Ahead

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 35:31


The Rink Live's Kirsten Krull, Mick Hatten, Matt Wellens, Jess Myers, and Brad Schlossman meet to catch up on the opening of college hockey action. Hatten recaps St. Cloud State's sweep at Wisconsin and women's series between Huskies and Badgers Wellens reviews the series sweep for the Minnesota State men over visiting Minnesota Duluth. Schlossman takes a look back at the tie and loss for North Dakota at home against Quinnipiac. Myers and Schlossman also preview this weekend's series with the Fighting Hawks playing at Minnesota. Wellens previews the Wisconsin at UMD men's series and the Minnesota Duluth at Ohio State women's series. Hatten previews the Minnesota State at SCSU men's series and he and Myers preview the home-and-home series between St. Cloud State and Minnesota in the WCHA.   For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live.

Boundless Body Radio
A Week Of Dissecting Cadavers with Bethany Ruff! 353

Boundless Body Radio

Play Episode Play 28 sec Highlight Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 74:42


Bethany Ruff our favorite guest ever! Bethany is the co-founder and co-owner of Boundless Body LLC, a health and wellness company that was started during the 2020 Covid -19 Pandemic. Bethany's purpose in life is helping people move themselves out of pain and into their most optimally functioning body. Her entrance into the field of human movement began as an Exercise Science major at the University of Minnesota Duluth. From there, her passion for corrective exercise and rehabilitation grew into something she could have never imagined. During her time in the fitness industry, she has expanded her knowledge base and capacity to serve others by earning specialty certifications. These include a Comprehensive Pilates Instructor course through Peak Pilates, advanced certifications in structural integration through The Rossiter System, as well as Corrective Exercise Specialist and Performance Enhancement Specialist certifications through the National Academy of Sports Medicine. Her precisely tuned eye for movement, posture, and alignment in the human body coupled by her passion for helping people heal makes her a powerhouse. With a constant thirst for learning, she works tirelessly to find the underlying roots of pain and dysfunction and integrates a tailored approach to a more optimally functioning body. She lives in South Jordan, Utah, with her husband Casey, their two dogs Rex and Tucker and their cat Lily!Find Bethany at-FB- @Bethany Alys RuffIG- @bethanyboundlessbodyFind Boundless Body at- myboundlessbody.com Book a session with us here! Check out our new Patreon page!

USCHO Game of the Week
Looking at some surprisingly large underdogs and a complete toss-up: Season 1 Episode 2

USCHO Game of the Week

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2022 30:20


USCHO Edge hosts Jim Connelly (@jimmyconnelly) and Ed Trefzger (@EdTrefzger) analyze five games among top 20 teams, looking at money lines and over/under as well as giving an in-depth look at the matchups. Jim also explains in this episode how and why money lines shift leading up to the weekend.This week's games:• No. 1 Denver at No. 13 Massachusetts• No. 9 Boston University at No. 6 Michigan• No. 11 Ohio State at No. 17 Connecticut• No. 8 Quinnipiac at No. 3 North Dakota• No. 4 Minnesota Duluth at No. 5 Minnesota StateThis podcast is sponsored by DCU Federal Credit Union at DCU.org

Bulldog Insider Podcast
S5 E4: Hawk-y talk with UMD's Jesse Jacques and MSU's Ryan Sandelin

Bulldog Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 28:46


This week on the Bulldog Insider Podcast, Minnesota Duluth's Jesse Jacques and Minnesota State's Ryan Sandelin go way back having both grown up in Hermantown together. For the past four years, however, they've been facing off as rivals in college. Besides their college careers as rivals and prep careers as teammates, the guys discuss how they met, Jesse's nickname and the origins of it, the significance of jersey number 11, who had the best hair in high school, which former teammate would make a good subject for a documentary film and more. The Bulldog Insider is co-hosted by Duluth News Tribune sports reporter Matt Wellens and My9 television voice of Bulldog hockey Zach Schneider. Episodes are edited by Duluth News Tribune digital producers Wyatt Buckner and Dan Williamson. You can find more Bulldog hockey coverage at duluthnewstribune.com.

Maverick Hockey Live
'22-'23 Let's Go! Coach Mike Hastings after season opening split vs Minnesota; Duluth up next

Maverick Hockey Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 29:33


Head Coach Mike Hastings joins the podcast after a season opening split vs Minnesota. Presented by Dunkin' Mankato.

The Rink Live
Recapping Minnesota-Minnesota State Split, UND Sweep of Holy Cross, Reporter Questions

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2022 24:20


The Rink Live's Kirsten Krull, Mick Hatten, Matt Wellens, Jess Myers, and Brad Schlossman meet to catch up on the opening of college hockey action. Myers recaps the top-5 matchup between Minnesota State and Minnesota. Wellens previews the Mavericks vs. Minnesota Duluth. Schlossman talks about North Dakota opening in impressive fashion against Holy Cross and previews the series against Quinnipiac. Hatten recaps the weekend for the rest of the NCHC and previews St. Cloud State at Wisconsin. The question of the week is which veteran player on the team(s) you cover do they need to keep healthy?   For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live.

Bulldog Insider Podcast
S5 E3: Sitting down with new Bulldogs AD Forrest Karr

Bulldog Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 43:31


This week on the Bulldog Insider Podcast, new University of Minnesota Duluth athletic director Forrest Karr joins to discuss the future of NCAA athletics and that little controversy over a new mascot costume. The Bulldog Insider is co-hosted by Duluth News Tribune sports reporter Matt Wellens and My9 television voice of Bulldog hockey Zach Schneider. Episodes are edited by Duluth News Tribune digital producers Wyatt Buckner and Dan Williamson. You can find more Bulldog hockey coverage at duluthnewstribune.com.

How Did They Do It? Real Estate
SA534 | Value Add Multifamily Assets Through Syndication with Frank Rush

How Did They Do It? Real Estate

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 25:05


Today, let's delve deeper into the lucrative business opportunities from value add multifamily investments. Frank Rush talks about his years of experience in the business, what to modify to scale a startup venture, and adding value by syndicating multifamily deals. Listen to his firm's massive success and be motivated to expand your investing knowledge!Key Takeaways to Listen forWays for students to finance a real estate investmentWhat you can do to maximize business profits and build your portfolioQualities to look for in a good tenant Things that add value to a multifamily investmentHow to determine the gross value of a property on saleResources Mentioned in This EpisodeFree Apartment Syndication Due Diligence Checklist for Passive Investor About Frank RushFrank was introduced to real estate, property management and investment properties at a young age. Growing up mowing lawns and helping with painting/light maintenance on a portfolio of duplexes and single-family properties in the Minneapolis area, Frank learned early how to manage and operate rental properties. Purchasing his first investment property in 2007, Frank later graduated from the University of Minnesota-Duluth with a degree in Finance in 2011. While working at Coldwell Banker East West Realty as real estate agents, Frank and business partner Alex Rogers began purchasing investment properties ranging from 1-15 units. Soon thereafter, East West Property Management was founded in 2014 and currently manages over 550 units in the Duluth/Superior area.  In 2020 Gray Duck Capital was formed, targeting value-add multifamily properties in the upper Midwest ranging from 75-150 units. It has always been one of Frank's passions to introduce friends and family to the short- and long-term benefits of investing in real estate. Connect with FrankEmail: frank@grayduck.co Website: Gray Duck CapitalLinkedIn: Frank RushConnect With UsPlease visit our website: www.bonavestcapital.com and please click here, to leave a rating and review!SponsorsGrow Your Show, LLCThinking About Creating and Growing Your Own Podcast But Not Sure Where To Start?Visit GrowYourShow.com and Schedule a call with Adam A. Adams.

The Rink Live
First Impressions of the College Hockey Season

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 29:30


The Rink Live's Kirsten Krull, Mick Hatten, Matt Wellens, Jess Myers, and Brad Schlossman meet to catch up on the opening of college hockey action. The Minnesota Duluth men and women and St. Cloud State men and women are all undefeated in the early going. The Gophers men opened with a sweep and the women get started this weekend. North Dakota opened with an exhibition win over the University of Manitoba. What stood out from those teams in the early going and which newcomer to their rosters stood out?   For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live.

Politics Friday
Frey on his police chief nominee and Jennifer Schultz, challenger in the 8th District

Politics Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 49:25


Host Mike Mulcahy talks with Mayor Jacob Frey about Frey's choice for the next Minneapolis police chief. Then, a conversation with State Rep. Jen Schultz, DFL-Duluth. She's an economics professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth and she's challenging U.S. Rep. Pete Stauber, R-Minn., for the 8th District seat in Congress and not running for reelection to the Minnesota House. (We have invited Rep. Stauber on the program, but he has not yet agreed to an interview.) Finally, Mike rounds up this week's political news stories with MPR News's Dana Ferguson and Brian Bakst and Minnpost's Peter Callaghan.

Minnesota Now
Frey on his police chief nominee and Jennifer Schultz, challenger in the 8th District

Minnesota Now

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 49:25


Host Mike Mulcahy talks with Mayor Jacob Frey about Frey's choice for the next Minneapolis police chief. Then, a conversation with State Rep. Jen Schultz, DFL-Duluth. She's an economics professor at the University of Minnesota Duluth and she's challenging U.S. Rep. Pete Stauber, R-Minn., for the 8th District seat in Congress and not running for reelection to the Minnesota House. (We have invited Rep. Stauber on the program, but he has not yet agreed to an interview.) Finally, Mike rounds up this week's political news stories with MPR News's Dana Ferguson and Brian Bakst and Minnpost's Peter Callaghan.

CFR On the Record
Social Justice Webinar: Infectious Diseases

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022


Demetre Daskalakis, deputy coordinator of the White House national monkeypox response, and Jeremy Youde, dean of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at the University of Minnesota Duluth, discuss the emergence of monkeypox and other diseases, international responses, and messaging around health issues that especially affect the LGBTQ+ community. Jennifer Nuzzo, senior fellow for global health at CFR, moderates. Learn more about CFR's Religion and Foreign Policy Program. FASKIANOS: Thank you, and welcome to the Council on Foreign Relations Social Justice Webinar series. The purpose of this series is to explore social justice issues and how they shape policy at home and abroad through discourse with members of the faith community. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. As a reminder, this webinar is on the record, and it will be made available on CFR's website, CFR.org, and on the iTunes podcast channel, “Religion and Foreign Policy.” As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We're delighted to have Jennifer Nuzzo, senior fellow for global health at CFR, to moderate today's discussion on infectious diseases. Dr. Nuzzo is a senior fellow for global health here at CFR. She's also a professor of epidemiology and the inaugural director of the Pandemic Center at Brown University's School of Public Health. Her work focuses on global health security, public health preparedness and response, and health systems resilience. In addition to her research, she directs the Outbreak Observatory, which conducts operational research to improve outbreak preparedness and response. And she advises national governments, and for-profit and non-profit organizations on pandemic preparedness and response, and worked tirelessly during the COVID pandemic to advise and tell people what was going on, to the extent that we knew, as we made our way through this two-and-a-half-year pandemic. So, Jennifer, I'm going to turn it over to you to introduce our speakers. NUZZO: Great. Thank you, Irina. Thanks for that introduction and thanks for organizing this webinar today. I'm very glad that we're having this conversation. As someone who's worked in infectious diseases for my entire career, I have found the last few years to be particularly staggering. I was looking, and as of today there are more than 616 million cases of COVID-19 that have been reported globally, upwards of 6.5 million diagnosed deaths that have been reported worldwide. At the same time, we are also seeing a global surge in cases of monkeypox, a disease that many hadn't heard of prior to this past year. And now we are over 66,000 cases that have been reported globally, more than 25,000 of those reported here in the United States alone. At the same time, successive outbreaks of Ebola have been occurring, and we have measles once again on the rise. And now vaccine-derived polio circulating in countries where the virus had been previously thought to be eliminated. So it's really a staggering list of infectious diseases that have been occurring and continue to occur. So clearly, we're at an important crossroads in terms of how we respond to these recurring hazards and infectious disease emergencies. But today we get to zoom out a little bit, and to examine factors that they may have all in common, and to try to understand what may be driving these—the recurrence of these events over and over again. So over the past few years we have seen the consequences of social, economic, and racial inequities play out center stage. These factors have underpinned not only our underlying vulnerabilities to infectious diseases, but also how effectively we respond to them. So that's what we're going to talk about today. And to help discuss these issues we are joined by two globally renowned experts who have a long history in working to address infectious disease threats and the disparities that accelerate them. Our first panelist is Dr. Demetre Daskalakis. Dr. Daskalakis is the deputy coordinator of the White House national monkeypox response. Prior to this role, he served as director of CDC's division of HIV prevention. And prior to that, oversaw infectious diseases for the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, which is one of the largest health departments in the nation and rivals the WHO in terms of staff and budgets. So Dr. Daskalakis is a leading national expert on many things, but also in particular health issues affecting the LGBTQIA+ communities. And he has worked clinically for much of his career to focus on providing care for these communities. We are also joined by Dr. Jeremy Youde, who is the dean of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Previously, Dr. Youde was an associate professor in the department of international relations at Australia National University in Canberra. Dr. Youde is an internationally recognized expert on global health politics. And he is a very prolific writer. He has written five books, and many chapters, and countless articles. I recently read a very compelling blog post by him on our own CFR's Think Global Health. So really excited to get both Dr. Youde and Dr. Daskalakis's perspectives on the issues in front of us. So I will get the conversation started. We have a lot of great attendees, and we'll have time for questions. But just to get the conversation going, let's see here. Maybe first, if I could turn to you, Dr. Demetre. For those who haven't been living in the monkeypox data as much as you have, perhaps you could just give us a quick summary of where we are and where you see us being headed. DASKALAKIS: Thank you. And thank you for having me. I'm really excited to join Jeremy and to be a part of this discussion. So living in the data is, in fact, what I do. So I'll tell you, so monkeypox—I'll give a little key bit of background just for everyone to be level-set—is an orthopoxvirus, that is a virus that causes disease, transmitted usually from animals to humans. Usually, traditionally, not a lot of human-to-human transmission. This current outbreak in 2020, global in scale, with 66,500 cases reported internationally, actually demonstrates pretty good human-to-human transmission, often in the setting of close contact, often associated with sexual activity, and the majority of cases being among men who have sex with men—the vast majority, over 96 percent. In the U.S., at this moment, we have 25,300 cases. I can tell you right up to the moment. And so we continue to see increases in cases in the United States, but we're seeing a deceleration in the rate of increase. So cases are stilling being logged. We used to see kind of around four hundred cases per day. We're now more on the order of two hundred or below and continue to see that trend going in a good direction with more data imminently coming to the website of CDC later on today. Again, just briefly, the demographic, majority male, mainly men who have sex with men—the gay, bisexual, other men who have sex with men. Looking at the demographics, at the beginning of the outbreak in May, the majority of cases were among white men. And now we're seeing about 68 percent of those cases are happening in Latino or Black men. From the perspective of that measure as well we've seen a significant increase in vaccinations. So we can talk—we're going to talk more about that, I'm sure. But really with lots of strategies to increase vaccine supply. We are now well over eight hundred thousand vaccines administered. There is an inequity there as well. The majority of vaccines are going to white men. And we're seeing Latino men and Black men in second and third place, respectively, in terms of vaccines administered. Jennifer, I hope that that's a good situation summary to start off with. NUZZO: Yeah, great summary. Thank you so much. That helped kind of bring everybody to the same—somewhat same level. Just a quick follow-up question for you. There have been a lot of headlines about the important progress we've made, and the fact that the global monkey—or, sorry—the monkeypox cases seem to be coming down in terms of numbers. Question: Are you seeing similar trends for all demographics? Or are you concerned that perhaps the large numbers are hiding increased transmission in other groups? DASKALAKIS: I had to fix the mute. There we go. So I think what we've seen is that the declines are looking to be even across population. So that's good news. Again, the vaccine equity is our main issue right now in terms of where we're—where that's stubborn right now, and really thinking about strategies to improve that. We had a lot of news today, which I'm sure we'll be able to talk about some of the strategies that we have to address that. But so I think there's no clear sign that the deceleration is different in different populations. Geographically, however, it is different. And so that's, I think, one place where—the jurisdictions that have had the greatest and longest experience with this outbreak, so the most cases, are also the jurisdictions that have access to the most vaccines. So whether it's because of behavior change that we're seeing, which is definitely something that we, I imagine, could talk about here as well, or natural infections plus vaccine-induced immunity, I think the places that have had more experience are showing deceleration faster. So New York, California, Texas, and Georgia are looking down, while some of the places where the outbreak is newer and they've also had less access and time for vaccines, those places are showing an increase. We're going to get an update of this, this week. So this is based on data that's about a month old. So soon we're going to have a new view into how this deceleration or acceleration looks like, jurisdiction by jurisdiction. NUZZO: Great. Thank you. Maybe turn to you, Dr. Youde. You've been an important voice about the global dimensions of the monkeypox crisis. And I'm just curious where you think we are globally. And I referenced in introducing you that piece that you wrote on Think Global Health that I thought was—made a quite compelling argument about the role of WHO and where you see the response needing to go. Do you want to maybe elaborate on those points for people who haven't had a chance to read your article? YOUDE: Sure. Thank you for the question, and thanks for organizing this. I'm honored to be part of this event. And, picking up on some of what you were talking about and what Demetre was just talking about as well, we do see these inequities that exist, especially when we're looking worldwide. The World Health Organization did declare monkeypox a public health emergency of international concern. And while it doesn't necessarily come with automatic funding or programmatic resources, it does raise the profile. It does put this on the global health agenda and say: This is something we need to be paying attention to. In the piece I described it as the WHO's bat signal. We're sending out the message: This is something that we need to pay attention to. But one of the things I think is frustrating about the WHO response, and just sort of the global community's response to monkeypox in general, is that monkeypox isn't a new disease. This is a disease that we've known about in human cases since 1970. Laurie Garrett in her book, The Coming Plague, which came out in '94—which is one of the books I think a lot of us who are probably about a similar age read in our early, formative days as we were coming into global health and global health politics—she talks about it in that book. And if you look at the data that we have, we've been seeing increases in monkeypox cases in humans in countries where monkeypox was endemic for about the last decade or so. And so—but what really caught the international community's attention was then when it came to the Global North, when it came to the industrialized countries. And that helps to reinforce some of these questions about what is the nature of our real concern about global health? Is it about health in this very broad mandate, like the World Health Organization has as part of its constitutional mandate, to be this international coordinating body? Or is the sense that we, in the Global North, want to keep the diseases from the Global South coming to affect us? And there are similar sorts of issues when we're looking at vaccine equity and vaccine access, when we're looking globally. And, there have certainly been some problems here in the United States, getting access to the vaccine. But, I was able to get vaccinated against monkeypox. Yeah, I had to drive two and a half hours to Minneapolis to do it, but I was able to do it. And I was able to arrange it. People in countries where monkeypox is endemic have little to no access to these vaccines. And it raises some of the questions then, again, about how the international system and the global health governance systems that we have in place—how they can address some of these equity challenges? Because in many ways, outbreaks like monkeypox, they glom onto the societal and social cleavages that exist, and help to reinforce and exacerbate them, but also provide this opportunity for us to really put some of our ideals and our promises around social justice, around a cosmopolitan view of understanding that we are all healthier if we are all healthier. And really put those into practice, if we have the political and economic will to do so. And that's where—that's one of the areas where I get a bit concerned right now. I know we're all exhausted talking about COVID-19 and about monkeypox, and all of these sorts of outbreaks. Jennifer, I know you've been doing a lot of this. Demetre, obviously, you've been on the frontlines. I've been doing some of this work as well. But when we lose that attention, sometimes we lose then that motive—that momentum in the political system to try to address some of these challenges and these shortfalls that we have identified. So, I can be a critic of the World Health Organization, but I also recognize that the World Health Organization is a creature of its member states. And so, it's really incumbent upon the member states to really put some action behind their words. And to say: If we want to have a more effective response, we need to build systems that are going to be able to respond better than this. NUZZO: Thank you for that. It's a good segue to what I wanted to talk about next, which is the title of this webinar being about social justice. And those who've worked in public health, the notion that social justice has a role to play in reducing our vulnerability to infectious disease is quite clear. But I'm aware, particularly over watching—(laughs)—the national political debate over the last several years that those outside of public health may not recognize the connection between our vulnerability to infectious diseases and social justice. And they may be dismissive of the idea that public health authorities should be engaged in the work of social justice. So this is actually a question for you both. And maybe reflect on monkeypox or your long experience of other infectious disease threats that you've worked to address. And what would you say to folks that just don't understand why public health should be concerned with social justice, and what role do you think it has to play going forward? And maybe we'll turn back to you after Demetre. DASKALAKIS: Do you want Jeremy to go or do you want me to go first? NUZZO: Go ahead. YOUDE: Go for it. Go for it. I'll let you start. DASKALAKIS: All right. So I'll put my very strong HIV hat on, because that's sort of where I come from. And I'll start that this is a forty-one—a forty-two, almost, year-old lesson that I think we've seen play out over and over again, which is that really the social determinants of health are actually what drive infection. So there are countermeasures that can work. There's vaccines. There's drugs. There's pre-exposure prophylactics, post-exposure prophylactics. It doesn't matter. The social determinants are really what ultimately ends up blocking us from being able to implement the full vision of what we know we can from the perspective of medical technology and public health. And so I think that at the end of the day that implementation piece is so critical. So much technology can exist, so many interventions can be designed, but they sit on the shelf unless there's both the political and social will to move them forward. And so I think I should put that HIV hat there for a second, because in environments where there is less political and social will we tend to see HIV flourish. And in places where there is social and political will, we tend to see HIV not do so well from the perspective—or, in other words, we will do well because of less incidents and prevalence. So I think that sort of looking at that will is so critical. I'll give you a story from monkeypox which I think is really important, that is about the sort of CDC response. I got pulled in really early on, before the first case actually hit the United States. One of the very early conversations that we had with the response is that we need to expect that we're going to have inequities that are going to be a part of this. And I think that's based on lessons from COVID, and lessons from HIV, and lessons from so many other infections. I think we really worked to make equity the cornerstone of the response. But even when you do that, it is an all-of-society thing that needs to happen, and not just something that is mediated simply by a public health department or a public health agency. Over. YOUDE: And if I can take that public health hat and HIV hat that you had on, and I'll wear it myself. I got into this line of work through working on HIV/AIDS issues in Zimbabwe and South Africa, and seeing how those sorts of societal cleavages played a role, but then also how infectious disease outbreaks, and the spread of HIV was glomming into these other issues around democratization, around building societies that were going to be equitable, that were going to be able to fulfill the promises that governments had made to their populations. And seeing how a disease like this was thwarting that progress. So it's something that is not just unique to the United States. It's something that we see globally. From a very instrumental perspective we can say, look, public health is ultimately a weakest link public good. Everyone is still at risk, so long as risks still exist. So we need to reach out to those places which might have fewer resources, which might not have the same sorts of ability to implement these sorts of programs, because ultimately that's going to make us all healthier. And I think there's elements and an important role for those sorts of instrumental views of public health. But I also think about the recently passed Paul Farmer, and his notion of public health, especially his idea around the preferential option for the poor, which was kind of a double-edge sword. Because on the one hand he was saying, look, the people who are disenfranchised within societies, those are the people who are the most vulnerable to these infectious disease outbreaks. Those are the people who are at the greatest risk. But also, we need to think about our programs, we need to think about our interventions putting those people first, thinking about equity. Putting that not as an afterthought or something that we think about five, six, seven steps down the road, but it needs to be central, and it needs to be core. Because, again, if we're not taking equity seriously and we're not really putting this into everything that we're doing, then we're just reinforcing these sorts of divisions and, again, providing these opportunities and these outlets where diseases can thrive. And so, to just cosign what Demetre was saying we can have all the technologies we want. And I have all my criticisms about the way that the access to pharmaceuticals and drug interventions exist on a global level, and questions about compulsory licensing and all these sorts of things. Those are all important, but those are secondary in a lot of respects if we don't have the underlying core infrastructure in place. And that core infrastructure, even if it's not touching us in a direct way, does have an effect on our ability to stay healthy. DASKALAKIS: Could I—this is a fun one. Could I keep going a little bit longer on this? NUZZO: Please do, yeah. DASKALAKIS: This is a great, stimulative conversation on this. And along with what ends up being both the foundation of the issue as well as the deeper foundation, the way that all of these social issues interact with stigma, like I think we've seen in fast-forward with monkeypox. Like all the things that we saw with HIV and other infections and COVID—today, for instance—this is a really good example. So, we're giving the vaccines and right now they're going on people's forearms. Which means that literally some people will have a mark on their forearm. So talking about stigma—literally stigma. And so, we changed it so that individuals can elect to get the vaccine on their shoulder or on their back. So we have people who want vaccines but are saying, I don't want to be marked by this. I don't want to have the sort of—someone know that I am someone who's potentially identifying myself as part of a group at risk. And so it interacts exactly with the social determinants. Whether it's poverty, transportation, racism, all of it interacts in a way where these sort of more brass-tacks economic issues interact with these very profound stigma issues and create barriers where even if you do have great access—I'll give an example again. [The] Ryan White [program] is really great access for people for HIV medication, but we still don't have everybody in the country—(inaudible)—right? So why is that? It's partially access, but it's also that the systems are built to sort of maintain structures of stigma and structures of inequity that are really hard to overcome, even with things that provide access. NUZZO: So I was actually going to ask you about stigma. So thank you for segueing to it. And I seems to me that—and I don't have the HIV hat to wear, like you both do. But studying events that we typically think about in the field of health security—which is a field that sort of struggles to incorporate the forty-plus year lessons that HIV has learned—is that it is clear that stigma is an issue in nearly every single event. Any time we have particularly a new infectious disease, or something that's unusual, society seems to look for some group to blame. But what it seems, though, is that while there's an increasing recognition of the importance of stigma, it doesn't seem like we have great strategies for addressing it. And I guess I'm wondering, do you agree? And also, what practically can and should we be doing to address stigma? I really saw us struggle with this. I mean, we had a recognition of it as being important in monkeypox, but I feel that the absence of clear ways to deal with it really led us to struggle to talk about monkeypox, and who was at risk, and how people could protect themselves. So what should we be doing going forward not just for monkeypox but future threats, so that we don't get hobbled by—first of all, that we can minimize or tackle stigma, but also don't get hobbled by it? Whoever wants to chime in. (Laughs.) DASKALAKIS: So this is back to the HIV hat. This is the tightrope that we walk every day in HIV. And I think that the lesson actually—well, one of the first lessons that's important, sort of sitting on the government side of the world, is that government needs to lead, and governmental public health needs to lead, so that its messaging does not propagate stigma. That's very important. Because whether people like governmental public health or not, or have complaints about it, ultimately people do look to governmental public health—like CDC, local health departments—to really fine-tune their own messaging, and then translate that messaging not just to another language but translate it so the populations that people work with actually understand. And so I think monkeypox was actually a kind of exciting example, where from the very beginning of the response it was a how can we take an anti-stigma stance in how we messaged it? And so the balance really then depended on the data. And so that's what was really important. So it was starting with imperfect data, and as the data became more and more clear, making sure that the messaging evolved in a way that addressed what you were actually seeing epidemiologically without necessarily—without creating a scenario where you're pinning infection, a virus, on a population. Let me give you an example since, Jennifer, you say your HIV hat isn't as strong as ours. So in the '80s, when HIV started, before it was HIV it was gay-related immunodeficiency. So that lesson was the lesson that was so important in the work that we did with monkeypox, to start off by saying: This is a virus that can affect anyone. But we're seeing this virus more in this population. As opposed to saying: This is this population's virus. And so it's leading by that example. And it's one of those things that we can raise up and say: We have learned the lesson from this forty-two years ago, and we're not doing it this way again. And so with that said, I think that there's a lot of strategies that can address stigma. And a lot of that has to do with communications, using trusted messengers. So, that has been a really important part of this as well because, again, working in public health I would love if everybody listened to public health data. So providing good communications to individuals who are trusted messengers is really important. And also, part of the propagating stigma is also being clear about what data is, things that we fully know and things that we're still learning. Because that really allows that risk communication so that you don't over-select or too rapidly move a response into what population, as opposed to being broad. So as you learn more data—so, for us, our guidance started off in one place about safer sex and safer gathering. As we were seeing that this was not moving throughout the different populations, it got stronger and stronger. And we really started the conversation by saying that this is guidance that's going to change as we learn more. I think that we do have stigma mitigation strategies. But stigma's a stubborn thing. I'll give it over to Jeremy. YOUDE: Yeah, I would agree with everything that you said. And especially being—having that level of humility. We are still learning about this. Things are going to change. Things are going to evolve but building those sorts of trusting relationships. The other things that I would emphasize, and I think these complement what you were saying quite well, is empowering communities to speak to each other. I think one of the things that we've seen here in the U.S. around access to the monkeypox vaccine, and the relatively high rates of vaccination that we've seen, has been people talking to other people. Men who have sex with men talking to other men who have sex with men, and this becoming part of the conversation. Even if it is something at the level of, where were you able to get access to it? When supplies are limited. Just building that sort of awareness within a community can be incredibly important. I think it's also important to make sure that we do have targeted messages. Not blaming messages, but understand that the message that just says, everyone is at risk for HIV or everyone is at risk for monkeypox, ends up falling flat and doesn't really strike anyone. And so having that sort of targeted outreach plays an important role. But going back to this point about empowering the affected communities, one of the most powerful things that I think that I've seen in the work that I've done is looking at the Treatment Action Campaign in South Africa, and the work that they did, especially in the late '90s and early 2000s, with the T-shirts that just in huge, bold letters across the chest said: HIV positive. And just having people going out there, wearing those T-shirts. The image of Nelson Mandela wearing one of those Treatment Action Campaign T-shirts is just incredibly important because, again, it's helping to remove some of that stigma. It's getting people who are trusted, who are respected, coming into the conversation. OK, if he's involved in this, if he's saying this is an important issue, maybe this is something that I need to be paying attention to. But also just trying to make that sort of availability, so that people are willing to share their experiences, or talk about what's going on, or what worked, or what didn't work for them. Again, these all play really important roles. It's never going to be perfect. It's something that we do need to keep at the forefront when these sorts of outbreaks happen. And you see some of this in some of the broader conversation around even what we call diseases, the names that we use. The fact that there is a very strong move away from geographically located names for diseases, because we don't want to stigmatize those particular communities or people who happen to be coming from those areas. Even something like that can play a really important role in helping people to think, this is something that I need to take seriously if I'm in the United States, I need to take this seriously. Even though we're talking about something like monkeypox, which isn't a geographic designator but there aren't a lot of monkeys roaming around in Minnesota. But it's something that they should be taking seriously, because of these effects and these sorts of community-based responses that help to try to destigmatize things, encourage people to get access to vaccines, or treatments, or other sorts of options that are available to them, and start to have those conversations to empower communities. NUZZO: That's great. I'm going to turn over to questions. And maybe participants can start putting their hands up. But while that's happening and before I turn it over for that section of the conversation, one last question to you both. Which is, I am deeply worried that we respond to these events as these one-offs. We have an emergency, we get emergency funding, then perceptions of the emergency being over, the funding disappears, and it's gone. And we saw that happen with COVID, where the money went away and then states had to let go their pandemic hires. And guess what? They weren't there when monkeypox happened. So I guess the question is, how do we move away from sort of seeing these as just one-off emergencies, and moving towards a role where we create a durable sort of permanent system that's in place to snap into action anytime there's an event, which is happening—which we're seeing—these events are happening with an increasing frequency? YOUDE: I'll jump in first, Jennifer. It's like you're reading the paper that I've been working on throughout the event today. And that's part of my concern about WHO designating this to be a public health emergency of international concern, when we're talking about monkeypox or COVID-19 for that matter, is the emergency framework. Public health, when it's doing its job, we don't know about it. It's something that—where we're essentially trying to stop things before they reach that level of public consciousness, or stopping it really, really early in the process. And so the emergencies, they get the attention for global health but they don't necessarily get the long-lasting system. It becomes, like, OK, whew, we got through that. We can move onto the next thing, or we can just not pay attention to global health again until the next system comes up. But at a very fundamental level we have this organization. We have the World Health Organization, which has this constitutional mandate to act as this international coordinating body for health—cross-border health issues. And it has a smaller biennial budget than many large hospital systems here in the United States. So how is it going to be able to do that sort of work when it has so few resources? Plus, given the way that the WHO is funded, it only has control over about 20 percent of its budget. The rest of it is coming through these voluntary contributions, which are generally specified for specific purposes, which may or may not align with the purposes that the WHO itself would put in place. So I think that one of the things that happens there is it behooves us, it behooves the member states to actually—to put some diplomatic and political capital behind this, to actually move on this. I have no doubt that in a few years' time we will have some sort of after—some sort of response that will look at the response that WHO made to COVID-19. And it will bemoan the failures. And it will talk about all the things that need to change. And then it will gather dust on the bookshelf. And we will get similar sorts of things for monkeypox. And what we haven't had is a country or a group of countries, or some sort of person with high stature, really glom onto this and be like, yes. We need to do this. This is our potential roadmap for trying to address this in the future. I—nerding out in the global health politics world—I had this idea that someone like a Helen Clark, or an Angela Merkel, someone who knows international politics, who knows the systems, who has that sort of diplomatic experience, but also is concerned about issues around health, that could be the person who could help to inspire some of these actions, and could get the attention of world leaders in a way that civil society organizations often aren't able to do. Which is not to say anything bad about those organizations, just that there are structural problems getting the attention of world leaders, and having that sort of concentrated attention. So I think we—ultimately, we need a champion. We need a person, or a country, or a group of countries who are willing to really champion this, and go to the mat for trying to make these sorts of changes, so it isn't just emergency, after emergency, after emergency, but something that is going to be more long lasting, that is going to provide that sort of infrastructural support, and make sure that we aren't just lurching from here, there and everywhere, but actually can have some sort of coordinated response and something that is a bit more forward-thinking. But it's a challenge. NUZZO: Demetre, the bullets of your bio—(laughs)—are a list of the emergency, after emergency, after emergency. So I know you have first-hand perspectives of this. So any hope we can fix it? DASKALAKIS: Sure do. (Laughter.) So, my perspective may be very domestic, but I actually think it's not. I think when I start talking, I think it's going to seem as if there's also infrastructure that needs to be leveraged internationally that's similar. Which is, I always think about what actually worked. And so one of the things that I think we're seeing over and over again, whether it's COVID, or monkeypox, or other outbreaks, is leveraging systems that already exist, and really figuring out how to support those systems during peacetime as well as wartime, so that it stays warm for a response. And that's a very public health—it's a very sort of operational, public health example. So I'm talking HIV. I'm talking chronic infections. I'm thinking domestically, we have this excellent—I think the HIV Epidemic Initiative, it's not nationwide yet. It hasn't been resourced to do that. But, if it were, that is a really sort of important way to be able to create and maintain an infrastructure. So thinking about sort of chronic diseases like viral hepatitis, having an infrastructure that could potentially lead to curing more people with viral hepatitis creates a system that then could be used for care and other public health delivery of countermeasures. So thinking about things that—what can we do to sort of do our peacetime work, which is around chronic infections like virus hepatitis and HIV, and what can we—and STIs, which are out of control in the United States, mainly because they're under-resourced—but what can we do sort of to maintain sort of those systems, so that when we flip the switch from peacetime to wartime that we can pivot those resources to do the work? I'll give an example from the research universe—monkeypox, as an example. Right now, there are studies that are going on for monkeypox vaccines and for monkeypox therapeutics. And they're built on the networks of HIV investigators. So, HIV Vaccine Trials Network and AIDS Clinical Trials Group are currently the people that are doing those studies. And sort of research funding potentially being a bit more flexible, that pivot is possible. But what if we had similar models sort of in the operational world of public health, where you have sexual health clinics or STD clinics that are doing HIV/STD work during peacetime, but can flip into monkeypox vaccines and testing in wartime? And so it's investing in a chronic infrastructure to be able to make it translatable into an emergency response, in a nimble way, I think is really important. And of course, I back up Jeremy. That idea of political will and leadership is really important in making sure that this sort of moves forward in a way that works. But, I mean, I say this domestically, but then one can conjure PEPFAR in terms of an infrastructure that works. So that—they have been leveraged. And so what if we worked harder to make sure that they were resourced adequately during the peacetime, so that during wartime they flip and are flipped more effective? And by the way, that HIV positive T-shirt has influenced my career, Jeremy, in terms of seeing people who were willing to put on a shirt that really works against stigma. My favorite being Annie Lennox, who I met with that T-shirt on, and I was very excited, as a fan. But definitely an important thing to reclaim that stigma. Jennifer, thank you. YOUDE: And if I can build on what Demetre was saying, think about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa in 2014, and the cases that popped up in Nigeria. That led to all sorts of concern. Now you've got someone who has Ebola in Lagos, a city of twenty million people, and just not a city that necessarily has the sort of infrastructure in place that you're going to think, oh, we're going to be able to contain this. But they were able to repurpose existing programs. They were able to use measles control programs and other sorts of programs. And, using the word that we have all become way too familiar with over these past two and a half years, they pivoted, turned that into doing the surveillance and doing the contact tracing for Ebola, and were able to stop the spread, and being able to prevent that from spreading rampantly throughout one of the largest cities in the world. And I think that's the sort of thing, you know? If we have these sorts of structures in place, we can adapt them. Even if they are for one purpose, they can be adapted for other purposes. And so it's not that we need to recreat the wheel each time, it's that we need to figure—we need to make sure that we've got enough wheels out there, essentially. DASKALAKIS: And that goes for surveillance. Maintaining good surveillance systems for chronic things means that when an acute thing comes up, that good surveillance already exists there. So not only for an operation, but also for being able to understand what's happening with the threat. I like to call it keeping the system warm, if you think of sort of the stuff that's happening. So when you have to heat it up, you're not starting from—it's not a TV dinner you're taking out from frozen. It's thawed already. You can move quickly. NUZZO: It's really hard to build capacities in the midst of an emergency. So thank you for those thoughts. I am going to give others a turn to ask questions and turn it over to the question-and-answer session now. OPERATOR: Thank you. (Gives queuing instructions.) Our first question comes from Mark P. Lagon from Friends of the Global Fight against AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. LAGON: Hi, there. Thank you for this really thought-provoking forum. I come from a perspective working in the health field, but also background in human rights. I was an adjunct senior fellow at CFR, and president of Freedom House. I wonder, to take some of the points that Jennifer Nuzzo has been making and posing to you, to move to pandemic preparedness. If you have—we've seen that AIDS confronts one with very clear human rights and equity issues, particularly for stigmatized populations. You have a kind of a reprise with monkeypox. There was a lot of discussion about in terms of the impact of COVID and equity on vaccines. As the international community has moved to form a fund housed at the World Bank, how do you embed preparation for pandemics to have a human rights or social justice perspective? Activists really had to push hard to get two voting seats for civil society on the governing body of that fund. Thank you. NUZZO: Anyone want to take that on? (Laughs.) YOUDE: Sure. I'll offer a few thoughts. I think this is something—again, this is something to be thinking about at this early stage. As these sorts of systems are being designed, as they're being set up, keeping these sorts of elements important and at play. But I also think it's important to make sure that there are multiple channels for this communication to happen. That there's one thing to talk about formal board seats, and those are obviously important to have people at the table for these pandemic financing facilities through the World Bank and other sorts of organizations. But also make sure there are other opportunities, because new organizations may pop up. They may change. Depending on the particular circumstance or the particular outbreak that we're talking about, there may be other groups that are being mobilized and being affected by this. And so, there needs to be a certain level of nimbleness that needs to go into this. I think it's also something that puts a lot of—we need to put pressure on our leaders to really put their promises into action, to make sure that this isn't just something that we have as a tick box exercise. Oh, yes, equity is important, we need to address this. But actually, that there is this ongoing pressure and this sort of check of what are we actually doing here? Are we reaching out to these communities that are being affected? How can we better do this? And so I—again, there's an interesting moment right now that we can hopefully seize to make sure that this is something that really does get instantiated within these systems. And I hope we don't let that moment pass. I hope we don't decide to just we'll go back to existing systems. Because that's the other thing that goes along with this. It does challenge the status quo. It does challenge the sorts of standard operating procedures that we have in these organizations. And that can be challenging. That can be a difficult sort of conversation to have. And we have to be willing within our international organizations and other sorts of responses, we have to be willing to have those conversations. We have to be willing to challenge ourselves and to criticize ourselves, and to then make changes that are going to be effective. LAGON: Thank you. DASKALAKIS: I don't have almost anything to add to what Jeremy said. I think there really—again, the political will is important. And just we've all experienced that U-shaped curve of concern, right, where when things are very exciting everyone is very worried and engaged, and then when it fades away, resources fade away. And what that means is the infectious disease comes back. And so it's really—whether it's the same or a different infectious disease, sort of keeping that momentum and having it really come both from the political piece, from organization, but also from the side of advocates and activists is really critical to keep the—to keep the energy moving and the momentum moving. We have to make sure that we come to a better place. Every event, you learn more. And so I think that even if we take a quantum leap in what preparedness looks like, whatever the next event will challenge that level of preparedness and will require us to then—to really develop systems that are—that are updated based on the experience. So I think moving the needle anywhere, but moving it in a coordinated way because of that will and that strategy is the most we could hope for and the most we should expect. Or the least that we should expect, the minimum, of being able to move to a place where we have something that is better than how we found it, and potentially more resilient in terms of a—monkeypox is minor compared to COVID, after COVID. NUZZO: Yeah. I mean, I think the more we have these events the more we learn, though it does feel to me a little bit like the more we have these events, the more we learn the same things over and over again. (Laughs.) And particularly when we're talking about these inequities. And Jeremy pointed out about the stark inequities in terms of who's able to access vaccines in the globe. And that was clearly something that we saw throughout much of COVID-19, still see it today. We saw it during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, in terms of who had vaccines and who didn't. So I guess the question—and I recognize that we have just about ten minutes left, and the CFR rule is we always end on time. So I'm going to—(laughs)—I'm going to be aggressive about that. But just on that point what do we need, I think, to put into place? We talked about how there's a pandemic fund now, which is important. But aside from money, and maybe it's just money, what else do we need to kind of create structures to address these inequities globally? Given, Jeremy, you also made the important point about—I've been struck by how hard it's been to contain monkeypox here in the U.S. But let's say we're successful, we're still going to have challenges as the virus continues to circulate. So we need to make progress globally. And we need to have systems in place such that every time these emergencies happen, we don't keep learning these same lessons over. So maybe just two or three minute each, your takeaways on what you would do to fix these problems if you were deemed in charge of the world. YOUDE: A little new world, just like that. Money is obviously important. The amount of money that we spend on development assistance for health has gone up dramatically since the early 1990s, but it still pales in comparison to the level of need. So there is just a basic resource need. The second is that we need to make sure that systems that we are building are not for specific diseases, but are things that can be flexible, things that can be adapted. We don't want to just say: Now we're going to set up all these monkeypox surveillance systems, when that may or may not be what is going to be the next big outbreak. So we need to have things that are going to be able to be flexible like that. Third, we need to have—we need to have a better sense of just our—I guess our international community's willingness to engage with global health. We have the international health regulations. So we do have an international treaty that's supposed to govern how states respond to infectious diseases and their outbreaks. But the willingness of states to abide by that varies quite dramatically. And so we need to have a big of a come-to-Jesus moment about what are we actually willing to do, when push comes to shove? And then last thing I'll say is that I do think we need to have a conversation around access to pharmaceuticals and vaccines and other sorts of medical interventions like that. Because we know that there are inequities, and we know that oftentimes the communities that have the least access are the communities that have the highest rates of incidence or are in the most need of these sorts of things. And our structures are not really well designed for getting people access. Even though there are things like COVAX, even though there are things like PEPFAR, and all these other sorts of programs, which have done tremendous work, they are still falling short. And so we need to—we need to have a better sense of what—how do we actually put these sorts of things into practice? How do we actually make sure that these scientific breakthroughs that are so invaluable are reaching all the people that need to be reached? DASKALAKIS: Ditto, I'll start off. So that makes my job a little bit easier, because I think what Jeremy said is really important. I'll say again, I think in my hierarchy the first and most important thing is consistent political will, because I think that that then drives a lot of what happens beyond that. So I think that that really jives really well with what Jeremy said, in terms of that sort of commitment. Money is very important, I think, but it is not the only thing that drives us into preparedness. So I think that having that commitment. I also would like to think about that investing the money in things that keep the system warm. So I'll go back to that sort of statement, or like thinking about investing in the diseases that we still haven't finished. We still are working—we've got HIV, we have hepatitis, malaria internationally that we're worried about. There are a lot of areas that we could invest to create systems that are infrastructures that keep it warm for operation for pandemic. I cannot say it loud enough that what Jeremy said about flexibility is right. You can't really build the infrastructure on chronic disease if it's not flexible to move to another acute event. So it needs to be something that is both creates and maintains the infrastructure, but also has the ability—everyone's favorite word today—to pivot into the emergency response zone. So very important. I think also workforce and data. I think that it is important to remember that we talk about giving patients trauma-informed care, but we need to give our workforce trauma-informed care. COVID has been hard. Monkeypox has been hard. Our next challenge will be hard. And sort of how can we support the workforce and then also continue to mentor it to be able to do the work? Data also is so important. A commitment to share data, and to have data that is accessible for decisions, even if it is imperfect. And then finally, the realization—and it goes back full circle, Jennifer, to your first question—about our—or, maybe second question—about the social determinants. There's only so much that public health can do. There is an all-of-society need to address the core drivers of so many of the inequities. We can't solve everything through public health. We can get closer to health equity, but ultimately the goal is that as you access is really to go into social justice, which is not just public health but really an all-of-society endeavor to try to improve the environment so that we don't have fertile ground for these pandemics to blossom and grow. NUZZO: Thank you. There's a question that just popped up in the Q&A box. And we just have a few minutes. It's about the privilege of good information and how we address misinformation and disinformation, which likely leads to fragmentation. I will just chime in, having done a lot of communication over the past two years, I think that this is not a problem that public health can solve. I actually think the drivers of this are much, much larger. And I think we need an all-of-government approach to this that includes the potential regulation of the platforms. But I'm curious if you all have any quick comments to add to that. DASKALAKIS: I mean, I just agree with you. (Laughs.) It's definitely much bigger. There are things we can do, like monitor social media and make sure that our messaging is one way. But ultimately this is an issue that's bigger, that requires not just the public health lens to address. YOUDE: And, at the same time, we also can recognize that those trusted outlets, those can be really important tools. So, churches in sub-Saharan Africa played a really crucial role in many parts of helping to decrease HIV stigma, helping to get access and information out there about testing, about protection, about these sorts of things. I mean, that can also be the flipside, though. If you got these trusted sources that are peddling this misinformation, then it becomes this much bigger issue that goes beyond what public health can do. So I guess it's—part of it is just figuring out where those allies exist, be they in government or outside of the government, and what sorts of connections they might have with populations. DASKALAKIS: And to your earlier point about building those connections prior to events, so those relationships exist and you're not trying to forge them in the midst of a crisis. NUZZO: Well, really, thank you both. I wish I could appoint you both in charge of the world, because if I was asked who should be in charge of the world you would both be on the top of my list. But I am very glad that you continue to do the work that you do and contribute in important ways. And have both been really guiding voices as we continue to experience these events. So thank you very much for that, and really thank you to our participants for attending and the thoughtful questions. FASKIANOS: I second that. Thank you all. And we appreciate your taking the time to do this. I hope you will all follow their work. For Dr. Daskalakis, you can follow him at @dr_demetre. Dr. Youde is at @jeremyyoude. And Dr. Nuzzo is at @jennifernuzzo. Pretty easy. So we also encourage you to follow CFR's Religion and Foreign Policy Program on Twitter at @CFR_religion and write to us at outreach@CFR.org with any suggestions or questions. We want to help support the work that you all are doing. And we hope you will join us for our next Religion and Foreign Policy Webinar on the Politics of Religion and Gender in West Africa, on Tuesday October 11 at 12:00 p.m. Eastern time. So thank you all again for being with us, and thank you for your public service. We appreciate it.

Bulldog Insider Podcast
S5 E2: Behind the scenes of 'Hockeyland' with Blake Biondi

Bulldog Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 33:13


This week on the Bulldog Insider Podcast, Minnesota Duluth junior wing Blake Biondi tells us what it was like to have his senior year at Hermantown High School documented by a film crew for the documentary, 'Hockeyland'; and what it was like to go back and relive that part of his life three years later. The Bulldog Insider is co-hosted by Duluth News Tribune sports reporter Matt Wellens and My9 television voice of Bulldog hockey Zach Schneider. Episodes are edited by Duluth News Tribune digital producers Wyatt Buckner and Dan Williamson. You can find more Bulldog hockey coverage at duluthnewstribune.com.”

PHNX Arizona Coyotes Podcast
Previewing the Arizona State Hockey season with head coach Greg Powers

PHNX Arizona Coyotes Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2022 43:15


Captained by Arizona Coyotes prospect Josh Doan, ASU Hockey kicks off its season this weekend at Minnesota Duluth. Head coach Greg Powers joins the show to discuss the year ahead, Mullett Arena and more! 0:00 Intro 1:10 Welcome to the show LIVE from Four Peaks 1:30 Reactions to Coyotes preseason loss to Dallas Stars 7:40 Greg Powers joins the show 8:00 Bittersweet final practice at Oceanside Arena 10:15 Meaning of Mullett Arena to the ASU Hockey program 12:55 ASU Hockey's tough schedule 15:15 How Powers prepares his team to open the season in Duluth 17:30 Prepping Lucas Sillinger to play against his old school, Bemidji St. 19:50 joining a conference vs. staying independent 26:00 Can the program get back on track after being derailed 2 years ago 28:10 The development of Captain Josh Doan 31:15 Greg Powers' tales from the road 33:10 Powers as a recruiter 35:00 Greg Powers is a "tequila snob" 36:38 Expectations for the program 37:20 Adjusting from being a club coach to D1 coach BUY COYOTES TICKETS HERE: https://gametime.hnyj8s.net/c/3442941/1441548/10874 SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube: https://bit.ly/phnx_youtube ALL THINGS PHNX: http://linktr.ee/phnxsports DraftKings: Download the DraftKings Sportsbook app now (https://bit.ly/3Jl1dMX), use promo code PHNX and make your first deposit of FIVE DOLLARS and get TWO HUNDRED DOLLARS in FREE BETS INSTANTLY! For every leg you add you can boost your winnings up to ONE HUNDRED percent! If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800-GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 1-877-770-STOP (7867) (LA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1-800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA). 21+ (18+ WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA/MI/NJ/NY/PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. Min. $5 deposit required. Eligibility restrictions apply. See http://draftkings.com/sportsbook for details. OGeez!: Enter the “Flavoring Life” sweepstakes. One winner will receive 3 bags of OGeez, an OGeez! Hat, a PHNX shirt of your choice, and a PHNX annual membership. Sign up at gophnx.com or visit https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfIplqDYsxYeiotn5Zc6hRahaX0a5qG99eHVzkhOlGZDRdgUA/viewform. Must be 21 years or older to purchase. Four Peaks: Enter to win the “Toast of the Month” sweepstakes to win a $50 Four Peaks gift card, a PHNX shirt of your choice, and a PHNX annual membership. Go to goPHNX.Com or visit https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfOabxo8KQxOWwn9wTilMBuTMAJdrL0CaH9lzfuJqgKN9vfSg/viewform Must be 21 or older. Enjoy responsibly. Underdog Fantasy: Sign up for Underdog Fantasy today! Go to the link https://play.underdogfantasy.com/p-phnx and use promo code “PHNX” to receive a deposit match up to $100 Liquid Death: Get free shipping on all water and merch at https://LiquidDeath.com/PHNX FOCO: FOCO has you covered with the best Arizona Merchandise. Head on over to foco.com. For all non pre-sale items use the promo code “PHNX” for 10% off When you shop through links in the description, we may earn affiliate commissions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rink Live
NCHC Season Preview with Brad Schlossman, Matt Wellens, Mick Hatten, Jess Myers & Joe Paisley

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 48:14


Now that the dust has settled from NCHC Media Day, The Rink Live takes an in depth look at the conference with its podcast with reporters Matt Wellens, Brad Schlossman, Jess Myers, Mick Hatten and Joe Paisley. Wellens covers Minnesota Duluth hockey, Schlossman covers the University of North Dakota, Paisley covers Colorado College and Myers interviewed two representatives from every NCHC team at media day. The group covered a variety of topics including their big takeaways from media day, which team may surprise some people in the conference race, key players throughout the league and more on this episode of The Rink Live podcast.   LINKS ⬇️ For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live. Bulldog Insider Podcast Follow Joe Paisley on Twitter

Bulldog Insider Podcast
S5 E1: Bell is back, and eyeing an NCAA title

Bulldog Insider Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 33:32


The Bulldog Insider Podcast drops the puck on its fifth season with an in-depth conversation with Olympic gold medalist Ashton Bell. The Minnesota Duluth fifth-year senior defenseman and captain is back with the Bulldogs in 2022-23 after traveling the globe last season with Team Canada, winning gold medals at the 2021 and 2022 IIHF World Championship, and at the 2022 Olympics in Beijing. The Bulldog Insider is co-hosted by Duluth News Tribune sports reporter Matt Wellens and My9 television voice of Bulldog hockey Zach Schneider. Episodes are edited by Duluth News Tribune digital producers Wyatt Buckner and Dan Williamson. You can find more Bulldog hockey coverage at duluthnewstribune.com.”

Green Visions on KUMD
Green Visions: SUN Delegation

Green Visions on KUMD

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 6:01


Riya Milan talks about the SUN Delegation at the University of Minnesota - Duluth

Locked On Blackhawks - Daily Podcast On The Chicago Blackhawks
Chicago Blackhawks Prospects Playing For Top-20 NCAA Programs

Locked On Blackhawks - Daily Podcast On The Chicago Blackhawks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2022 32:45


Wednesday's episode of Locked On Blackhawks features a breakdown of USA Today & USA Hockey Magazine's NCAA preseason top-20 rankings! The Chicago Blackhawks have 12 prospects playing for top-20 programs in college hockey, from Frank Nazar at Michigan, to Drew Commesso and Ryan Greene at Boston University, and many more! Tune into Locked On Blackhawks for a full discussion on each and every prospect. Part of the Locked On Podcast Network. Your Team. Every Day. Thompson & Denver (4:35) Kaiser, James & Minnesota-Duluth (6:40) Nazar & Michigan (10:05) Slaggert, Rolston & Notre Dame (12:25) Basse & St. Cloud State (16:30) Commesso, Greene & BU (17:50) Harding, Kelley & Providence (22:15) Wise & Ohio State (25:20) SUBSCRIBE on YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCc1cYsJV90zr-fxKmeUkcGA FOLLOW on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/LO_Blackhawks FOLLOW on INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/lockedonblackhawks/ BetOnline.net has you covered this season with more props, odds and lines than ever before. BetOnline – Where The Game Starts! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

TNT Radio
Professor James H. Fetzer on Jerm Warfare with Jeremy Nell - 09 September 2022

TNT Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 55:31


GUEST OVERVIEW: Professor James H. Fetzer is a Distinguished McKnight University Professor Emeritus at the University of Minnesota Duluth. He has published more than 100 articles and reviews and 20 books in the philosophy of science and on the theoretical foundations of computer science, artificial intelligence, and cognitive science.

The Rink Live
Gabbie & Terry Hughes on Sophie's Squad Event, Mental Health, 2022-23 Bulldogs Season

The Rink Live

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 31:06


Minnesota Duluth forward Gabbie Hughes and her father, Terry, a former MSU-Mankato defensemen, have both earned All-America status in their hockey careers. Gabbie was a top three finalist for the Patty Kazmaier Award and a top five finalist for the Hockey Humanitarian Award last season. The father-daughter duo has become heavily involved in helping players with mental health issues through Sophie's Squad, a nonprofit organization established in 2021. Sophie's Squad is working toward helping athletes with their mental health, mental health awareness and suicide prevention. The organization is having a fundraiser that includes a 5K run/walk and golf event on Saturday, Sept. 10 at Victory Links Golf Course in Lino Lakes, Minn. The golf event is sold out, but there will be a silent auction and people can still register for the 5K or volunteer. To learn more, visit https://sophiessquad.org/. Gabbie and Terry also discuss their playing careers with The Rink Live's Jess Myers and Mick Hatten on this podcast. For more hockey coverage, visit The Rink Live.

The Huskies Warming House Podcast
Episode 126 - Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs 2022-23 Season Preview (Overview, Stats, Incoming Players, Schedule + More) - NCHC Team 5/8

The Huskies Warming House Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 95:25


Episode 126 - Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs 2022-23 Season Preview (Overview, Stats, Incoming Players, Schedule + More) - NCHC Team 5/8 August 28th, 2022 St. Cloud, MN   YouTube: https://youtu.be/aM63k5OjKbI Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-huskies-warming-house-podcast/id1499278131   Episode 126 of the CenterIceView News and Notes segment features some college hockey and NHL news. First, it's the Huskies Illustrated Weekly Roundup (2:14), where the guys talk about the latest in the world of hockey. In this segment, the guys discuss some more signings, Kyle Turris retiring and a Columbus Blue Jacket who will not join the team this season. Our fifth of eight NCHC team previews is here, with the Minnesota-Duluth Bulldogs and their team stats (14:40). The guys also discuss player depatures and stats from last season (31:12). There are once again, nine incoming freshman on the team, a grueling schedule and our final thoughts to unpack (43:23). In the Extra Ice Session, we take a look at the start of the 2022 Women's World Championships and where team USA stands (1:19:17). All this and more in another week in the Den! As always, find us on Apple Podcasts, Podbean, Spotify, TuneIn, iHeartRadio, Google Podcasts and Youtube + more. Visit us at huskieswarminghousepodcast.com, and check out our affiliate at centericeview.com. The latest news is on Twitter and Facebook @warminghouseden, and email us at @warminghousepodcast@outlook.com.

Telepractice Today
Kathryn Mancewicz Discusses Literacy Intervention

Telepractice Today

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 44:31


Kathryn Mancewicz, MS, CCC-SLP is a bilingual speech-language pathologist and owner of Moving Forward Speech Therapy. Kathryn received her Master's degree with distinction from the University of New Mexico, where she was a member of the CLASS for ALL bilingual emphasis program. She received her Bachelor's degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders and Spanish from the University of Minnesota - Duluth. Kathryn has experience providing therapy to children and adults of all ages in both English and Spanish. Her passion is for providing literacy intervention for struggling readers and writers via telepractice. She uses a combination of intervention methods including the Science of Reading, Speech to Print, and Orton Gillingham based programs to design an intervention plan tailored to each child. When she isn't providing therapy, Kathryn loves to be outdoors. She likes to ski, rock climb, and go on hikes with her husband, Joel, and her Miniature Australian Shepherd, Luna. She also loves to read and believes you're never too old for a good story! For questions, contact Kathryn@movingforwardspeech.com You can access this episode at: www.3cdigitalmedianetwork.com/telepractice-today-podcast  

Radio German Democratic Republic
Artists Take on The State! Experimental Art in Late East Germany, with Sara Blaylock

Radio German Democratic Republic

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 78:55


Did you know East German artists used their Stasi files as artwork after the fall of the Berlin wall? Ever heard of the Erfurt Women's Artists Group who stormed the Stasi Headquarters in their city? These were jaw-dropping facts I learned when I read Parallel Public - Experimential Art in Late East Germany by our guest today, Dr. Sara Blaylock, Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Minnesota Duluth. Sara's book is a masterpiece and reveals that experimential artists in the final years of the GDR did not practice their art in the shadows, on the margins, hiding away from the Stasi's prying eyes. Instead, these artists used media like photography, film, and performances to cultivate a critical influence over the very bureaucracies meant to keep them in line, undermining state authority through forthright rather than covert projects. Some East German artists made their country's experimental art scene a form of counter public life, creating an alternative to the crumbling collective underpinnings of the state. Let's hear from Sara about the incredible insights she gained through the interviews and work she conducted to put this amazing book together.   Be sure to purchase Sara's book using this link! Our ability to bring you stories from behind the Berlin Wall is dependent on monthly donors like you. Visit us at  https://www.eastgermanypodcast.com/p/support-the-podcast/ to contribute. For the price of a Berliner Pilsner, you can feel good you are contributing to preserve one of the most important pieces of Cold War history. If you feel more comfortable leaving us a review to help us get more listeners, we appreciate it very much and encourage you to do so wherever you get your podcasts or at https://www.eastgermanypodcast.com/reviews/new/. For discussions about podcast episodes and GDR history, please do join our Facebook discussion group. Just search Radio GDR in Facebook. Vielen dank for being a listener!

Sharon Says So
144. Legislating at the State Level with Representative Jen Schultz

Sharon Says So

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 38:05 Very Popular


In this episode, Sharon talks to Minnesota State Legislator Jen Schultz. Jen is currently running for Congress, and is also an educator who has taught economics at the University of Minnesota Duluth for about twenty years. Rep Schultz talks about the ins and outs of working in state government: how budgets are set as well as how bills are written, introduced, prioritized, and voted on. She touches topics like model legislation, which is when a state reviews bills that have passed in other states and looks at ways to adapt it to their state, how state legislators work together across the aisle, and what they do when the session has wrapped for the season (there's a lot of door knocking involved). Shifting gears, Sharon and Rep. Schultz talk about her current run for Congress, how she plans to bring her state expertise to the federal level, and the value women bring to political office. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.