Podcasts about Doctorate

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  • 3,355PODCASTS
  • 5,711EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 2DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 28, 2022LATEST
Doctorate

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Best podcasts about Doctorate

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Latest podcast episodes about Doctorate

Young Black and Professional
Landing A Job After College By Talking To Strangers Feat. Alexis Story

Young Black and Professional

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 58:35


You don't want to miss this episode with Alexis Story, a former recent grad bootcamp student! She discusses her journey from college to the career field, and how she just obtained her CHES certification! We dive into leveraging your network to find a job, navigating college and dealing with all the pressure of figuring out your next move, as well as dealing with ADHD and figuring out how to navigate the professional world. Alexis is a recent graduate of the Health Education and Promotion major at Towson University. Although new to the workforce, Alexis has gained a vast amount of experience as an intern at the District of Columbia Department of Health, and various organizations throughout her college career. Alexis currently works as an Advocacy Program Coordinator at the Global Liver Institute. This episode discusses: - How to identify support systems that can help propel your career forward - The importance of having a mentor (virtually or in-person) - Landing a job through informational interviews - Changing your major in college and deciding your next steps - How Recent Grad Boot Camp helped Alexis Secure the Bag! Connect with Alexis on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/in/alexisstory22 Don't forget to like and subscribe to this podcast! Also make sure you check out our online courses designed to help you land the career you want! Don't forge to check out Recent Grad Bootcamp to learn more about how this course can help you elevate your career. (For those that graduated less than 5 years ago) Recent Grad Boot Camp If you graduated from college [Bachelors, Masters or Doctorate] 5 years ago or less then this boot camp is for you! Dr. Des takes you through everything needed to land a job in the field you love. Whether you looking to land your first career starting job, or you looking to transition into a higher position then this course will get you all the way together! Developing Your Career Goals Resume Development [ATS Compatible Templates] Cover Letter Development Digital Portfolio Development Networking + LinkedIn Tips Interview Prep Check out the Young Black and Professional Website to sign up for our free email list! --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Behind The Mission
BTM75 - Besa Pinchotti - The National Military Family Association

Behind The Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 26:28


About Today's GuestAs Executive Director, Besa brings leadership at NMFA along with her personal experience as a military spouse to this incredible team. Besa is an award-winning journalist and marketer whose passion for our military began during her time as a reporter and television news anchor. From Jacksonville, North Carolina to Kosovo, her assignments opened her eyes to the post-9/11 military experience, and its cycles of deployment, redeployment, and constant transition. She also covered highly-contentious Congressional hearings and the impact military life has on families, including the effects of water contamination aboard military bases. During Besa's time covering Camp Lejeune, she met a guy named Dave, whom she decided to marry despite warnings to “never marry a Marine.” Now 15+ years later, they live on Capitol Hill with their 3 kids.Links Mentioned In This EpisodeNational Military Family Association Web SiteMilitary Teen Experience ReportBasic Needs Allowance LegislationPsychArmor Resource of the WeekThe PsychArmor Resource of the Week is the PsychArmor course Veteran 201: Military Families. The life of a military family can be chaotic and stressful. This course provides some insight into the unique challenges faced by military families, and you can find a link to the resource here: https://learn.psycharmor.org/courses/veteran-201-military-families This Episode Sponsored By:This episode is sponsored by PsychArmor, the premier education and learning ecosystem specializing in military culture content. PsychArmor offers an online e-learning laboratory with custom training options for organizations.Contact Us and Join Us on Social Media Email PsychArmorPsychArmor on TwitterPsychArmor on FacebookPsychArmor on YouTubePsychArmor on LinkedInPsychArmor on InstagramTheme MusicOur theme music Don't Kill the Messenger was written and performed by Navy Veteran Jerry Maniscalco, in cooperation with Operation Encore, a non profit committed to supporting singer/songwriter and musicians across the military and Veteran communities.Producer and Host Duane France is a retired Army Noncommissioned Officer, combat veteran, and clinical mental health counselor for service members, veterans, and their families.  You can find more about the work that he is doing at www.veteranmentalhealth.com  

The Dr. Kinney Show
80: How To Heal Your Postpartum Symptoms Through Physical Therapy with Kelsey Vagnoni

The Dr. Kinney Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 16:17


Many women face a lot of lingering issues after having a baby.    They face back pain, diastasis recti, pelvic floor issues, and so much more. Unfortunately, most don't get the treatment they need because the medical focus usually shifts to the baby after birth.   In today's episode of The Dr. Kinney Show, I sat down with Kelsey Vagnoni to talk about how physical therapy can make a huge difference for postpartum moms.    ​Kelsey Vagnoni earned her Doctorate of Physical Therapy from the University of Delaware in 2007.  Since that time, she has taken over 400 hours of additional hands-on training to improve her manual therapy skills.  She spent 9 years in outpatient orthopedics as a spine and pelvic specialist before starting her own business.   She became a mother in 2015.  While she was recovering from a very traumatic birth, she realized physical therapy had a much-needed place in postpartum recovery.  Why is physical therapy routine for a sprained ankle but not after childbirth?     She started Personalized Physical Therapy in 2016 with a goal to provide high-quality, accessible care to mothers and change the way we think about physical therapy. The truth is, postpartum women don't get the care they need to truly heal their bodies after all they go through.    Tune in to learn more about how physical therapy can help you heal your body and improve your strength postpartum.   Show notes available at www.drerinkinney.com/80   Resources Mentioned:  Visit the Personalized Physical Therapy website: https://www.personalizedphysicaltherapy.org/   Connect with Kelsey on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/personalizedphysicaltherapy I would love to connect on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DrKinneyND   I would love to connect on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drkinney

Unstress with Dr Ron Ehrlich
Prof Dave Singh: Has Your Craniofacial Development Reached Its Potential?

Unstress with Dr Ron Ehrlich

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 66:16


Have you ever heard of the term craniofacial development? Does it relate to how well we breathe and sleep? How about cleft lip and palate? Well, today we are going to be exploring these fascinating topics. My guest today is Professor Dave Singh. Professor Dave Singh is a US citizen who was born, educated and trained in England, UK. He holds three doctorates, including a Doctor of Dental Medicine; a PhD in cleft palate development, and a third Doctorate in Orthodontics. Dr Singh was the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of BioModeling Solutions, Inc. He has published over 200 articles in the peer-reviewed medical, dental and orthodontic literature, has published 7 books/chapters, and is currently finishing his new book entitled “Pneumopedics and craniofacial epigenetics.” Join me in this episode as we tackle craniofacial development, cleft lip and palate, epigenetics, the importance of nitric oxide, and so much more. ----  CREDITS: Host: Dr Ron Ehrlich Guest: Prof Dave Singh Producer: Amelia Navascues ----  You can also watch this episode at https://drronehrlich.com/ ----- TIME TO TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR HEALTH? Join me in my online health programs.  ----- CONNECT WITH ME You can ask questions via social media using my Instagram or Facebook or TikTok or YouTube page. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Freeman Means Business
Wonder Woman in Business, Sonja Elise Freeman

Freeman Means Business

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 43:12


Resplendent, Compassionate, Inspiring and Beautiful are some of the words often used to describe Sonja Elise Freeman, Inaugural Ms. WIBOP 2020 and Miss WIBOP Photogenic 2020, Women in Business Pageant system , who is driven by her faith in God, love for serving the community with her platform with the Diva's Diamonds: Words to Inspire, Empower and Encourage Online Empowerment Movement by sharing her gift of encouragement on Anchor.fm and Instagram Live weekly. She is the Sole Proprietor of Divine Voices Media, a multimedia production, brand marketing strategy and entrepreneurial consulting firm. She is also a critically acclaimed Off-Broadway & Broadway Producer/Star of Strength of a Woman: A Phyllis Hyman Tribute of the only Phyllis Hyman tribute approved and supported by the Hyman Family, Friends and New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy and former Mayor Bill de Blasio and First Lady Chirlane McCray of the City of New York. She is a proud HBCU 2x time PVAMU Alumna and a PVAMU Alumni Affairs 5 Year Class Reunion Ambassador at Prairie View A&M University College of Arts & Sciences, a part of the Texas A&M University system, where she received a Bachelor of Arts in Vocal Performance with a minor in Fashion Merchandising & Design in 1991. She is a recent MBA-Executive Magna Cum Laude with a 3.75 GPA/4.0 GPA scale graduate from Prairie View A&M University College of Business Class of 2021 where she was a member of Graduate Student Organization, Toastmasters International, and National Association of Black Journalists. She also earned a Doctorate in Divinity (Honoris Causa) in 2021 from the Omega Bible Institute and Seminary in Monroe, Louisiana for 30 years of service as a Psalmist and Christian Multimedia Educator as a recording artist, radio personality, podcaster, publisher, and inspirational influencer. She completed a Women's Entrepreneurship Certification from Cornell University/Bank of America Institute, WE NYC Kauffman FastTrac Powered by Grow with Google Entrepreneurship Program in New York City, Rice University Susanne M. Glasscock School of Continuing Studies in Music Business & Law, Leadership Certificate Charter Class Inspire Women Leadership Institute at the Dallas Theological Seminary in Houston, Texas, Certificate of Achievement from Fashion Institute of Technology State University of New York Beauty Essentials and Bloomberg Market Concepts Certificate from Bloomberg LP. She is competing in the Ultimate Queen WBLEP Pageant 2022 on June 16-19,2022 for the “Queen of Queens” Business Pageant within the Women Business Leaders and Entrepreneurs Pageant system and presently working with the Rhythm and Blues Preservation Society in Atlantic City, New Jersey as an Artist-in-Residence, VP and COO to get funding for recording a tribute album and documentary of her Phyllis Hyman tribute. She has a beautiful and talented 24-year-old daughter named Gabbie Gabs, an award-winning Toastmaster, Filmmaker, and Music Video Director. She is an alumna of University of Rochester with a Bachelor of Arts in Film Media Studies. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/freeman-means-business/support

Transformative Principal
Stop the Pathologizing of Adolescence with Dr. Briony Scott Transformative Principal 487

Transformative Principal

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 40:33


Dr Briony Scott is an Australian educator and columnist, and the Principal of Wenona in North Sydney, an independent K–12 girls school. Dr Scott has a Masters and Doctorate in Education from the University of Sydney; specialising in girls' education, technology and pedagogy, motivational theory, and choice in education. Prior to Wenona, Dr Scott was Principal of Roseville College. She has worked as a systems analyst for Italian computer firm Olivetti and spent time volunteering as an Emergency Technician with the Wheaton Rescue Squad in Maryland, US. Dr Scott speaks regularly on educational and parenting issues at community forums and conferences. It's really fascinating to think about leading a school that is focused on one thing, like all girls. How do you see your role differently because of the way your school is structured as an all-girls school? Gap of about 2 months pay in gender gap in pay You have to be aware of stereotypes. How women finally got into colleges for medicine You can't be what you can't see! How can we do a better job of teaching mental health? Anything that reduces a person's agency is an obstacle. Recognize what power looks like in a room. Mental health itself is neutral, but there are good and bad mental health. They're not allowed to be sad anymore, they can only be depressed. Little people look to adults about cues about how to behave. Mental health - they're actually fine, if we create a feeling of doom and gloom Pathologizing of adolescnce We do an extraordinary disservice when we write off an entire generation. Transactional Analysis Kids are clever but they're not wise [[Wisdom]] Nous - wisdom We're all just walking them home. Renaissance Women's Network - connecting female education leaders to others. We create the world they can aspire to. It is massively disrespectful to people with real mental health issues. In the desire to listen respect and value people's feelings, we forget that they have agency. We teach the feelings, but don't teach agency and the power we have over them. How to be a transformative principal? Get some sleep.

What is Going OM with Sandie Sedgbeer
Richard Rudd and Rosy Aronson - The Dream Arc

What is Going OM with Sandie Sedgbeer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 57:17


The Dream Arc: Expanding the Dreaming Consciousness of Humanity Decoding the secret meanings of animals, and their role in your awakeningLivestreaming Thursday, 23 June 2022 at 7:00 AM PST/10:00 AM EST on OMTimes Magazine Facebook, OMTimes Radio & TV Facebook, or OMTimesTV YoutubeThe Dream Arc is the ultimate antidote for our troubled times, giving us a more magical experience of the universe, where we will learn:• That our world needs the balance of right-brain, intuitive wisdom to deal with the future• That our trauma can only be released when we can see it and embrace it• That anyone can learn to harness the power of their dreams• That our pauses are as important as our achievements• That a sense of creative play can resolve most of our problems• That a spirit of generosity creates the ripples of unexpected miracles all around us• That every creature of the natural world holds a specific message for us• That your body is a reservoir of timeless ancestral wisdom• That action rooted in empathy can change anything in this worldIf you're intrigued by the thought of connecting to the deep ancestral power of the earth… if you're eager to expand your creativity, unlock your intuitive wisdom, and open new circuits in your brain and body, join Sandie this week when Richard Rudd, founder of the Gene Keys, and inspirational artist, author, teacher, and creator of the Wisdom Keepers Oracle Rosy Aronson share the secrets of the Dream Arc Program.Topics include: how to:• Unlock the power of your imagination to help you manifest your highest aspirations• Harness the power of your dreams and transfer information fluidly between the realms of sleeping and waking• Root out hidden fears and unconscious blocks using animal symbolism as a new alphabet of consciousness• Discover a new sense of living life at a mythic level… and moreRICHARD RUDD has a Master's degree in English and Metaphysics and is fascinated by the synthesis of science and mysticism. Apart from writing many inspirational books, as well as award-winning poetry, he is also founder of the Gene Keys, a system of personal development that has spread all over the world and been translated into many languages. ROSY ARONSON is an inspirational artist, author and teacher with a Masters in Expressive Arts Therapy and a Doctorate in Intuitive Listening & the Creative Art. Her deepest intention is to provide empowering tools and experiences for people to awaken their Inner Wisdom Keeper. A lucid night-time dreamer and avid day-time permission-giver, Rosy has created rich, fun and transformative offerings including books, courses, art, film, various global outreach projects, as well as the globally-loved Wisdom Keepers Oracle Deck.Connect with them at https://genekeys.com/dream-arc/ | https://www.wisdomkeepers.net#RichardRudd # RosyAronson #TheDreamArc #SandieSedgbeer #WhatIsGoingOMVisit the What Is Going OM show page https://omtimes.com/iom/shows/what-is-going-omConnect with Sandie Sedgbeer at https://www.sedgbeer.comSubscribe to our Newsletter https://omtimes.com/subscribe-omtimes-magazine/Connect with OMTimes on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/Omtimes.Magazine/ and OMTimes Radio https://www.facebook.com/ConsciousRadiowebtv.OMTimes/Twitter: https://twitter.com/OmTimes/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/omtimes/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/OMTimesTVLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/2798417/Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/omtimes/

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast
Dr. Jessica Davis - International Clinical Education

The Healthcare Education Transformation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 27:50


In this episode of the HET Podcast, we welcome Dr. Jessica Davis! Dr. Davis speaks about her role as an assistant director of clinical education and how it led her to teaching clinical education in another country! Biography: Jessica Davis, PT, DPT, OCS, FAAOMPT has been practicing orthopaedic physical therapy with an emphasis in manual therapy since graduating from Duquesne University in 1999. She received her Doctorate in Physical Therapy from Chatham University in 2008, became a Board-Certified Specialist in Orthopaedics in 2002, and a Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapists with Evidence in Motion in 2017. Jessica is the co-owner of Perform Physio, LLC. She is currently an assistant professor, assistant chair, and assistant director of clinical education with Duquesne University. She has been faculty with the Institute of Clinical Excellence where she was lead faculty for the Performing Arts Division and has also been interim faculty with the Dance Department of Slippery Rock University teaching dance kinesiology. She has extensive orthopedic manual therapy experience and has provided outpatient orthopedic physical therapy for many years in southern California and Pittsburgh. Her primary areas of specialty include orthopedics, manual therapy and performing arts medicine. Jessica maintains various professional memberships, including the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists, the Pennsylvania Physical Therapy Association, International Association of Dance Medicine and Science, and the American Physical Therapy Association.

Joa Fitness podcast
Achilles tendon pain?

Joa Fitness podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 26:29


Discover how Dr Keon Kirlew went from pain to passion. Dr. Kirlew's journey in healthcare began at the University of Lethbridge studying a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology. During his education he played soccer for the University of Lethbridge that sparked his interest in injury rehabilitation. He eventually found himself studying at New York Chiropractic College where he earned his Doctorate in Chiropractic and began exploring his interest in sports medicine. Dr. Kirlew recognized the importance of exercise in people's lives and has done additional education earning a Diploma in Fitness and Health promotion at Humber College. After graduation he co-founded a multidisciplinary clinic called LABX that focuses on creating long term solutions to pain. "Your best self is built in the Lab" Find him IG: dr.keonkirlew and thelab.x We shared a conversation about his circle of influence. And all a little of Achilles tendon pain, tendonitis and rupture. 

IAQ Radio
Bill Sothern, DrPH, CIH, LEED AP - Chris Mikrut - Michael Berg, PhD - Misalignment between Clinical Mold Antigen Extracts and Airborne Molds Found in Water-damaged Homes

IAQ Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 61:25


This week we welcome Dr. Bill Sothern, Chris Mikrut and Dr. Michael Berg to discuss their recent paper called Misalignment between Clinical Mold Antigen Extracts and Airborne Molds Found in Water-damaged Homes. We will look at the current antigen testing being done for mold allergies then discuss their results and what changes could be beneficial. The authors have collected a great deal of data from the real world that will be of interest to our audience and hopefully the medical community. LEARN MORE this week on IAQ Radio+   Dr. Bill Sothern is a Certified Industrial Hygienist, LEED AP, and Chief Operating Officer of Microecologies, Inc., a NYC-based indoor environmental consulting firm he founded in 1993. He earned his Doctorate in Public Health from CUNY, and is a recognized contributor to NYC DOHMH, NIEHS, HUD and WHO guidance documents. Bill is an active advocate for changes in law and policy that can improve health outcomes at the population level. He is the primary author of NYC Local Law 13 - 2014 that prohibits the use of paper-faced gypsum boards in moisture-prone building areas, which serves to reduce the occurrence of mold growth and the incidence of asthma. Bill is an active health researcher and is the lead author of the article Misalignment between Clinical Mold Antigen Extracts and Airborne Molds Found in Water-Damaged Homes published in the May 2022 issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, he has conducted environmental assessments for schools, NGO's and businesses throughout NYC to assess HVAC systems and implement ventilation controls to reduce airborne concentration levels of SARS-CoV-2 and thereby reduce risk of transmission of COVID-19 in schools and workplaces. Bill currently serves as a court-appointed independent consultant on mold, water damage and ventilation issues to the NYC Public Housing Authority (NYCHA).   Chris Mikrut is a Senior Investigator at Microecologies, Inc., an indoor environmental consulting firm in New York City. He earned his Masters Degree in Environmental and Occupational Health Science from Hunter College where he was awarded the prestigious National Institute of Safety and Health's (NIOSH) Scholarship. Chris is an EPA Certified Lead Risk Assessor and NYS Certified Mold Assessor, and over the past 10 years has conducted over 1,000 indoor air quality and indoor environmental inspections in residential and commercial settings involving water damage and mold growth conditions, chemical vapor emissions, construction dust and crystalline silica infiltration, lead-based paint hazards, and other indoor environmental exposure factors. Chris has been a key contributor to program development for response to mold, water damage, and exhaust ventilation issues in NYC Public Housing Authority's (NYCHA) and administration of classroom and field training for NYCHA staff. Chris has also collaborated on several projects as part of Microecologies' research team and is a co-author of the article Misalignment between Clinical Mold Antigen Extracts and Airborne Molds Found in Water-Damaged Homes published in the May 2022 issue of the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.   Dr. Michael Berg joined Eurofins EMLab P&K in 2005 and worked as Department Manager, Regional Director and Technical Director. He holds a Ph.D. in Biology from the Technical University of Darmstadt, Germany. Dr. Berg researched plant pathology and plant genetics as postdoctoral fellow at Oklahoma State University. He also worked in fungicide research for BASF in Germany. Dr. Berg engages in training and other educational events with focus on the topics of infection control, water risk management and molecular biology.

REimagine
Episode #118 Don't Blow Up Your Ministry with Dr. Michael Mackenzie

REimagine

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 49:47


Today on the podcast we welcome Michael MacKenzie. Michael is the author of the book Don't Blow Up Your Ministry.  Michael and his wife Kari, have both specialized in counseling for Christian leaders for 20 years and have served Christian leaders not only nationally, but internationally. Michael received his master's and Doctorate in Counseling from Lincoln Christian Seminary. Michael, along with his wife, have led the Marble Retreat Center in Colorado where they specialize in helping pastors, missionaries, and Christian leaders through counseling and hospitality.  Check out The Marble Retreat CenterPick up a coy of Don't Blow Up Your Ministry

The Egg Whisperer Show
Reaching Your Peak Fertile Potential with guest Dr. Lorne Brown

The Egg Whisperer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 34:04


Today on the Egg Whisperer Show podcast, I'm joined by Dr. Lorne Brown Dr. Brown is the founder of Acubalance Wellness Center in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Once an accountant, he left his career as a CPA to receive a Doctorate of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Dr. TCM) at Vancouver's International College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and trained in hypnosis, functional medicine, cold laser therapy and Psych K. His training in this exciting mix of wellness practices allows him to help patients tap into their innate ability to heal from pain, digestive disorders, anxiety, hormone imbalances and reproductive health issues. He's done a lot of ground breaking work around laser acupuncture protocols, and integrative medicine. I'm excited to have him on to talk about his practice and experience today!   Read the full show notes and transcript on my website.   Subscribe to my YouTube channel for more fertility tips! Join Egg Whisperer School Checkout the podcast Subscribe to the newsletter to get updates   Dr. Aimee Eyvazzadeh is one of America's most well known fertility doctors. Her success rate at baby-making is what gives future parents hope when all hope is lost. She pioneered the TUSHY Method and BALLS Method to decrease your time to pregnancy. Learn more about the TUSHY Method and find a wealth of fertility resources at www.draimee.org.

Calm and Connected Podcast
Executive Function for Kids and Teens - An interview with Dr. Lynne Kenney

Calm and Connected Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 25:16


I'm so excited to welcome Dr Lynne Kenney on to the Calm & Connected Podcast this week. We chat about all things executive functioning and how sessions differ with children in comparison to teenagers. We kept the conversation on the lighter treatment side rather than all the science-lingo heavy side. I hope you enjoy it!! The topics we cover in this episode are;What actually is executive functioning?How young you can start teaching children executive function skillsHow slowing down for kids can make them achieve and learn moreDifferent types of mindfulness practices How mantras can helpHow little questions can have a big impactHow things differ from children to teenagersTeenagers are human too - they want love, affection and to feel masterfulThe importance of thinking about what other people needAnd remember, do not forget about yourself, take a few minutes for you and have a little fun!Dr. Lynne Kenney is the nation's leading pediatric psychologist in the development of classroom cognitive-physical activity programs for students grades K-8. Dr. Kenney develops curriculum, programming, and activities to improve children's cognition through coordinative cognitive-motor movement, executive function skill-building strategies, and social-emotional learning. Dr. Kenney is a pediatric psychologist on the Language & Cognition Team at Wellington-Alexander Center, Scottsdale, Arizona. She has advanced fellowship training in forensic psychology and developmental pediatric psychology from Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School and Harbor-UCLA/UCLA Medical School. Dr. Kenney holds a BA in Psychology and an MA in Physical Education from the University of Southern California. In 1992, she earned her Doctorate in Psychology at Pepperdine. Dr. Kenney's books include Brain Primers, 2020 (Kuczala & Kenney); 70 Play Activities for Better Thinking, Self-Regulation, Learning and Behavior (Kenney & Comizio, 2016); the Social-Emotional Literacy program, Bloom Your Room™; Musical Thinking™; and Bloom: 50 things to say, think and do with anxious, angry and over-the-top-kids (Kenney & Young, 2015). ​​Website - www.lynnekenney.comTwitter - @drlynnekenney Instagram - @drlynnekenney About The Host - Janine HalloranJanine Halloran is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor, an author, a speaker, an entrepreneur and a mom. As a Licensed Mental Health Counselor, Janine has been working primarily with children and adolescents for over 15 years. She loves to create products and resources, so she started two businesses to support families and professionals who work with children and teens. ‘Coping Skills for Kids' provides products and resources to help kids learn to cope with their feelings in safe and healthy ways. It's the home of the popular Coping Cue Cards, decks of cards designed to help kids learn and use coping skills at home or at school. Janine's second business ‘Encourage Play' is dedicated to helping kids learn and practice social skills in the most natural way - through play! Encourage Play has free printables, as well as digital products focused on play and social skills.Coping Skills for Kids - https://copingskillsforkids.comEncourage Play - https://www.encourageplay.comInterested in reading my books? The Coping Skills for Kids Workbook - https://store.copingskillsforkids.com/collections/coping-skills-for-kids-workbook/products/coping-skills-for-kids-workbook-digital-versionSocial Skills for Kids - https://store.copingskillsforkids.com/collections/encourage-play/products/social-skills-for-kids-workbook Connect with Janine on Social MediaInstagram: @copingskillsforkidsFacebook: facebook.com/copingskillsforkids and facebook.com/encourageplayYoutube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JanineHalloranEncouragePlay

Self Talk with Dr. Ray Self
The Christian Response to the Spirit of Witchcraft

Self Talk with Dr. Ray Self

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 19:07


This week, Dr. Ray Self discusses how to recognize and handle the spirit of witchcraft running rampant in churches and attacking families. This episode is vital to help you understand and defeat one of Satan's primary weapons against the body of Christ. Follow and subscribe to Self Talk With Dr. Ray Self at our new podcast website  - https://www.icmcollege.org/selftalk  Partner with Dr. Self at www.icmcollege.org/donate  International College of Ministry is now enrolling at www.icmcollege.org/enroll You can purchase Dr. Self's books - Redeeming Your Past and Finding Your Promised Land and Hear His Voice, Be His Voice at Amazon.com Author Bio – Dr. Ray Self is the founder of Spirit Wind Ministries Inc. and the International College of Ministry. He holds a Doctorate in Christian Psychology and a Doctorate in Theology. He currently resides in Orlando, Florida. He is married to Dr. Christie Self and has three sons and a daughter.  

HELLO! The Daily Lowdown
Glastonbury opens its gates and Stormzy receives a doctorate

HELLO! The Daily Lowdown

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 3:00


Glastonbury festival opens its gates for the first time in two years and Stormzy shares his big achievement. Join us for your Daily Lowdown from HELLO! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Business Innovators Radio
Ep. #34-Fibromyalgia pain- the brain-body connection-Dr. Irene Luc, Therapeutic Pain Specialist with Coach Tavia Morse-Salvadalena

Business Innovators Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 28:53


In this episode, I interview Dr. Irene Luc. A Therapeutic pain specialist. We discuss all things pain but specifically what Fibromyalgia is. Fibro as most call it is a diagnosis for thousands of people, generally more women than men are diagnosed. It's a diagnosis for when people experience widespread pain for no known cause. Most of the time after digging a little deeper, Dr. Luc says there is always an underlying cause. Dr. Luc explains this more in our podcast.She also explains the brain, gut connection as well. Dr Luc uses brain training and her physical therapy approaches to help people get out of pain, anxiety, depression and trauma. She blends modern tech like neurofeedback with compassionate clinical care.Tune in as we discuss this plus other conditions that Dr. Irene has treated.You won't want to miss this episode!!To learn more about Tavia you can go to:healthcoachtavia.com and follow her on IG @healthcoachtavia About Dr. Irene LucDr. Irene started as an artist and found she could be just as creative in medicine as well as on canvas. She has practiced in an orthopedic setting since 2002 with a concentration in treating chronic conditions with pain. Over the last 10 years she extended her studies to the brain and how it processes pain, emotions and trauma which she blended into a new program. She is the only practitioner in Tri-cities, WA and Eastern Washington that is certified in brain training and physical therapy for a holistic approach to pain, anxiety, depression and trauma.Doctorate in Physical Therapy – University of MontanaCertified Therapeutic Pain Specialist (TPS) – EIM/ International Pain and Spine InstituteABPTS Board Certified Orthopedic Clinical Specialist (OCS)Anxiety Certified Rehabilitation Service Provider (A-RSP)Applied Neuroscience and Brain Health Certification – The Neuroscience AcademySexuality Counseling Training – Northwest Institute of IntimacyNeurofeedback User – Brain Trainer InternationalA few more notes about Dr. Irene:Name: Dr. Irene Luc owner/founder Mind Door, LLC : a specialty clinic that blends neuroscience and a hands- on approach to pain and autoimmune conditions Email: info@mind-door.com IG: @burnoutrescue FB: @yourminddoor Website is the most active and has my free program: https://mind-door.com How did you get into this business or what was your inspiration for doing this work? I've always love the human body and understanding it but I was inspired by my grandmother who was a eastern medicine healer to blend both what she taught me with western medicine. I firmly believe that our bodies are designed to heal after I had my first burn out at the age of 22 and my hair fell out. Without a diagnosis but armed with my own understanding of science I Created my own program which is what I share with others today . Learning to live With my own auto immune condition has taught me so much and how to encourage and treat others who might be going through the same. I believe the body has the resources to heal as long as were able to reconnect the brain and body. How long have you been at this career? 20 years!What is your favorite success story? I have so many stories over my career…. One of my clients who have worked with for multiple years Was able to reduce his pain medication by 90% after being in them for almost 15 years and regain his ability to have control over his life and activities. I have another patient where she was in so much pain that the only body part that didn't hurt was the tip of her middle finger. But after working together she was able to run/walk a long distance race! I'm so grateful to be surrounded by amazing patients every sayDo you have a specialty? See above. Mostly I help people reconnect their brain and body is using a blend of neuroscience and eastern medicine.My main focus right now is helping people out of burn out- The physical and mental exhaustion from the pandemic is resulting in people burning out in their health.You can find Dr. Irene at: http://mind-door.comThe Sweet Life Coaching Podcast https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/the-sweet-life-coaching-podcast/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/ep-34-fibromyalgia-pain-the-brain-body-connection-dr-irene-luc-therapeutic-pain-specialist-with-coach-tavia-morse-salvadalena

Dental Up
How to Successfully Manage a Startup, with Dr. Perry Joiner

Dental Up

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 25:49


On this episode of the Dental Up Podcast, we welcome to the podcast Dr. Perry Joiner! Dr. Joiner is a Georgia native and received his Bachelors in Finance from the University of Georgia. He then went on to receive his Doctorate in Dental Medicine from Midwestern University in Glendale, Arizona. Dr. Joiner has practiced dentistry around the country learning the latest techniques in implant, sedation, and general dentistry. He has earned accolades for his dedication to dentistry including Fellowships from the Academy of General Dentistry and the International Congress of Oral Implantologists. He has also passed the written boards for the American Academy of Implant Dentistry, received training in both IV and oral sedation, and has been a practicing Invisalign provider for over seven years. Dr. Joiner and his wife recently returned to Georgia and are excited to raise their three children here in Fayette county. In this episode of the Dental Up Podcast, you will hear about: - Dr. Joiner's first job coming out of Dental School - His first practice and how he grew it from the ground up - The importance of great office staff - Removable and Crown & Bridge Cases: From Prepping, Materials, to Delivery - What it's been like working with Keating Dental Lab - His advice to younger dentists looking to branch off on their own   Find out more about Dr. Joiner and Fayette Family Dental here!   Discover the Dental Up Podcast and subscribe on your favorite listening platforms like Spotify, Apple Podcasts, iHeart Radio, YouTube, and more! Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6gfHeYc6WHsPfzVdoLQVV9 Apple Podcasts:  https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-dental-up-podcast/id999909601 iHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/263-dental-up-28030030/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/keatingdental

Christ Church (Moscow, ID)
Good News for Cultures Built on Guilt, Shame, and Fear

Christ Church (Moscow, ID)

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 51:17


Talk 4 of 6 from Missions Conference 2022: As the Waters Cover the Sea. Consider donating to our Missions Conference fund: https://bit.ly/missions-conference-donation. — Francis Foucachon was born and raised in France, and trained as a young man to be a chef in the elite world of lyonnaise gastronomy. After working in that field for seven years, he was mentored and trained for the pastoral ministry by a missionary church-planter. He moved to the United States after marrying Donna Rapacz, a high school French teacher from Florida, but they returned to France a few years later for Francis to attend the Reformed Seminary in Aix-en-Provence. During this time, he was part of a church-planting team with one of his professors, and helped start a French-speaking Christian school. After graduation, Francis was ordained as a minister in the Presbyterian Church in America. Under the auspices of the PCA, Francis and Donna and their five children planted a church in the suburbs of Montreal, Quebec and a church in Lyon, France. Francis completed the course work in the Doctorate of Ministry program at RTS Orlando, and was the Evangelism Explosion Director for Quebec. Francis and Donna returned to the United States to be with their children as they went through college. To support his family during this time, Francis created a high-end French restaurant called West of Paris, which he sold in 2011 to return to full-time ministry. He is President of Huguenot Heritage, working in partnership with Third Millennium Ministries as French Project Coordinator, with the mission of training francophone church leaders worldwide. — The gospel is good news for all people, in all lands, at all times. The call of the church is to obey Christ's command to teach the nations obedience to Him, as the King of all the earth. The great promise of the prophet Hosea is that the knowledge of the glory of the Lord shall cover the earth as water covers the sea. But between the commencement of Christ's kingly rule of earth and the day when he comes again to judge the living and the dead, there will be ebbs and flows. While initially in the gospel's advance it centered in Jerusalem, and then took root in the West, we see in more recent decades how the gospel is rapidly advancing in South America and in the Eastern lands. But oftentimes, Christians in the West are often unsure of how to take the gospel and share it with their fellow Westerners; but more so are stumped by how to share the good news with those from very different cultures and religions. Missions Conference 2022 is intended to help answer those questions, while equipping the saints where they are to be ready to share the word with not only their neighbor but the foreigner in their midst as well.

Behind The Mission
BTM74 - Dr. Lynda Davis - Implementing Change in Military and Veteran Support

Behind The Mission

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 31:42


About Today's GuestDr. Davis is a subject matter expert on Military, Veteran, Family (MVF), Caregiver & Survivor support through successful, sustainable services. Dr. Davis is currently working with the Department of Defense in the area of Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) and Caring for Military Families, Elizabeth Dole Foundation. She was educated at the University of Southern California. She is the former Deputy Undersecretary Of Defense for military community and family policy and former Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for manpower and personnel policy, to the position of Senior Vice President for Defense and Intelligence.Links Mentioned In This EpisodeMilitary and Veteran Caregiver Experience MapTragedy Assistance Program for Survivors Institute for Hope and HealingPsychArmor Resource of the WeekThe PsychArmor Resource of the Week is the PsychArmor course Why Collaboration is So Important in Supporting Mitliary members, Veterans, Their Families, and Caregivers. This course is designed for community leaders interested in exploring some key components to a successful collaborative journey. You will learn how collaboration can provide the structure needed to impact the lives of military-connected people. You can find a link to the resource in our here: https://learn.psycharmor.org/courses/why-collaboration-is-so-important This Episode Sponsored By:This episode is sponsored by PsychArmor, the premier education and learning ecosystem specializing in military culture content. PsychArmor offers an online e-learning laboratory with custom training options for organizations.Contact Us and Join Us on Social Media Email PsychArmorPsychArmor on TwitterPsychArmor on FacebookPsychArmor on YouTubePsychArmor on LinkedInPsychArmor on InstagramTheme MusicOur theme music Don't Kill the Messenger was written and performed by Navy Veteran Jerry Maniscalco, in cooperation with Operation Encore, a non profit committed to supporting singer/songwriter and musicians across the military and Veteran communities.Producer and Host Duane France is a retired Army Noncommissioned Officer, combat veteran, and clinical mental health counselor for service members, veterans, and their families.  You can find more about the work that he is doing at www.veteranmentalhealth.com  

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ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts
Advanced Practice Providers - APPs 101: What and Who Are Advanced Practice Providers (APPs)?

ASCO eLearning Weekly Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 37:14


Partners in cancer care – who are advanced practice providers? In the first episode of ASCO Education's podcast series on Advanced Practice Providers (APPs), co-hosts Todd Pickard (MD Anderson Cancer Center) and Dr. Stephanie Williams (Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine), along with guest speaker, Wendy Vogel (Harborside/APSHO), discuss who advanced practice providers are, share an overview of what they do, and why they are important to oncology care teams. If you liked this episode, please subscribe. Learn more at https://education.asco.org, or email us at education@asco.org   TRANSCRIPT Todd Pickard: Hello everyone, and welcome to the ASCO Education Podcast, episode number one of the 'Advanced Practice Providers' series, 'APPs 101: What and Who Are Advanced Practice Providers?' I'd like to introduce my co-host for this series, Dr. Stephanie Williams. My name is Todd Pickard. I'm an advanced practice provider, I'm a PA, and I work at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. I'm also the Executive Director of Advanced Practice and my clinical practice is in urology. Dr. Williams, how about you introduce yourself? Dr. Stephanie Williams: Thanks, Todd, and thanks for this opportunity to present this incredibly important topic. I am currently retired from clinical practice. I had been in practice for over 35 years both in an academic setting, a private practice, and more recently in a large institutional, multi-specialty institutional type of practice. My primary clinical care has been in stem cell transplants and cellular therapy. And we have used APPs, both PAs and NPs for a couple of decades in our particular area. Todd Pickard: Great, thanks for that. I'd also like to introduce you to our guest panelist today, Wendy Vogel from Harborside, who is a certified oncology nurse practitioner with over 20 years of clinical experience and expertise. We're excited to be chatting with Wendy today about the basics of advanced practice providers and who they are. This will be an introduction for the rest of the upcoming episodes of APP Podcasts. Wendy, why don't you tell us a little bit about yourself and your practice. Wendy Vogel: Thanks, Todd. It is a pleasure to be here. I appreciate you asking me to talk. I am an oncology nurse practitioner as you said. I do a high-risk cancer clinic and do that a couple of days a month. And I am also the executive director of APSHO, the Advanced Practitioner Society for Hematology and Oncology. Todd Pickard: Great! We're looking forward to a robust and informative discussion today between the three of us. So, I'd like to get started with some basics. Wendy, do you want to always start with a definition of advanced practice registered nurse? Wendy Vogel: Okay, great question! So, APRNs or advanced practice registered nurse include nurse practitioners. It can include clinical nurse specialists, nurse anesthetists, and nurse midwives. And generally, APRNs hold at least a master's degree in addition to some initial nursing education as a registered nurse. Some APRNs have doctorates like the DNP or Doctorate of Nursing Practice. But licensure for APRNs generally falls under the State Board of Nursing.   So, we're also required to have a board certification, usually as some sort of generalist as in family medicine, pediatrics, geriatrics, women or acute care. But in oncology, many APRNs also carry oncology certification. Todd Pickard: Excellent! Thanks for that. I'll go ahead and add to the conversation by defining physician assistant. So, physician assistants are individuals who are trained in the medical model and are licensed to practice medicine in team-based settings with physicians. Very much like advanced practice registered nurses, we come from a variety of backgrounds, and our education model is really focused on thinking about the patient the same way that our physician colleagues do. We're trained in really taking a very broad look at patient care, and our education as a generalist model. PAs are certified by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants, which is one national certification that includes all of the content areas in which we will practice. Dr. Stephanie Williams: For those out there who don't know, what are the differences between a physician assistant and an APRN? Or are there differences in practical terms, in terms of how we practice our field? Wendy Vogel: That is a great question, Stephanie, thanks for asking that. We function very much the same. The main difference is just in our educational background, where nurse practitioners come from a nursing background and the nursing model of care, and I'll let Todd speak to where PAs come from, but basically, our functions are very much the same. Todd Pickard: I very much agree. If you are in a clinical setting, and for some reason, Wendy or myself failed to identify who we are, you wouldn't really detect a distinction between the care either of us provide, because we are there in that provider setting and we're really there to assess the conditions you have like appropriate history in physical examination, think through differential diagnosis or a workup, create a diagnosis and then a therapeutic plan and also to educate you as the patient or to make an appropriate referral. So, really, when APPs, PAs, and NPs work side by side, there's really not a lot of difference in what people detect in what we're doing and how we're doing things. But there are some educational differences, which are pretty minimal. So, for example, one small difference is that PAs include surgical assisting as part of our core fundamental training, and our APRN colleagues generally don't. So, in my institution, we do have nurse practitioners that go to the OR and do assisting, but in order to get there, they did a Registered Nursing First Assist Program, it's a certification. So, they learn those fundamentals of sterile technique and surgical technique. So, in essence, there's really not a whole lot of difference. Dr. Stephanie Williams: I think what I was struck with about the difference was the history and the fact that PAs came out of the Mobile Army Surgical Hospitals. To me, that was just fascinating. I think Duke was the first graduating class. Wendy Vogel: You know, the role of the APRN has really changed drastically. It began in the 1960s, because there were not enough primary care providers, particularly for children in the urban and rural areas of the US, and the first nurse practitioner program was in 1965, at the University of Colorado. So, gosh! Have we come a long way since then, both the PA role or the NP role. When was the first PA role, Todd, when was that? Todd Pickard: We were born at the same time in 1965, we just happened to be at Duke University and y'all were in Colorado. You know, I think that the most important thing about working with advanced practice providers is that you look to work with somebody who has the competencies, the skills, interpersonal communication, and the pertinent experiences because honestly, I know fantastic APRNs, I know fantastic PAs, and I know some of either profession that really just don't quite fit a particular role. And so, there is some kind of mythology around PAs and APRNs, and who should work where, like PAs should be more procedural and more in surgery, and nurse practitioners should be more in medicine in the hospital. And really, there's nothing in our training that defines that per se, I think it's just a natural progression of we're over 50 now, so our professions are middle-aged. And we're starting to really have our feet underneath us. And I think people who've worked with PAs or NPs really understand, it's about the individuals and what they bring to the table. It's not really about the initials behind our names, because honestly, that's not what makes me do good work. It's not that I have the PA or NP behind my name. It's my commitment and dedication to my patients and supporting the rest of my team. Wendy Vogel: I think Stephanie, that's why we use the term advanced practitioner, advanced practitioner provider because it doesn't single out either one of us because we are functioning in the same manner. It's easier to say than say, PAs and NPs, so we just say, APPs. Todd Pickard: Yeah. And it doesn't mean that we don't identify as individual professions, because we do. I mean, I'm a PA, but I am part of a larger group. And part of that larger group is identifying as advanced practice provider because, at my institution, there are over 1000 of us, and we are a community of providers, and that's the way that we sense how we function within the team and within the institution. And so, it's really about that kind of joint interprofessional work. And speaking of work, Wendy, tell us a little bit about what are typical things that advanced practice providers do? Wendy Vogel: It might be easier to say what we don't do. I've got a list. Do you want to hear my list? Todd Pickard: Yeah, lay it on us. Wendy Vogel: Okay, here you go. Staff and peer education, survivorship care, palliative care, hospice care, pain management, acute care clinics, case management, research, cancer patient navigator, genetic services, lung nodule clinics, quality improvement. We're writers, we're authors, we're speakers, we mentor, and we do all kinds of public education. We can have clinical roles with faculty and professional organizations. We do procedures like bone marrows, paracentesis and suturing, and all that kind of stuff. We do a lot with all the other things like diagnosing, all the things you said earlier, diagnosing, ordering lab tests, ordering chemotherapy, etc. Todd Pickard: I think what's amazing about advanced practice providers is the flexibility we have to fill in gaps on teams or in service lines, no matter what that is. You know, I like to say and I'm sure everybody thinks that they originated this, but I feel that advanced practice providers are the stem cells of the team because we differentiate into whatever is necessary. At my institution, we recently had a gap in how our peer-to-peers were handled. Many times, you order an MRI or a PET scan, and the payer will, the day of or the day before, say, ‘Oh, I need to talk to somebody.' How that gets to the clinical team and when the clinical team has time to do that, it's really hard to coordinate. So, we created a team of advanced practice providers who spend one day a week doing the regular clinical roles, but then the rest of the time, they are dedicated to facilitating these peer-to-peer conversations. They have over a 95% success rate. And the payers, the medical directors, have actually gotten to know them. And so, they'll say, ‘Hey, I want to talk to so and so because she's fantastic and knows our program, and it's really easy to have these conversations.' And so, patients are taken care of and these business needs are taken care of, and then our clinical teams can really focus on what they're there for, which is to see those patients in and out every day. So, that's the power of advanced practice, its flexibility, filling in gaps; we can bend and morph to whatever we need to do because one of the things that's in our DNA is part of PA and advanced practice RN, we're here to serve, we're problem solvers or doers, too. When we see something, we pick it up and take care of it. That's just in our nature. Stephanie, tell us a little bit about your experience working with an advanced practice provider, is what Wendy and I are saying ringing true, or what's your experience? Dr. Stephanie Williams: Oh, absolutely! As I look back on my career, I'm not certain that I could have accomplished much of what I did, without my team members and advanced practice providers, both PAs and NPs. We also use them in an inpatient setting. And I can't remember Wendy mentioned that to take care of our stem cell transplant patients, because of residency, our requirements were removed from our services, and they became the go-to's to taking care of the patients. It actually improved the continuity of care that the patients received because they would see the same person throughout their 4 to 6-week course in the hospital, they also helped run our graft versus host clinics. I hate that term physician extender because they're really part of our health care team. We are all healthcare professionals working together, as Todd beautifully mentioned, for a common goal to help that patient who's right there in front of us. And not only that, from a kind of selfish viewpoint, they help with a lot of the work, doing the notes, so that we could all split up the work and all get out on time and all have at least some work-life balance. And I think that's a very important part of any team is that we can each find our own work-life balance within the team. So, I feel that they're a very important part of the oncology healthcare team. And I would recommend that everyone who wants to take care of patients, incorporate them into their team. Wendy Vogel: Can I say something right here that you mentioned that I'm so glad you did, which was physician extender. That is a dirty, dirty word in the AP world now because we don't know what part we're extending, that is not what we do. And also, we don't want to be called mid-level providers because – you can't see but I'm pointing from my chest to my belly - I don't treat just the mid-level, nor do I treat in mid-level care. I give superior care. I just give different care. And I give care on a team. And the last one is a non-physician provider. That is also a no-no because I wouldn't describe a teacher as a non-fireman, nor would I describe you, Stephanie, as a non-nurse practitioner. So, I don't want to be a non-physician provider either. Todd Pickard: It is an interesting phenomenon that even after 50 years, so many different places, whether it's the Joint Commission, or the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services, whether it's a state legislator, an individual state, an individual institution like Memorial Sloan Kettering or an MD Anderson or a Moffitt, everybody comes up with these different terms. And it's so interesting to me. Physicians are either physicians, doctor, sometimes they're called providers. But as a PA, who's an advanced practice provider, those are the two things that resonate with me: either call me PA or call me advanced practice provider. All these other names seem to just be, it's an alphabet soup, and it really doesn't carry any meaning because some places just come up with these strange terms. And I agree, physician extenders has been the one that always has amused me the most because it reminds me of hamburger helper. Am I some noodles that you add to the main meal so that you can extend that meal out and serve more people? I think what Wendy and I are really trying to get at, I know this has been with a little bit tongue in cheek, but we are part of the team. We work with physicians in a collaborative team-based setting, just like we all work with social workers and schedulers and business people and pharmacists and physical therapists. I think the main message here is that oncology care and taking care of patients with cancer is a team effort because it is a ginormous lift. It's a ginormous responsibility and our patients deserve a full team that works collaboratively and works well and has them in our focus like a laser, and I know that's what APPs do. Dr. Stephanie Williams: I think that's well said, Todd. What I enjoyed in the clinic in particular, was sitting down and discussing patient issues and problems with my APPs. And we worked together to try to figure out how to resolve issues that would come up. But we also learned from each other, you're never too old to learn something from people. I just felt the interaction, the interpersonal interaction was also very satisfying as well. Wendy Vogel: I think that the job satisfaction that comes from being a team player and working together is so much higher and that we're going to experience so much less burnout when we're working together each to the fullest scope of our practice. Todd Pickard: So, Wendy, one of the things that people ask a lot about when they work with advanced practice providers is, ‘Well, gosh! How do I know that they have this training or this experience or this competency?' And then the question arises about certification. So, let's talk a little bit about certification and what that means and what it doesn't mean. So, tell me, are advanced practice providers certified? And are they required to get a variety of certifications throughout their career? Let's talk a little bit about that. Why don't you open up the dialog. Wendy Vogel: Okay, happy to! So, to be able to practice in the United States, I have to have a board certification. And it can vary from state to state, but generally, it has to be either a family nurse practitioner certification, acute care nurse practitioner, geriatrics, women's health, pediatrics, there are about five. So, you are generally certified as one of those. There are a few oncology certifications across the US, board certifications to be able to practice at the state level, but not all states recognize those. So, most of us are educated in a more generalist area, have that certification as a generalist, and then can go on to get an additional certification. So, many nurse practitioners in oncology will also get an advanced oncology nurse practitioner certification. So, that's a little bit different. It's not required to practice. But it does give people a sense that, ‘Hey, she really knows what she's doing in oncology.' Todd Pickard: The PA profession has one national certification, and it is a generalist certification. It's probably similar to USMLE, where you really are thinking about medicine in its entirety. So, whether that be cardiology, orthopedics, family medicine, internal medicine, geriatric, psychiatry, or ophthalmology. I mean it's everything – and oncology is included as well. And that certification really is the entree into getting licensure within the states. It's basically that last examination that you take before you can get that license just to make sure that you have the basic knowledge and fundamentals to practice. And so, I always respond to this kind of question about certification, I say, ‘Well, is it really the experience and the onboarding and the training that one gets on the job and the mentoring and the coaching that one gets from our physician colleagues and other advanced practice providers that brings them the most value? Or is it going through an examination, where basically you're responding to a certain amount of information, and you either pass it or you don't, and you can get a certification? I'm not saying there's not value in that, but I'm also making the argument that if you are working with your APPs well, and they have good mentors, and they have good resources, they're going to be excellent clinicians. And having an additional certification may or may not make some huge difference. Many times I see people use it as a differentiator for privileges or something. It's really an external kind of a pressure or a desire, it doesn't really have anything to do with patient care. I mean, Wendy what has your experience been around that need for additional certification? Wendy Vogel: I've seen it used in practices to merit bonuses, which isn't really fair when a PA does not have that opportunity to have a specialty certification per se. So, I've seen it used negatively. I'm a great believer that any additional education that you can get is beneficial. However, I will say just like you said, if you are getting your mentoring, you have good practice, you're doing continuing education, then it's essentially the same thing. To be able to have an oncology certification, I had to practice for a year and I had to take a test that really measured what I should know after one year. And that's what a certification was for that. Is it beneficial, do I want it? Yeah, I want it. Do I have to have it to practice? No. Todd Pickard: I think that is a great way to segue to having a brief conversation about how you bring APPs in? I mean, just at a very high level, should people expect for an APP to come in right out of school and just hit the ground running without any additional investment? And I could ask the same question about a resident or a fellow who completes an oncology training program. Do you just put those people to work? Maybe that's an older model, and now really mentorship and that additional facilitated work is, I think, critical. So, I'll start with Stephanie, tell us a little bit about what's your experience been with advanced practice providers, or even young physicians as they enter the workforce? What's the role of onboarding or mentoring program? Dr. Stephanie Williams: So, it's important. We had a set process for bringing on our new APPs and it pretty much followed the guidelines from the American Society of Cellular Transplantation in terms of the knowledge base that they would need to know. So, it was a checklist. And we would also have them do modules from ASCO's oncology modules, as well looking at primarily hematologic malignancies, so they could get a background there. And then we would slowly bring them on board. Usually, they would start taking care of autologous patients, a certain subset of patients, and then move on to the more complicated patients. We did the same clinic, whether they were clinic or inpatient APPs. So, it took us about three to four months to onboard our APPs. In terms of a fellow becoming an attending physician, I'd like to say that there's specific onboarding there. Unfortunately, sometimes they're just, ‘Okay, these are your clinic days, this is when you start.' I mean, you're right Todd, we really need to work more on onboarding people. So, that one, they like their jobs, they're not frustrated, and they want to stay and continue to work in this field. I see many times after two or three years, if they're not onboarded properly, they just get frustrated and want to move on to a different area. Wendy Vogel: We know that most of the advanced practitioners who come into oncology don't have an oncology background, PA or NP.  They just don't, and we don't get a lot of that in school. So, it takes months, it would probably, I dare say, take 12 months of full-time practice to feel comfortable in the role. But how many practices particularly in the area that I've practiced in you get this AP, and you throw them in there, and in four weeks, you're supposed to be seeing patients. How can you make those decisions when you haven't been properly mentored? So, absolutely important to have a long onboarding time till that APP feels comfortable. Todd Pickard: Yeah, I think that it is critically important that we set up all of our team members for success, whether they be physicians, or PAs, or nurse practitioners or nurses, or pharmacists, and I think that is the role of onboarding and mentoring, having people who will invest time and energy in what you're trying to accomplish. You know, Wendy is spot on. Advanced practice providers have specific types of training within their educational program. As a PA, my focus in oncology was to screen for and detect it. So, to understand when a patient presents with a mass or some symptoms that may make you think that, oh gosh, maybe they've got acute leukemia or something else and looking at those white counts and, and understanding. But that transition from identifying and screening and diagnosing cancers is very different than how do you care for specific types of tumors and specific disciplines, whether it be radiation oncology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, cancer prevention. There's a lot that folks need to be brought up to speed about the standards of what do we do in this practice and how do we care for these types of cancers? And that really is the role for the onboarding and mentoring. You know, you may be lucky, you might get an advanced practice provider who used to work at a big academic cancer center in the same field, whether it be breast medical oncology or GI, and yeah, that's a much easier task. That person probably really needs mentoring about the local culture, how we get things done, what are the resources, and which hospitals do we refer to. But for the most part, working with an advanced practice provider means that you've got a PA or an NP, who has a strong foundation in medical practice. They know how to care for patients, they know how to diagnose, they know how to do assessments, they know how to critically think, they know how to find resources, and they know how to educate. But they may not know how long does a robotic radical prostatectomy patient going to be in the hospital? And how long does it take to recover and what are some of the things you need to be considering in  their discharge and their postoperative period? That is very detailed information about the practice and the local resources. Every advanced practice provider is going to need to have that kind of details shared with them through mentorship, and a lot of it is just how do we team with each other? What are the roles and responsibilities? Who does what? How do we have backup behaviors to cover folks? So, a lot of this really is just deciding, ‘Okay, we've got a team. Who's doing what? How do they work together and how do we back each other up?' Because at the end of the day, it's all about the team supporting each other and that's what I love about advanced practice. Wendy Vogel: Very well said, yes. I had an AP student yesterday in clinic, who told me - I was asking about her education in oncology and what she got - and she said, ‘Well, so for lymphoma, we treat with R-CHOP. So, a student, of course, raised their hand and said, ‘What's R-CHOP? She's like, ‘Well, the letters don't really line up with what the names of the drugs are, so, just remember R-CHOP for the boards.' So there you go. That's kind of what a lot of our education was like specific to oncology. And again, I'm a little tongue in cheek there also. But Todd, are you going to tell everybody about the ASCO Onboarding tool that's now available? Todd Pickard: Absolutely! ASCO has done a really great job of trying to explore what advanced practice is, and how teams work together. All of us are part of the ASCO Advanced Practice Task Force. One of the things we did was really to look at what are some best practices around onboarding, orientation, scope of practice, and team-based cancer care, and we created a resource that is available on the ASCO website, and I think that it is a great place to start, particularly for practices, physicians, or other hospital systems that don't have a lot of experience with advanced practice. It's a  great reference, it talks about the difference between orientation and onboarding. It gives you examples of what those look like. It talks about what are the competencies and competency-based examinations. So, how you assess people as they're going through the onboarding period. It has tons of references, because ASCO has done a lot of great research in this field, around collaborative practice and how patients experience it, and how folks work on teams, and what do those outcomes look like. So, I highly recommend it. Wendy, thank you for bringing that up. It's almost like you knew to suggest that. Well, this has been a really, really good conversation. I'm wondering, what are some of those pearls of wisdom that we could all provide to the folks listening? So, Stephanie, what are some of your observations that, you know, maybe we haven't just thought about, in your experience working as a physician with advanced practice providers? Dr. Stephanie Williams: One, it's important to integrate them into the team, and, as Wendy mentioned, to mentor them – mentor anybody correctly, in order for them to feel that they're contributing the most that they can to the care of the patient. I think there are other issues that we'll get into later and in different podcasts that come up that make physicians hesitant to have nurse practitioners or physician assistants. Some of those are financial, and I think we'll discuss those at a later time. But really, that shouldn't keep you from employing these particular individuals for your team. It really is a very rewarding type of practice to have. You're not alone. You're collaborating with other providers. I think it's just one of the great things that we do in oncology. Todd Pickard: I wanted to share a moment as a PA, advanced practice provider, when I most felt grateful for the opportunity to work as an advanced practice provider. My clinical practice has been in urology for the past 24 years for the main part. I've had a few little other experiences, but mainly urology, and I'll never forget a patient who was a middle-aged lady who had been working with transitional cell bladder cancer. It was superficial. So, the treatment for that is BCG and repeat cystoscopies and surveillance. And I walked into the room and I was going to give her BCG installation, and she was so angry. I wanted to know what was going on. I thought, gosh, should I make her wait too long or something else? So, I asked her, I said, ‘How are you doing today? You seem to be not feeling well.' And she said, ‘Well, I'm just so tired of this. I don't understand why y'all don't just fix me. Why don't y'all just get this right? Why do I have to keep coming back?' And as I looked at the medical record, this patient had had superficial bladder cancer for years. And I thought, ‘Has nobody ever really kind of sat down and mapped this out for her?' So, I asked her to get off the examining table, and I pulled the little paper forward, so I had someplace to draw. And I drew a big square and I said, ‘This is a field, just think of any big field anywhere near you. And it's full of weeds.' And I drew some weeds on there. And I said, ‘You know we can pull them out and we can pluck them, and we can put some weed killer in that field,' I said,  ‘do you think that if you come back in three months and there will be any weeds on that field?' She said, ‘Of course, there will be. There are always weeds because they always come back. It's very hard to get rid of.' And I said, ‘Well, this field is your bladder. And the type of cancer you have are like these weeds, and we have to constantly look for them, remove them, and then put this treatment down, that's why you come.' And she started crying. And I thought, ‘Well, I've blown it.' Because this was in the first couple of years of working as a PA in urology. And I said, ‘I'm so sorry. I really apologize.' She said, ‘Don't you dare apologize to me.' I said, ‘Man, I've really blown it now.' She said, ‘Todd, I've had this disease now for this many years. This is the first time I've ever fully understood what's happening to me. I am so grateful to you.' I will never forget this patient. I will never forget this experience. And I'm extraordinarily proud. It's not because I'm the smartest person in the world. I just happened to investigate, take the time, and I drew it out. I explained it in the simplest of terms because I wanted her to understand. And then whenever she came back, she always wanted to see me. So, it was great. I really developed a really lovely relationship with this patient. It was very rewarding. Wendy, can you think of a story that you have about an advanced practice provider that makes you particularly happy or where some big lesson was learned? Wendy Vogel: Yeah. I love your analogy. That's a great analogy. I think that part of what I love to do is similar to you, Todd, in that I like to make things understandable because I consider myself an East Tennessee southern simple person, I want to understand things in the language that I understand. So, I like using a language that a patient understands. I think if I was to say about some of the proudest things, or what makes me so excited about oncology is what we've seen in our lifetime. So, Todd, you and I practice probably about the same number of years and we could say we remember when Zofran came out, and how that revolutionized chemotherapy nausea and vomiting – Stephanie's nodding here, too. We all know that. And then wow! When we found out that we could maybe cure CML, that we're having patients live normal lives in our lifetime, that we've seen non-small cell lung cancer patients living past a year that are metastatic – Oh my gosh! This is such an exciting field and we learn something every day. There's new drugs, there's new treatments, there's new hope, every single day, and that's what makes me proud to be a part of that. Todd Pickard: Yeah, I think that oncology and the work that we get to do as a team is so incredibly rewarding. It's challenging, and we have losses, but we also have wins, and those wins are amazing, and transformative, not only for us but for our patients. So, some final pearls of wisdom. I'll share and then Wendy, I'll turn it over to you. One thing that I really want to convey to folks is to know about the state that you work in and what are the practice acts for advanced practice providers. Because, unlike our physician colleagues who have a very standard scope of practice across the country, advanced practice can drastically change from state to state and place to place even from institution to institution. So, be aware of that, so that you can build your team-based practice around what are the constraints, what is the scope of practice, and you can comply with that. It just takes a little bit of pre-work at the beginning. It's not daunting. These things are written in English. We're all smart folks. We can understand them and we can build our teams in the right way. So, just keep that in the back of their mind. It is not an obstacle. It's the instruction manual of how to build your team. That's all it is if you just think about it simplistically like that. So, Wendy, what's one or two things that you would say you really want our listeners to understand about advanced practice? Wendy Vogel: I loved what you said, Todd, both of our PA Associations and our Nurse Practitioner Associations have that information online, so it's very easy to find. But I think I would say, don't be afraid to stand up for yourself as an advanced practitioner or as a physician who wants an advanced practitioner. Don't be afraid to stand up for yourself and your scope of practice, know what you can do, know what you can't do, know and demand the respect that you deserve. I would always say that just don't forget that ‘no' is the first step to a ‘yes,' and keep on trying. Todd Pickard: I think we can all appreciate that sentiment, whether we be a PA an NP or a physician. Many times, we're advocating for our patients within our systems or our practices or with our payers or insurance providers. And yeah, sometimes you start from a place of ‘no' and then you work until you get to that ‘yes', or at least a compromise, if you can get to a 'maybe,' that's a good place too. Stephanie, any particular last words of wisdom or wrap us up with our conclusion? Dr. Stephanie Williams: Thanks, Todd and Wendy, for sharing your insights today. It's always a pleasure chatting with you both. Stay tuned for upcoming episodes where we plan to dig deeper into the various types of APPs, how they are trained, what a day in the life looks like for an oncology APP, their scope of practice, and the importance of team-based care, especially in oncology. Thank you to the listeners as well. Until next time. Thank you for listening to the ASCO Education Podcast. To stay up to date with the latest episodes, please click subscribe. Let us know what you think by leaving a review. For more information, visit the comprehensive education center at education.asco.org.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product , service, organization, activity or therapy should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.  

We Go There Podcast
S5 | E49 Unlocking Your Sexual Superpowers with Dr. Stephen de Wit

We Go There Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 57:53


Dr. Stephen de Wit is a Board Certified Sexologist through the American College of Sexologists. He holds a Masters of Public Health in Human Sexuality and a Doctorate of Human Sexuality. Stephen travels internationally speaking about sexual empowerment and will show you how to inject more freedom and fun into your sex life so you can enjoy more pleasure, connection, and excitement.    Nikki, Lexi and Stephen are talking about the unfiltered truth of sexuality. We chat about embracing your sexual desires, ensuring your partner is on the same page, and how to start your journey to a better sex life. Buckle up ‘cause the ride is going to get fun!   What We're Chatting About: Tell us about your day to day as a Board Certified Sexologist. What made you get into this field? Why are you so passionate? How can women feel empowered sexually? Is it ever “too late” to transform your sex life? How do you start? How do we build a foundation for a great sex life? How do you think society views sex positive women? What sex advice do you have for all women listening? Show Notes:  Here is the sex menu we discuss! For more of Dr. Stephen de Wit, please visit instagram.com/drdewit on Instagram sexlifeunleashed.com on the Web   For more of We Go There Podcast, please visit instagram.com/wegotherepodcast on Instagram wegotherepodcast.com on the Web *Warning- this podcast is completely unfiltered. If you are around young children, we suggest headphones.*

The My Future Business™ Show

Leadership Lessons from An Illiterate Mom Interview with lecturer, author and former executive Dr. Majed Yaghi #Leadership #Author #MajedYaghi Hi, and welcome to the show! On today's show I have the pleasure of welcoming marketing lecturer and established author Dr. Majed Yaghi to talk about B2B Marketing, Professional Selling, and how the lesson's he's learnt along the way, can help you build a better, more productive and more profitable business. Recently, Dr. Yaghi retired from a 32-year corporate career that saw him working four of the largest consumer brands in the world, including Shick Razors, Gillette, Kimberly-Clark and Coca-Cola. Dr. Yaghi spent the lion's share of his career at Coca-Cola before retiring as Vice President Global Accounts. Dr. Yahgi holds a Doctorate degree in Organizational Leadership and wrote a thesis titled “The Influence of Toxic Leadership on Employee Commitment and Mediating Role of Organizational Culture”. This work led Dr. Yaghi to teaching B2B Marketing and Professional Selling at the University of North Texas. Dr. Yaghi is also an established and influential author with his first book “Leadership Lessons from An Illiterate Mom” which is a guide to developing great leadership; along with his second book, called “The Toxic Trigon” which outlines the dangers of toxic leaders and destructive environments they create. To learn more about the topics discussed, or to contact Dr. Yaghi directly, click the link below. Disclosure of Material Connection: This is a “sponsored post.” My Future Business is disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”