Podcasts about state fairs

  • 1,210PODCASTS
  • 2,580EPISODES
  • 37mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Dec 2, 2022LATEST
state fairs

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about state fairs

Show all podcasts related to state fairs

Latest podcast episodes about state fairs

Moose Tracks
Iowa State Fair Controversy

Moose Tracks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2022 8:45


- First World Friday! - Hike CHECK! - CONTROVERSY at the Iowa State Fair

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire
11/23 5-2 State Fair Freak Show

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2022 22:00


Good people watching.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Adam and Jordana
Jerry Hammer from the State Fair and our gameshow with Rod Irons

Adam and Jordana

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 33:15


11-22 Adam and Jordana 11a hour 

The Mix Chicago Flash Briefings
Dancing With The Stars Winner, Illinois State Fair, Worst Holiday Travel Times

The Mix Chicago Flash Briefings

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 0:52


Tik Tok star Charli D'Amelio is your new Dancing With The Stars season 31 champion. Now through December 31st you can save 30 dollars off Mega and Jumbo Passes at the Illinois State Fair. Your worst travel times over the next 3 days are late morning to late afternoon.

Chad Hartman
If you could change one thing about the State Fair, what would it be?

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 8:34


Don't let Chad fool you, he LOVES the Minnesota State Fair. But if he had to change one thing about it, what would it be? What would you change?

Chad Hartman
Cory Hepola, State Fair changes & Covid

Chad Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2022 32:23


Friend and former coworker Cory Hepola joins at the top of the hour to talk about his run for Governor and what he hopes is coming up next in his life. Later, we discuss the one change we would make to the Minnesota State Fair before Chad wraps up the hour with a couple topics related to Covid-19.

Page Living
The Thanksgiving Pie Episode

Page Living

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 21, 2022 37:36


In today's episode, we are focusing on one thing and one thing only: PIES! More specifically, how to make the ultimate pie crust. Because,  if you're anything like me, pie making seems to have a  magical quality, like it's a special talent doled out to a select few in the family who have mastered the art of pie making.I, admittedly, would LOVE to be one of those people. In the spirit of fully exploring our pie crust recipe options, I could not take one magazine's promise of perfection alone.  Referencing the pages of Food and Wine, Sunset Magazine, Martha Stewart Living, Better Homes and Gardens, Cooks Illustrated, Bon Appetit, Taste of Home, Epicurious, and the Pioneer Woman, today's episode is the ultimate education in making perfect, flaky pie crust. So today, friends, we become pie bakers together by exploring time-tested pie crusts curated from the pages of our beloved magazines. In the end, the goal is to land on the pie dough for the pie that we will proudly and triumphantly lay on the Thanksgiving buffet -just right of the green bean casserole and just below the cranberry relish. Friends and family may swoon. And we may even have an entry for the State Fair. Goals! Joining me today is the one, the only, the pie champion of all time for our family … my mom!This is the Page Living Podcast. We are grateful for YOU. And YOU are welcome here. 

This Is Texas Wine
Glena Yates, President of the Texas Wine & Grape Growers Association

This Is Texas Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2022 52:49


Connect with the Podcast: Facebook: @texaswinepod Instagram: @texaswinepod Twitter: @texaswinepod Email: texaswinepod@gmail.com Help the Show: Buy Shelly a Glass of Wine! Subscribe to the newsletter to get the Texas wine crossword puzzle!  Mentioned in this Episode ‘Tis the season to Drink It All In! at the 2022 Christmas Wine Affair! November 28th through December 23rd, you can sip your way through over 35 unique Texas Hill Country Wineries, sample award-winning wines at up to four wineries per day, and receive exclusive discounts on bottle purchases! Buy your passport ticket to The Christmas Wine Affair at www.texaswinetrail.com and Head for the Hills - November 28th through December 23rd. Hey podcast listeners,The State Fair of Texas has wrapped up for the year, but the fair's curated list of sixteen award winning Blue Ribbon wines representing twelve Texas wineries are now available on Sommly! These wines were hand-selected by yours truly as a representation of the highest quality wines that Texas has to offer. For a limited time, you can support local businesses and bring the Texas winery experience to your doorstep.Delivery is set to align with Christmas, so wine lovers can share a bottle of award-winning Texas wine that pairs perfectly with holiday dinner parties or to give as gifts. Bundles are perfect for that wine-lover in your life, and with bottle counts of 3, 6, or 12, there's one for every budget.Check out the “Buy Wine” section on sommly.com to see all of the bundles that are available.In Texas Wine News 1. Halter Ranch Winery from Paso Robles is Opening a Tasting Room in Fredericksburg 2. Charitable Wines for Thanksgiving and Beyond: Messina Hof - The Museum Collection William Chris Wine Co - Wanderer Series: Relief Project Kerrville Hills Winery - Conservino Wines 3. William Chris Vineyards named to World's Best Vineyards List 4. Celebrate Beaujolais Nouveau Day with Lewis Wines 5. December 10 is the final deadline for ordering Blue Ribbon Wine bundles or cases from Sommly.com 6. Save the date for the 1st podcast happy hour! Tuesday, November 29 at 6 p.m. Interview Glena Yates, President of Texas Wine & Grape Growers Association (TWGGA) Special Thanks Thanks to Texas Wine Lover for promotional help! For the latest information on Texas wineries and vineyards, visit Texas Wine Lover Wine & Food FoundationI'm so happy to be part of the community of wine and food lovers at The Wine & Food Foundation! Get more information about upcoming events, the IMBIBE: The WFF Education Series, and find membership options here. Need lodging in Fredericksburg? Check out my home Cork + Cactus!Find Cork + Cactus and many more great rentals at Heavenly Hosts.com!

The Magic Guys
State Fair of Louisiana Debrief! #98

The Magic Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2022 63:10


This week Doug chats about the ups and downs of spending 3 weeks in Louisiana for the state fair plus recent gig stories from Josh. Meanwhile Jason is somewhere floating in the ocean. Checkout Our Merch Store! The Podcast where Professional Magicians, Josh Norbido, Doug Conn & Jason Maher take on the important questions of life (Mainly from our youtube subscribers) and deliver answers from a Magicians point of view. Come hang out with us while we chat about our lives as Magicians and the ups and downs that go with it.   Follow the show on social media: Facebook Page Instagram Youtube   Or You Can Follow Josh Norbido Directly Here Instagram Facebook Website Youtube   Or You Can Follow Jason Maher Directly Here Instagram Facebook Website Youtube   Or You Can Even Follow Doug Conn Directly Here Instagram Facebook Website Youtube

Who The Folk?! Podcast
Shahar Cohen

Who The Folk?! Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 13, 2022 18:42


This week we talk with Shahar Cohen the schlicha -- emissary -- working for the St. Pual Jewish Federation. We talk about what got her interested in this opportunity, some of the programming she has planned, and her State Fair experience, on this week's Who The Folk?! Podcast.

Choke On My Artichoke
State Fair Lemons | Week 9 Recap and Week 10 Preview, + Yellow Draft

Choke On My Artichoke

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 44:18


Texas Brave and Strong Podcast
High Society Comes to Texas

Texas Brave and Strong Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2022 9:44


High Society comes to Texas, 1898 In February of 1892, The New York Times published its official list of the creme de la creme of New York Society— 400 individuals, a mix of “Nobs”— old money families such as the Astors and “Swells”—the nouveau riche including the Vanderbilts. It was the Guilded Age in New York and the city's influence helped city directories become popular across the country. In 1890, the Census had revealed that Dallas was the most populous city in Texas with 38,067 residents. It was followed in size by Galveston with 29,084 residents and Houston with a population of 27,557. Texas' largest city caught the attention of Holland Brothers Publishing, a company looking to expand its market in high society lists of major cities. Dallas seemed ripe for its own list of who's who in society and Voila! the Red Book of Dallas, Texas was born. The volume had the distinction of being the first Red Book published in Texas. And of course, the book's cover was red. One can only imagine the buzz this created in the city. To fill the book's 137 pages, in what was still somewhat of a frontier town, Holland Brothers Publishing needed lots of filler content. But let's start with the preface from the publisher. “In presenting the [Red Book] to the public, the publishers feel they have supplied a decided need of an important element of the community. To facilitate the requirements of social life and place persons in direct communication with the representatives of the different phases of the best local society, this directory is intended. It is here also that new residents of this city may find the names of any and all persons whom they may desire to include in their visiting list, and whom they wish to meet in any social way.” The small volume contained a high society list of 3,245 adults and children from Dallas, supplemented by 333 from Oak Cliff. If the household had a designated day for accepting in-person visits (or calls, the proper term), that was noted. Also included were the membership lists of eight local clubs, four for gentlemen and four clubs for ladies. Based on the Red Book, Dallas in the late 1800s appears to be a “clubby” city. The Dallas Club for gentlemen was by far the largest and owned its own building—a handsome four story, brick and stone structure completed in 1888 for $45,000 and located at the corner of Commerce and Poydras Streets. The Dallas Club was central to the activities of business, civic, and professional men of the city: however, ladies were allowed for special receptions and parties for visiting dignitaries. The Idlewild Club was a much smaller men's club — about three dozen members— founded with the purpose of giving four grand balls each season, beginning with a ball during the State Fair of Texas. It's hard to imagine that the wives of these men didn't provide input for the planning of these events, whether they were asked to or not. The Ladies' Shakespeare Club, founded in1855, was for the sole purpose of studying Shakespeare's plays. Membership was limited to 45 members. The thirty-two member Ladies Pierian Chatauqua Club reported its object was mutual improvement of its members, the social aspects were a side issue. Apparently a serious literary group. Not to be outdone, The twenty-one member Quaero Club adopted as its course of study “A new method for the study of English literature, which included reading current literature and a weekly review by critics. Two other ladies' clubs, the Standard Club and CLMA club, also existed to study literature. The Phoenix Club for Jewish gentleman was for the mutual benefit and mental, moral, and social advancement for its members and had sixty-five members. The Social Ethics Club was open to any unmarried gentleman over the age of twenty-one and its purpose was to promote the social, musical...

The Big Show Hosted By Brad Hanewich
#215 :: Jeff Miller :: Cutler, Indiana :: Cell: (765) 414-4547 :: 2 Time Breeder Of Indiana State Fair Grand Steer :: Breeder Of “Almost Famous”

The Big Show Hosted By Brad Hanewich

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2022 15:09


North American International Livestock Expo Podcast Topics Discussed: -Lloyd Stone -Perry Vance NAILE Story -$59,000 “Almost Famous” A.I. Sire -Wilcox Family Indiana State Fair Grand Steers in 2012 & 2014 Raised By Jeff Miller -Kai McKinney!!

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology
People Like Us: What it Means to be an Outsider in Oncology

Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2022 30:07


Listen to ASCO's Journal of Clinical Oncology essay, "People Like Us," by Dr. Stephanie Graff. The essay is followed by an interview with Graff and host Dr. Lidia Schapira. Graff reflects on her life experience as a female physician, farmer's daughter, mother, and pie connoisseur to connect and help her patients get through a life-altering diagnosis. TRANSCRIPT Narrator: People Like Us, by Stephanie Graff, MD (10.1200/JCO.22.01835)   I was standing in the dining room on the 15-year-old burnt sienna carpet, so heinous that it could have only been chosen because it was on sale. I remember the afternoon light from the western windows falling across the oak dining table which matched my mother's brusque, wooden tone. She remembers nothing. She does not remember saying the words that I have so often replayed, pondered. I was stung by the interaction in a way that rendered me speechless, in a way I now recognize too often in my approach to conflict in adulthood: silence assumed to represent understanding, consent, or complicity.   Weeks earlier, this same woman drove all over our small town hoping to catch the mailman before driving to my track and field meet 30 miles away. I was waiting for word from the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC) School of Medicine, and I think my mom was as anxious to hear as I was. Conveniently, her brother (my uncle) was our mailman. When she arrived at the track meet, she handed me the large envelope proudly bearing the school's logo in the return address. I tore it open sitting with my boyfriend on the bleachers, seeing my prayers answered in black and white before my eyes. There is a photograph of this moment, so I can describe perfectly what I am wearing: my royal blue and white track uniform, my sprinters spikes and—I am sorry to tell you—a neon green hair scrunchy. This photograph also proves, in that instant, my mother understood that what was unfolding was a milestone moment in my life. I remember asking her later when I discovered she tracked the mailman around town to get the mail what she would have done if I had not been accepted. She replied that she knew I had gotten in from the size of the envelope, so she never had to think about it. I like to imagine my mom also had faith in me that led to the wild goose chase for the mailman, even before she saw the envelope.   Within the envelope, in addition to the acceptance letter and glossy brochure telling me all about my wonderful new life as a UMKC medical student, was a parental consent form. The 6-year combined BA/MD program at UMKC was far from inexpensive, and, as a minor, I would need my parents to sign this letter stating that they agreed that we would pay the tuition. Of course, by we what was really meant was I would be taking out student loans to cover every single cent of tuition, room, and board. But the letter, with a DUE BY date ticking ever closer, had been sitting on our dining room table since the day the acceptance arrived, unsigned. My father signed things like this. Never my mother. My mother would not even broach the subject with him. Nice families in rural Missouri just do not talk about money or politics. So, there it sat, a white paper elephant in the room.   “Mom, when is dad going to sign my acceptance letter? The deadline is soon, and we still have to mail it back,” I pleaded with her that afternoon. She turned to look at me, en route from the dining room to the kitchen and said, “Stephanie, people like us don't go to medical school.” People like us? Who is this us? Women? Mid-Missouri farmers? People from small towns? Our family specifically? Poor people? I may forever regret not asking. I may forever regret that moment of stunned silence where I only wondered if she had just said no to my dream and considered my next move very carefully so as to not make it worse or potentially close a door forever. By the time I asked her, years later, what she meant in that moment, my mother had no memory of saying it to me. This innocuous phrase, “people like us” that haunted me for most of medical school.   Eventually, of course, my father signed it. Only a day or two before the deadline as my memory recalls. He sat me down and told me it was a lot of money and asked me if I was serious about this whole doctor thing. I assured him that the one and only thing I had ever wanted to be had not changed in 10 years, after a short-lived dream of being a country western singer and that it was unlikely to change now. Then, he had signed the consent, which I had taken immediately to the post office before anyone could change their mind.   Yet, those words kept bubbling up. When I struggled with a test or subject, I wondered if people like us always had a hard time with organic chemistry or neuroanatomy. When my classmates talked about their exotic travels to tropical getaways or international hotspots, I sheepishly admitted people like us do not travel much. When patients assumed the female medical student was a nursing student rather than a medical student, I assumed that was just what happens to people like us. When I mispronounced something or exposed my total ignorance into the broader process of step examinations, residency, the road to physicianhood, I figured it was just the sort of thing people like us cannot help.   Then one day, a patient newly diagnosed with melanoma shared with me that he was worried about how treatment would interfere with farming. “Well, what kind of farming are we talking about?” I probed. He raised cattle, had some corn and hay fields. “Oh really? What breed? How many head?” We fell into the easy talk of farm life, and he shared his current toils of repairing his tractor. When he left, his wife pulled me aside and confided, “It really is nice to know that his doctor is one of them.” When I start to write a prescription, I often stop to think about the cost, about how $20 US dollars is a big deal to people like us, and I talk to patients about what is financially possible, what help they need, what resources we have. One of my breast cancer survivors always framed her chronic lymphedema symptoms in terms of how much or how little it held her back from baking pies. We shared recipes of her grand champion state fair pies and my mom's own grand champion pecan pie. I could understand the flurry of activity and pressure to bring your freshest, most beautiful pies to the fair because I shared that lived experience. Patients like this, one by one, started me thinking that maybe more people like us should be in medical school. I know the statistics for my own field of medical oncology, and few oncologists practice in rural areas, despite the community needs. I have no statistics for how many of my colleagues grew up farming or preparing for state fairs every summer. But, I have answered phone calls from my mom, asking advice about what aspects of farming are safe when you are neutropenic or how best to plan Moh's surgery around harvest. People like us are necessary to fill those gaps.   As a woman in medicine, numerous women have reached out to me to ask me questions about the duality of medicine and mothering or the intersection of work and sex. My emails, text messages, and social media feeds are filled with threads on breastfeeding at work, daycare solutions, unique challenges in leadership for women, and advice on career growth. These conversations ring with the chorus of someone like me as we connect over similarities. My mom recognizes this version of like me as well, handing out my phone number to women in the intervening years from my hometown applying to my alma mater or medicine in general. If community and connection with other women improves career experience for women in oncology, I am glad there are people like us.   And as much as I see a need in medicine for people like me, I also see all the ways I represent privilege—which of course means that there is ample space in medicine for people not like me. If the numbers of rural or female oncologists are low, the numbers of Hispanic/Latino, Black/ African American oncologists are startling. How can we collectively provide culturally and linguistically competent care if our workforce does not share the same diversity as our patients?   So, mom, 25 years later, I think we have both grown to understand medical schools need people like us, people like all of us. I think you have felt that as much as I have over the years in your own connections with doctors caring for members of our family or in the health questions you save for me. When I sit with a patient as their doctor, I am also there as a woman, farmer's daughter, mother, writer, baker of pies, and so much more. Each time one of these versions of me creates connection with a patient or colleague, my care improves. Each of our unique gifts and experiences help us connect with our patients in ways both big and small. Medicine needs people like us.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: Hello, and welcome to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, brought to you by ASCO Podcasts, which covers a range of educational and scientific content, and offers enriching insight into the world of cancer care. You can find all ASCO shows, including this one at: podcasts.asco.org.   I'm your host, Lidia Schapira, Associate Editor for Art of Oncology, and Professor of Medicine at Stanford University. Today, we are joined by Dr. Stephanie Graff, Director of Breast Oncology at Lifespan Cancer Institute, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Legorreta Cancer Center, at Brown University. In this episode, we will be discussing her Art of Oncology article, 'People Like Us.'   Our guest's disclosures will be linked in the transcript.   Stephanie, welcome to our podcast and thank you for joining us.   Dr. Stephanie Graff: Thanks so much for having me.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: It is our pleasure. So, I like to start the show by asking our authors what they are currently reading and would recommend to listeners.   Dr. Stephanie Graff: I am currently reading The Power Broker, which is kind of a funny book to be reading. It's obviously an older book, and it's the story of Robert Moses who famously, or infamously, perhaps, built New York City, and sort of wrote the power structure of city government or state government and politics in New York, and it's written by Caro and is a Pulitzer Prize winner, and I just have never read it. It's quite the tome, so it's hard to power through, but it's excellently well-written, and really insightful into political culture and the history of New York. So, I'm finally working my way through it. I'm not sure that I would recommend it for the average reader. I just finished The Sentence, by Louise Erdrich, and, Unlikely Animals, by Hartnett, and both were delightful reads.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: You are a gifted storyteller. I wonder if you could tell our listeners and share with us a little bit about your process and when you write, how you write, and what inspires you to write.   Dr. Stephanie Graff: When I write and how I write, I think the answer is, all the time. You and I may have talked about this before. I feel like writing is often how I decompress, and I find that I'm often writing in my head all the time. So, when I'm walking my dog, when I'm driving my car, when I have downtime, I'm sometimes turning over ideas or events and looking for the thread or the storyline there. I write poetry, actually mostly for myself as my form of journaling, or meditation, or rage, or sadness, whatever it is I might be feeling. And sometimes that then turns into something narrative, and that's a habit that I've had for a very long time, even as early as middle school and high school, it was a habit that I've always had. In terms of then turning that into something narrative or publishable, I think that that's more of an ‘aha' moment where an idea that I've been turning over for a while finally feels like there's a unifying theme, or thread, or a particular patient encounter, or a funny thing that one of my children said inspires it to become this sort of 360 moment that makes it feel more like thematic story that can be told.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, given your expertise with stories, and your appreciation of literature, and the fact that you've now lived in the world of Oncology for quite a while, what is your opinion of the role of stories and narratives in our culture and our approach to training others, and sort of sustaining that sense of vocation I think that drove us all to choose a specialty in the first place.   Dr. Stephanie Graff: Yeah. I think that story is so important for how we relate to one another, and how we relate to our patients because I think that, you know, if we're just talking to patients about a phase III randomized clinical trial and throwing at a patient a bunch of statistics, or metrics, or guidelines, it's not digestible, or understandable, or relatable. And so, being able to talk about what we do at the story is what makes that understandable, memorable, digestible for patients, but also for our colleagues, and our students, and residents, and fellows, staff, everyone that we interact with in our day-to-day experience. And so, I think that really thinking about The Art of Oncology, the practice of what we do day-to-day as parables, and stories, and looking for ways to turn that science, that data into little anecdotes is really so central to understanding.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: Let's talk about the story that you so beautifully wrote, ‘People Like Us'. Thank you for sharing that and sending it out to the world. I assume this is something that you've been thinking about for decades, and I, since you don't look like a teenager waiting for mom and dad's approval to go to med school. You know a good story, Stephanie, I'm sure you agree, allows the reader to project into, and imagine things. And there were two big themes for me, and one of them had to do with the mother-daughter relationship. So, can you talk a little bit and share with us a little bit about that aspect of the story of the words that your mother said at a very tender age that sort of stuck with you and kept on giving?   Dr. Stephanie Graff: So, for those listening, the story is that my mom said to me after I had been accepted to medical school and was kind of waiting for my parents to sign the acceptance letter, I went to the University of Missouri, Kansas City six-year program, so I got accepted to medical school, straight out of high school. And because I was 17, they had to sign this parental consent in order for me to actually start. And so, this letter was like sitting like the elephant in the room on my dining room table for, I don't know, two weeks or something, waiting for them to sign it. And my mom one day, in a moment, that to her was, I mean, she doesn't remember it.   So, like to her clearly, it was like this nothing-passing comment, like, you know, "Pick up your shoes." She said “People like us don't go to medical school.”   And at the time, I was so struck by it, but I have no idea who this "us" was that she was referencing. And I have spent decades wondering, in retrospect, "Oh, why didn't I ask questions?" You know, my mom actually was this amazing hero to me in my childhood. You know, she was a Girl Scout leader, and I got my Girl Scout Gold Award, she created all these opportunities for leadership and engagement in my community. She taught Sunday school. She graduated high school but just has a high school degree. She never went to college herself, because she was actually told by her parents that girls don't go to college, that girls get married and stay home. And so, though she wanted to go to college, her parents closed that door for her, and so she worked a factory job to earn extra money to help support the things that my siblings and I all wanted to do that, you know, kids' activities get pricey. Eventually, the factory job was physically demanding on her as she aged, and she ended up applying to become a paraprofessional in the schools, and so spent the second half of my childhood working as a para in our schools, which actually also ended up being a very physically demanding job. But really all kind of just out of determination and passion to create opportunities for us as children. So, in no way is this story meant to be a shot at my mom. She's been a really, really great mom. And again, she has no memory of saying this thing to me that has stuck with me so harshly, perhaps over the last several decades. But she said it, and at the time I was kind of like, "What does she mean by this?" I mean, obviously, I already had a lot of doubt about whether or not medical school was going to be right for me or if I was gonna fit in there, and for her to say that, I was kind of like, "Oh gosh, maybe people like me don't go to medical school." And then as I entered medical school, medical school was hard. It was hard as an 18-year-old. I struggled in classes, there were lots of moments where my peers were just more worldly than me. They had traveled, they came from backgrounds where most of their parents-- I had so many classmates whose parents were both physicians, and so they didn't struggle with the language of Medicine, the career paths of Medicine in the same way that I did. You know, my mom's words just kept coming back - people like us don't go to medical school. It was something that just sort of kept coming up over my career.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: So, who are those "People Like Us"? Have you figured it out? I certainly enjoyed reading all of the possible spins of People Like Us - people who come from farm backgrounds, people who aren't rich and worldly, perhaps women. Who are these "People Like Us?"   Dr. Stephanie Graff: Well, at the end of the day, I think all of us are People Like Us because you know, if anything I've learned in my last 20 years of this, is that everybody has those feelings of self-doubt, and feelings like, "we don't fit in." And hopefully, those are coupled with moments of feeling like you do belong, and hopefully, everybody has a network of belonging. But we're all periodically thrust into times where we don't feel like we fit in, and we don't feel like we belong. And there's so much that can be drawn from those moments. So, whether it's that you are from an underrepresented group, from your ethnic or cultural background, your socioeconomic background, your gender, your sexual identity, you know, no matter what that is, your parents' occupation, if you're the first person in your family to go to college, you are going to bring the tapestry to Medicine that helps us kind of richly relate to our patients in a way that's so cool. One of my favorite studies that I've seen in the scientific literature is actually not an Oncology study, it's a Cardiology study that looked at patients presenting to emergency departments with heart attacks, and it was a gender inclusion study. And what it looked at is in patients that have heart attacks in the emergency department, if the cardiologist caring for the patient is matched gender, like a man caring for a male heart attack patient, they have a better outcome. But if that cardiologist has a partner that is of the same gender, so like if the male cardiologist has female partners, their care of female heart attack patients improves, and that patient's cardiac mortality improves, which was so fascinating that like just having a greater exposure to female cardiologists helped male cardiologists provide better care to female patients. So, I do think that just gathering experiences of the people not like me, that surround me all day, help me relate better to my patients. There's certainly so many cultural celebrations, travel experiences, world celebrations, that I better understand through my classmates, peers, colleagues, friends, that I have encountered in Medicine, that help me connect and relate to my patients in ways that I previously didn't have access to. And there's ways that I'm sure me as a Midwestern farmer's daughter have helped my colleagues understand some of the things that our patients cope with.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: You make a brilliant case for diversity, and of course, for inclusion, which is something that everybody is really keenly trying to think more deeply about these days. And that brings me to another question or follow-up, and that is the role of empathy in communicating with people who are not like you. One of the most beautiful parts of your essay, I thought, was when you take us into the exam room with a patient, and you're actually giving us some examples of how your lived experiences as a farmer's daughter allowed you to connect with people who work the land, or who depend on the land or women who bake pies. Tell us a little bit about that - the role of the connection with a patient, and empathy, and compassion in helping us create a more welcoming environment, both for our colleagues and for our patients.   Dr. Stephanie Graff: I think everybody has had that experience before where a patient asks us, as their Oncologist, if while they're undergoing chemotherapy, undergoing radiation, if they're still going to be able to like [insert their passion here]. You know, as I reflect over my lifetime of patients, I've had patients who are professional poker players. I had a professional accordion player. I've had figure skaters. I've had everything, right? And I don't know the first thing about professional poker, okay, I would be a terrible professional poker player. But I could imagine what skills are needed to be a professional poker player and answer that question. But every once in a while, a patient asks me if they're still going to be able to do X, and whatever they fill in that blank is something that so deeply relates to my childhood experiences, that it becomes this bonding moment with my patient. So, some of the ones that I shared in the essay is a patient who spent every summer baking pies for the State Fair. For those of you who don't know, at the State Fair, you can enter your pies, cookies, baked goods, canned goods, decorated cakes, pretty much anything you can imagine, breads, and they're judged, and the winner gets ribbons - red, white and blue, and grand champion, and reserve grand champion that come with cash prizes, it's bragging rights. If you happen to also own like a bakery, or decorate wedding cakes, for example, that's something that's then marketing material, advertising material for your company that you're the Missouri Grand Champion of wedding cake decorating for 2022, or whatever it might be. So, this is a big deal, and people in my community talked about it and joked about it. And you would, at the church picnic when you're picking which pie, you know whose pie was the grand champion pie. So, she told me going into her chemotherapy, that it was really important to her that she could do the pies. We laughed, because my mom is the grand champion pecan pie baker for our county, and my mom makes a, pardon me, damn good pecan pie, I would say.  So, that patient and I spent a lot of time talking about how her pie baking was going. And I will say that the summer that she was on chemotherapy, she said that it was really fatiguing and hard for her. And so, that next year when it came time to pie season, she was really excited to tell me that like she entered two more pies than she had the prior year because she had that extra energy to like get up on the morning of the fair, and bake the extra pies, and spending all the extra time on making the crust beautiful. And I know what that's like because I've seen my mom get up at four o'clock in the morning to make a beautiful, perfect pie, and have it ready to enter at 8:00 AM when the fairgrounds open. That's so unique to perhaps rural Missouri, or the Midwest, or fair culture, and I guess probably not a lot of Medical Oncologists know what that's like. I had another patient who was, when I was still early in my career and was caring for things other than just breast cancer, who had a melanoma, and his wife asked me a lot of questions about how it was going to impact his farming. And we had this really lovely conversation about what kind of farming, and how many acres he had, and how many head of cattle, and what crops, and they were shocked at the depth of my knowledge about farming, and my ability to answer their questions in detail about what would be safe, and what would not be safe. And when they found out that it's because that's what I was raised doing, and that's what I did when I went home on weekends to visit my family, it was help out on the farm and do many of the same things that we were talking about. They saw me in this completely different light. Then they had seen me as this high-heeled wearing, white coat dawning Medical Oncologist, and it, I think helped them feel so much more comfortable in their cancer treatment, knowing that I understood where they were coming from.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: I have to ask you this question. Have you shared the essay with your mom?   Dr. Stephanie Graff: I have not shared it with her yet. I will when it comes out in print.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: What do you think her reaction will be?   Dr. Stephanie Graff: I think that she'll think it's lovely. We've had this conversation about how annoyed I am that she doesn't remember saying it, and how -- I guess it's weird because, you know, she said it and at times in my life I would say that it was hurtful that she said that people like us don't go to medical school, and that probably is the right language at different time points. I don't know that today I would describe it as a hurtful comment because I know what it was. It was just words that came out of her mouth whilst she was busy doing 100 other things, right? She doesn't remember it for a reason, which is that it wasn't a big commentary on me, or my life, or my choices. It was just words coming out of her mouth as she was going from one thing to another. So, I don't think that she'll find any hurt, or ill will in it at all.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: She may respond with a comment about what it's going to be like for you when you're in that situation with perhaps your children, and perhaps, at that point, make a comment that to you, may be forgettable, but makes a deep impression and a lasting impression in their young minds.   Dr. Stephanie Graff: That's actually something that I've spent a lot of time thinking about, both as I reflect on the comment, and, you know, at the very beginning of this, we talked about when I'm writing, and I said, always. I think about that comment a lot in the context of so much that I do - in my own parenting with my children, things that I say to them, and how those words might impact them. Things my husband says to them, and how those comments might affect them. But also, in the larger work of DEI, and how "jokes", or jabs, or sarcasm, things that aren't necessarily meant as true, can cut wrong. And that's why we have to be thoughtful, and careful because you never know who is listening, and how words are going to hit somebody on any given day.   Dr. Lidia Schapira: On that beautiful note, I want to thank you for sending us your work. Please continue to write, and I look forward to reading future stories, maybe even a poem, sometime. Until next time, thank you for listening to JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology. Don't forget to give us a rating, or review wherever you listen. Be sure to subscribe so you never miss an episode.   JCO's Cancer Stories: The Art of Oncology, is just one of ASCO's many podcasts. You can find all of the shows at: podcasts.asco.org.   The purpose of this podcast is to educate and to inform. This is not a substitute for professional medical care and is not intended for use in the diagnosis or treatment of individual conditions. Guests on this podcast express their own opinions, experience, and conclusions. Guest statements on the podcast do not express the opinions of ASCO. The mention of any product, service, organization, activity, or therapy, should not be construed as an ASCO endorsement.   Show Notes: Like, share and subscribe so you never miss an episode and leave a rating or review.   Bio: Dr. Stephanie Graff is the Director of Breast Oncology at Lifespan Cancer Institute, and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Legorreta Cancer Center, at Brown University.

Cigars Liquor And More
295 Texas State Fair Numbers with Kristoff Maduro First Call Cask

Cigars Liquor And More

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 75:31


They cover some information about the largest and longest state fair in the nation, the Texas State Fair. Yes, there is a focus on food. They smoke the Kristoff Maduro Robusto and drink some First Call Cask strength bourbon. They talk about rollers for a bit and their favorite cigar shapes. They talk about the 'Top O' the Hill Terrace' tea room, speakeasy, casino, and brothel, now Arlington Baptist University, as well.

9malls
State Fair Dollar Store Dollar Tree Corn Dogs Review

9malls

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2022 13:04


State Fair Dollar Store Dollar Tree Corn Dogs Review. Original audio from a live stream event.

The Daily Chirp
SVUSD recognizes effects of positive student behavior; Arizona State Fair ends with monster trucks; Remembering Elisa Castellano

The Daily Chirp

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 16:06


Today - Though the concept has been around for more than four decades, the effects of positive student behavior on a school's culture are showing up in a big way at Sierra Vista Unified School District.Support the show: https://www.myheraldreview.com/site/forms/subscription_services/See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts
Football Friday Paul Finebaum - Dems and Crime - Josh Woods Greater Gulf State Fair - Mobile Mornings - Friday 11-04-22

FM Talk 1065 Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 36:45


This Is Texas Wine
Lynne Majek: Making Big Waves in a Small Market

This Is Texas Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2022 51:26


Connect with the Podcast: Facebook: @texaswinepod Instagram: @texaswinepod Twitter: @texaswinepod Email: texaswinepod@gmail.com Help the Show: Buy Shelly a Glass of Wine! Subscribe to the newsletter to get the Texas wine crossword puzzle!  Mentioned in this Episode ‘Tis the season to drink it all in at the 2022 Christmas Wine Affair! November 28th through December 23rd, you can sip your way through over thirty-five unique Texas Hill Country Wineries, sample award-winning wines at up to four wineries per day, and receive exclusive discounts on bottle purchases! Buy your passport ticket to The Christmas Wine Affair at www.texaswinetrail.com and head for the hills November 28th through December 23rd. Hey podcast listeners,Have you ever wanted to bring the winery experience home? With Sommly, you can! Now get the very best Texas wine shipped right to your doorstep.Sommly features many of the highest quality, small production wines you won't find in retail or restaurants.Check it out for yourself - sign up, discover, and shop local today atsommly.com. In Texas Wine News 1. State Fair's Blue Ribbon Wines are for sale now!2. Carl Hudson for Texas Wine Lover: Texas AVA Background3. Slate Mill Wine Collective is now Invention Vineyards 4. TWGGA's Lone Star International Wine Competition Results5. Wine Enthusiast: “Does Sound Affect Our Perception of Taste? These Wine Experts Think So”6. Texas Wine Certification at Texas Hill Country Wineries Symposium7. Save the date for the 1st podcast happy hour! November 30 at 6 p.m. on Zoom.    Interview Lynne Majek of Majek Vineyard & Winery@majekvineyard on socials Special Thanks Thanks to Texas Wine Lover for promotional help! For the latest information on Texas wineries and vineyards, visit Texas Wine Lover Wine & Food FoundationI'm so happy to be part of the community of wine and food lovers at The Wine & Food Foundation! Get more information about upcoming events, the IMBIBE: The WFF Education Series, and find membership options here. Need lodging in Fredericksburg? Check out my home Cork + Cactus!Find Cork + Cactus and many more great rentals at Heavenly Hosts.com!

OBBM Network
SO Much More to The Texas State Fair! This Newsletter Is Political (Podcast)

OBBM Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2022 21:50


Father / Daughter duo Warfield & Victoria are back again to share their experiences at the State Fair of Texas, and there's SO much more than you can take in at one visit.This Newsletter is Political is also available on OBBM Network Podcasts on Rumble here: https://rumble.com/c/c-1971254Subscribe to their substack here: https://thisnewsletterispolitical.substack.com/Find This Newsletter is Political Podcast on the OBBM Network Podcasts, available on Spotify, iHeart, Pocketcasts and more. Start at https://obbm.buzzsprout.com. For sponsor and guest information, call 469-888-2298.Support the show

Clemson Sports Talk
The "Deep Fried Twinkie" Edition

Clemson Sports Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2022 85:01


Former Clemson fullback Emory Smith joins the show, plus Tim Bourret spends some time with us on a Thursday afternoon. Additionally, Swanny dreams of what could have been after skipping the State Fair this year.

Weekly Dose of BS
Lingerie Parties, State Fair Funk, Pickle Bars, and Honeymoon Gas-X

Weekly Dose of BS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 28:31


What happened at the Texas State Fair that gave Brandi “Witch's Feet”? Stephanie sets the record straight about what it's like choosing your outfit for a Real Housewives Reunion Show. Stephanie discusses throwing a lingerie party for Trey's Wedding and we bring on Trey's Fiancé, Zach, to ask him what he wants Trey to wear on their wedding night! If you enjoyed this episode, leave a review and make sure you subscribe! If you want to connect with Brandi and Stephanie directly, message them at: www.instagram.com/brandiredmondwww.instagram.com/stephhollmanwww.instagram.com/bsthepodcastIf you are interested in advertising on this podcast or having Brandi & Stephanie as guests on your Podcast, Radio Show, or TV Show, reach out to podcast@yeanetworks.comProducers: Mike Morse / Madelyn Grimes For YEA Networks

Shake Rag Radio
Episode 80: Going Back Home

Shake Rag Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 60:00


New York State Fair, Syracuse, N.Y. - August 23, 2001:"Playing with Chuck at the State Fair was quite an experience…  Chuck was late, forcing the opening act to significantly stretch out their set.  He raced a large Lincoln hard into the infield behind the stage.  He got out and handed a briefcase to management and said, 'First things first.'  Berry insisted being paid upfront - cash only.  The promoter must have been previously made aware of what to expect with Mr. Berry…  After Chuck finished counting out his $20,000 in $100 dollar bills, he went to his dressing room and requested the presence of the bass player from the pickup band. The bass player came back with Berry's guitar in hand.‘Did he give us a set list?' Asked the drummer…‘No, he just wants me to tune his guitar.'As they were about to take the stage, Berry emerged to tell the roadie, ‘Put all the dials on my amp on nine.'”Freight Train - Elizabeth CottenEnd Of A Rainbow - Jimmy JohnsonSho' Nuff I Do - Elmore JamesHot Pants Woman - Willie WilliamsGotta Move - Homesick JamesBring It On Home - Willie DixonLost Sheep In The Fold - Otis SpannSome People - Chuck BerryLittle Angel Child - Pinetop Perkins with Sammy LawhornI Still Don't Know - Willie MabonI've Been Loving You Too Long - Etta JamesHelp Me Through The Day - Bobby BlandThose Lonely, Lonely Nights - Earl KingI Won't Be Worried No More - Otis RushNew Ma Negress - Clifton ChenierGoodnight Well It's Time To Go - Chuck BerryLove Letters - Elvis Presley

Gavin Dawson
State Fair of Texas by the Numbers & GBAG of the DAY

Gavin Dawson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 15:33


KRLD All Local
Dallas PD still don't know why parolee started shooting at Methodist over the weekend

KRLD All Local

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 5:12


Plus, clean-up began at the State Fair of Texas after a 24-day run and today is the first day of early voting. This and more on the All Local Afternoon News update for October 25, 2022.

Best of Hawkeye in the Morning
Tom at The State Fair Quiz - What's a Marconi?

Best of Hawkeye in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 4:55


Support the show: http://www.newcountry963.com/hawkeyeinthemorningSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

We Don't Make The Rules Podcast
Episode 117: "State Fair!" Feat. Tyree| 10.23.22

We Don't Make The Rules Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2022 100:20


This week the guys are joined by Tyree, owner of Liquid Proof Cocktails. He tells the guys the struggles with starting a new brand and what its like being an entrepreneur in a world where everyone wants to be a boss. They all give their thoughts on NBA opening week and the returns on Zion and Ben Simmons. Dre gives his Top 5 and during Quick Hits they discuss Bronny's NIL deals and College Game Day going to Jackson State. And in Rule Breakers they discuss a politician with an interesting campaign strategy! Enjoy!

Sunday Morning Coming Down
Episode 133: Episode 133 Sunday Morning Coming Down: The Real C-Word, Travel is Tonic & A Pair of Kings.

Sunday Morning Coming Down

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2022 30:17


John and Stacey are comparison shopping at the State Fair of Texas down in Dallas. John discusses the differences with Minnesota's State Fair, toasts 25 years of marriage, and lauds the real C-Word: charisma. 

Tracking The Storm
3.2: The State Fair Road Trip Saunters On

Tracking The Storm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 34:04


Matt and Brandon discuss the Hurricanes' annual Western road trip during the North Carolina State Fair, including the second line's extremely exciting start, who's started hot, and who the team needs more from. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, crisis  counseling and referral services can be accessed by calling 1-800- GAMBLER (1-800-426-2537) (IL/IN/LA/MI/NJ/PA/WV/WY), 1-800-NEXT  STEP (AZ), 1-800-522-4700 (CO/NH), 888-789-7777/visit http://ccpg.org/chat (CT), 1-800-BETS OFF (IA), 877-8-HOPENY/text HOPENY (467369) (NY), visit OPGR.org (OR), call/text TN REDLINE 1- 800-889-9789 (TN), or 1-888-532-3500 (VA).  21+ (18+ NH/WY). Physically present in AZ/CO/CT/IL/IN/IA/LA(select  parishes)/MI/NH/NJ/ NY/OR/PA/TN/VA/WV/WY only. New customer offer void in NH/OR/ONT-CA. New customers only. Valid 1 per new customer. Min. $5 deposit. Min $5 wager. Bet must win. $200 issued  as eight (8) $25 free bets. Free Bets are non-cashable and cannot be withdrawn. Free bets must be wagered 1x and stake is not included in  any returns or winnings. Free Bets expire 7 days (168 hours) after  being awarded. Promotional offer period ends 1/15/23. See terms at  draftkings.com/sportsbook. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Red Pegasus Podcast
SHORT - State Fair Quiz

The Red Pegasus Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 12:33


Ladies and gentlemen, we present to you another short edition of your favorite podcast featuring two homeboys that have been friends since middle school. In this short edition, they dive deep into a State Fair of Texas Quiz. How many gallons of mustard will be squirted on corn dogs this year? How tall in feet is Big Tex? How many games are on the midway this year? Tune in to find out all of these astonishing answers and a whole lot more. Twitter: @redpegasuspod Instagram: @redpegasuspod Facebook: The Red Pegasus Podcast  Email: redpegasuspod@gmail.com Merch: https://my-store-11619045.creator-spring.com

Best of Hawkeye in the Morning
State Fair of Texas Lost and Found: a Leg and Wedding Ring?

Best of Hawkeye in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 3:53


Support the show: http://www.newcountry963.com/hawkeyeinthemorningSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Manestream Podcast
We didn't have time to edit this mess!!//Texas State Fair

The Manestream Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2022 62:07


Episode 143- The gang tried to make an episode at the last minute, on Thursday night. Just us doing our normal banter, Texas State Fair, rollercoasters, Chris's travel adventure, and more.  Follow me @ Anchor.FM|IG - Hanshinagi|Twitter - nagata21519|Email - hanshinagi@gmail.com Chris Bryant Follow Chris @ Anchor.FM|XBOX- Slevin Kalevra|Twitter - IGotPaid Sarah Hamilton Follow Sara @ https://t.co/usoxmK0JQX?amp=1| Twitter- Romancing the Story --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/themanestreampodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/themanestreampodcast/support

Arkansas Farm Bureau Podcast
Visiting the State Fair, FFA Interview & More

Arkansas Farm Bureau Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 40:04


This week we take the show on the road to the Arkansas State Fair, where we discuss the latest in ag headlines and sit down with Jennifer Cook, executive director of the Arkansas FFA Foundation. And we have a bit of fun along the way.

Carolina Outdoors
Check out the NC & SC State Fairs

Carolina Outdoors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 15:35


(From 10.22.22, Segment 1) Christopher Lawing is joining Bill this week to give you all the scoop on the Carolina Outdoors! Tune into this epsiode to get the need-to-know details about the North Carolina State Fair AND the South Carolina State Fair!. October 21st through October 23rd is the last weekend to visit these state fairs before they clear out the fairgrounds! Need a pack to carry your state fair souvenirs? Stop by Jesse Brown's Outdoors or visit us online!  

Within The Mist
Minnesota Iceman

Within The Mist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 46:14


At the end of the 1960s, Frank Hansen was making the rounds on the State Fair circuit. He was exhibiting a man-like creature covered in hair and frozen in a block of ice. At times, he would claim that the creature had been discovered in Siberia, while other times, that it was found by Japanese fishing boat floating in the sea. It was so realistic that noted scientists, Ivan Sanderson and Bernard Heuvelmans declared it was a genuine "missing link", a bigfoot creature. Eventually, Hansen decided to write the "true story" in his own words. Join Gary and GoldieAnn as they relate the how and what regarding the creature known as the Minnesota Iceman. "Fear" by David Fesliyan: https://www.fesliyanstudios.com/royalty-free-music/download/fear/351 Spooky Empire: https://spookyempire.com/ Neanderthal: The Strange Saga of the Minnesota Iceman by Bernard Heuvelmans: https://www.amazon.com/Neanderthal-Strange-Saga-Minnesota-Iceman/dp/1938398610 Frank Hansen's Story of the Minnesota Iceman: https://www.museumoftheweird.com/tag/saga-magazine/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/withinthemist/support

Best of Hawkeye in the Morning
State Fair of Texas Workers and Their Best NYC Accents

Best of Hawkeye in the Morning

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2022 4:17


Support the show: http://www.newcountry963.com/hawkeyeinthemorningSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

CRANEiacs
Session 123: Our State Fair is a Great State Fair

CRANEiacs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2022 58:00


S10 E3 "Proxy Prexy" and E3 "Kissing Cousin" Our hosts discuss Ryan's recent visit to the Texas State Fair, citizenship test questions, and their rave/clubbing days.  Email us! CRANEiacs@gmail.com Tweet at us! @CRANEiacs Join the Facebook Group! https://www.facebook.com/groups/CRANEiacsPodcast/

Brian, Ali & Justin Podcast
Ali & Justin bond over finding love at the State Fair [10-18-22, 7:00AM]

Brian, Ali & Justin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 21:11


Something about corndogs is painfully romantic.  Chicago's best morning radio show now has a podcast! Don't forget to rate, review, and subscribe wherever you listen to podcasts and remember that the conversation always lives on the Q101 Facebook page.  Brian, Ali, & Justin are live every morning from 6a-10a on Q101. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Not Another Baptist Podcast
Episode 326: POTLUCK PODCAST 216: CP, Annie/Lottie, Associational Meetings, and the State Fair

Not Another Baptist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 19:34


Jared and Allen hold down the fort while Matt was tied up, and they take the time to serve up a chat about some strong SBC giving, the value of associational meetings, and the State Fair. Dig in!Make sure you are following us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PotluckPodcastSBC

Humans of Travel
USTOA's Terry Dale on Farm Living, Responding to 9/11 and Transforming the ‘T Word' (Touring)

Humans of Travel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2022 37:35


Most people in the travel industry have crossed paths with Terry Dale, who has served as the president and CEO of the U.S. Tour Operators Association (also known as USTOA) since 2011. But many may not know that although he currently resides in Brooklyn, N.Y., Dale's roots are firmly planted in Brooklyn, Iowa, a town of 900 that served as the backdrop for his childhood on the Dale family farm. In this episode of Humans of Travel, listeners will learn about Dale's early vacations (to Iowa's State Fair) and his entrance into the travel industry via an entry-level job with Cedar Rapids Tourism in Iowa. They'll also hear about the career growing pains Dale faced as he hopped between tourism boards in the U.S. (including a tense run-in with the mayor of Providence, R.I.) and how he navigated 9/11 as the executive vice president of NYC & Co. Finally, Dale will share more information about USTOA's 50th Anniversary, and how the association and the traditional travel style of touring (what he calls the “T word”) has evolved since he joined the association. INSIDE THIS EPISODE 1:00: Meet Terry Dale, president and CEO of United States Tour Operators Association (USTOA) 2:00: How has Dale seen USTOA evolve since he came onboard? 3:30: Dale talks about his childhood living in Brooklyn, Iowa (a town of 900 people).7:30: Dale reflects on his earliest travel experiences — to the Iowa State Fair.12:00: Dale lands his first travel industry job at the Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Tourism Board. 15:30: Dale speaks of a challenging career relationship, when he butted heads with the mayor of Providence, R.I., during his time at the Visit Providence. 21:00: Dale gives listeners some background about what it's like to work for a destination.22:00: Listeners hear how Dale navigated 9/11 during his time at NYC & Co. 28:30: Dale talks about his family, which includes his husband (Rich), his sons and his three grandchildren. 31:00: Dale talks about the evolution of packaged travel (or touring) and its perception of being an antiquated mode of travel. He also shares updates on the future of the association, which will place a heavy emphasis on sustainability and diversity, equity and inclusion efforts. RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE United States Tour Operators Association (USTOA)TravelAge West article on USTOA's 50th Anniversary ABOUT YOUR HOST  Emma Weissmann is the Digital Managing Editor of TravelAge West, a print magazine and website for travel advisors based in the Western U.S. She is also the co-host of Trade Secrets, a podcast created with sister publication Travel Weekly. TravelAge West also produces national trade publications Explorer and Family Getaways, as well as events including the Future Leaders in Travel Retreat, Global Travel Marketplace West, the WAVE Awards gala and the Napa Valley Leadership Forum.  ABOUT THE SHOW  TravelAge West's podcast, “Humans of Travel,” features conversations with exceptional people who have compelling stories to tell. Listeners will hear from the travel industry's notable authorities, high-profile executives, travel advisors and rising stars as they share the experiences — the highs and the lows — that make them human.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Creedal Catholic
E128 Roger Scruton and Teachers Saving Ukraine: What a Week w/Andrew Petiprin

Creedal Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2022 64:51


Today on the show, we discuss the State Fair of Texas, John Fetterman's absurd Senate candidacy, Elon Musk, the American Federation of Teachers, and Roger Scruton.  Links for things mentioned on the show:  Misinformation: New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/10/us/politics/biden-exaggeration-falsehood.html Saving Ukraine: https://twitter.com/rweingarten/status/1579414707949096960?s=20&t=yq7G1i_UD_DTlr-3tHkunQ Elon Musk: https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-63225781 Close Read:  Roger Scruton's piece: https://www.firstthings.com/article/2022/10/the-work-of-mourning Recommendations:  A French Village: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1288631/ Johnny Cash: https://open.spotify.com/artist/6kACVPfCOnqzgfEF5ryl0x

The Evangelism Podcast
Free Prayer Booth at the Tulsa State Fair | Daniel King & Joshua Wagner

The Evangelism Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 25:21


Our ministry hosted a Free Prayer booth at the Tulsa State Fair. The results were amazing! In eleven days, we had 1,001 conversations about God. We prayed with a total of 1,844 people. We led 479 individuals in a prayer of salvation. 60 people testified they were healed by God of a pain or sickness. We had a total of 318 volunteers show up to help us pray with people. Many of these volunteers were teenagers or college students who had never had the opportunity to lead a person to Christ before.

Beck and Call
58. That's Entertainment!

Beck and Call

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 59:43


In this week's episode, Merritt recaps the big TX/OU watch party she hosted over the weekend and answers listener questions about entertaining and hosting parties at your house! At the top of the episode she discusses the items she ate at the State Fair last week, including Big Tex Choice Award winners Cha-Cha-Chata and the Fried Charcuterie Board. In addition to sharing new recs & reviews, she also shares an exciting but major business update that will be happening over the next few months! In the Beck & Call segment, Merritt answers listener questions about laundry, her morning routine and how to rock clothes when you're not feeling your best. Call into the hotline at 214-620-0473 or email info@beckandcallpodcast.com to submit your questions for Merritt. Follow along on Instagram @beckandcallpodcast and @merrittbeck! THANK YOU TO THIS WEEK'S SPONSOR, OLIVE & JUNE! Enjoy 20% off your first Mani System when you visit OliveandJune.com/BeckandCall! MENTIONED IN THIS EPISODE: Venita Aspen, State Fair of Texas, Gadabout Creative, The Empress on Netflix, Luckiest Girl Alive on Netflix, The Midnight Club on Netflix, Reminders of Him by Colleen Hoover, The Laundress No. 723 Laundry Detergent, The Laundress Wool & Cashmere Shampoo

Nosebleed Seats
The State Fair of Texas, CA induction into the Texas Boxing Hall of Fame and Final Call

Nosebleed Seats

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 45:30


In the final hour of The Get Right, Reg and CA talk about his induction into the Texas Boxing Hall of Fame, the State Fair of Texas and the Final Call.

JaM Session
Dallas Cowboys Cooper Rush Conundrum, ESPN's Todd Archer, The State Fair

JaM Session

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 83:19


(START): JaM discuss the Cowboys QB situation and why there seems to be so much fan support behind Cooper Rush but why Dak Prescott is the answer when he's healthy. (24:54): The State Fair of Texas is back yet again and what a wild presentation of food it is (38:47): College Football Chaos and the October 8th no one expected us to get (55:23): ESPN Cowboys Insider Todd Archer RECORDED 10/4/22. EXPLICIT LANGUAGE INCLUDED.

JaM Session
Dallas Cowboys Cooper Rush Conundrum, ESPN's Todd Archer, The State Fair

JaM Session

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 83:19


(START): JaM discuss the Cowboys QB situation and why there seems to be so much fan support behind Cooper Rush but why Dak Prescott is the answer when he's healthy. (24:54): The State Fair of Texas is back yet again and what a wild presentation of food it is (38:47): College Football Chaos and the October 8th no one expected us to get (55:23): ESPN Cowboys Insider Todd Archer RECORDED 10/4/22. EXPLICIT LANGUAGE INCLUDED.

The Ticket Top 10
The Norm & D Invasion- Opening day of the Texas State Fair ft. Donnie's Sister

The Ticket Top 10

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2022 5:48


9.30.22.See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire
9/26 App 1 State Fair Food

Todd N Tyler Radio Empire

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 26, 2022 9:00


Fry it and put it on a stick!See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street Radio
Butter Cows, Ugly Cakes and Blue Ribbons: Welcome to the State Fair!

Christopher Kimball’s Milk Street Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 50:58 Very Popular


We dive into the world of state, county and agricultural fairs with Marla Calico to learn about their history, impact and why roast beef sundaes are all the rage at fairgrounds across the country. Plus, we head to the Iowa State Fair to meet the woman who carves cows out of butter and the kids striving to create the world's ugliest cake. We also get a crash course in wine from sommelier André Hueston Mack and we make Eggplant and Tahini Dip. Get this week's recipe for Eggplant and Tahini Dip here.We want to hear your culinary tips! Share your cooking hacks, secret ingredients or unexpected techniques with us for a chance to hear yourself on Milk Street Radio! Here's how: https://www.177milkstreet.com/radiotipsListen to Milk Street Radio on: Apple Podcasts | Stitcher | Spotify Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Garage Logic
Weekly Scramble: Going to the State Fair with Frattallone, Brett Favre, and Reuvers went to the Michael Buble' concert??

Garage Logic

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 48:53


Weekly Scramble: Going to the State Fair with Frattallone, Brett Favre, and Reuvers went to the Michael Buble' concert??