Podcasts about Mississauga

City in Ontario, Canada

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Best podcasts about Mississauga

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Latest podcast episodes about Mississauga

Match Point Canada
Interview with Bianca Andreescu

Match Point Canada

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 7, 2022 7:07


She's a 2019 US Open champion and one of Canada's best players! Mississauga's Bianca Andreescu joins Ben of Match Point Canada for a chat ahead of the Billie Jean King Cup Finals in Glasgow, Scotland. Andreescu is returning to the international stage at the event for the first time since 2019. Enjoy! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sunday Night's Main Event
SNME Bonus: AEWTF 004 - What Does Everybody Want to Talk About?

Sunday Night's Main Event

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2022 85:28


Join the boys this month as they cover everything AEW that has happened in the past month. We are joined as always by Uncle Bobby B of MLW Rewind where he gives us his hits and s**ts of the month. You can catch him on Straight Talk Wrestling at https://www.youtube.com/c/StraightTalkWrestling And a very special interview guest, We also discuss: Jon Moxley signing a 5 year extension deal. We need BTE to come back!!! AEW in Toronto and all the shenanigans surrounding that. Our Triplemania Review?! (Or should I say Eric's contribution) And our special guest, pro wrestling's bubblegum princess, Alexia Nicole from the Oct. 25th episode AEW Dark where she took on Athena. You can also catch her on Nov. 5th at The Arthur Caulfield Memorial Show at Battle Arts Academy in Mississauga. Grab your tickets at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/live-pro-wrestling-battle-arts-academy-tickets-432717408417 If you would like to support our guests, Check out Alexia Nicole at Instagram: @alexxiaanicole  Twitter: @itsalexianicole  Big Cartel: https://alexianicolewrestler.bigcartel.com/ Pro Wrestling Tees: https://www.prowrestlingtees.com/bubblegum And special thank you again to THT who you can find on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/handshakingteam Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/tht420 Or check out their podcast the Skelecast on Spotify at: Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/6L9PkVhjSxNsHynRVc0X7D?si=d1f1e603a477446b Be sure to follow us on Twitter and Instagram where we will post new episode details Instagram: @aewtf  Twitter: @aewtf4 

STR8UP SHOW PODCAST
Music Monday- Geneva Lei

STR8UP SHOW PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 35:59


It is a new season which means we're bringing back a fan favorite, Music Mondays. Tune in as we talk to Filipino -Canadian singer, Geneva Lei. One this episode, Geneva Lei talks to us about her ability to structure her songwriting in a way that speaks directly to her fans and her upcoming music projects. She then hits the stage to perform her newest single "Sober." Follow Geneva Lei: @GenevaLei

FloppyDays Vintage Computing Podcast
Floppy Days 119 - ZX Spectrum Part 4 - Interview with Chris Smith

FloppyDays Vintage Computing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2022 65:50


Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/FloppyDays  Welcome to Floppy Days #119 for October, 2022.  And I'm your host, Randy Kindig.  I hope everyone is safe and sound... We are currently covering the prolific year (for home computers) of 1982.  This episode is the continuation of a multi-episode arc that covers the Spectrum through all the usual topics.  I don't even know yet how many episodes we're going to end up in this arc.  There's so much to talk about and so many knowledgeable people on the subject, that the Spectrum is probably going to set the illustrious Floppy Days records for the number of episodes about a single machine. This is the fourth of those, with the first having been the interview with John Grant of Nine Tiles, and the second and third being coverage of the history of the Spectrum with Alessandro Grussu. In this episode, I talk with the author of the wonderful book “The ZX Spectrum Ula: How to Design a Microcomputer”; Mr. Chris Smith.  I don't know of anyone who knows more about the internals of this machine than Chris, as evidenced by his book, other than maybe the original designers.  In this episode, I interview Chris about him, his book, his collection and other topics. As usual, I will talk a bit about what I have been up to, including an update on the The Great Barn Find of 2022, attendance at a computer show, as well as a few new acquisitions (beyond the barn find) that have come my way.  In addition, I'll briefly tell you about upcoming shows of which I'm aware. Finally, while I usually abstain from talking about monetary support for this podcast, I do want to mention that I have a way for you to help if you have the  inclination.  I have a page set up at https://www.patreon.com/FloppyDays where you can donate.  Any funds will be used to defray the cost of managing the podcast as well as acquiring new hardware to  talk about.  Thank you so much everyone who has contributed and continues to contribute! Links Mentioned in the Show: New Acquisitions and What I've Been Up To Apple GS monitor connector for CoCo - Mike Rojas, Facebook - (https://www.facebook.com/commerce/listing/392874865780089/?ref=share_attachment)  GFA BASIC - http://gfabasic.net/  “GFA BASIC Training Reboot Camp - A Beginning Tutorial for the GFA BASIC Interpreter” - https://docs.dev-docs.org/  “GFA BASIC Book - An intermediate programming tutorial for GFA BASIC” - https://docs.dev-docs.org/  GFA BASIC Atari Reference Manual  Tandy Assembly - http://www.tandyassembly.com  Vintage is the New Old with Paulo Garcia - https://www.vintageisthenewold.com/  Jeff Birt's Website at Tindie - https://www.tindie.com/stores/hey_birt/ Upcoming Shows Chicago TI International Worlds Faire = Oct. 29, Evanston Public Library, Evanston, IL - http://chicagotiug.sdf.org/faire/  World of Commodore = Dec. 3-4. - Mississauga, Ontario, Canada - https://www.tpug.ca/world-of-commodore/world-of-commodore-2022 - Virtual and Physical!  Interview with Chris Smith The ZX Spectrum Ula: How to Design a Microcomputer (ZX Design Retro Computer) Illustrated Edition  Chris' Web site - http://www.zxdesign.info/indexPage.shtml  Harlequin - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ZX_Spectrum_clones#Harlequin  ZX Spectrum 30-year Anniversary event - http://www.computinghistory.org.uk/news/23039/Celebrating-30-Years-of-the  MicroMen: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1459467/  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIcAyFVK0gE 

You Had Options
Pretty Ricky Willdy (@prowilldy) | Episode 69

You Had Options

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2022 55:34


This episode I talk with pro wrestler Pretty Ricky Willdy. We talk about his career beginnings, sponsorships, and the Nov 5th Arthur Caulfield Memorial show happening at Battle Arts Academy in Mississauga, ON. Tickets to the Nov 5th Arthur Caulfield Memorial show: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/live-pro-wrestling-battle-arts-academy-tickets-432717408417?fbclid=PAAaaNLf99mPj364ZbFqAiootSnc3O0SwSjGY9FNbnWEXS90dIBWul5Y47mDQ Music by Brady Turner https://www.bradyturnermusic.com/ https://www.instagram.com/bradyturnermusic Art by Kat Lanser https://hatemail.bigcartel.com https://www.instagram.com/_hatemail_ Animation by Bradley Thomas Turner http://bradleythomasturner.com/ https://www.instagram.com/bradleythomasturner/ You Had Options socials https://www.instagram.com/youhadoptions https://www.twitter.com/youhadoptions youhadoptions@gmail.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/you-had-options/support

Canada's Podcast
If You're Going to Spend the Time, Do it Your Way, with Your Own Style - Toronto - Canada's Podcast

Canada's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 22:09


Henry Rojas is a Sheridan College graduate in Architectural Technology. He started his career as an Architectural Draftsman and continued to grew his skills in various roles in the industry. He began to work with custom homes and progressed to designing and constructing commercial spaces and apartment buildings. He extended his passion by overseeing the development of apartment units. His company Rojas Empire of Design, founded in 2018, is based in Mississauga, Ontario in 2018. Entrepreneurs are the backbone of Canada's economy. To support Canada's businesses, subscribe to our YouTube channel and follow us on Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter. Want to stay up-to-date on the latest #entrepreneur podcasts and news? Subscribe to our bi-weekly newsletter

Immanuel Network Podcast
Featured Sermon: Who is Your Savior?

Immanuel Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2022 58:24


Chris Shipley (Pastor at Hope Church, Mississauga, Ontario) preaches from Psalm 146. The post Featured Sermon: Who is Your Savior? appeared first on .

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History
341 Mairi Cowan, Possession and Exorcism in New France

Ben Franklin's World: A Podcast About Early American History

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2022 60:53 Very Popular


Prepare for tricks, treats, and time travel! In honor of Halloween, we're traveling back to the mid-seventeenth century to investigate a case of demonic possession and the practice of exorcism in New France. Mairi Cowan, an Associate Professor of History at the University of Toronto, Mississauga, joins us to investigate the life of a young French woman named Barbe Hallay and her demonic possession. Cowan is the author of The Possession of Barbe Hallay: Diabolical Arts and Daily Life in Early Canada. Show Notes: https://www.benfranklinsworld.com/341 Join Ben Franklin's World! Subscribe and help us bring history right to your ears! Sponsor Links Omohundro Institute Colonial Williamsburg Foundation The Ben Franklin's World Shop Complementary Episodes   Episode 108: Ann Little, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelright Episode 197: Brett Rushforth, Native American Slavery in New France Episode 278: Sarah Pearsall, Polygamy: An Early American History Episode 283: Anne Marie Lane Jonah, Acadie 300 Episode 318: Ste. Geneviéve National Historical Park Episode 334: Brandon Bayne, Missions and Mission Building in New Spain    Listen! Apple Podcasts Spotify Google Podcasts Amazon Music Ben Franklin's World iOS App Ben Franklin's World Android App Helpful Links Join the Ben Franklin's World Facebook Group Ben Franklin's World Twitter: @BFWorldPodcast Ben Franklin's World Facebook Page Sign-up for the Franklin Gazette Newsletter

Casefile True Crime
269: Case 228: The Harrison Family

Casefile True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2022 65:35 Very Popular


In April 2009, 64-year-old Bill Harrison, a much-loved member of the community of Mississauga, Canada, was found dead in his home. An autopsy revealed that he died of natural causes. Just over one year later, Bill's wife, Bridget Harrison was also found deceased in the family home. --- Narration – Anonymous Host Research & writing – Jessica Forsayeth Creative direction – Milly Raso Production and music – Mike Migas Music – Andrew D.B. Joslyn Sign up for Casefile Premium: Apple Premium Spotify Premium Patreon This episode's sponsors: Amazon Pharmacy – Your medication, made easy DoorDash – Get 25% off up to $10 value on your first order of $15 or more with promo code ‘CASEFILE' Best Fiends – Download Best Fiends for free Matty – New podcast from Casefile Presents SimpliSafe – Get 40% off your order For all credits and sources please visit casefilepodcast.com/case-228-the-harrison-family

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench
Critical thinking, long-distance relationships and reading with Evelyn Brindle

#ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2022 33:58


Episode #46 - Evelyn Brindle lives at The Village of Erin Meadows in Mississauga with her husband David.  A conversation about critical thinking, long-distance relationships, and unexpected travel with Erin Davis & Doug Robinson on the Green Bench. "If you just stop and talk with somebody. Everybody's got a story.  You don't have to have a movie of the week or a book made about you." - Erin Davis The Village has a library that is well used.  The continuous increase of books that are brought in and mixed around. Evelyn always snuck a book into her grandchildren's stockings at Christmas to encourage reading. What are your book recommendations? "It's so important to have the ability to read and to enjoy what you are reading." - Evelyn Brindle Evelyn has 2 daughters and 4 grandchildren, with one daughter living in Hong Kong.  A conversation about staying in touch and how that has changed over the past 25 years. “Everyone is a person, everyone is beautiful, and everyone has something to contribute.”  - Evelyn Brindle Sharing some laughs as Evelyn shares about her honeymoon travel stories. Reading the newspaper has been an enjoyment for husband, David living with dementia.  With discussing what he is reading and encouraging it, he has reclaimed his ability and joy to read and has moved onto a variety of books.   Subscribe, rate, and review our podcast on any network and share your thoughts on social media using the #ElderWisdom tag to help others find us. ----more---- The Green Bench is a symbol of elder wisdom. Physically or virtually, the bench invites us all to sit alongside a senior, share a conversation, or give and offer advice. It challenges the stigma seniors face; the ageism still so prevalent in society. It reminds us of the wealth of wisdom our elders offer and in doing so, helps restore them to a place of reverence. "The greatest untapped resource in Canada, if not the world, is the collective wisdom of our elders." -Ron Schlegel This podcast is brought to you by Schlegel Villages, retirement & long-term care homes in Ontario, Canada. #ElderWisdom | Stories from the Green Bench is produced by Memory Tree Productions Learn more about our host, Erin Davis, at erindavis.com Learn more about #ElderWisdom at elderwisdom.ca

Crime, Wine & Chaos
Episode 105 - The Survival Story of Lenore & The 1904 Olympic Marathon

Crime, Wine & Chaos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2022 64:02


Guess who's back? Back again! Amber's older sister, Naomi joins the show again.  This week, Amber tells the incredible survival story of Lenore. Lenore was working in a women's clothing boutique in Orangeville, Canada. It was he very first shift working alone when she is attacked by a "customer".  Amber pulled her sources from:  I Survived Season 9 Episode 3www.thestar.com “Dangerous offender status sought for man who viciously attacked female shopkeepers,” Peter Small, 5-30-2012 www.thestar.com, “Woman Critical After Orangeville Stabbing,” Precious Yutangco, 7-12-2009 www.insauga.com “Mississauga man who attacked two women in 2009 denied parole,” Gene Pereira, 3-10-2021www.shoporangeville.com “Creek Side Clothing Co” Then Naomi tells us all about the first time the Olympic Games came to the United States and the cast of characters that ran the opening Marathon event.   Naomi pulled her sources from:  www.smithsonianmag.com, “The 1904 Olympic Marathon May Have Been the Strangest Ever,” Karen Abbott, 8-7-2012 www.runnersworld.com, “The Unbelievable True Story of the Craziest Olympic Marathon,” Ashwin Rodrigues, 8-6-2021 www.wikipedia.org “Marathons at the Olympics” www.wikipedia.org “Louisiana Purchase” www.penn.museum “The Real Story of the Ancient Olympic Games,”  Amber was drinking  Matt Parish Cabernet Sauvignon from Napa ValleyNaomi is a Co-Founder and Producer at neon media. You can follow her work at https://www.neonmedia.ioYou can also follow her on Twitter @MissGnomersTo sign up for Buzzsprout and to support our show, follow the link below:https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=1303834    

Red Pill Cartel
Ep 83. The Haunting of Cherry Hill Mississauga & Other Amazing Paranormal Stories W/ Rose & Giovanna

Red Pill Cartel

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 100:36


Welcome back for Paranormal October Cartel! I have the most beautiful Rose on the show who is joined by her beautiful mother Giovanna & they share so many wild paranormal stories for you all today! I'm super thankful to have them on & share their stories with you all!! Let's get into it!! Watch little Rose on the drums & see a shadowy figure walk by when nobody was there except Giovanna here: https://youtu.be/zI1ZVRjLplw Follow Rose on IG here: @rosemarysnaturalessentials https://instagram.com/rosemarysnaturalessentials?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y= Check out a little research on the Cherry Hill house here: https://www.insauga.com/is-the-cherry-hill-house-haunted/ Make sure to visit https://www.owlcreekcoffee.com and make a purchase with the promo code: cartel15 for 15% off your order of this great tasting coffee. 10% of all proceeds go to people with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy!! Owl Creek Coffee on IG here: @owlcreekcoffeecompany Please like, share, subscribe and leave a review on #iTunes! Also you can feed Nigel the goat some extra shekels at my patreon if you would be so kind. He will love you for all eternity. Patreon here: patreon.com/redpillcartelpodcast Telegram here: t.me/redpillcartel Instagram here: @redpillcartelpodcast Always feel free to ask to get on the show! Email redpillcartelpod@gmail.com

Kelly Cutrara
The new Mexit, Mississauga's Mayor want to separate

Kelly Cutrara

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2022 8:19


Kelly asks the mayor why she wants the city to leave Peel Region.

The Rush with Reshmi Nair & Scott MacArthur

Bob Reid went to Philadelphia, and yes, he ran up the Rocky steps..Mississauga mayor Bonnie Crombie wants to break Mississauga free of Peel region..Smart Speakers with Mark Mendelson and Matt Gurney. 

PORTICO Community Church
Discovering Your Spiritual Gifts

PORTICO Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2022 40:01


In week 6 of the sermon series "God's Plan For Your Life", we're learning how to discover our spiritual gifts.This was live-streamed from our Mississauga campus. If you are in need of prayer, reach out to us at PORTICO.cc/prayer, and our prayer team will be praying for you.  If you said YES to Jesus for the first time, let us know at PORTICO.cc/yes, so we can journey alongside you.   To learn more about PORTICO Community Church, visit porticocanada.ca. Or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter @porticocc. Related Content:PORTICO.cc/yes - https://porticocanada.lpages.co/yes/PORTICO.cc/alpha - https://porticocanada.lpages.co/alphaPORTICO.cc/grow - https://porticocanada.lpages.co/growp...PORTICO.cc/livestream - https://porticocanada.online.church/

Sermons – LifeHouse Church Mississauga
Love the Lord Your God and This is How | Josh Martin | LifeHouse Waterloo | Oct 2nd

Sermons – LifeHouse Church Mississauga

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2022 44:03


Love the Lord Your God and This is How | Josh Martin | LifeHouse Waterloo | Oct 2nd by LifeHouse Church

Brian Crombie Radio Hour
Brian Crombie Radio Hour - Epi 738 - Current State of the Real Estate Market with Anil Ramlal and Carla Corsi

Brian Crombie Radio Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 48:16


Brian interviews two real estate people: Anil Ramlal and Carla Corsi. Tonight we focus on the current real estate market and where are volumes and pricing going and what should buyers and sellers do.

Album Mode
CIX. age/sex/location | Ari Lennox

Album Mode

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 50:14


This week Demar and Adriel discuss Ari Lennox's second studio album ‘age/sex/location', what it'll take for Lennox to really pop and her lowkey explicit lyrics. Demar's rating: 9 Adriel's rating: 9 The Love List: POF, Leak It, Waste My Time, Pressure Follow us: Twitter / Instagram/ TikTok: @AlbumModePod @AdrielSmileyOfficial @DemarjGrant Clubhouse / Greenroom: @demar @adrielsmiley

Cold Pod
Ep29 - "Are You Trying To Be My Manager?" with Kara Lane

Cold Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 76:32


Kara Lane is a musician, songwriter and co-host of the podcast Kinda Jaded with Kacy Hill. Kara sat down with Josh and Austin to discuss growing up emo, Myspace Top 8, late night talk show hosts, Lena Dunham, Mississauga, getting married, living in Los Angeles, her previous band K.I.D., fear of being cringe, major labels, going solo, working with Dylan Brady of 100 Gecs, Kara becomes Josh's therapist, being obsessed with Gen Z, self managing, Allo Vapes, ASAP Rocky's fridge, The Used, Photobucket, Olympic power lifting, Las Vegas, her upcoming EP, her Mom and much more! Kara Lane Josh McIntyre Austin Hutchings ---- Cold Pod https://www.patreon.com/coldpod

Sermons – LifeHouse Church Mississauga
Empowered for Purpose | Leigh Colgan | LifeHouse Church | Oct 2nd

Sermons – LifeHouse Church Mississauga

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 48:41


God the Holy Spirit is our Advocate, Comforter and Teacher. He lives with us, and He is the one who empowers us to make the love and power of Jesus evident to those around us.

Randy Selzer's Real Estate Podcast
All About Port Credit Mississauga

Randy Selzer's Real Estate Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 39:19


In today's episode, we interview Emily Miszk, a Director of the Port Credit Business Improvement Association (BIA). Emily shares a lot of info about this popular and touristy area of Mississauga, Ontario including: - an explanation of what the Port Credit BIA does - an overview of the charms of Port Credit - favorite things to do in the area - seasonal vs year-round activities - changes over the past 5-10 years - community involvement - future developments including Brightwater and the Hurontario LRT - the state of the real estate market in Port Credit Check out Emily and the Port Credit BIA here: https://www.portcredit.com/about-us/b... She is also a mortgage broker and business owner of Port Credit Mortgages. https://www.portcreditmortgages.com/ #Mississauga #PortCredit #PortCreditBIA

The Sunday Magazine
The Sunday Magazine introduces: That's Puzzling!

The Sunday Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2022 22:44


Set aside your crossword, Wordle, Spelling Bee, or whatever your Sunday diversion... because The Sunday Magazine is starting a challenge of its own: That's Puzzling! Each month, Piya Chattopadhyay will compete against one familiar voice and one clever listener in a battle of brain games devised by puzzle master Peter Brown, a writer, performer and former CBC host and producer. Playing along this week are Mississauga, Ont. listener Ashis Basu and Ify Chiwetelu of CBC's Now or Never.

PORTICO Community Church
Practicing Peace

PORTICO Community Church

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2022 28:36


In week 5 of the sermon series "God's Plan For Your Life", Pastor Duane teaches us what the Bible says about creating peace in our world.This was live-streamed from our Mississauga campus. If you are in need of prayer, reach out to us at PORTICO.cc/prayer, and our prayer team will be praying for you.  If you said YES to Jesus for the first time, let us know at PORTICO.cc/yes, so we can journey alongside you.   To learn more about PORTICO Community Church, visit porticocanada.ca. Or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter @porticocc. Related Content:PORTICO.cc/yes - https://porticocanada.lpages.co/yes/PORTICO.cc/alpha - https://porticocanada.lpages.co/alphaPORTICO.cc/grow - https://porticocanada.lpages.co/growp...PORTICO.cc/livestream - https://porticocanada.online.church/

What the Forensics
Special Episode - Highway of Tears & Starlight Tours

What the Forensics

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2022 62:40


This is a special episode where in honour of the National day of Truth and Reconciliation, September 30, we have decided to focus on some cases of wrongful death and murder of Indigenous men, women, and children in Canada. We felt that since we are fortunate enough to have this platform we need to bring awareness to the atrocities that Indigenous communities face everyday. This episode is definitely one of a more somber nature and we hope that it encourages you to educate yourself on the issues that Indigenous communities are facing. And even though we will never understand what Indigenous communities go through and are currently going through, we want to let you know that we sympathize and stand with you. We hope that everyone takes a second to recognize the land that they are living on does not belong to them and was taken from First Nation communities during time of Colonization, that was not that far in the past. We want to acknowledge that the places we live and are currently recording from are the ancestral, unceded, and traditional lands of indigenous peoples. In Halifax, we are in Mi'kma'ki, the unceded territory of the Mi'kmaq peoples.In Calgary, we are in the traditional territories of Niitsitapi and the people of the Treaty 7 region in Southern Alberta, which includes the Siksika, the Piikuni, the Kainai, the Tsuut'ina and the Stoney Nakoda First Nations, including Chiniki, Bearpaw, and Wesley First Nations.And in Burlington, we are in the Haudenosaunee, Anishinabewaki, Attiwonderonk, and Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, Mississauga peoples.

MY GOSPEL @ Desmond R Singh
S3-114 LETTER TO THE CHURCH (December 1996)

MY GOSPEL @ Desmond R Singh

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 59:58


During his ministry, Paul wrote many epistles (or letters) to Body of Christ assemblies. We hold these writings as sacred scriptures. Yet, just as any sermon delivered under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit is God's spoken word, so are inspired letters penned by the man of God to his congregation. What follows are excerpts from a letter written by Brother Singh to the Mississauga saints on December 5th, 1996. About five months earlier, a profound man of God, Lloyd L. Goodwin, had died unexpectedly. He was Brother Singh's pastor, teacher, and mentor–as Paul was to Timothy.

Say Hi to the Future
Canadian Leadership in AI Research and Technology

Say Hi to the Future

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 27:59


Joining us on the podcast today is Ali Taiyeb, Director of Industry Innovation at Vector Institute. We discuss the rising Canadian leadership in AI research and technology and the critical role incubators play. Ali will be leading the Next Gen Panel at our Activation, A Path To Resilience, happening on September 22nd at the Living Arts Centre of Mississauga. . . . Follow us: https://linktr.ee/Spyder.Works Contact: sromero@spyder.works . . . Part podcast, part blog series, part live event, Say Hi to the Future is an inclusive platform aimed at highlighting the human side of ingenuity: clever, inventive, and original thinking. We are a global community driven by passion, savage curiosity, and the audacity to make a difference. . . . . Hosted by: Ken Tencer Produced by: Sonia Romero Johnson Matt Miller

Roy Green Show
Roy Green Show Podcast, Sept 17th: Upcoming funeral for Queen Elizabeth, What Pierre Poilievre leadership will bring, Officers killed in the Line of Duty

Roy Green Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 38:50


The Roy Green Show Podcast, September 17th 2022 From London: Ben O'Hara Byrne reports on preparations for the funeral of Queen Elizabeth.         Guest: Ben O'Hara Byrne. Host: A little more conversation. Corus radio nationally. Pierre Poilievre a week into his leadership of the Conservative Party of Canada certainly continues to lay down the gauntlet to Justin Trudeau. We speak with one of Poilievre's earliest supporters within the Conservative Party about what Senator Denise Batters believes a Pierre Poilievre leadership will bring to the CPC and what Canadians might expect from the official opposition and its leader. (Most will recall Senator Batters very public challenge of Erin O'Toole when he was CPC leader which led to the expulsion from the CPC MP caucus by O'Toole, although the party's Senate caucus refused to expel Batters.)              Guest: Senator Denise Batters (Saskatchewan) When police officers are killed in the line of duty it is their immediate families which suffer most. We speak with Jason Harnett whose brother Andrew, a Calgary Police Service Sergeant was killed on New Year's Eve, 2020, after being dragged by a fleeing vehicle and falling into the path of an oncoming car following a routine traffic stop. The driver of the fleeing car was 17 at the time and faces a murder trial. A second occupant of the car who Sgt. Harnett was in the process of arresting on outstanding warrants pled guilty to manslaughter and will be out of prison before Sgt Harnett's then unborn son will reach his 4th birthday. Sunday, September 25, the first post-Covid delayed Canadian Police and Peace Officers Memorial service will take place in Ottawa. Sgt Harnett will be recognized.                    Guest: Jason Harnett. Brother of Calgary Police Service Sergeant Andrew Harnett.    When a police officer is murdered in cold blood the entire police community in Canada suffers and rallies. On Monday (Sept 12) Toronto Police Service Constable Andrew Hong was shot and killed execution-style by Sean Petrie who according to police had been waiting at a Mississauga, Ontario, Tim Hortons for more than 2 hours for a police officer to appear. Petrie had earlier hijacked a vehicle which also involved him shooting one person who suffered life-altering injuries. Petrie then drove to his former employer's place of business and shot and killed the 38 year old father of 2 young girls and shooting two other persons at the auto body shop with one victim not expected to survive. - Petrie was then shot and killed by police near Hamilton.               Guest: David Perry. Former Toronto Police homicide unit detective and 20-plus year member of the Toronto police. Now CEO of Investigative Solutions Network.  --------------------------------------------- Host/Content Producer – Roy Green Technical Producer - David Hunter Podcast Producer – Tom McKay Podcast Co-Producer – Matt Taylor If you enjoyed the podcast, tell a friend! For more of the Roy Green Show, subscribe to the podcast! https://globalnews.ca/roygreen/ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Roy Green Show
Sept 17: When a police officer is murdered in cold blood, the entire police community in Canada suffers and rallies.

Roy Green Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 8:36


When a police officer is murdered in cold blood the entire police community in Canada suffers and rallies. On Monday (Sept 12) Toronto Police Service Constable Andrew Hong was shot and killed execution-style by Sean Petrie who according to police had been waiting at a Mississauga, Ontario, Tim Hortons for more than 2 hours for a police officer to appear. Petrie had earlier hijacked a vehicle which also involved him shooting one person who suffered life-altering injuries. Petrie then drove to his former employer's place of business and shot and killed the 38 year old father of 2 young girls and shooting two other persons at the auto body shop with one victim not expected to survive. - Petrie was then shot and killed by police near Hamilton.  Guest: David Perry. Former Toronto Police homicide unit detective and 20-plus year member of the Toronto police. Now CEO of Investigative Solutions Network.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Janette's TV Podcast
DREAMS COME TRUE AT WORLD OF BARBIE

Janette's TV Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2022 10:47


In this Janette's TV & Janette's TV Podcast Season 12 kick off episode, Janette sits down with Heather Carrick, Operations Manager, The World of Barbie, Mississauga, Ontario to talk about how Barbie's impacted women and girls since the 60's, Barbie's creator, Ruth Handler intention that through the Barbie doll, girls could dream big and be anything that they wanted to be. How Barbie exemplifies a woman always has choices. How Barbie breaks traditional dolls of the time which were marketed as babies or housewife type characters. The misconception is that girls must renounce their femininity to be taken seriously. How Barbie teaches that it's okay to look good and still work in a serious field. How Barbie is a strong, independent, financially secure woman and much more. Janette also takes you inside the exhibit so you can explore Barbie's Dream House, Camper, Airlines, Closet, Fashion Runway, cars, outfits, and tons more! LISTEN TO THIS EPISODE & POST YOUR COMMENTS IN THE FEED BELOW Support us on Patreon www.patreon.com/janettestv Looking for more ways to support Janette's TV? Buy our merchandise here! https://www.janetteburke.com/shop Protect your Privacy with Express VPN. Find out how you can get 3 months free by clicking the link below. www.expressvpn.com/ Janette's TV & Podcast Channels www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDHHvKvXq7o Want my help on your media journey? Check out my 1:1 On-Camera Training Opportunity https://www.janetteburke.com/1-1-on-c... Interview Showcase Package Who Is It For? If you're a celebrity or thought-leader in your industry (i.e. an entrepreneur, professional, coach, consultant, speaker or book author) that wants exposure to mine and other audiences and also understands that in order to get it and become an industry leader you must first be camera ready, let's talk! I'll take you through the 4 pillars of my Interview Showcase Package. Book Your Complimentary 15-minute Audition! https://www.janetteburke.com/interview Book Your 15-Minute Complimentary Audition Link to my calendar below https://www.janetteburke.com/book-online

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast
CTV News Toronto at Six for Sept. 13, 2022

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 46:47


The motive for the unprovoked "ambush" attack that killed a Toronto police officer in Mississauga is still unclear; Ontario will not make the Queen's funeral on Sept. 19 a provincial holiday; and, a mom says a school bus company left her son with autism stranded 20 km away from home.

Fight Back with Libby Znaimer
Toronto Gun Violence & Ottawa's Affordability Plan

Fight Back with Libby Znaimer

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 51:59


Libby Znaimer is joined by Jon Reid, President of the Toronto Police Association, followed by the Rev. Sky Starr, founder and executive director of Out of Bounds which provides grief and trauma support to victims of gun violence and Joseph Neuberger, a criminal defense lawyer with Neuberger & Partners LLP. In the news: Toronto is experiencing a surge in gun violence. Between Sept. 9-12, the city saw 8 shootings resulting in 11 victims including the death of a 15-year-old teenager. Constable Andrew Hong, a veteran Toronto police officer, was killed in an unprovoked shooting on Monday while eating lunch at a Tim Hortons in Mississauga. That same day a driver was shot in a carjacking and then three people were shot in Milton resulting in one death. Our guests react to the latest news and Joseph weighs in on the judicial system's bail system. ---- THE MICHELIN GUIDE IN TORONTO Libby Znaimer is now joined by Ren

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 57 – Unstoppable Stroke Survivor with Melanie Taddeo

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 70:09


Meet Melanie Taddeo. Her parents always encouraged her to be the best that she could be. That attitude shined through when, at the age of 21, she experienced a stroke that left her paralyzed on her left side and totally blind. Her drive helped her to regain the ability to walk. Also, she regained some of her eyesight.   Melanie will tell you that she is a teacher and loves to impart knowledge. In this episode, you will get to hear how she crashed through barriers when school principals and others would not give her a job after discovering she was blind. As many of us have experienced, Melanie found that no matter her capabilities and experience, the only thing prospective employers considered was that she was blind.   Melanie's story proves how incredibly unstoppable she was and is. I hope you will find this episode as inspirational and thought-provoking as did I.   About the Guest: Melanie Taddeo is a passionate advocate for inclusion who at the age of 21 suffered a massive stroke that left her completely paralyzed on her left side and legally blind. After years of therapy, she was able to regain her independence and go on to become the first legally blind teacher to graduate in Ontario.   She is a certified special education teacher with over 20 years of experience in program development, fundraising, community outreach, volunteer management, and public speaking. Melanie founded Connect 4 Life and Voices 4 Ability; V4A Radio based on her personal experience of the lack of programs that promote independence for people with disabilities. She has made it her goal to help empower others to achieve their dreams despite the challenges they face.   Melanie has assisted hundreds of people through Connect 4 Life's programs such as the first broadcast training program for individuals with disabilities: “An Accessible voice in Broadcasting”, life skills training program, and public speaking. Melanie's passion is evident in everything she does to ensure that each client sees their abilities and not only their disabilities.    Melanie published her first book in 2019. “My Unforeseen Journey Losing Sight Gaining vision.   Melanie has been a Toastmaster for eight years achieving her, Distinguished Toastmaster (DTM), and was the recipient of the Member Making a Difference award (MMAD) in 2020, and now using her speaking to inspire others across the globe as a champion of inclusion,    Melanie empowers entrepreneurs, professionals, and community leaders to embrace challenges and how to overcome unforeseen change with dignity, and ease.   Most recently Melanie has created a company called gaining vision, to help promote inclusion across the world, ensuring that every person feels heard, seen, and valued just as they are.      Her story is proof that despite adversity success is possible with hard work and perseverance.         To learn more please visit www.connect4life.ca    WEBSITE: www.melanietaddeo.ca   http://gainingvision2020.com  FACEBOOK PAGE   https://www.facebook.com/gainingvision/  TWITTER   @gainingvision  INSTAGRAM   @gaining_vision  YOUTUBE   Gaining vision with Melanie Taddeo Nxumalo    About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is an Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21  Well, hi, once again, and welcome to unstoppable mindset. I am excited to introduce you all to Melanie Taddeo . And Melanie's gonna tell her story. I don't want to give it all away. But Melanie has everything that we could ever expect to have in an unstoppable mindset podcast. She has a great story. She has unexpected life challenges that she has chosen to deal with. And she did deal with them. And she has all sorts of other things that I'm sure we're going to talk about. She's an advocate, dealing with persons with disabilities and all sorts of other stuff. And rather than saying all sorts of other stuff, and then living it to your imagination, Melanie, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Melanie Taddeo  02:04 Thank you so much for having me, Michael.   Michael Hingson  02:07 So here it is a late afternoon for me and an early evening for you. You're in Toronto or LLC and Ontario, right? Correct. Yes. And we're out here in California. So we traverse the three major time zones of our two countries. And so you Have you had dinner? Not yet. I will. I will start cooking after this is over? Well, let's get started. So why don't you tell us a little bit about you kind of your, your early years and all that stuff. And we'll go from there.   Melanie Taddeo  02:42 Wonderful. So I'm the eldest of four girls, my dad is Italian descent, and my mom is Canadian, and a little bit of Irish and English in her background. But I was raised in an amazing loving home, where everything was encouraged, reach for the stars, hard work ethic possibilities and be a great role model for my three younger sisters. And that sounds like a really comfortable life. But it can be challenging at times, of course, because you know, you want to be the perfect daughter, whatever perfect was, but in your is a child that's the impression was given work hard. Of course, you had choices be a doctor or lawyer. I didn't either. But that's okay. But everything they taught me was about equality. And everybody's equal everybody, although there may be differences in our friends, all of us are the same inside and really to focus on that and not seeing differences. And I appreciate that now. Now, this was the mindset they taught me yet in their generations. Decision. How   Michael Hingson  03:46 old were you when this was was being taught to you?   Melanie Taddeo  03:49 Oh, from age five, up so   Michael Hingson  03:53 in school and so on, you are already thinking of people more as equal than probably a lot of kids did.   Melanie Taddeo  04:01 Yes, definitely. And, you know, it's, I'm so thankful for that. Because, obviously, we live in a very multicultural area of Mississauga. And we, it was really great, because, you know, although there are different types, sizes, you know, different genders, all these different things, and of course, you know, different backgrounds. We just were all friends. And that was a great mentality. And I'm really happy my family instilled that in me at that age.   Michael Hingson  04:28 Did other children have any kind of an issue with that? They tend to view people the same way. How did all that work?   Melanie Taddeo  04:37 You know, it was interesting, I think, looking back reflecting back, perhaps there was some definite biases there. But as children, you just think, Oh, they're mean. And that was about it. And I don't want to be their friend because they're mean, but it was never about oh, you're this or that. But it was just that unconscious bias or the way that they were they were raised. But we all play together. We all had great opportunities to learn about one another. And I appreciated that. Even individuals with disabilities, you know, there was a special class back then you might exam not going to age myself. But back then there was different separate classes. But they were just kids, there was nothing different, which I really appreciate that. My family always said, you know, no matter what family you know, sticks together, we always work towards a common goal. Set your goals high. Again, remember that lawyer and Doctor kind of mentality. I reached for the stars, everything I did in my life was to be a teacher, because that was my dream. I wanted to be a teacher, I was that girl that settled her stuffed animals to the front of the room to teach them, you know, the ABCs. I loved it. So everything my volunteer work growing up, as I started to get older, 13 and up was all right around kids. And I wanted to teach that was my dream.   Michael Hingson  05:57 So when you were when you were growing up? Did you have many friends who had any kind of disability? Do you remember? It was they were in different schools?   Melanie Taddeo  06:10 It mostly Yes. But for me, it was just, you know, it wasn't even on my radar, to be honest, at that point. Actually, that's not true. There was a young man down the street that lived there, and he had Down syndrome. But he just used to ride his bike around and he was just the boy like, we called him by his name, Jay. And that was that. But again, everybody was the same. So it didn't dawn on me. But again, reflecting back, I now recognize that, but it was never said to me, oh, this person has Down syndrome. It was just he was Jay. And it was a good thing, because I feel it taught me so much about seeing past the disability. So that was thrilling years, great. Life was really great.   Michael Hingson  06:57 So you went through? Well, I guess would be high school and all that. And you still wanted to teach   Melanie Taddeo  07:04 everything. Actually in high school I used to I got into art. And I found my passion. I had a mentor in high school teach me about art. And I was able to do all these beautiful paintings and drawings. And my creative side came out and I was on cloud nine. i My mentor at the time said I can retire if somebody one of my students goes to university for art, like that's me. And again, I did everything working in art galleries, that sort of thing, just to get experience. And I put together an amazing portfolio and was accepted to go to university for Arch. Again. It's a big joke on me in the future. But this point I was living the dream, teaching art and summer camp. And just loving my spare spare time was painting and drying and really absorbing all the arts.   Michael Hingson  07:53 So you went off to university what university I went to York   Melanie Taddeo  07:57 University, which is in Toronto. At first I committed and then I lived in residence. And it was a great opportunity. It was very well known for their art program, top notch professors and had great facility and I was just experimenting with all the different techniques and styles and just really trying to get my feet footing because I encounter a world would be an art teacher that was my dream. Best of both worlds.   Michael Hingson  08:25 So I get the impression that something happened along the way to change all that.   Melanie Taddeo  08:31 Yes, yes, it did. My fourth year university, I started to develop migraines. And everybody kept saying lots of stress from University. I'm thinking I'm studying art, what kind of stress do you have during kid paid by campus, really. And they kept giving me medication to numb the pain. But till one morning, I couldn't lift my head off the pillow. Finally I said there's something wrong and I went and they did MRIs they did CAT scans. They said no, nothing showing. And so one day, they saw something behind my eyes. And they said well, there's something there. And they diagnosed me with pseudotumor servi. And really just means there's a fake tumor. Yeah. But it was a misdiagnosis. It was a sign of a stroke. So they sent me for the eye operation to relieve the pressure from the optic nerve. And they kept me in the hospital and I was lethargic that was throwing up and they said all this anesthetic, it's this it's that it's the other they sent me home. And I was at my parents house recovering. And they had to go the family doctor and I'd still been really really sick and not well. And I couldn't see out of my eyes when I woke up. So they had the bandage. And they say Oh, it's okay. It's part of the surgery, it's going to come back. And so I had to call the family doctor for a checkup for them to test the eyes. And again, remember remembering that they said oh, you're going to be able to see Don't worry me He's fine. It's just they're swollen, they're going to come down. And I remember having to get showered. And I was like, come on, Melanie get given the shower, and I said, okay, okay, okay, just a minute I sit on, see the toilet and just rest. Basically, my mom had to shower me, and I'm a very modest woman, I would never let that happen. But I was just really out of it. Got to the top of the staircase, and I was like, Okay, go ahead and go down. I'm like, Oh, the house was spinning. And I said, I think I'm gonna go down on my bomb. So I said, at the top of stairs, and I started to go down. And mom's like, move your left side. Melanie said, I am. What do you think I'm stupid. And I would never talked to my mother. But I had had a stroke at the top of the staircase. So this struggle of be completely paralyzed on the left side and legally blind. So I was in a coma for two weeks. And I tell you, everybody, you can hear everything going on when you're in a coma. So please talk to us. I heard everything I heard. I had the last rites. I heard the doctors told my parents, I wasn't going to live to plan my funeral. I heard them basically say, if I survived, I would be a vegetable. Of course, I also heard everybody's deepest, dark, darkest confessions. So again, be careful what you share. My little sister came to me said, I'm so sorry, I stole your case of peach gum, because I kept it in my bedroom, you know, extra case, throw it in your bag every day. And when I woke up, I had remembered everything. And so of course, I would question them. But during the coma, my dad put a Walkman. And again, I'm dating myself, but with music on my ears. And I remember the songs from that time. And again, all of the DJs everything was right there in my mind, because I could hear everything. And I knew it was going, I just wasn't awake.   Michael Hingson  11:48 So you actually were unconscious. So it wasn't just that you were paralyzed and could move. You're actually unconscious. But as you said, you could hear everything. Yeah,   Melanie Taddeo  12:00 that you couldn't communicate. And, again, my brain wasn't there. Apparently, supposedly, I was. You know, they kept saying she's not gonna wake up, she said, and that's a scary thing for a family to go through. But imagine hearing all this and wanting to say, Hello, I'm alive. I'm still here. So it was a very exciting time to reflect on but at that time it was. And so when I woke up, I couldn't see anything. And of course, I was intubated. So I couldn't communicate either. And they kept saying, use this for that and use because I could hear, so use a thumbs up for Yes, down for no. And they wanted me to use this bliss board of letters to point out and I couldn't see them and explain to my can't see anything, and my eyes were no longer bandaged. And this was it. So when I was finally out of the coma, or type still, during the coma, they did life saving procedure, where they inserted a catheter into the groin and inserted 1 million units of blood into my brain. And I was the second out of five in North America to survive. And that changed a lot because it relieved the blood clots, but it also added extra pressure to behind the eyes. So the optic nerves were permanently damaged, destroyed during this whole procedure. So yeah, welcome blind, Nigel to move. It was a very scary time, a very angry time.   Michael Hingson  13:25 So you were intubated, that must have been pretty uncomfortable, especially once you woke up?   Melanie Taddeo  13:30 Definitely I you know, especially because you have to learn to swallow again, not only the stroke, but having this to die for so long. It was it was just a very new process for me having to digest everything that had happened, as well as recover physically.   Michael Hingson  13:46 How long were you intubated once you woke up?   Melanie Taddeo  13:50 So I was in a coma for two weeks. And I'd say that was going to be another two weeks.   Michael Hingson  13:55 Wow. Yeah. My wife went through a situation in 2014, where she had doubled ammonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome, and was put in an induced coma. So she was intubated. But after two weeks, they said they they needed to remove the two but they did a tracheostomy so that she could, she could continue to breathe, but they kept you intubated for a month.   Melanie Taddeo  14:21 Mm hmm. Yes. And again, I am sure again, depending on the timing, how that was because again, I had long term, like they've cracked on my teeth, all that fun stuff. So it was you know, so lots of other things. And then of course, the raspy throat for quite a while. Yeah. But yeah,   Michael Hingson  14:38 yeah, it was. So you were totally blind.   Melanie Taddeo  14:43 Totally nothing at that point. And it was, you know, it was it was it was scary, because I couldn't see I could just hear people come in the room. I couldn't tell who's there. Of course, I got very used to people's voices. And that was a good thing because that's how I tend to, you know, really depend on my sense of hearing. But I also want to have us on one hand, so having to learn to do everything, feed myself, things like that just laying in a hospital bed alone. But being told that I was never going to see again that I was never going to get out of the bed, all those negative thoughts, and I'm a very positive person, I always had been with that positive upbringing. And I kept saying, no, no, I'm going to I'm going to do this. And they, they said, Oh, Melania, you know, stroke really affects you. You're the mindset of how you perceive things. And it's true, I understand that. So I always say I had stroke brain, it's not a medical term. It's a melody term, that I thought I could do everything I kept telling them. This was happening in July, I'm going to university back to university in September, I'm going back to move out on my own pictures to paint you exactly. In my mind that I just wanted to get back to normal, whatever normal was.   Michael Hingson  15:57 So what happened? Well,   Melanie Taddeo  15:59 I am a fighter. I'm a survivor, my parents will tell you I'm stubborn, but I'd like to say determine it sounds much nicer. And after a good kick in the butt from a chaplain of the hospital. I decided that I wanted to thrive instead of just survive, I stopped feeling sorry for myself. And, you know, there's a lot of time to think in the hospital. And you know, I had amazing family support, whatever they were petrified. Because of course, going through the I had regressed because I was scared to a little childcare my parents, mommy and daddy again. And I've just was it was just part of the stroke and part of the fear. But after the chaplain really brought it back home, he's like, if you want to go back to school, you can you know, you just need to really get your act together and work hard. And I went to a rehab hospital where I learned to walk walk again, I don't have use of my left arm still. But that's because I'm right handed and I kind of forgot it was there for a while. But I started walking again after you know, driving my wheelchair and to the wall several time, they said they had to repeat the entire hospital, the rehab center after I left because I kept couldn't see where I was going. So I kept ramming into walls and things like that. But I just kept a positive attitude got my independence back as far as I could physically walking first, of course, you know, with a quad cane, a single pain, and then without a cane. But then I had to come to terms with the fact that I was blind. I went through the denial. They had cniv with just cane National Institute for the Blind, come and see me with a guide dog and a talking watch. Like what are you here for? I don't need you. Well, Melanie, you're black. No not. And after going through that denial, I went to see an IV and learned how to navigate use my white cane, get around and cook independently and get my independence back. And then, of course being stubborn, as you know, as my family would say or determined. I went to teachers college I applied and because my grades were great. My volunteer experience was right up that I knew they had to give me that interview. And the interview went like this much. How are you going to do this with your disability? And how are you going to do that with your disability? Of course, in my mind, I don't have a disability, right. I'm like, fine. I said, I thought this interview was about my abilities and not my disability. Oh, well, they let me in. And my first day of teachers college, my professors are gone by Christmas. I said, Watch me. I had no idea what I was doing. I never went to school without eyesight. And I had to learn to put books on tape about having notetakers asking for accommodations. I knew nothing about this. But I quickly learned and Teachers College was only a year. It was intense. And even with my practicum I had to advocate for myself. So I learned a lot really, really quickly. Because I was determined to achieve this dream. I wasn't gonna let anything hold me back at this point, because that was my lifelong dream. I had to learn how to do things differently, though, because of course, I couldn't do it the same way. Well, you could do them. Absolutely. 100% I got very creative. I was teaching a grade seven, eight split art. And I had these goggles created for the students to see what I saw. So they could understand just a little bit of what I was seeing. And it was the best teachable moment I've ever had. Those students could empathize. They got a really great ideas of what they couldn't do what they couldn't do ask a lot of questions, which opens the dialogue for kids because they you know, they're there. They want to ask questions are curious, but they also are afraid of offending. And I was able to get them to try using doing art without their eyesight. Yes, I haven't blindfold themselves put some music on Okay, painters, and it was a really great experience at the beginning. And as well working with little kids and teaching them about abilities versus the disability, because of course at that time when I was teaching and Teachers College, there was the differences and there was really hard differences with people with this abilities into schools. So they're being made fun of and stuff like that. So I wanted to close that down fast. So it was a great experience. But the one thing I did face that was challenging for me is my professors thought that I should only teach special education. And I fought that tooth and nails. I ended up going into special education because I love it. But I was angry at them for putting me in that box.   Michael Hingson  20:25 So, you, when you were teaching art in Teachers College, what kind of art? Was it painting or sculpting   Melanie Taddeo  20:36 or helping and drying, believe it or not, and it was really getting them to teach the basics. And I had to teach myself, okay, how am I going to teach this concept now that I can't see, because after I, when I was in the rehab hospital, they had me trying to paint and draw. And first of all, the drawings was totally totally disproportion. So I thought, you know, what, it's all about interpretation and perception. So why not call it abstract. But I was still able still having the skill sets to talk it through. So I would help them with a verbal practice, okay, so we're going to, you know, take the charcoal and do this and walk them through it. And I said, Why don't you try and show me how you would draw this from your perspective. And then I would do a demonstration. And they'd be like, Oh, mister, doesn't look like that bowl of fruit? No, it doesn't, you're right, what does it look like, but this is my interpretation. So it was a really great eye opening experience for them. But I also really started to sway towards clay, and sculpture, and really get those tactile feelings. So for me, that's what shifted for me in my art, but I still had to teach the the elements of art. So being creative thinking outside the box, and getting the students to really listen, and be creative as well.   Michael Hingson  21:58 So when you were teaching, drawing, and charcoals, and so on, were you doing that, in part, because you still were going through some sort of a denial or?   Melanie Taddeo  22:10 Oh, okay. And wasn't it?   Michael Hingson  22:14 Right? Because that's, that's what you teach in the in art, right?   Melanie Taddeo  22:17 And that's the norm, right? Because I was normal, though, it took me a long time to really understand when I got to that acceptance stage, I was like, you know, I don't want to join it anymore. And that was okay, for me at that time, since then I've gone back to it, but in a very different way. So, but at that moment, it was working through the process of acceptance.   Michael Hingson  22:41 So you were you were totally blind, that that did change at some point. It did.   Melanie Taddeo  22:46 So I it's amazing. The brain is a amazing muscle, I'll call it. And so because my eyes actually are fine, this optic nerve that is destroyed, in my optic nerve wasn't passing the messages to the brain and what I was seeing, so technically, my brain taught itself how to see. Not well, but it's still going see some shapes. And I see some details. I can read large print, things like that. So I do have some usable sight. However, I also learned very quickly not to depend on that site, because you never know. So,   Michael Hingson  23:21 so how long after? Well, you were in Teacher's College? How long after that? Did you regain some use of eyesight?   Melanie Taddeo  23:29 It was actually a number of years after Teachers College that actually, yeah, okay.   Michael Hingson  23:34 Did you learn braille? I did. So you use Braille. Still?   Melanie Taddeo  23:39 I do not. i It's funny because I had when I was doing my additional qualifications. To teach individuals with a blind or partially sighted they, they you have to learn how to read Braille. So I mastered grade one like that grade to the contractions a little tricky for me, I'll be honest, but it was more visual, I was doing it because my fingertips are not so good with sensation. And, you know, of course, I can still teach it, but I don't use it myself and then still depend on that large print or a Sharpie marker. But I'm also learning but other technologies now to count on that instead of the print.   Michael Hingson  24:21 You think your fingertips and their ability to sense or read dots were affected at all by the stroke?   Melanie Taddeo  24:28 i Yes, absolutely. Even though it's my right side, I definitely feel it was that I noticed even though the stroke affected my left side, other sensations on my right side were diminished. So I think that was definitely part of it.   Michael Hingson  24:40 So that may have been an issue that if you didn't have a loss of sensation that may have helped with Braille.   Melanie Taddeo  24:47 Oh 100% And I think I would have definitely continued with it if it had been able to read it with my fingers because it is such an easy way to communicate and help with interviews like this. If you have no So whenever it would be great.   Michael Hingson  25:03 Yeah. Well, and it's important to be able to do that. And you're absolutely right. The The reality is Braille is the main reading and writing mode that blind people and a lot of low vision people use as well, because in general, it's more efficient than looking at letters unless you have enough eyesight to read to be able to do that comfortably. Yes. And so the problem is that a lot of people, on the other hand, never get to learn braille as children, because they're forced to try to use their eyes. I've heard just countless people say, if I'd only really had the opportunity, and really did learn braille as a child, I'd be a much better reader today.   Melanie Taddeo  25:47 I've heard that a lot as well. And then also, a lot of parents don't want their children to depend on Braille, which is mind boggling.   Michael Hingson  25:55 They don't want their children to be blind, and they won't deal with that. That's true, too. Which is, which is part of the problem. But Braille is still the, the means by which we read and write. But you, you certainly have dealt with it well, and you've dealt with it in some some very practical ways, since you really don't have the sensation to do Braille really well. And that's perfectly understandable. So you went off and you went to be a teacher, you went to Teachers College, and then what did you do?   Melanie Taddeo  26:25 I graduated as a first legally blind teacher to graduate in Ontario, which is a really big deal. Except nobody would hire me. And, you know, I've really struggled with that I didn't comprehend why. Because again, to me, there was no difference. It was just doing something differently. And creatively. I had a lot of great references, of course, because I was doing practice teaching at my old high school as teaching art. And of course, I have references. But once I put my application out to the boards, I get calls from the principal's and they'd be like, Oh, you're exactly looking for, you know, grade seven, eight split for RT, are you willing, and I Ghen, this is something I learned, but not you do not disclose your disability over the phone before getting to the interview, and I asked, Are you aware that I'm visually impaired? And they said, Oh, no. And of course, I said, What was that a problem? Well, not with me, of course, but will be with parents. And again, it wasn't a huge understanding advocacy at that point. But to me who better to tshirt, children with a disability than somebody that little one, just 24/7? So I said, Okay, thanks so much. So I didn't get hired. And I started to feel like what a waste, oh, my gosh, I'm never gonna get a job. You know, the whole pour was me pity parade thing. Stopped. And I thought, you know, what, I'm a great teacher, I was still volunteer teaching, and I was loving it. And I was coming up with really unique ways to teach and get around this, you know, safety thing. So I had all the answers down pat, and how to do things safely for everybody, and where I would be successful, and what different things I could do to bring to the table to add that little bit extra. And I started to talk to people, a lot of people with various disabilities. And they kept saying, you know, we want to learn how to be independent. Melanie, how did you do this? And I said, Well, it's easy. You just have to, you know, really put your mind to it set some goals. And so I thought, wouldn't it be amazing to have a charity, or a program known as a first it was a program to help individuals with different disabilities access, education and training, just as they are, despite their disabilities. And so I had run a learning center for adults with disabilities, just teach them life skills, help them learn to advocate for stuff, all the stuff that I had done to get my independence back. And that went on for three years. And that was great. But I learned a hard lesson. Like I'll use my own money for that. Not a good idea. So it didn't last long. And I then I have met a lawyer, and they're like, why did you start a charity to do the same type of programming, and that way you can seek funding and donations. Okay, so I did that. And in the meantime, I was trying to think outside the box other than life skills, what other skills should I be teaching when the programs you're talking to different people? And advocacy was a big piece. And then also, I needed something to share information because I can't read brochures, and I was like, No, you have to have a great brochure on it, but I can't read it. So I created voices for ability radio, which is the first 24/7 Internet radio station for about and by people with disabilities as a platform for us to have a voice and that was in Canada so I wouldn't be clear in Canada because there's many all over the globe but and so voices for ability radio was our A platform for people to share their stories, as well as those resources that I and my family found so hard to find after becoming someone with a disability, because nobody shared information. So this was an exciting journey that started 2014. And we still are up and running. And it's exciting. We now since doing voices learned that many people with disabilities love media. So what created a radio broadcast training program? And how to podcast so I teach that every day, it's a great thing. So I'm teaching just in a very different way.   Michael Hingson  30:34 Well, and there's nothing wrong with that. No, not at all. I've always liked to teach. And when I was getting my master's degree in physics, I also got a secondary teaching credential. And in a sense, the actual certifications in both cases, I have not used, I didn't really end up with major jobs in physics, although I did, and still do work with companies in terms of scientific technologies, bleeding edge technologies, and so on. And teaching, by definition, because that is something that all of us have to do, as you're pointing out. The reality is we're the best teachers for teaching about disabilities or persons with disabilities. Absolutely. And, and so it's important to do that. The other side of that is that we also, if we do it, well learn to sell we all become great salespeople, because we have to do that in order to break through the misconceptions and perceptions that people have about us. Absolutely. So we we have to do that and make that work. So your the radio and the internet program is still up and running.   Melanie Taddeo  31:56 It is yes, we act now virtual because of course with pandemic, a lot of our clients are high risk. So we had them sound during the pandemic and we were able to reach more people throughout Ontario. So for us that makes sense. So with a 20 week program, we teach radio broadcasting just the basics introductory, they created their own podcast and a demo reel and a resume and then we connect them we partner with a lot of broadcasters they come in and they share their expertise and teach them and connect them with internships after they graduate and help them get their start that's the starting point.   Michael Hingson  32:31 You teach them how to edit and and process what do you use for that Reaper? Okay. There is there and all the appropriate plugins and and scripts that go with it. Yes, Reaper is a wonderful thing.   Melanie Taddeo  32:48 Yes, it is incredible. And you know, it's funny because it took us from trial and error. We tried to das it. We tried all those other ones. It's just like, I can't do this. They're not gonna be able to do it. So yes.   Michael Hingson  33:01 Well, I go back, talk about not wanting to give away your age, but hey, I'm not shy. I'm Nora, my modest. I worked in radio at a campus radio station in the late 60s and early 70s. Actually up through May or June of 1976. And I can tell you that there is nothing like when you need to edit a reel of tape, cutting, splicing, putting splicing tape in and doing it in such a way that you really can bridge the sound very effectively. It is nothing like Reaper today.   Melanie Taddeo  33:35 Yes, it's amazing how far it's come the technology and it again, I can't even imagine how you did that. That's incredible.   Michael Hingson  33:44 Yeah, my wasn't the best splicer in the world. But I but I can use Reaper really well. So I'm very happy with with all the different things that one can do with Reaper, it is a great program. Yes. And it is accessible. And the reality is that it is possible to do editing and so on. And Reaper is something that not only blind but sighted people use, but they have the people who are involved with it have been very diligent about doing everything possible to add in scripts and do other things so that all the features of Reaper are available and accessible.   Melanie Taddeo  34:16 Yes, and it's so great because when we teach our students with who are blind, we do the shortcuts, but we don't do it just for them. We do it for everybody. It's faster guys. And they're like, Yeah, I did as well. This is great. I love that. And it's interesting because it's amazing because everyone's on the same level. And we do do some extra work for those individuals with screen readers, you know, because we've got to make sure that Jaws key commands aren't the same and all those fun things so but it's great.   Michael Hingson  34:46 There are some great Reaper listservs and most of the time is spent talking about doing things to create an edit music and I don't use it for that. I'm so I'm only doing simple stuff by hand. relative terms and that is for podcast. But it is amazing the things that I see people doing and, and all the things that we're learning and all the different things that are available. It's just pretty incredible.   Melanie Taddeo  35:10 It is it is. But I really appreciate the fact that they continue to update the accessibility with Asara and as somebody else. And there's even a group, I don't know if they're in Canada, or they're on national, where they're located. But Reapers without papers. And they're a group of young people that have all this expertise of a river. It's amazing. And they're a great resource.   Michael Hingson  35:32 And that's where all the music stuff comes from. Most Well, I think the main proponents of it are in England or, or in the British Isles somewhere. But it is all over. And there is a huge subscription list. For the for the Reapers with the help papers. It's pretty cute.   Melanie Taddeo  35:52 Yeah, no, I think it's awesome. It's a great resource for our guys as well. So it's, it's wonderful. It's a great experience, and I get to do what I love and watch individuals grow. And that's a dream come true.   Michael Hingson  36:05 So you're, you're teaching them, but do you still have a radio program or any kind of thing that you're publishing?   Melanie Taddeo  36:12 I have my own podcast, take another look podcast, with my co host, kereta Felix, and we talk about uncomfortable and difficult conversations. So that's what I'm doing, you know, because you have to lead by example, of course. And if you don't have a podcast, you're teaching podcasts like, how does that work? But I also, I did have a show on voices for ability for a long time, but just don't have the time to do everything. So I said, just take my content from the podcast and put on station so we're gonna get to that.   Michael Hingson  36:41 Well, there you go. See? And and the podcast is working. Well, how long have you been doing it?   Melanie Taddeo  36:45 Since January?   Michael Hingson  36:47 Oh, you're just you're?   Melanie Taddeo  36:49 Yes, we're newbies. It's interesting, because we wanted to start something new and different. And working together is a lot of fun. And of course, we have we just recorded our 25th episode. So it's exciting.   Michael Hingson  37:03 You're doing once a week.   Melanie Taddeo  37:05 We Yeah, they come on every Saturday, we meet together, we record two episodes, and then just launch them every Saturday. Yes, yeah.   Michael Hingson  37:13 Well, we just are ready to put up show 37 of unstoppable mindset, it goes up on Wednesday. And same thing, we're doing one a week, and we started in September. And we're we're pleased with the results. We've gotten a lot of people who listen, and I hope that the people who are listening to this will definitely reach out as you get the opportunity to and let us know what you think of this. But we're having a lot of fun doing the podcasts. And hopefully we'll be able to teach other people the value of doing their own. It's all about telling stories, isn't   Melanie Taddeo  37:45 it? It is really isn't it, but a platform to be able to share your story to inspire others to educate others, there's so many opportunities, and really just have a conversation with the world about things that others don't know about. It's a great opportunity. And I've learned a lot from your podcasts, Michael, hearing all the different guests and different perspectives, I think it's a great opportunity for everybody.   38:07 So is Connect for life still in operation?   Melanie Taddeo  38:10 It is it is that's where I teach. So I teach students connect for life, the charity that I started. And it's great because not only are we doing the broadcasting class and the life skills class, where we have started up intro to public speaking course. And again, for individuals with, with, you know, some difficulties with being able to see, confidence sometimes could be but any disability can generalize. But so we have an introduction to public speaking course where we just teach the basics and get them comfortable and get them confident to be able to share their story because that's what advocacy is all about and being able to ask for things in an effective way when they need it. And then we also have our Connect for wellness program, which helps individuals cope with their mental health what's happening with being isolated, lonely, having a disability, and again talking about that so that they can get through anything they're struggling with.   Michael Hingson  39:04 So, in teaching public speaking, what's the most basic thing that you try to get people who are interested in becoming like public speakers? What's the most basic thing you work to get them to understand or what what kind of things do you have to overcome?   Melanie Taddeo  39:20 So first thing first is having a universal message that your audience can relate to your stories can be personal, but you always have to have that universal message. And please don't talk like this because it's really boring. vocal variety is everything. And for me, it's just about communicating and sharing stories, having that engaging connection with your audience. Because if you lose your audience right off the bat, they're not going to listen. So it's that universal message, tie it through so that what you're saying makes sense to people. And so that would be the main thing but then of course, you know, of course, in our state Your words don't mumble as well as to to clearly outline your speech or Keynote, whatever it is, so that you know where you're going with this and that people can follow easily. Those will be the main things.   Michael Hingson  40:10 read or speak from the heart and don't read a speech.   Melanie Taddeo  40:14 Exactly. And don't read, don't read, please don't read. Because that's terrible. It sounds awful, but connect with your audience have a conversation. And that's exactly speak from your heart. A lot of people speak best when it's off the cuff.   Michael Hingson  40:28 When I first started, when I first started speaking, after September 11, a couple people said you should write your speeches. Okay, I wrote a speech. And I read, it sounded horrible. And I read it to the audience. And it sounded horrible. They were very kind. But I listened to it because I like to record speeches, and then go back and listen to them again. And find that I probably learn more from listening to speeches, as well as going back and listening to these podcasts, which we do as we're running them through Reaper, to take out any little funny noises and throw clearings and all that. But I find that I learned a lot by doing that. And what I discovered was don't read a speech. Yes. And it's important. And the other reason, which most speakers get locked into a mindset don't do is the value of not reading your speech. If you are at a venue where you're speaking and you get there early, you never know what you might learn that you want to put into the speech to add value to it. You   Melanie Taddeo  41:38 got it 100%. And I think it's so important, because I think, you know, what I learned is, if you read a speech, you sound like you're reading a speech, you're not connected with the audience, and nobody knows what you've written. So here's the thing, if you know what you're talking about, just talk, have that conversation and connect with somebody. And like you said, you can add live and add things that just happen. So can be more relatable to your audience, because they were there for that. Sorry, perhaps they can relate to the topic because they're right there in the moment. But for people that are so focused on what they've written, they won't even go off script, and they lose.   Michael Hingson  42:20 And how boring is that? Or what?   Melanie Taddeo  42:22 Yes. And they only say there's three types of speeches, the one you wrote, when you delivered and the one you wish you'd delivered, right? Yeah. Wouldn't it be great just to deliver and be happy?   Michael Hingson  42:34 Yeah, I work really hard to get to the deliver the one I wish to deliver. And so that's why I love to listen to speeches, and so on, and why it's so important to do. But I don't know whether I've ever mentioned that on unstoppable mindset. I was asked once by a speaker's bureau to go deliver a speech to an organization called the National Property Managers Association. And I said to the speaker's bureau person, well, what is that organization, already having my own preconceived notion of what it was, but they said, what I thought, oh, it's an organization while the people who are in charge of taking people's properties and renting them out and so on. So, you know, do you have stories that you can tell him all that and I said, Sure, because, in fact, at the time that we were doing that we had rented, well, we had given a property manager a home, we were moving from one place to another, we're moving Southern California after Karen's illness. And so we had a property manager take over that. And then there were stories about that, not all positive. But I flew in to deliver the speech and got there very late the night before I was supposed to deliver a breakfast speech. So I got to the event on 1230. And I went to bed, got up in the morning, went down after taking my guide dog Africa outside because she has to go do her stuff. So we went in to do the speech, and it was breakfast. So I sat down and I was listening to some people near me speak. And something sounded off. So I said to one of the people, tell me more about the National Property Managers Association. Exactly what do you guys do and so on. The National Property Managers Association is an organization that is in charge of and responsible for anything physical owned by the United States government. Totally different? Yes. And I'm about 10 minutes away from speaking, whole speech has to be revised. And I'm not saying that to brag, but rather to express the importance of really learning to be flexible. Now as it turns out, I had negotiated government contracts and schedules and so on and had lots of great stories. In fact, it was a much more fun speech to give and did deliver a speech that everyone appreciated. He got to also talk about things regarding disabilities and other things like that. But the bottom line is that if you are locked into something so much that you don't pay attention to what's going on around you, you're going to get in trouble. Or you don't care, in which case, they're not going to want to have you come back.   Melanie Taddeo  45:23 Exactly. You would have got up until richer, original speech and they would have been sad about exactly. And probably wouldn't have said much, but probably wouldn't have invited you back. Yeah, no, exactly.   Michael Hingson  45:39 Right. Exactly. Right. They would, they would not have but, but it was fun. It was a great event, and enjoyed it and spoke to other divisions of it. So it was a it was a fun time. But I very much enjoy the fact that I believe it's important for me to learn more when I go to a speaking event than the people I'm speaking to, because that will help me in future speeches. And it's all about speaking from the heart. And it's all about learning to speak. And I can't even say extemporaneously because I know what I want to say. It's not like it's totally random. But I want to be able to be flexible. And that's what any good speakers should be able to do.   Melanie Taddeo  46:20 You know, it's when I ever talked to my students, oh, how do you memorize all your speeches, I said, Well, I personally, I write out my thoughts on the computer. And then I listened to it over and over again, I never ever go by what I write, but it's just the concepts I want to cover. And I may make point form notes, as I'm practicing, but it's just a matter of listening to it. And then I just put them away, and I just start talking. And that's the best speech when you start talking. Because I already know what I want to say, because I've written it down. And that's part of how I learned. It's just like, putting it down on something. And it could and then I'll just walk around the house talking to myself, my husband's like a UK. Oh, yeah, I'm just talking to yourself. And it works out just fine. And sometimes again, you get up and, you know, wait a minute, no, I'm gonna say this instead. And it just happens. And in the moment, so it is a great way. But it's important I find to teach the art of public speaking to anyone with a disability because they've got to be confident in what they're saying, because they want to win what what we what I like to do is to ensure that people feel heard and valued. And being able to articulate what you need and how you feel things like that is very, very important skill that not everybody does. Because that Oh, well. I'm just somebody with just blowing the whistle here. Yes, they do. They need to hear your voice. So for me, that's why we do that course.   Michael Hingson  47:50 Yeah. And by doing that, you're helping them to gain confidence. And the reality is people always say, well, aren't you afraid to get up in front of an audience and speak because why couldn't do that, I'd be afraid. And so I love to tell the story that after September 11, the first time I was invited to speak anywhere, was to a church service in central New Jersey, where they wanted to honor the people who were lost. So it was like two weeks after September 11. So that would have been? Well, it was the 26th. That was Wednesday, two weeks in a day later. And I said, Sure, I'd be glad to come they said, Well, you don't have a lot of time, only about six minutes or so. But we'd like you to come and tell your story. And I said, Sure, I'd be happy to do that. Then I asked the big question, how many people will be there, not 6000. So I learned pretty quickly, you don't be afraid of how large or what kind of what audience you have. You can you can deal with them. And it doesn't matter about the audience. If you connect, which is what you said earlier, it's all about connecting with the audience.   Melanie Taddeo  49:01 And again, knowing that they're there in an emotional state like you had just gone through and knowing that you can connect on that level, you can connect by celebrating the first responders or whoever you were the fire you're celebrating, and just really truly you're all there for a similar reason. And any conference any speaking engagement usually the people are there for the same reason, usually, but usually, you never know there's always that person that it may hit that may not know what you're talking about, or may really get something more out of it than you even expected.   Michael Hingson  49:37 And one of the things I love to do after speaking is take time to talk to people to to meet with them and so on course it's a blessing to have a book. That was the number one New York Times bestseller and, and also have a guide dog because what we do afterward usually is is there is a book table set up and I'll tie now Alamo black lap current eighth guy dog and tie him to the table. Alamo knows how to draw in people when it's all about petting him, of course. But but people come in, and then we get to chat. So whatever tool you have to use, but the bottom line is that people mostly really do want to interact. And you know, I've spoken at events, if you talk about politics and so on, that are completely opposite in view from the political views that I have to that I happen to have. But who cares is for me, it's not about politics, it's about about speaking and delivering messages. And one of the things that I generally do tell people is, like, I am perfectly capable, and probably will pick on Washington DC during this speech, but just let the record show. I'm an equal opportunity abuser. I go from the standpoint of Mark Twain who said Congress's Grandal benevolent asylum for the helpless, so they're all in the same boat. Yeah. So I said, you know, we could we could pick on all of them. And it's a whole lot of fun,   Melanie Taddeo  51:06 though, and again, adding humor, and it just breaks the ice. It says people at ease, and they know that you're just here to share a story. And then you're not going to get those people. Well, I'm on the side, I'm on that side. Right. Yeah. That that commonality. I love it.   Michael Hingson  51:20 And you know, a lot of people say, don't tell a joke at the beginning of a speech. Well, if, if you're telling a joke, just to tell a joke, then I agree. But if it has a purpose, and I have found some of those that are that are really very helpful to drive points home. So it's a lot of fun.   Melanie Taddeo  51:39 Yes, absolutely. And that's exactly it, it's the right time, the appropriate time, you get used to where that is. And yeah, it's just every speech is unique and different. Every audience is unique and different. So really, knowing your audience ahead of time, the best your ability is good thing,   Michael Hingson  51:55 even delivering the same speech at a lot of different kinds of venues. Each speech is different, and it should be different.   Melanie Taddeo  52:04 Yeah, you have to tailor it, even though you say,   Michael Hingson  52:07 even though it's basically the same speech, but every one is different. And that's what makes it fun, and also makes it great to listen to, because when I go back and listen to some of those speeches in here, how audience react or don't, then that helps me improve it for the next time. So thanks, that's pretty   Melanie Taddeo  52:26 good feedback, or the the response or having those conversations after always gives you that feedback. And you can just evolve from there.   Michael Hingson  52:36 Well, with speeches that I give today, I've learned what I should be able to expect from an audience if I'm connecting with them. And if I'm getting those reactions, then I know that I'm connecting. And if I don't, then I'm, I'm well, on the fly literally need to figure out what to do to make sure that I connect, and I've learned enough to be able to do that. But it is important to do that. And that's what a good speaker should do. Yeah. So you on the other hand, in addition to speaking have written a book, I have, tell us about that if you would,   Melanie Taddeo  53:15 please. So my unforeseen journey losing sight gaining vision is my book and it was published in 2019. I had been told for years, I should write a book, who would want to read my book. And I was listening to an audio book over the Christmas holiday in 2018. I received it and I was mesmerized. It was also such an inspiring book. And it's like, that's why you need to read a book. I'm like, asking the question, Who would want to read my book, he's like, you don't get it Do you don't understand how inspiring you are. So he planted a seed, and I didn't want the book just to be about me. I wanted something tangible for the audience. So the book is about unforeseen change in our life and how we cope with it, and some tangible resources for them to use for their own life. So everybody goes from preceding change, a breakup, a relationship, a death in the family, a loss of a job, let's say, the pandemic, and all of these things. But so the first part of each chapter is my story on a word. So it might be differences, beliefs, success, whatever the word of the chapter is the title of the chapter. And then underneath, I give some things that helped me cope with it. And that way the reader has a choice to add, try to apply it to their situation, or maybe it doesn't work for them. But I wanted something so people's could walk away, go wow, okay, now I can try this out my life, because these are the things that helps me. And it was such an amazing, cathartic process to write the book for myself, but also had my book launch the beginning of December 2019. And I plan this amazing book tour for 2020 and   Michael Hingson  55:00 You know what happened? You got to do it virtually. He   Melanie Taddeo  55:03 was this is it. I didn't actually do much of it to be honest, I understand. Yeah, I, you know, I still will do it. I, you know, I've got all these books. And but what was really great, we got to record the book and audio version, my friend ready for an audio book. And I've been talking a lot about it with different things. But it was a great help. In the pandemic, I had a lot of people say to me, your book, Can I order 10 copies for my friends because they need this right now. And who would have thought I didn't know anything about the pandemic, which was definitely a solution to coping with unforeseen change.   Michael Hingson  55:40 We've just started writing a new book I and a colleague, are writing a book that we are I originally wanted to call blinded by fear because people, when unexpected life changes come about, literally become blinded by fear and they can't make decisions. And it's all about learning to create a mindset where you can deal with unforeseen circumstances and, and be able to move forward. For the moment that we changed the title Carrie, my my colleague decided better title. So right now we're calling it a guide dogs Guide to Being brave, because I've had a guide dogs and so my whole life has been intermix with dogs. So we're going to have a lot of dog stories and other things in it. But the the issue is that people really do need to learn that they can deal with fear and sounds and deal with unexpected life changes. And that sounds like your book, very much talks about that, which is great. It really   Melanie Taddeo  56:37 does. And it's interesting, because I think we automatically assume okay, it's it's terrible life, oh my gosh, how could this? I can't get over it. But we all have that choice. And that's what I had to learn the hard way, that chapel, they came to me and said, Melanie, do you want to just survive? Or do you want to thrive and both. But we don't always have that Chaplain come to us. Sometimes we have worked struggling on our own and not knowing where to turn. And I had to learn a lot of hard lessons. And they weren't easy. So why not share? I wish I had had a book like this. Before this all happens.   Michael Hingson  57:15 When you published the book, was it self published or did a publisher partner publishing?   Melanie Taddeo  57:21 And it's interesting because I did a lot of research about publishing. And I knew nothing about writing a book. And I Okay, I could do the self publishing to a lot of work, and what if it sucked? So I wouldn't know. So I went partner publishing, and I had an angel publisher, and she was amazing. I created a new language. It's called Melanie's, so I use Dragon naturally speaking to me. And it doesn't take what you say. Not always, no, not all the time. So there was a lot of parts, she'd be like, What did you mean here? And then I'd have to go back. Okay, this is what I meant. And so we were caught through it. But she was such a great help in creating the structure of the book and then helping with editing. And she's like, Melanie, look, I wrote it, within eight months, it was just because it was all in my heart in my head. And it was just, I needed to put it on onto the computer, and just get it there. And she's like, this is easy. It's not a problem, just the deciphering of the Davinci Code you've written for me. And, but it came up beautifully and exactly how I wanted it. And it was, it was a great experience. You know, of course, partner push publishing costs money. So that's something I learned now that I kind of know what I'm doing, I would definitely hire an editor, and maybe Self Publish.   Michael Hingson  58:43 Yeah, the thing about self publishing is that you just have to be prepared to do all the marketing, but that's okay.   Melanie Taddeo  58:49 And I did a lot of that with partners publishing as well. So half and half, so it was good.   Michael Hingson  58:55 Don't think for a minute though, that even if you create a contract, and you actually work with a regular full time legitimate publisher, don't think you won't be doing the marketing still, because more and more, they're expecting the authors to do a lot of the marketing, they do provide support, and there's some value to it, but they do require you to demonstrate that you not only can mark it, but that you have a cadre of people to to help and that you have an audience that you can market to, which is cool.   Melanie Taddeo  59:25 And the thing is, who better to market your book than yourself. Because you know the story, you lived it, you've written it. So to me, that makes a lot of sense. And again, I think it's like you mentioned, if you do speaking engagement, you have your book, you can talk about that you can connect with people, and again, it's just making that circuit and I still have to do a lot of that because I haven't had the opportunity yet, as the pandemic starts to, hopefully cool down. We're hopeful I'm optimistic. Again, travelers become, again, something that we're able to do and I hope to go and take it across. Well, definitely to Africa to where my husband is from. So   Michael Hingson  1:00:06 we'll see how it works worse. Yeah. Now where is he from?   Melanie Taddeo  1:00:10 He's from Swaziland, which is a little bit north of South Africa. Closer South Africa.   Michael Hingson  1:00:15 Yeah. So it'd be great to go internationally. Yeah. You join Toastmasters along the way.   Melanie Taddeo  1:00:20 I did. Really when I started the charity. Yeah. So when I started the charity, I knew I had to talk a lot about it. And I'd have to talk to bigger audiences and be able to get my message across. And every single Toastmasters, I'm like, I don't need toast, I don't need to drink, I just need to talk. Like, that's what it's a

The Richard Syrett Show
The Richard Syrett Show - Sep 13, 2022 - Cop Killed in Mississauga, Action Needed on Kamloops Retraction, & CPC Smashing Trudeau in Polls

The Richard Syrett Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 81:02


Today on the Richard Syrett Show: Toronto Sun columnist, Joe Warmington talks about the cop who was shot and killed in Mississauga. Federal director at the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, Franco Terrazzano discusses the CTF slamming Liberals for failing on affordability. Then Ruth Gaskovski, The Home School Advisor. Independent writer, James Pew says we need some action on a Kamloops retraction. Wyatt Claypool, senior correspondent for The National Telegraph brings up Pierre Poilievre's Conservative party smashing Trudeau in the polls. Then Dan McTeague, president of Canadians for Affordable Energy shares his thoughts on Vancouver getting electrical fire trucks & some of the drawbacks that come with it.

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast
CTV News Toronto at Six for Sept. 12, 2022

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 46:26


A Toronto police officer is among the dead and a suspect is in custody following two shootings in Mississauga and Milton; students at a Toronto high school are grieving the murder of a 15-year-old classmate; and, will the Queen's funeral be a national holiday in Canada?

The Man Cave Chronicles
Richard Harmon talks Netflix's 'Fakes'

The Man Cave Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 13:10


Richard Harmon recently joined host Elias in the cave! You can see Richard as Tryst on his latest project 'Fakes' now streaming on Netflix. Fakes - FAKES is the story of two best friends who accidentally build one of the largest fake ID empires in North America. They move into a downtown penthouse, have more cash than they know what to do with, and then get raided by the feds. One of them goes to jail, the other doesn't. This is the story of their ultimate betrayal, told through each of their POVs with regular fourth wall breaks. This is a comedy-drama with two unreliable narrators who are both competing for the last word. Richard Harmon is a world-class actor, consistently working with Hollywood elite. Born in Mississauga, Ontario, Richard began acting professionally when he was only 10 years old, but it took him until he was 15 to fall in love with the craft and hit his stride as a thespian. Richard has had numerous recurring and guest star appearances on such TV shows as TheCW's "Smallville" and "The Secret Circle", SYFY's "Jeremiah", "Flash Gordon" and "Caprica", FOX's "Fringe", Cartoon Network's "Tower Prep", Showcase's "Continuum", A&E's "Bates Motel", CBS' "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation", Netflix's “Van Helsing”, the critically acclaimed AMC series "The Killing" and “A Cinderella Story Starstruck” for HBO Max. He also starred as John Murphy in The CW's "The 100", a post-apocalyptic drama set 97 years after the earth has been destroyed by a nuclear war which aired for 7 seasons. You can watch this interview on YouTube  https://youtu.be/nhljdovrSjQ Have a question? Email us  themccpodcast@gmail.com Follow us on Social Media for the latest show updates  www.twitter.com/themccpodcast www.instagram.com/themccpodcast www.facebook.com/themancavechroniclespodcast www.themccpodcast.com  www.youtube.com/c/TheManCaveChronicleswElias  

ARC ENERGY IDEAS
Charging into the Energy Transition: An Interview with Canadian Battery Technology Company Electrovaya

ARC ENERGY IDEAS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 32:00


One uncertainty about how the energy transition will play out is how prevalent battery technology will be in the future. Today's lithium-ion batteries work well for short duration utility storage and electric cars, but they are not commercial for some other applications – such as long duration energy storage or heavy hauling.  Also, material supply constraints are increasing the cost of batteries and becoming a limit to growth.  To understand the current and future state of battery technology, we welcome Dr. Rajshekar DasGupta, Chief Executive Officer of Electrovaya to our podcast.  Electrovaya is a Canadian developer and manufacture of lithium-ion batteries that is based in Mississauga, Ontario. They are also developing proprietary solid state battery technology.Please review our disclaimer at: https://www.arcenergyinstitute.com/disclaimer/

The Current
The push for unionization and what it means for workers

The Current

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2022 23:55


During the course of the pandemic, a number of Indigo bookstores voted to unionize, including at the Square One store in Mississauga, Ontario. We hear from Jennifer Mitchell, an employee who helped lead that effort. Unions are hoping that successful unionization drives are a sign of things to come. But for Canada's largest private sector union, Unifor, it first has to overcome a big hit to its own reputation earlier this year after president Jerry Dias retired in the midst of a bribery scandal. We hear from new president Lana Payne.

Hands Off My Podcast: True Crime
Ep17: Honor Violence ~ Palestina Isa, Hatice Peltek, Aqsa Parvez, Monika Rani, Amina & Sarah Said, San-deela Kanwal, Aasiya Hassan, Noor Almaleki

Hands Off My Podcast: True Crime

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 36:38


“Honor violence has been largely misclassified by law enforcement, by no fault of their own. They simply didn't know the signs and symptoms of honor-related violence. They do not have the training on how to effectively identify and investigate these cases.”  ~ Stephanie Baric, executive director of the AHA FoundationHONOR KILLING/VIOLENCE:   An estimated 23-27 honor killings per year occur in the U.S., noted that 91 percent of victims in North America are murdered for being “too Westernized,” and in incidents involving daughters 18 years or younger, a father is almost always involved. This is a particular type of violence that doesn't fit neatly into the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting Statistics. These are their stories.....LEARN & SUPPORT:Relevant websites that were reviewed included the AHA Foundation (http://theahafoundation.org ), Honour Based Violence Awareness Network (http://hbv-awareness.com ), Tahirih Justice Center, a nonprofit organization that works to protect immigrant women and girls from violence through legal services, advocacy, and public education programs (http://www.tahirih.org/mission/the-issues) , Sauti Yetu (http://www.sautiyetu.org),Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Founder of AHA Foundation Journey |  | https://www.theahafoundation.org/ayaan-hirsi-ali-founder-of-the-aha-foundation/LOST LOVE ONE: Palestina Isa Nov. 6, 1989, St. Louis, MO Hatice Peltek. In April,15th, 2004, Scottsville, N.Y. Aqsa Parvez, 16, In December 2007, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada Monika Rani, Rajesh Arora, Vansh Kumar Dec 29th, 2007, Oak Forest, IL Amina & Sarah Said Jan 17th, 2008, Lewisville, Texas San-deela Kanwal. On July 6, 2008, Clayton Cty, GA Aasiya Hassan 2009, Buffalo, N.Y Noor Almaleki Oct 2009, Peoria, Ariz MIDROLL MISSING IN TEXAS from National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) https://www.missingkids.org/gethelpnow/amber Martinez | TX | 10/20/2004 | https://www.missingkids.org/poster/NCMC/999024 Kendrick Jackson | TX | 4/7/2006 | https://www.missingkids.org/poster/NCMC/1041530 Elian Majano | TX | 6/21/2006 | https://www.missingkids.org/poster/NCMC/1047169 Danielle Jimenez | TX | 7/31/2006 | https://www.missingkids.org/poster/NCMC/1050042 Daisja Weaver | TX | 6/10/2009 | https://www.missingkids.org/poster/NCMC/1124733 Armaidre Argumon | TX | 9/18/2020 | https://www.missingkids.org/poster/NCMC/1401817 Lina Sardar Khil | TX | 12/20/2021 | https://www.missingkids.org/poster/NCMC/1439053 ARTICLES/SOURCES:Honor Killings' Trial: Yaser Said found guilty of killing his two daughters, sentenced to life in prison | Fox 4 News | August 9, 2022 | https://www.fox4news.com/news/honor-killings-trial-closing-arguments-begin-on-tuesdayFrom Kuwait to America, Gender-Based Killings Considered Less Than Murder | TCF .org | 7/26/18 | https://tcf.org/content/report/kuwait-america-gender-based-killings-considered-less-murder/?agreed=1Uniform Crime Reporting Program | FBI .gov | 2020 | https://www.fbi.gov/services/cjis/ucrHonor Killings in America | The Atlantic | 04/30/15 | https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2015/04/honor-killings-in-america/391760/Report on Exploratory Study into Honor Violence Measurement Methods | Westat | 11/26/2014 | https://www.ojp.gov/pdffiles1/bjs/grants/248879.pdfMan gets life sentence in fire deaths of 3 family members | Chicago Tribune | 5/14/15 | https://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/daily-southtown/ct-sta-oak-forest-killer-st-0515-20150514-story.htmlCourtroom erupts after Iraqi man found guilty of killing wife | Fox 5 News | 04/18/14 | https://fox5sandiego.com/news/verdict-reached-in-brutal-murder-of-iraqi-mother/Violence In The Name Of Honor: North America | NPR | 1/26/09 | https://www.npr.org/2009/01/26/99622481/violence-in-the-name-of-honor-north-americaThe legacy of Aasiya Hassan, 10 years after her death shocked community | The Buffalo News | 3/1/19 | https://buffalonews.com/news/local/the-legacy-of-aasiya-hassan-10-years-after-her-death-shocked-community/article_7b0848b2-fede-5c4f-9b07-cd28bd4a2592.htmlTown remembers slain teen | Ontario The Star | Wed., Jan. 6, 2010 | https://www.thestar.com/news/ontario/2010/01/06/town_remembers_slain_teen.htmlPhyllis Chesler: Are Honor Killings Simply Domestic Violence? | SCHOLARS FOR PEACE IN THE MIDDLE EAST | 10/9/09 | https://spme.org/spme-research/analysis/phyllis-chesler-are-honor-killings-simply-domestic-violence/7464/‘Die, my daughter, die' – 1989 honor killing shocks St. Louis | Fox 2 Now | 04/16/02 | https://fox2now.com/news/true-crime/die-my-daughter-die-1989-honor-killing-shocks-st-louis/Aiya Altameemi Beating: Parents Who Padlocked Daughter To Bed For Talking To Boy Take Plea Deal | HuffPost | Nov 7, 2012 | https://www.huffpost.com/entry/aiya-altameemi-beating-padlocked-talking-to-boy_n_2089763How a Muslim Woman Was "Honor-Killed" by Her Father Because He Believed She Was Too Americanized | Phoenix New Times | April 1, 2010 | https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/how-a-muslim-woman-was-honor-killed-by-her-father-because-he-believed-she-was-too-americanized-6445842?storyPage=2Texas Teen 911 Call: 'I'm Dying' | Associated Press | January 17, 2008 | Texas Teen 911 Call: 'I'm Dying' - YouTubePATREON SHOUTOUT:Kat K. Member as of April 20, 2022 ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Album Mode
CV. Funk Wav Bounces Vol. 2 | Calvin Harris

Album Mode

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 33:09


This week Demar and Adriel discuss Calvin Harris's sixth studio album ‘Funk Wav Bounces Vol. 2', whether he's DJ Khalid East and why important artists like Tyler the Creator or Doja Cat aren't on the project . Demar's rating: 3 Adriel's rating: Incomplete The Love List: New To You Follow us:Twitter / Instagram/ TikTok:@AlbumModePod@AdrielSmileyOfficial@DemarjGrantClubhouse / Greenroom:@demar@adrielsmiley

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast
CTV News Toronto at Six for Aug. 16, 2022

CTV News Toronto at Six Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 45:56


A man and woman have been found dead inside a Mississauga home; SickKids hospital is warning parents may need a prescription for over-the-counter children's fever and pain medicine amid a sever shortage; and, where did a massive pile of dirt in a Toronto neighbourhood come from?

Baseball Central @ Noon
Jays-Guardians Preview with Shi Davidi & Tom Hamilton

Baseball Central @ Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 50:32


Sportsnet's Shi Davidi joins Blair and Barker to discuss some Blue Jays topics including his latest column on John Schneider, George Springer's troublesome elbow, and Yusei Kikuchi's role going forward with the ball club (03:44). Later on, Tom Hamilton, the voice of The Guardians, previews this weekend's series from a Cleveland perspective and touches on the job Terry Francona has done as Manager, reliever James Karinchak not making the trip, Steven Kwan's standout season, and Mississauga's Josh Naylor working his way back from injury (28:43). The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the hosts and guests and do not necessarily reflect the position of Rogers Sports & Media or any affiliates

This Matters
905 politicians behaving badly

This Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2022 19:21


Guest: Noor Javed, staff reporter Controversial politicians in Brampton, Richmond Hill and Mississauga have caused several issues for the municipal governments in those communities recently. While the reasons are very different, there has been all kind of political manoeuvring, lawsuits filed and city council meetings disrupted or cancelled. One issue this exposes is the lack of mechanism to punish or remove an elected official from office, other than voting them out in the next municipal election. This episode was produced by Alexis Green, Paulo Marques and Raju Mudhar. Audio sources: CityNews, CTV and CAGRichmondHill.

WTF @ TFW – The TFW2005 Transformers Podcast
WTF @ TFW – 619 – TFcon Toronto Debrief – July 15 2022

WTF @ TFW – The TFW2005 Transformers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022


Tape down your thumbs, and grab a MeltWich! Vangelus and Aaron emerge out of Mississauga and straight into the recording of a special TFCon Toronto 2022 Episode of WTF@TFW- cell service or no cell service!

The Decibel
Stress Test: How TikTok changed the vibe of personal finance advice

The Decibel

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 28:16


Today we're bringing you an episode of Stress Test, a Globe and Mail podcast about personal finance, hosted by Rob Carrick and Roma Luciw.Gen Z and millennials are getting a lot of their money advice from TikTok, where personal finance videos have more than 5.8 billion views. In this episode, we look at why the social media platform is resonating, how to use it effectively and what advice you should be wary of on the app. We hear from a 25-year-old TikTok user from Mississauga, Ont., about how he started getting personal finance advice from the platform. Plus, Roma speaks to Ellyce Fulmore, aka @queerd.co, a TikTok content creator from Calgary, Alta. Ellyce, who identifies as queer and neurodivergent, shares how her experience helps her create personal finance advice for audiences traditionally ignored by the financial industry.

Christian Science | Daily Lift
Immortality runs in the family (encore)

Christian Science | Daily Lift

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022


Catherine DeJocas, from Mississauga, Ontario, Canada

RedHanded
255: Episode 255 - Who Killed the Harrisons?

RedHanded

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 46:03 Very Popular


In 2013, paramedics were called to a home in Mississauga, Ontario. There they found the body of 40-year-old Caleb Harrison lying in bed, with red marks around his neck. But this wasn't the first time that the paramedics had found a dead body at the Harrison family home. In fact, in the space of just five years, three members of the Harrison family had died in separate and bizarre incidents in the same house… Was the house haunted by a murderous ghost, or was the family being preyed upon by a calculated and patient killer? Become a patron: Patreon Order a copy of the book here (US & Canada): Order on Wellesley Books Order on Amazon.com Order a copy of the book here (UK, Ireland, Europe, NZ, Aus): Order on Amazon.co.uk Order on Foyles Follow us on social media: Instagram Twitter Visit our website: Website Sources:  https://projects.thestar.com/harrison-family-murders/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U7qECRc0VVk https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/forensic-pathology-nb-1.3704109#:~:text=National%20shortage,to%20attain%20the%20right%20qualifications. https://healthydebate.ca/2020/02/topic/death_investigation_feb2020/ https://www.thestar.com/life/health_wellness/2009/02/02/addressing_ontarios_pathologist_shortage.html https://www.crime-scene-investigator.net/forensic-science-in-canada.pdf https://www.ojp.gov/ncjrs/virtual-library/abstracts/forensic-pathology-canada https://thepointer.com/article/2020-08-19/part-1-the-harrison-murders-how-did-peel-regional-police-investigators-miss-the-obvious https://thepointer.com/article/2020-08-21/part-2-the-harrison-murders-failing-to-catch-a-killer https://thepointer.com/article/2020-08-22/part-3-the-harrison-murders-peel-police-finally-catch-a-killer-but-expose-their-own-failures https://projects.thestar.com/harrison-family-murders/

Canadian Prepper Podcast
A Van Down By The River

Canadian Prepper Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 73:56 Very Popular


  News -   https://www.cbc.ca/news/world/sri-lanka-economic-crisis-protest-1.6515788 Sri Lanka is in a bit of turmoil. Protesters broke into the palace and burned it down    Russia's ruble is now the strongest currency in the world…..  Glad we're doing our part with pricey gas. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/russia-ukraine-ruble-currency-russian-economy-sanctioms-2022/#:~:text=Even%20as%20Russia%20marks%20a,in%20the%20world%20this%20year.   Rogers was down across the realm. https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/rogers-outage-cell-mobile-wifi-1.6514373   Second gas plant in the US went up - https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/2022/07/authorities-respond-massive-fire-explosion-oklahoma-natural-gas-plant-forcing-major-evacuations/    netherlands farmers protests https://www.foxnews.com/world/dutch-farmers-form-freedom-convoys-protest-governments-strict-environmental-rules       PODCAST CHALLENGE Put 3 things in your vehicle to allow for some basic services away from town.    Taccom - https://www.taccomcanada.com/ Sept 9-11.  Mississauga, ON   Jeff's Weather Blurb:   IT'S GONNA BE HOT Drought status in the US https://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/   Deal of the Week Ian - Costco first aid kit - 29.99 .  Value for $$ spent Item 9112022   Survival PDF collection. https://www.worldstudybible.com/moreonline.htm  

Elitefts Table Talk podcast
120 We Have BIG News with Dr.Eric Serano & Dr.Ken Kinakin!

Elitefts Table Talk podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2022 114:31


SWIS 2022 Registration: https://www.elitefts.com/2022-swis-seminar.html In this 120th podcast episode of Dave Tate's Table Talk, Dr. Ken Kinakin and Dr. Eric Serrano take a seat. Chiropractor Dr. Ken Kinakin is located in Mississauga and specializes in weight training injuries and sports medicine. Dr. Kinakin's chiropractic clinic provides a variety of alternative healing modalities for everyone seeking chiropractic care, including active release technique (ART), acupuncture, laser therapy, and more.  Dr. Kinakin is the founder of the Society of Weight-Training Injury Specialists (SWIS), which focuses on the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of weight-training injuries. In this podcast episode, Dr. Kinakin and Dave Tate have a BIG ANNOUNCEMENT! Listen for more details.  Dr. Eric Serrano, MD, is the ace sought out by elite athletes and business professionals worldwide for help with the most difficult of problems. Dr. Serrano spends the majority of his time promoting the success of his family practice patients in Pickerington, a suburb of Columbus, Ohio. Amongst the thousands of patients are elite athletes who travel to the ends of the earth to consult with Dr. Serrano.  A unique approach to medicine enables Dr. Serrano to customize nutrition, exercise, and supplementation protocols to support quicker success. A constant desire to learn leads Dr. Serrano to review thousands of patient hormonal blood work tests and read over 30 medical/ingredient journals each month. At any given time, multiple nutrition, exercise, and supplementation trials are conducted within the Serrano Family Medical Practice. Dr. Serrano is a graduate of Kansas State University and earned his medical degree from Kansas University. He previously served as an award-winning professor of family practice and emergency medicine at the Ohio State University. About the Host Dave Tate is the founder and co-owner of elitefts.com. He is the author of twenty books and has logged more than 40,000 hours of training and consulting. Dave is married to elitefts co-owner Traci Arnold-Tate, and they reside in London, Ohio, with their two sons. Personal Credo: Live, Learn, Pass on™. Sponsors Marek Health  Marek Health is the telehealth platform that connects customers to partnered providers focusing on hormone optimization and preventative medicine—offering self-service labs at great prices and guided optimization.  Build your custom panel or a preexisting panel at marekhealth.com.  Visit https://www.MarekHealth.com/tabletalk to order a comprehensive panel, lab analysis, and optimization, plus 10% off your first order when you use code "Tabletalk" (one word) at check-out. https://www.marekhealth.com  IG @marekhealth elitefts elitefts is a proud sponsor of Dave Tate's Table Talk Podcast. If you can put it in a gym bag or load weight on it, we have you covered. Get 10% off your first elitefts order by using the discount code: TABLE TALK.  elitefts Shop: https://elitefts.tiny.us/yt  elitefts IG: https://www.instagram.com/elitefts/ Troponin Nutrition Smarter nutrition for harder athletes—receive the best coaching from bodybuilding and powerlifting champion Justin Harris and Team Troponin. Troponin Nutrition provides monthly coaching to help you build muscle, increase strength, and follow a customized nutrition plan.  Get started: https://www.troponinnutrition.com/collections/coaching-diet-plans More  Dave's IG: https://www.instagram.com/underthebar/?hl=en Ken's IG: https://www.instagram.com/drkenkinakin/ SWIS: https://www.swis.ca/ Infinity Fitness: https://www.infinityfitness.com/ Serrano Family Practice: (614) 833-5520 Health First Group: (905) 812-0644