Podcasts about carnegie mellon

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Private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

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Best podcasts about carnegie mellon

Latest podcast episodes about carnegie mellon

Essential Work: Exploring the Past, Present and Future of Jobs
Dr. Joe Trotter and Black Labor in the Making of America

Essential Work: Exploring the Past, Present and Future of Jobs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 40:32


This is Episode 2-3 of Essential Work: Exploring the Past, Present, and Future of Jobs, brought to you by the Battle of Homestead Foundation.Nathan Ruggles hosts our feature interview Dr. Joe Trotter is the Giant Eagle University Professor of History and Social Justice and past History Department Chair at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is also the Director and Founder of Carnegie Mellon's Center for African American Urban Studies and the Economy (CAUSE), President Elect of the Urban History Association and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His latest publication is Workers on Arrival: Black Labor in the Making of America (University of California Press, 2019).Review us and give us five stars on Apple Podcasts!Support this podcast and the work of our sponsoring organization: battleofhomestead.orgessentialworkpodcast.orgShare a comment, ask a question:(412) 326-9435comments@essentialworkpodcast.orgAudio Engineering support and consulting provided by Angela Baughman: thatsoundgirl.comLogo by Brittany Sheets: bsheetscreative.comOriginal Music Composed and Recorded by Jason Kendall: jasonkendallproductions.comThe Battle of Homestead Foundation Organized to preserve, interpret, & promote a people's history focused on the 1892 labor conflict.SquadCast Record studio-quality content from anywhere. Create engaging audio + video with an intuitive platforBuzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show (https://battleofhomestead.org/bhf/donations/)

The BHHcast
Geoff Plitt

The BHHcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:00


There is a knock at your door. You open it to find a toddler that demands all of the money and blankies in the house? What do you do? Or, you encounter a new dating app that only includes pictures of potential companion's bedrooms. What makes you swipe left and what makes you swipe right? These and other great lightning round questions are posed to our guest comedian Geoff Plitt. Tune in to hear all of the great questions and Geoff's answers. Geoff Plitt is a LA based comedian who studied at Second City and iO in Chicago (not to mention Carnegie Mellon where he obtained an engineering degree). He has performed in festivals and comedy clubs around the world. He co-founded Jetpack, a highly-acclaimed alternative standup showcase in Los Angeles, and he now writes and hosts the weekly YouTube late-night comedy show "What You Need to Know", whose clips have 3+ million TikTok views.Website: http://www.geoffplittcomic.com/Twitter: https://twitter.com/GeoffreyPlittTikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@whatyouneedtoknowYou can catch Geoff most Wednesday evenings at Bar Lubitsch in West Hollywood at the Totally Comedy Show. Catch national headliners and other amazing comics performing each week. Be sure to follow Geoff across social media.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/bhhcast)

Happy Path Programming
#48 Composability in Distributed Systems - Because Math! With Heather Miller

Happy Path Programming

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 62:11


Heather Miller, Computer Science professor at Carnegie Mellon, joins us to talk about her research into composability in distributed systems, the challenges with serialization, and a better approach to Chaos Engineering. Discuss this episode: https://discord.gg/nPa76qF

Bank Notes
Exploring the Predictive Power of Guilt

Bank Notes

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 36:18


Taya Cohen is an associate professor of organizational behavior and theory at Carnegie Mellon's Tepper School of Business. She studies moral character in the workplace, including the predictive power of guilt proneness in individuals. In this episode of "Banking Culture Reform: Norms, Mindsets, and Decision-Making," Taya discusses why highly guilt prone individuals may have a moral advantage and shares her perspective on individuals' proclivities toward ethical behavior and honesty, as well as how to hire for these traits.

DreamPath Podcast
Kourtney Kang on Television Writing, and Creating Doogie Kamealoha, M.D. for Disney Plus

DreamPath Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 51:20


Kourtney Kang is a writer, producer, and the creator/showrunner of the new hit Disney+ show Doogie Kamealoha, M.D., a reimagining of the beloved 90s show, Doogie Howser, M.D. Kourtney was also an executive producer on How I Met Your Mother, co-executive producer of Fresh Off the Boat, and supervising producer of Netflix's Pretty Smart. What you will learn: ​​How Kourtney became the creator and showrunner of Doogie Kamealoha, M.D., and how she and her writing team were able to thoughtfully and cleverly incorporate references to the original Doogie Howser, M.D. into the reboot. How setting and shooting the show in Hawaii allowed Kourtney to accurately represent Hawaiian culture and also hire local Hawaii residents to staff various departments on set. [0:00-7:35] How Kourtney managed to put such a personal touch on a show produced by such a huge network like Disney, which included basing the show's characters on her own family and basing the themes on her own experiences. How she was able to strike a balance between finding a personal spin on material for the show and hooking studio executives with the idea of a reboot. [7:35-15:11] The logistics of working in the writers room of Doogie Kamealoha, M.D. in the middle of a global pandemic, the importance of “story breaking,” and the benefits of having a diverse group of writers on a show depicting Asian and Hawaiian characters of all ages. [15:11-23:23] What it was like shooting on location in Oahu, and how her team was able to create a fabulous, elaborate set at a real medical center for Doogie Kamealoha, M.D. How the late Steven Bochco's family became involved in the show. How working on a network show, with rigid time constraints, differs from working a show available on demand through a streaming service like Disney +, financially, logistically, and artistically. [23:23-34:39] How her formal education at the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon were formative experiences in her career as a writer. How the many twists and turns in her writing and producing career brought her to a place where she is thriving artistically and collaboratively. [34:39-42:57] How the writers room work culture has changed over the last two decades, especially with more women becoming showrunners and holding positions of authority in Hollywood. Why showrunners are focusing more now on efficiency over putting in long hours. Finally, Kourtney talks about the possibility of Doogie Kamealoha, M.D. getting picked up for a second season, and why it's more difficult today than it was 10 years ago to measure the success of a show on streaming services like Netflix or Disney+. [42:47-51:19] Resources: Kourtney Kang's: IMDb, Twitter, Instagram

Web Masters
Steve Kirsch @ Infoseek: The Entrepreneur Who Wanted to Charge for Web Search

Web Masters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 32:54


Considering one of the most valuable companies in the world -- Google --- makes a majority of its money from web search, it's hard to imagine a world in which startups struggled to make money from search engines. But that's actually how the world was in the early days of the Web. Back in the mid-1990s, most search engines were being run as experiments out of either universities (e.g. Lycos at Carnegie Mellon) or companies (e.g. AltaVista at Digital Equipment Corporation). As a result, search engines didn't need to be profitable, and that was a good thing because they were expensive to operate and nobody could figure out a viable business model.The biggest exception to this was Steve Kirsch's Infoseek. Infoseek wasn't an experiment. Instead, Infoseek was the search engine that was launched as a business from Day 1. And, like any business, someone needed to pay.In the minds of Steve and his co-founders, the most obvious people to charge were the people they were directly giving value to: the ones using Infoseek to perform searches. As a result, in the earliest days of Infoseek, the company charged users for each search they performed.Can you imagine that? How different would the world be if every search we performed online cost us money? We'll explore that, and more, on this episode of Web Masters in a conversation with Infoseek founder and well-known serial entrepreneur Steve Kirsch.For a complete transcript of the episode, click here.

Hard Factor
11/2/21: Zuckerberg's Developing Plastic Robot Skin So You Can Feel the Metaverse

Hard Factor

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 68:14


Mark Zuckerberg is working with Carnegie Mellon scientists to develop ReSkin a deformable plastic “skin” less than 3 mm thick for use to satisfy Metaverse ambitions and the sensation of touch in the Metaverse. That story here (00:57:27) (00:00:00) - Timestamps Cup of Coffee in the Big Time (00:06:25) - Fun Fact: Chimps testicle size is directly related to female promiscuity and infanticide (00:08:05) - Holidays: All Souls Day, Native American Heritage Month (00:09:09) - This Day in History: 1898 - first cheerleaders squad assembled at University of Minnesota and it was an all male group; 1983 - MLK JR Day became a national holiday and Michael Jackson's ‘Thriller' dropped (00:11:43) - Trending Mentions: Congress still hasn't passed the Infrastructure Bills; Joe Biden dozed off during the UN Climate change conference in Glasgow (00:18:35) - #3 - Mariah Carey released a video smashing pumpkins and playing her Christmas hit ‘All I Want for Christmas' (00:20:37) - #2 - Shiba Inu is still sky rocketing and it got added to Webull and passed Doge coin; Starship coin is joining Bitmart exchange on Wednesday; Hard Factor coin coming (00:23:49) - #1 - The NFL trade deadline is today and the Rams already picked up Von Miller (00:29:40) - Philadelphia became the first major city to decommission the police from pulling people over for minor traffic violations TikTok International Moment (00:42:17) - North Korea - The North Korea state loves Netflix smash hit ‘Squid Game' because it depicts South Korean's capitalist greed (00:47:05) - Germany - 66 year old psychopath is on trial for a murder and eight castrations (00:49:33) - New Zealand - A Christian man chopped off the penis of a Maori statue because he was “doing God's work” (00:57:27) - Together with Carnegie Mellon scientists, artificial intelligence researchers at Meta created a deformable plastic “skin” less than 3 mm thick for use to satisfy Metaverse ambitions These stories, and much more, brought to you by our incredible sponsors: Paint Your Life; Text Factor to 64-000; 20% Off + Free Shipping MackWeldon.com/Factor; Promo Code: Factor; 20% Off First Order Decked.com/HARDFACTOR and get free shipping (on a badass truck bed drawer system) Go to store.hardfactor.com and patreon.com/hardfactor to support the pod with incredible merch and bonus podcasts Leave us a Voicemail at 512-270-1480, send us a voice memo to hardfactorvoicemail@gmail.com, and/or leave a 5-Star review on Apple Podcasts to hear it on Friday's show Other Places to Listen: Spotify, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Lots More... Watch Full Episodes on YouTube Follow @HardFactorNews on Instagram, Twitter, TikTok, and Facebook

Global Summitry Podcasts
Summit Dialogue: Ep. 25: Valerie Karplus on the upcoming COP26 Glasgow Summit and China's Role in it

Global Summitry Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 35:39


I was pleased to invite Valerie Karplus into the virtual studio to examine the progress towards the upcoming COP26 Glasgow Summit scheduled for November 1 -12th. Many see this Summit as the best last chance to receive national commitments (NDCs) that will achieve the 45% cut based on 2010 levels, that scientists say is needed by 2030 to limit global heating to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels. Will the key CO2 emitters – the US, China, India, Brazil, etc. be willing to make those kinds of commitments at Glasgow. Valerie and colleagues recently released a new report: “China's CO2 Emissions Trading System: History, Status, and Outlook”. I was keen to review with Valerie the efforts by China to create a Emissions Trading System (ETS) to reduce carbon emissions. Valerie Karplus is currently an Associate Professor in the department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon. Previously, Karplus served as an Assistant Professor of Global Economics and Management at the MIT Sloan School of Management. Karplus studies resource and environmental management in firms operating in diverse national and industry contexts. She works with a collaborative team of researchers to study the micro and macro determinants of clean energy transitions in emerging markets, with a focus on China and India. From 2011 to 2015, she directed the MIT-Tsinghua China Energy and Climate Project, a five-year research effort focused on analyzing the design of energy and climate change policy in China, and its domestic and global impacts.

RAGE Works Network-All Shows
Trek Untold -Episode 71

RAGE Works Network-All Shows

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 111:44


Patricia Tallman, Actress & Stunt Performer on Star Trek TNG, DS9 & VOY Patricia Tallman has done it all in her career as an actress and a stunt performer, but all of her accolades came with a hefty price. In this episode of "Trek Untold," we have a candid conversation with the spectacular Patricia Tallman, who performed stunts on TNG, DS9, Voyager, and the "Generations" film. She's also served as a double for Gates McFadden, Nana Visitor, Gwynyth Walsh, Daphne Ashbrook, and many others. She has also been a Starfleet officer, a Romulan, a Bajoran, a Klingon, and even her own new race in the TNG episode "Starship Mine." Through all of her successes and accomplishments, Patricia struggled with being an actress in Hollywood that greatly affected her mental and physical health. Years later, she came to terms with everything she had been through and ultimately discovered her true passion. Patricia started in a small town playing Star Trek with her barbie dolls, which led her into the art of storytelling and the different ways she could express her feelings. We discussed her education in Carnegie Mellon, working with Tom Savini and George A. Romero through her career, memories of Tony Todd and the pranks she played on him during "Night of The Living Dead," learning to perform stunts, and her first role as a stunt performer in "Road House" under instruction from Rowdy Harrington and Charlie Picerni (and the injury she had that made her first stunt even more difficult), doubling for Molly Ringwald in "The Stand" and that explosive stunt that went deadly wrong, and working with Steven Spielberg as Laura Dern's double in "Jurassic Park."  From there, we discuss her Star Trek work, including fights with Nana Visitor, taking falls for Gates McFadden on generations, her first Trek stunt gig, Patricia's full role on "Starship Mine," a fight scene with Tim Russ on "Invasive Procedures" that busted her wide open and left her with a crimson mask, doubling for Melinda Culea in The Outcast," a repetitive stunt for Michelle Forbes that left Patricia badly bruised, and a whole lot more! Order Patricia's autobiography "Pleasured Thresholds" here - https://b5events.com/store/ Check out Patricia's travel agency - QuestRetreats.com Support the Penny Lane charity through Patricia's "Be A Santa" program - https://beasanta.orgInside NY Comic Con During COVID-19: https://youtu.be/kQSxXhjBV78Visit Pancan.org to support the Trek against Pancreatic Cancer Please subscribe to our YouTube channel and hit the notifications button to be updated when we go live or upload our next video! Support Trek Untold by checking out our merchandise at https://teespring.com/stores/trekuntold or become a Patreon at Patreon.com/TrekUntold. Trek Untold is sponsored by Triple-Fiction Productions, a US-based company that 3-D prints Trek-inspired prop replicas for fan films and cosplayers, as well as accessories and playsets for all iterations of Trek figures through the years. Visit them at Triple-Fictionproductions.net.   Don't forget to subscribe to the show and leave a rating if you like us!   The views expressed on air during Trek Untold do not represent the views of the RAGE Works staff, partners, or affiliates.   Follow Trek Untold on Social Media Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/trekuntoldTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/trekuntoldFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/trekuntold Follow Nerd News Today on Social Media Twitter:  Twitter.com/NerdNews2Day Instagram: Instagram.com/NerdNewsToday Facebook: Facebook.com/NerdNewsToday Trek Untold is sponsored by Treksphere.com, powered by the RAGE Works Podcast Network, and affiliated with Nerd News Today.

Futurum Tech Podcast
Samsung Tech Day 2021: Academia

Futurum Tech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 3:46


In this short episode of the Futurum Tech Webcast, I talk with Jim Elliott, Corporate SVP of Memory Sales for Samsung about the colleges and universities who will be participating in Samsung Tech Day 2021 on November 15, 2021 and some of the subject matter they will be covering. The conversation highlighted: The schools who are participating in Tech Day including MIT, UCLA, Carnegie Mellon and UC Santa Cruz MIT's session on flash and storage accelerators UC Santa Cruz's session on leading edge genomics research UCLA's session on utilizing in-storage SSV's Carnegie Mellon's session on programmable logic and the future of data centers  There is lots to come during Samsung Tech Day 2021 and it's sure to be a great event. If you are interested in attending, register here.

Tepper Reads
Tepper Reads Fall 2021 Podcast #1 - Matthew Stewart and Michelle Stoner

Tepper Reads

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 18:37


In the first episode of the Tepper Reads podcast for fall 2021, Accelerate Leadership Center program managers, Matthew Stewart and Michelle Stoner, talk about the genre mashups of Charles Yu's Interior Chinatown, what white space on a page means, how something can be both funny and important, and why this book works so well for building empathy.

Trek Untold: The Star Trek Podcast That Goes Beyond The Stars!
71: Patricia Tallman, Actress & Stunt Performer on Star Trek TNG, DS9 & VOY

Trek Untold: The Star Trek Podcast That Goes Beyond The Stars!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 111:44


Patricia Tallman has done it all in her career as an actress and stunt performer, but all of her accolades came with a hefty price. In this episode of "Trek Untold," we have a candid conversation with the spectacular Patricia Tallman, who performed stunts on TNG, DS9, Voyager, and the "Generations" film. She's also served as a double for Gates McFadden, Nana Visitor, Gwynyth Walsh, Daphne Ashbrook, and many others. She has also been a Starfleet officer, a Romulan, a Bajoran, a Klingon, and even her own new race in the TNG episode "Starship Mine." Through all of her successes and accomplishments, Patricia struggled with being an actress in Hollywood that greatly affected her mental and physical health. Years later, she came to terms with everything she had been through and ultimately discovered her true passion. Patricia started in a small town playing Star Trek with her barbie dolls, which led her into the art of storytelling and the different ways she could express her feelings. We discussed her education in Carnegie Mellon, working with Tom Savini and George A. Romero through her career, memories of Tony Todd and the pranks she played on him during "Night of The Living Dead," learning to perform stunts, and her first role as a stunt performer in "Road House" under instruction from Rowdy Harrington and Charlie Picerni (and the injury she had that made her first stunt even more difficult), doubling for Molly Ringwald in "The Stand" and that explosive stunt that went deadly wrong, and working with Steven Spielberg as Laura Dern's double in "Jurassic Park."  From there, we discuss her Star Trek work, including fights with Nana Visitor, taking falls for Gates McFadden on generations, her first Trek stunt gig, Patricia's full role on "Starship Mine," a fight scene with Tim Russ on "Invasive Procedures" that busted her wide open and left her with a crimson mask, doubling for Melinda Culea in The Outcast," a repetitive stunt for Michelle Forbes that left Patricia badly bruised, and a whole lot more! Order Patricia's autobiography "Pleasured Thresholds" here - https://b5events.com/store/Check out Patricia's travel agency - QuestRetreats.com Support the Penny Lane charity through Patricia's "Be A Santa" program - https://beasanta.org Visit https://www.drivebydogooders.org/ to donate to the cause, and if you donate $35 or more, Lycia will send you an autographed picture. In the comments section where you donate, include your name and address and what pic you would like, and Lycia will send it on your way! Visit Pancan.org to support the Trek against Pancreatic Cancer Please subscribe to our YouTube channel at youtube.com/nerdnewstoday and hit the notifications button to be updated when we go live or upload our next video! Support Trek Untold by checking out our merchandise at https://teespring.com/stores/trekuntold or become a Patreon at Patreon.com/TrekUntold. Trek Untold is sponsored by Triple-Fiction Productions, a US-based company that 3-D prints Trek-inspired prop replicas for fan films and cosplayers, as well as accessories and playsets for all iterations of Trek figures through the years. Visit them at Triple-Fictionproductions.net.   Don't forget to subscribe to the show and leave a rating if you like us!    Follow Trek Untold on Social Media Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/trekuntoldTwitter: https://www.twitter.com/trekuntoldFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/trekuntold Follow Nerd News Today on Social Media Twitter: Twitter.com/NerdNews2DayInstagram: Instagram.com/NerdNewsTodayFacebook: Facebook.com/NerdNewsToday Trek Untold is sponsored by Treksphere.com, powered by the RAGE Works Podcast Network, and affiliated with Nerd News Today.

B-Schooled
Interview with Cooper, current CMU Tepper student: B-Schooled episode 79

B-Schooled

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 24:08


Cooper is on the younger side of the MBA applicant pool and applied to a handful of programs in Round 2 of the 2020-21 application season. He knew going into the process that in addition to his age, he'd after to overcome his GPA, GMAT score, non-feeder college program status and being in an overrepresented demographic bucket. In this interview, he shares his application experience and what he thinks helped him ultimately gain admission to Tepper. He also shares his experience at Tepper so far.

D3football.com » D3football.com Around the Nation Podcast
ATN Podcast 291: Bad break for SJU, tough loss for W&J

D3football.com » D3football.com Around the Nation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 59:57


We have no idea who the leader of the PAC is right now. None. If you have four leaders, you don't have any — at least, that would be the coach speak version of the answer. We can't fully clear up a four-way tie between Carnegie Mellon, Grove City, Washington and Jefferson and Westminster (Pa.), but […] The post ATN Podcast 291: Bad break for SJU, tough loss for W&J appeared first on D3football.com » D3football.com Around the Nation Podcast.

CEO's You Should Know - Pittsburgh
CEO, Adam Hahn of Leaf Shave Company

CEO's You Should Know - Pittsburgh

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 19:29


Adam Hahn is the Co-Founder of the Leaf Shave Company, an innovative new razor company that is upending the market by using sustainable materials, eliminating disposable plastic, and saving consumers hundreds of dollars a year on replacement blades. A former surgical robotics engineer, Adam has been designing innovative and disruptive products in various industries for over 20 years.Prior to Leaf Shave, Adam was one of the first employees at another Pittsburgh startup company, Blue Belt Technologies, a Carnegie Mellon spinoff. He was instrumental in the design of a navigated, computer assisted "smart" drill that made orthopedic surgeries more accurate and less invasive. He helped grow the business from a micro startup to over 100 employees and an acquisition by Smith and Nephew for $275 million dollars in 2015.Adam holds dozens of US patents in the medical device and consumer product industries. He graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with degrees in Mechanical Engineering and is a licensed Professional Engineer in the state of Pennsylvania. Adam lives with his wife and son in the South Hills of Pittsburgh.

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Sarah Hammer & Sameer Gupta - Introducing Cypher, Penn's New Blockchain Accelerator

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 38:27


Anirudh Singh sits down with Sarah Hammer and Sameer Gupta to discuss launching the Cypher Accelerator. Topics include: - Sameer's work at Point72 - Why Sarah is well-positioned to lead Cypher - Cypher's incredible board of advisors - What excites the two most about Crypto / Blockchain And much more! Sarah Hammer:  Sarah Hammer is Managing Director of the Stevens Center for Innovation in Finance and Senior Director of the Harris Alternative Investments Program at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. In these roles, she focuses her efforts on private capital investments and financial technology. Sarah is also Adjunct Professor of Law at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, teaching an upper-level juris doctor course on financial regulation. Previously, Sarah was Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary for Financial Institutions and Director of the Office of Financial Institutions Policy at the United States Department of the Treasury. In this role, she led and directed the Department's policy responsibilities involving financial institutions, as well as oversaw the Federal Insurance Office and the Office of Critical Infrastructure Protection and Compliance Policy (cybersecurity). Sarah earned a J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School, an M.B.A. from the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and a Master of Studies from Oxford University. She is a Harry S. Truman Scholar and a Member of the American Law Institute. Sameer Gupta:  Sameer Gupta is the Head of Data Solutions at Point72 and for the New York Mets. He is responsible for creating end-to-end solutions in data and analytics for all Point72 businesses as well as the Mets. Before joining Point72, Gupta was the chief operating officer at iSentium, an artificial intelligence startup where he led key business functions including sales, business development, fundraising, engineering, and operations. Before iSentium, he was the COO for the Global Electronic Trading and Americas Cash Equities business at JPMorgan. Gupta also served in business development and product management roles at New York Stock Exchange Technologies, and in software development and technology strategy positions at Goldman Sachs. He is also actively involved in the New York City startup community through TechStars and New York University's Endless Frontier Labs. Sameer earned his MBA from Harvard Business School, M.S. in Information Systems Management from Carnegie Mellon, and B.S. in Computer Science from the National Institute of Technology in India.

Influencers & Revolutionaries
Dr Steven MacGregor 'The Daily Reset - how to move your life forward'

Influencers & Revolutionaries

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 55:30


In this episode of The New Abnormal, I interview Steven MacGregor. He's a global expert in workplace health, wellbeing and performance with PhD and Master's degree in design thinking and virtual teams. Steven is also founder of The Leadership Academy of Barcelona. and author (or lead co-author) of six books in the past 12 years, notably 'Chief Wellbeing Officer' and 'Sustaining Executive Performance'. His next book 'The Daily Reset, 366 ways to move your life forward' is published in Dec 2021. A keynote speaker and guest professor with experience in research and teaching at Stanford, Carnegie Mellon, IE, IMD, IESE, CEIBS and Pompeu Fabra, he's trained with Olympic athletes, Tour de France riders and Ironman champions. Steven's also an international level Duathlete and former national champion currently racing for FC Barcelona. So...we discuss all of the above in what I hope you'll agree is a suitably dynamic conversation!

STEM-Talk
Episode 129: Morley Stone talks about biomimetics and human performance augmentation

STEM-Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 48:04


Our guest today is Dr. Morley Stone, the former Chief Technology Officer for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and former Senior Vice President for Research at Ohio State University, who is now IHMC's Chief Strategic Partnership Officer. Morley is recognized as an international leader in biomimetics and human performance. In today's interview, we talk to Morley about his time as AFRL's chief technology officer as well as his stint as the chief scientist for the Air Force's 711th Human Performance Wing, which is responsible for providing technical oversight of projects geared to optimize human performance for the nation's air, space, and cyberspace forces. We also have a fascinating conversation with Morley about his early career and research into biomimetics, which is the study of using biological structures, materials and principles as models for the development of new materials, structures, and devices. In his new role at IHMC, Morley will become the institute's point person for public- and private-sector partnerships. He also will work with IHMC's scientists and research staff to help coordinate and implement the multitude of scientific projects the institute has in its pipeline. Show notes: [00:03:07] Dawn mentions that Morley grew up in a small steel producing town in Pennsylvania and asks him what he was like as a kid. [00:03:56] Ken asks Morley about his days as wrestler growing up and why he still today views wrestling as a special sport. [00:05:00] Dawn asks about Morley's move to Dayton, Ohio, when he was 17. [00:05:36] Dawn asks how Morley decided upon Wright State as opposed to the University of Dayton. [00:05:57] Morley tells the story of how a girl in college pointed out an ad for an internship and how that helped him decide to become a biochemistry major. [00:06:43] Dawn asks what happened to the girl who pointed out the aforementioned ad. [00:08:28] Ken asks Morley to talk about the Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) and the role of the lab's Materials and Manufacturing Directorate. [00:09:53] Dawn mentions that after earning his bachelor's degree, Morley had a short stint as a materials research engineer at the directorate before heading off to Carnegie Mellon University to work on a Ph.D. in biochemistry. Dawn asks why Morley chose to attend Carnegie Mellon. [00:11:08] Dawn mentions that in the late ‘80s and early ‘90s, Morley had the good fortune to work with scientists who had the foresight to know that there was going to be a radical change in material science, which up until that point had been dominated by metals and ceramics. Morley talks about the most important lessons he learned from these colleagues and mentors. [00:12:41] Dawn asks about Morley's time as a research biologist, and eventually principal research biologist, at the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate after his Ph.D. [00:14:41] Ken asks Morley to explain biomimetics and discuss the systems that Morley and his colleagues looked at during his time at the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, ranging from infrared sensing to instances of biological camouflage. [00:18:01] Dawn mentions that the creation of nanoscale materials for advanced structures has led to a growing interest in the area of biomineralization, she goes on to say that during Morley's time at the directorate, he especially researched the process of biomineralization and the assembly of nanostructured inorganic components into hierarchical structures, which led to the development of a variety of approaches that mimic the recognition and nucleation capabilities found in biomolecules for inorganic material synthesis. Morley discusses his 2002 paper in Nature Materials where he described the in vitro biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using silver-binding peptides. [00:21:20] Dawn asks about Morley's 2004 paper in Advanced Materials where he and his colleagues had taken a protein that was responsible for thermal sensi...

Security Architecture Podcast
CloudDefense(AppSec) - Season 03/04 - Episode #32

Security Architecture Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 31:02


This Season is dedicated to Application security, our guest for the show is Abhi Veldurthy from CloudDefense. He joins us to discuss their SAST, SCA, and VA solutions. Abhi Veldurthy is VP of Engineering at CloudDefense responsible for the technical direction and strategy. To promote our work and support the podcast, please review us here https://www.podchaser.com/podcasts/security-architecture-podcast-1313281 Season 3 KickOff episode with Tanya Janca Season 3 kickoff Episode - Application Security - Tanya Janca - YouTube Demo/POC: https://www.clouddefense.ai/request-demo Whitepaper: https://www.clouddefense.ai/ CloudDefense Summary CloudDefense is an Application Security company that provides a single pane of glass view into the overall security health of an organization. It provides tools to discover open source vulnerabilities, open-source licenses, static analysis (SAST), API and Web penetration testing, as well as Cloud Native, Cloud Infra, and Container Vulnerabilities with a few clicks. CloudDefense helps you in preventing accidental slippage of critical security issues in production. Abhi Veldurthy Bio https://www.linkedin.com/in/aveldurthy/ Abhi Veldurthy is VP of Engineering at CloudDefense responsible for the technical direction and strategy, while leading the engineering efforts at the company. He has a Masters in Information Security from Carnegie Mellon and is deeply passionate about application development and is using this powerful combination to build a holistic security solution at CloudDefense. Prior to joining CloudDefense, Abhi has worked with LinkedIn, Amazon and Yahoo.

Write On, Mississippi!
Write On, Mississippi: Season 4, Chapter 5: Civil Rights

Write On, Mississippi!

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 50:46


Period photographs of pivotal moments, first-person stories from history, and the trail of Black America's fight for freedom and equality present a vivid look at the movement that transformed America.Panelists:DEBORAH D. DOUGLAS is the Eugene S. Pulliam Distinguished Visiting Professor of Journalism at DePauw University and a senior leader with The OpEd Project, leading thought leadership fellowships and programs that include the University of Texas at Austin, Yale University, Dartmouth College, Columbia University, Urgent Action Fund in South Africa and Kenya, and the McCormick Foundation-supported Youth Narrating Our World (YNOW). While teaching at her alma mater, Northwestern University's Medill School, she spearheaded a graduate investigative journalism capstone on the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and taught best practices in Karachi, Pakistan. She is an award-winning journalist, including the 2019 Studs Terkel award, and founding managing editor of MLK50: Justice Through Journalism. Douglas is author of "Moon U.S. Civil Rights Trail: A Traveler's Guide to the People, Places, and Events That Made the Movement" (Moon Travel, 2021) and is among 90 contributors to "Four Hundred Souls: A Community History of African America, 1619-2019," edited by Ibram X. Kendi and Keisha N. Blain (Random House/One World).A native of Holly Springs, Mississippi, Roy is the Executive Director and one of the founders of the Hill Country Project . He was active as a high school student in the Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s, and then as a general organizer. Roy earned his Bachelor's degree in Sociology at Brandeis University in 1970. Continuing his education at Brandeis, he went on to earn a Masters and later a Doctorate in Political Science in 1978. He has also pursued additional studies at Jackson State, Duke, Carnegie-Mellon, Michigan and Harvard Universities.He has a wife, Rubye and one daughter, Aisha Isoke. William Ferris is the Joel R. Williamson Eminent Professor of History Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The former chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities (1997-2001), Ferris has written or edited 16 books and created 15 documentary films. He co-edited with Charles Wilson the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, which was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize. His books include: Give My Poor Heart Ease: Voices of the Mississippi Blues, The Storied South: Voices of Writers and Artists, and The South in Color: A Visual Journal. His most recent publication Voices of Mississippi received two Grammy Awards for Best Liner Notes and for Best Historical Album. Ferris curated "I Am a Man:" Civil Rights Photographs in the American South-1960-1970, which is on exhibit at the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum and is accompanied by his latest book "I Am a Man": Civil Rights Photographs in the American South-1960-1970.His honors include the Charles Frankel Prize in the Humanities, the American Library Association's Dartmouth Medal, the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Award, and the W.C. Handy Blues Award. In 1991, Rolling Stone magazine named him among the Top Ten Professors in the United States. He is a Fellow of the American Folklore Society. Ferris received the B. L. C. Wailes Award, given to a Mississippian who has achieved national recognition in the field of history by the Mississippi Historical Society. In 2017, Ferris received the Mississippi Governor's Arts Award for Lifetime Achievement.Moderator :Motivational speaker, historian, and women's activist, Pamela D.C. Junior is a native of Jackson, Mississippi and earned a B.S. in Education with a minor in Special Education from Jackson State University. Pamela is the newly appointed director of the Two Mississippi Museums in Jackson, Mississippi. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson
Barry Pearl Live On Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Game Changers With Vicki Abelson

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 99:54


'Twas Doody, no shit! Barry Pearl, my fab new friend was such a delight, tonight. Grease is the word, and Barry's got lots of ‘em. Great stories about Travolta, Olivia Newton-John, Jeff Conaway. We talked his beginnings from tap class in Lancaster Pa to the original Bye Bye Birdie on Broadway at 11, and then Broadway's Oliver with The Monkees Davy Jones, right after, where I saw him! I was but a little girl, my first Broadway show, literally life-changing. Great story about the cast on Ed Sullivan, with The Beatles. What! There was C.P.O. Sharkey, starring Don Rickles, a humbling story, also, life-changing, Barry's this time. The National Tour of Grease before the movie, where Travolta played Doody and Barry, Sonny. We talked Days of Lives, and The New Love American Style, both recurring roles. Oliver again, Fiddler on the Roof, and the important work he's doing this very day. There were a few stump the geezers, where Barry and I searched for names of people and shows… kind of hysterical how that happens. With help, we got them all. Such fun. We came back to Broadway, The Producers, to TV's Grease: Live, and the original cast's just pre-pandemic appearances. So many great stories along the way with lots of overlap of people we both know. Barry's a mensch. A very talented one. One of a handful to survive Carnegie Mellon's relentless cuts, he's the real deal in his art and in his life. So happy to be getting to know him and to share this time with him with youes. Barry Pearl Live on Game Changers with Vicki Abelson Wed, 10/6/21/21, 5 pm PT, 8 pm ET Streamed Live on my Facebook Replay here: https://bit.ly/3FnmrYW All BROADcasts, as podcasts, also available on iTunes apple.co/2dj8ld3 Stitcher bit.ly/2h3R1fla tunein bit.ly/2gGeItj Also on iHeartRadio, SoundCloud, Voox, OwlTail, Backtracks, PlayerFM, Himalaya, Podchaser, and Listen Notes Thanks to Rick Smolke of Quik Impressions, the best printers, printing, the best people people-ing. quikimpressions.com Nicole Venables of Ruby Begonia Hair Studio Beauty and Products, for tresses like the stars she coifs, and regular people, like me. I love my hair, and I love Nicole. http://www.rubybegoniahairstudio.com/ Blue Microphones and Kevin Walt

Unleashed - How to Thrive as an Independent Professional

Tony is the co-founder and managing director at InsurTechNY, an organization that helps startups, carriers/brokers, investors, and enablers in the New York region and beyond through hosting InsurTechNY community events, startup competitions, and accelerator. He is a BCG Alum, and his background includes product leadership at Alibaba, Gartner & NBC, an MBA from NYU Stern MBA, and a Bachelor of Sciences from Carnegie Mellon. In this episode, Tony talks about his business model. Learn more about the organization at www.insurtechny.com. Key points include: 00:53: What InsurTechNY is and who it serves 13:57: Embedded insurance plays 17:14: Blockchain in InsurTechNY 26:04: Setting up the first InsurTechNY event Unleashed is produced by Umbrex, which has a mission of connecting independent management consultants with one another, creating opportunities for members to meet, build relationships, and share lessons learned. Learn more at www.umbrex.com.

VO BOSS Podcast
Voice and AI: Descript

VO BOSS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 35:22


If you can dream it, it can happen! Jay Leboeuf from Descript joins Anne to discuss the benefits of having a voice clone and how Descript can improve work-from-home potential for talent. Remove filler words with one click, adjust your audio via transcript, fix errors using an Overdub voice clone, and so much more. Use your voice beyond its in-person potential with tools that bring the power of AI editing directly to talent. More at https://voboss.com/voice-and-ai-descript-jay-leboeuf/ Transcript >> It's time to take your business to the next level, the BOSS level! These are the premiere Business Owner Strategies and Successes being utilized by the industry's top talent today. Rock your business like a BOSS, a VO BOSS! Now let's welcome your host, Anne Ganguzza. AI Voices: Welcome to the podcast. The VO BOSS podcast blends solid, actionable business advice with a dose of inspiration for today's voiceover talent. Each week host Anne Ganguzza focuses in on a specific topic to help you grow your voiceover business. Anne: All right. Hey everyone, who was that? That was some other people introducing the podcast today. So welcome again, everyone to the VO BOSS podcast. This is the AI and Voice series, and I am your host Anne Ganguzza, Anne Ganguzza. Today, I'm excited to bring you special guest Jay LeBoeuf, head of business development at Descript, a company that creates tools for new media creators. Now, Jay is also a lecturer on media technology and business at Stanford University, Carnegie Mellon, and University of Michigan, and sits on the board of advisors of numerous AI media and ed tech startups. He previously worked at some little known companies, probably to you guys out there and in the voiceover world, Avid Pro Tools and Izotope. Jay, thank you so much for joining me today. Jay: Thanks for having me, Anne. It's, uh, it's wonderful to be here with some of my AI-driven voice friends. Anne: Yeah, that was fantastic. So what we heard in the beginning was a couple of your voices on your platform, right? Jay: Indeed. One of which is my own and we were using Descript's Overdub technology. Anne: Awesome. Well, I want to definitely talk to you about that, but before we get into your role at Descript and what the company offers, first of all, let me just say, okay. Avid Pro Tools and Izotope, known to just everybody probably that listens to this podcast, and your resume is so incredibly impressive. Back in 2008, you were founder and CEO of Imagine Research where you created the first sound object recognition platform. And somehow that, I believe that that led into a patent as well as some small business research awards to you. And then somehow that became Izotope in 2012. Now, does that mean that my mouse clicks are being detected by an AI engine? Jay: So there's so many ways that AI is now integrated into the creative products that we use on a daily basis. And so the short answer is yes. So Imagine Research was based on some of what I was seeing. So I was at the, on the Pro Tools team, like you mentioned for about eight, eight and a half years before that. And I was seeing all these struggles that recording engineers, mixing engineers, voiceover talent, uh, ADR, we were seeing all these, these problems in the process that AI could solve. So we attempted to create the first set of tools where we could teach a computer how to recognize basic sounds and musical instruments, and even robustly differentiate is this a male speaker versus a female voice, and, you know, try to choose presets automatically for it. So Izotope acquired that company and that technology. I was at Izotope for about two years or so, helping to integrate all that work. And you know, you now see that Izotope products include a number of assistants -- Anne: Oh yeah. Jay: -- and things that will listen to your content and it's going to help it -- Anne: Absolutely. Jay: -- get it to the next stage. And that's the goal with all of this. Anne: And I have to say that there's a lot of people in the voiceover industry that just absolutely, that is their go-to, that is their go-to product to get rid of excess noise in their recording. So I thought that that was so fascinating. So, and now you are at Descript, and I've heard of Descript from the podcast world, and I'd heard about it a few years back where a lot of people were starting to use Descript for transcripts for their podcasts. And then wow, you guys just seem to have like catapulted with your product offerings since then. Tell us a little bit about Descript and the products that you offer, because I'm genuinely impressed with everything that you guys have going on over there. Jay: Great. Uh, thanks for using it, being familiar with it. For those that don't know De-script or Descript, we have no official pronunciations. So the choice is yours. Anne: Okay. Jay: Our team is kind of split on it. I go with De-script myself. So -- Anne: De-script. 4:30 Jay: Descript allows creators to create and edit audio and video as simply as typing. And this is this paradigm where you can drag in content that you've recorded externally, or you can record natively in the app. A transcript appears in seconds to minutes. You know, this time transcript will appear. If you have multiple people on a track, will automatically detect who they are, split them into different speaker labels. So you have this like really rich transcription going on. And a lot of people might stop right there and say, yeah, I've seen transcription tools before. Then I, you know, do a paper edit in Google docs, and then we bring it into Pro Tools and then just start cutting. But with Descript, we have all this alignment technology where the transcript is automagically aligned to the underlying audio and video. So as you are editing the text, as you are doing things like cutting out all of your ums, ahs, likes, you knows, all of that, just snips them out. And we use some AI to kind of stitch it all together. So that way you make a few cuts. And I have plenty of examples I can play of like befores and afters, where we can take a lot of great material and just make it sound so much better. So that's all you have to do, just edit text. Anne: Now I remember when I looked at it a couple of years ago, one of the things that I have today is when I record through ipDTL, because it's a high quality audio connection, people can talk over one another. And whenever I tried transcript technologies in the past, it couldn't deal with people talking at the same time, and then basically separating out who they were. But I feel like your technology has now surpassed those issues. And it's really something that I think is incredible, that it can even overlay the words on the wave form. Is that what you had mentioned? Jay: Absolutely, so you have, you have two ways of editing. You have the script view where you can actually just see the transcript. And if you just, all you want to do is select words and phrases and hit, delete, or strike through, you can edit through that. But if you are more comfortable with the wave form, we actually will overlay the words on top of each part of the wave form. Anne: Wow. Jay: And then you can make your manipulations there. So if you want to add a crossfade to a certain place, you know that, okay, yeah. Just put a crossfade between the words, voiceover and business, and no more needing to audition thousands and thousands of times to get them right. Anne: Wow. Well, that's fantastic. All right. So that's for podcasting. And now you have some other products that you offer as well that are quite powerful. Jay: Exactly. So, you know, we're most known for podcasting, I'd say. You know, the, the people in that community have probably heard of us, have probably tried it out. If you haven't, by all means, now's a great time to at least try. Drag some tape in, start cutting it up, and of course if there's anything I can help you with, let me know. But you know, we added video support in 20 -- what year are we in now -- 2020. Anne: Yep. I saw that. Jay: It's been a year. Anne: It's been a year. Jay: It's been a year. So about halfway through 2020, we -- you were always able to kind of edit the video because it was always linked to the audio, but we really doubled down. So, uh, what we ended up doing was built in all of the basic features that you would have in a typical non-linear editor, like an, an iMovie or a Final Cut or a Premiere. We built in all the basics, all the bread and butter things that you need, on top of all of the word and text editing capabilities we had. So you can now do all of your cross fades, all of your titling, arrows and annotations, and you know, very basic multicam support. All these things work great, 4k, 60 frames-a-second video. It's all synced to the cloud, so that's something that's also really wonderful about the tool, and you, and I could record something. I can invite you just like a Google Doc, and then you and I can start collaborating on this material simultaneously. We see the same doc. We have the same footage. Anne: So, wow, a video word processor. So we have the audio word processor -- Jay: Video word processor. Anne: -- and now a video word processor. That's, wow. Also, in addition to that, I think you can do screen recording as well with Descript? Jay: Exactly. So for all of us that are fully embracing the remote collaboration -- Anne: Yeah. Jay: -- asynchronous video communication life, we're sending each other a lot of quick updates or quick tutorials. So rather than have to type out those "here's all the instructions on how to connect to ipDTL for the first time," you can actually just do a quick screen recording using your own voice. And what differentiates the Descript screen recorder is again, as soon as you finish recording your screen recording, either, you know, your webcam or the screen itself, you see an instant transcript of what you said. And with one click, if you want to remove all of your filler words -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- I am a prolific ummer and ahher when I'm making stuff up. Anne: We all -- yeah, I think we all. We all are. Jay: So when -- you get to this little dialogue that pops up that says you have 35 filler words -- Anne: Wow. Jay: -- click to remove, and then you'll see the sentence where I start explaining it. And then I say, "yeah, let me try that again." I can just whack that sentence out and then send the video along. You can ask my team. I do tons of those every day,. Anne: Now does it record the screen, and also use the video cam? So it can do multiple cameras or multiple recordings at the same time? Jay: Exactly, exactly. So, so right now you can have your webcam as a bubble that you can position anywhere you want on the screen. Also, you have separate audio tracks for your mic. You have computer audio. So that's something that I use a lot where I'm demoing something and maybe sharing the output of Descript to the app or a different tool. So you can capture audio from computer audio and also your high input. Anne: Fantastic. Jay: Very nice microphones. Anne: Now I happen to read a press release the other day about a new product called Studio Sound, which allows you to remove noise [laughs] in your recording. Jay: Okay. Anne: That's pretty powerful. [laughs] Jay: So I have incredible admiration for companies that make professional noise reduction, de-reverberation restoration tools. I have a ton of friends that work at Izotope. Having worked there myself, I love the company. So -- Anne: I was going to say, you have quite a background in it. So that would make sense. [laughs] Jay: So I will say what we wanted to build was as close to a one checkbox solution where you know what, you have this audio, you either don't have the time, you don't have the skill -- Anne: Right, exactly. Jay: -- you don't have the knowledge to use the professionals. So like we're not talking about saving location recording from the deadliest catch and removing like -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- some of those conditions. We're talking about -- let me play an example. So I'm going to play you some material, and this, this is maybe what got recorded with some, you know, room tone on a not great mic. So let me just hit play. Anne: Okay. [room noise] Jay: Hey, there's the room tone. Voice: The appearance of the island when I came on deck next morning was altogether changed. Although the breeze had now utterly ceased, we'd made a great deal of way during the night and were now lying becalmed about half a mile to the southeast of the low eastern coast. Jay: Okay. So now let me click a checkbox that's called Studio Sound in Descript. Anne: And that's not uncommon for people with podcasts who have guests that are not necessarily -- Jay: Right. Anne: -- having the right recording studio. Jay: Right. No, definitely. Anne: Yeah. Jay: So now, now let me hit the space bar and now I'm playing. Voice: The appearance of the island when I came on deck next morning was altogether changed. Although the breeze had now utterly ceased, we'd made a great deal of way during the night and were now lying -- Jay: Let me turn it off. Voice: -- becalmed about half a mile to the southeast of the low eastern coast. Anne: Wow. Jay: And back on. Voice: Green colored woods covered a large part of the surface. Anne: Wow, wow! Jay: That's one checkbox. Anne: This is a product that's actually out now? Jay: This is out now. We -- Anne: Wow, that's incredible. Jay: -- have a beta tag applied to it because we're still experimenting with it -- Anne: Sure. Jay: -- but it's actually on every plans. Anne: Okay. Jay: We have a free Descript plan. So people listening to this, they're like, I want to try this out. You can try this out. It's totally free. Try it on your files, download your files when you're done with them. Anne: Right. Jay: We're really excited about this. And this is just one of these other suites of tools that we're trying to do to allow people to create professional sounding and looking content faster than ever before. Anne: Sure. Jay: You shouldn't have to spend hundreds and hundreds of extra dollars to download and learn tools when you have problems with your content. And so that's, that's some of the stuff we're trying to solve. Anne: Yeah, and that really serves a need. You know, I cannot tell you how many people -- I mean, I'm a full-time voice talent. And so for me, you know, this is part of my daily thing. I had to learn how to, or I'd had tools that helped me to remove noise, but there's so many people out and in the podcast world, or just in general, that are creating content and yeah. Stuff like this is it can be immensely helpful. So, wow. So that's an incredible suite of tools, and you also now have, well, you've had it for a couple of years now, Overdub, right, which is your -- this is how you can create an AI voice, your voice cloning technology. Talk to me a little bit about that. Jay: Absolutely. So Overdub allows anyone to create their own voice clone, and importantly, only with their own voice. And you can do that with only a few minutes of training data. And once you have this voice clone, this voice model, you can generate new sentences or correct your verbal typos. So a few ways that we see it being used, being -- really resonate with your listeners. Let's say you made a mistake in a, in an audio book or, you know, in a podcast, you mispronounced the key character's name. Anne: Right. Jay: You stated a date wrong, something like that. So you need to go back to the studio, or if you're at home, you need to kind of set up your equipment again, get it exactly how it was before. Anne: Punch and roll. [laughs] Jay: Rerecord everything, punch and roll, or even better, I have much more experience on the editor side. So as an editor, I would spend hours trying to find that word or phrase and then splice it in from elsewhere in the archives. Anne: Absolutely. Jay: It just never sounds right. Anne: Yeah, that actually makes me think of a lot of medical recordings that I do, for medical narration. If you find that you've mispronounced the word once, it's usually in the script quite a few times, if it's a product name. Jay: Right. So with Overdub, you would have created your own voice model. And so if you have the script and you knew -- you're using Descript, you can actually go in, find that one word that needs fixing or that phrase that needs fixing, or the sentence you actually forgot to say, and just type it in. And what we actually do behind the scenes -- this part is fascinating -- we don't just generate in the word in isolation. We take the text that you type in. We take basically the audio recording before your contextual edit and the audio after. And then we send that all to the cloud, and using those three inputs along with, you know, your voice model, we're able to generate the missing word or phrase to make it fit in in context. So, you know, if I was trying to resynthesize the word Overdub, sometimes it will sound like Overdub. Sometimes it'll sound Overdub, and it's just gonna depend on where it's going to fit in within the phrasing of what you were saying. Anne: Wow. So tell me again, what does it take to create your Overdub again? How long does it take? Jay: As little as 10 minutes -- Anne: Wow! Jay: -- of training data. Anne: So does that mean you have a model that's already there, that's being used for these voices? Jay: So let's go even deeper with the super behind the scenes. The way that we're able to make it so easy where all you need to do is create, you know, you basically read a training script. Anne: Okay. Jay: And you read this training scripts to us, and, you know, we have it on our website and there's, there's nothing special about it. Technically any source material would work, but we just provide this like David Attenborough voiceover stuff. It's really fun to read. Anne: Okay. Jay: So you read that, and we need as little as 10 minutes. The more you add, the better it's going to get. There's no point in going over an hour at that point. Our research has shown it's not going to sound any better. Anne: Okay. Jay: So, you know, between 10 minutes and an hour that you're willing to sit and read this script. The other thing we need of course is your voice consent statement. So this is a 30-second long blurb we also have available on our website, which you grant consent to Descript to create your own voice model. And you're just stating that, like, I and I alone have access to this voice model. If I choose to grant it with somebody else, then I'm giving people the option to use my voice. But you know, this voice is just mine. And we use that to compare against the training data to make sure that this is really you. Anne: Got it. So then let me just back up just a second. Jay: Yeah, please. Anne: So if you're using any of the material that people upload, let's say, for podcast editing or any of the, any of the products that you offer, is any of that being used for training data from Descript? Jay: No. So all of your material, all your voice data is yours and yours alone. Anne: Got it. Previous to releasing Overdub, we had actually learned from this the general speech patterns from thousands and thousands of speakers. Uh, Descript acquired a company called Lyrebird in 2019. Anne: Yes, I'm familiar with that. Jay: And they're real pioneers in this space. And they had actually learned from thousands of existing speakers. Anne: I heard the viral thing they did with politicians, so back a few years back. Absolutely. And so you've had the model for a while that's been developed with thousands and thousands of voices. Jay: Exactly. Anne: Got it. Jay: What, what the secret sauce is, is the ability to, with just a few minutes of a different person's speech, be able to identify what makes Jay or what makes Anne sound the way they do with the mic they have in the room that they do with the cadence that they're speaking? And we kind of can make this like lighter weight model to generate your speech. Anne: Okay. So what, in your opinion, or what, in your knowledge, what makes a better AI voice? Is it the person that records being, I don't know, more conversational or what makes some voices sound a little more robotic than others? Jay: The short answer is it's really going to depend on the underlying technology that's being used. So that's why Descript's Overdub technology sounds different than Alexa, than Google Wavenet, than Thimble, than, you know, than other solutions. For our approach, some of the things that we think makes it sound so good, so one thing is that we are one of the only solutions that actually we generate already 44,100 samples every second of your voice. And your listeners know what that means. If, if people don't it's, you know, CD quality sound -- you don't even know what CDs are anymore. Anne: I know! Jay: It's really good, super high resolution. And so that's one of the things that people often notice, like Alexa is nowhere even close to -- Anne: Right. Jay: 44.1 K. And so that's why she'll always sound that little bit muffled, that little bit like flat. And so by generating in, you know, what the researchers called super resolution, that's one thing that really makes a very big difference with what we're doing. From a training material standpoint, when we, you know, when we work with artists and celebrities, sometimes we'll actually coach them on, you know, the training material that they should put into the system should be read as naturally -- Anne: As possible. Jay: -- as they want the output to be. So, yeah. So, you know, we have the David Attenborough scripts, but if you're never going to be doing that in the wild and then read it in a way that's more representative -- Anne: In the wild! [laughs] Right, right, absolutely. Jay: Literally in the wild. Anne: Yup. Yup. Okay. All right. That makes sense. Now, do you have tools that allow you to change the sound of it once you've, you know, once you've typed in a script, and you change -- can you add emotion? Can you change speed? Those sorts of things? Jay: Change style is what we have. Rather than exposing 10, 15, you know, sliders, controls, checkbox, the Descript way of doing it is to allow you to actually select some source material that sounds representative of the style you want to recreate. So I would go in there, I would highlight a sentence or part of a paragraph that sounds like what I want to create. I would then right click on it, say overdub voice style, and I would say "create new voice style," and then call it whatever you want. So maybe it's happy or enthusiastic. Anne: Okay. Jay: You give it a name and then that name can be applied for Overdub generation in the future to steer the material. Anne: Are you recording that happy? Or are you recording that? Like, where are they getting that from? Where are you getting the happy from? Or the emotion from? Jay: Yeah. Anne: The style. Jay: We leave it to users. Anne: Oh, okay. Jay: That's one of the things people say like -- Anne: I got it. Jay: -- "hey, you know, I just created my voice model. Why don't you provide some templates?" I'm like, because I don't know what you sound like when you're happy. Anne: Okay, okay. Jay: So you get one default style -- Anne: Okay. Jay: -- that the system thinks is neutral Anne. This is what neutral Anne sounds like. And then it's up to you to go through, and in your training data, start finding examples of here's me being contemplative, here's me being excitable, and then give them the names -- Anne: Okay. Jay: -- that you you feel comfortable with. Anne: Do you resell these voices? Jay: No. So your voice is only your voice. You can assign it to other people that you work with on your team -- Anne: Okay. Jay: -- but you can also revoke that at any time. That's, uh, you know, it's functionality that we, we treat seriously. Now that -- the one thing we do provide to get people started out of the box, when we were playing the welcome to the VO BOSS intro, for example, we provide some stock voices. So we have eight right now, just a very limited palette, but still eight stock voices, which are pre-trained voice models of voice actors that we have an agreement with to get people get up and running. Anne: Got it. So then if I wanted to resell my voice, is that possible? Like if I create, let's say I get a script, I mean, you can hire human Anne or you can hire AI Anne. And so somebody says, well, I'm going to hire AI Anne, and I'm going to pay a certain amount. You know, probably not as much as human Anne. Could I then on Descript generate that voice and sell that? Jay: Yeah, we, you know, we don't have a marketplace or anything like that to facilitate that, but -- Anne: Interesting. Jay: -- the voice is yours. So you would come to an arrangement. You would be responsible for sharing your voice with another Descript user and overseeing how they're using it. And you know, the nice part of the voice ownership, you can turn it off at any time, so you can revoke access. Anne: So I guess my question would be, let's say I have a client, and they say, you know what? I have a bunch of material that I need to have recorded, but my budget is so much. And I say, okay, well, I can do that for you with my AI voice. 'Cause I don't have enough time to go in my studio and record that, but I could go to Descript, throw in the scripts, generate that, and then sell that to my client. I guess that's my question. Um, and that would be in agreement -- Jay: Oh, totally. Anne: -- that would be in agreement. How interesting, because I think one thing that a lot of people in the voiceover industry have been fearful of is, you know, who owns that voice, and how do I know where it's being used, and how do I, you know, is there an agreement, a contract that's been drawn up? So what that would do is it would allow us control over our own voice in selling the voice. So we would like, we normally do, we have contracts where we specify usage. So if it happens to be, let's say, in the commercial realm, and it's a commercial for McDonald's, if that's, you know, what they were looking for, we could then, you know, put in usage that would be appropriate for the job. And it would be something that we would negotiate with the company. Jay: Right. Anne: And that would be fine. You're not even a middle guy in that. That's basically we own our own voice. Jay: No. Anne: We can do whatever we want with it. Right? We can download it, right, I assume. Jay: Absolutely. This is the workflow I heard you say, Anne, is maybe we can flip it. You hire me, I'm voice talent. You give me the script. Anne: Yup, yup. Jay: But then like, oh, this is not within my budget. And you're like, how about this? I'm going to give you AI Jay. Anne: Yup. Jay: You're only interested in the final files. Maybe I can also give you the Descript file so that way, if you need to make -- Anne: Changes. Jay: -- changes and tweaks, you can, but you can't make, you can't generate new material. Anne: Well, then they'd have -- Jay: So here's AI Jay. This is Jay. I'm reading a sentence for Anne. She paid me to read this. Here you go. Anne: Oh, yup, yup. Jay: There's my material. You provide the audio files. These things are getting a lot of traction. So we actually have the ability to batch export material. And also we have API access for -- Anne: Wow. Jay: -- Overdub for if you want to programmatically do things. Anne: Sure. Jay: So a real example, there's a -- Anne: Wow. Jay: -- creative agency, and they work with one of their voice actors to do a mixture of things that are read real, but then they have a contract with Sunglass Hut. And they want to personalize it to go to your local Sunglass Hut. Anne: Right, exactly. Jay: And they get the address or the town. Anne: Sure. Jay: And so what they actually do, and Descript is not involved in this -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- but they use the tools to programmatically then create all the addresses sp this voice talent doesn't have to read 10,000 different Sunglass Hut locations. And so the voice actor consents to using their voice for that. And often they're the ones like generating on their system -- Anne: Sure. Jay: -- because they want to make sure it sounds right, and it's -- Anne: Well, yeah, exactly. So the client isn't necessarily going in -- they don't have a Descript account, and they're going in and typing it -- in addresses. It would be the talent probably, 'cause you're right. They would tweak it speed-wise or, you know, just so it sounds good. Jay: Right. And it's as super flexible. So I would encourage -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- because you know, the voice that you create, you can only create a voice with your own voice. You -- Anne: Right. Jay: We have people that try to upload a Barack Obama voice, you know, try to fake the consent statement, and AI built this. AI is kind of smarter than that. So it can detect that you're trying to fake the system. Anne: Right. Jay: We also have a human in the loop that listens to these consent statements. Make sure everything's legit. Anne: Oh, got it, got it. Jay: So we do everything we can to keep this as secure as possible. Anne: Wow. Talk to us a little bit about ethics, because I know you're one of the early adopters of putting a terms of service and an ethics statement on your website. Tell me about your policies on that. Jay: Yeah. I love that when I joined -- I joined the company at the beginning of 2020. There was already an ethics statement in place -- Anne: Mm-hmm, yup. Jay: -- which, which I was really inspired by. So you own, and you control your use of your digital voice. And this is something we strongly believe in that users can, you know, create a model that's authorized by you and controlled by you. So that's something that we unwaveringly do not budge from, and it's all based on this recorded verbal consent state, that kind of grants consent, and also helps us verify that you are a real, live, consenting person. So we will not clone voices of the deceased. Anne: Okay, okay. Jay: It's just, it's just a slippery slope. Anne: Yeah. Jay: That's an unapproved voice cloning. So unless we have a consent statement,. Anne: Oh, okay, that makes sense then why you have a verbal consent statement, yeah. Jay: We have a verbal consent statement, and, you know, uh, and again, people will try to stitch it together with -- Anne: Sure. Jay: -- with words, but it's just the system's designed to, to try to not allow that. And you know, we personally view that unapproved voice cloning -- like if we start making exceptions to this rule, then we're going to get into a world where we're making subjective judgment calls -- Anne: Yeah. Jay: -- about what's ethical and what's not ethical -- Anne: Absolutely. Jay: -- or what's a creative use case. And that's a very slippery slope. So we just want to be very clear and transparent. You have to own your voice. You have to be able to provide a consent statement. Um, we do not clone voices of children or minors. That's also against our terms of service. So if you're under 13, you can't use Descript. Our terms of service prohibit that. Anne: Okay. Jay: And we really want to stay up on what are the, the latest ethical standards? How are other companies using this? So we're talking to a lot of companies, participating in different membership organizations to try to figure out, you know, how do we ensure that content is authentic and -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- we're, we're as responsible as possible? Anne: Are you in the process of improving your model? So the AI voices will become even better and better and better with even maybe less data or, you know, even more human-like? Or is there a point where you kind of say, this is the level of -- like, how human do you want it to be? Because I think there's a level there of, if it becomes too human, then maybe there's that one note that somebody says, "wait a minute, am I being duped? Is this, you know, is this a human talking to me? Or is it an AI voice?" Do you have a level of, I guess, humanness for your AI model? Jay: We're going to keep improving it until it is indistinguishable from reality. And there's a lot of podcasts right now where you know, the sweet spot right now, Anne, is for this contextual edits where a word or a phrase has been fixed in the context of a longer recording. So we're at the point now where hosts are using that on a regular basis, and you can't tell. Like, no one's writing in and saying -- Anne: Right. Jay: -- that it sounds fake. And that's something that even a few years ago, it sounded like -- Anne: Sure. Jay: -- like voicemail phone tree systems, it would stick out. Those are just smooth. They sound great. Where we're going to be going, and what I think is going to sound better and better in the coming years is this like longer form text-to-speech. Anne: Yeah, right. Jay: So let me give you an example. So this is, this is how Malcolm Gladwell and his team at Pushkin Industries use Descript, and they use this for podcasts and audio books. So, you know, they're using Descripts, the desktop app, to transcribe dozens of interviews and, you know, archive material, and then starting to pull tape, pull selects, and getting the show in like a good rough cut. And then Malcolm Gladwell created his Overdub voice, and he assigned access to his voice to some of his editors. So they can create a draft narration for what the show would sound like with him doing the intro and kind of transitioning between different pieces. And so they can actually do a table read, and everybody can just kind of get on a call, listen to the table read with digital Malcolm, so they can hear how it sounds before anybody entered the -- Anne: Sure. Jay: Now that -- nothing's going to replace Malcolm in the zone saying and introducing his stories as himself. Anne: Right. Jay: And he's going to be like that for a while. Anne: Yeah. Jay: But there's always going to be applications, and it could be for really short commercials. Anne: Yeah. Jay: It could be for no budget audio books where, you know what, I'm just going to throw the AI voice at it. And we're gonna certainly know it's fake, but it's not going to be like listening to Alexa reading audio. Anne: Right, right, exactly. Jay: Because it's going to, it's going to actually have some, have some level of dynamics. Anne: Well, I think as long as the listener, I mean, then it becomes like the consumer, right? And you know, as long as they're aware. You know, I don't have a problem listening to Alexa 'cause I know it's Alexa, and I don't feel like Alexa is trying to dupe me into thinking she's human. And so I feel that same way. If I'm aware, I don't have a problem in certain cases, listening to it as long as know. Jay: That's it. And that's also why we want to, if anything, empower creators to have control of their voice. And if they wanna use it for editorial corrections, fantastic. If they want to use it for some longer form projects that they don't actually have the time to do or the budget -- their clients might not have the budget to do it -- Anne: Right. Jay: That that's their choice. Anne: Wow. Well, this has just been so enlightening. Woo, thank you so much for talking to me and talking to our listeners and talking about this, this amazing product that just seems to keep going. You guys keep coming up with these really wonderful things. So congratulations on that. Where do you see AI going in five years or even ten years? Jay: I'm super excited about this. Like media production is now actually entering a phase where if you can dream it, it can happen. And we don't necessarily need the expensive studio or the years and years and years of audio or video production training. We just need our laptops. So you and I both seen this in our careers with, with the move, from editing on tape -- Anne: Yup. Jay: -- to digital and then with PCs becoming so powerful with tools like iMovie and Garage Band that, you know, truly anybody can be a creator, and professionals can work from home. Well, the thing is there were a lot of advances during this time on other parts of the production process, like filming on smart phones and being able to broadcast and publish on social media, YouTube and podcast hosts, but all that stuff in between, all the editorial, all the correcting out mistakes -- Anne: Yeah. Jay: -- uh, generating small replacements, re-records, cutting, all that has been painstakingly difficult. Anne: Yeah. Jay: So this is where AI is really stepping in. And this next wave is, is huge because everybody is going to have access to these tools that make life even simpler, and the next generation of storytellers have never had it so good. Anne: Yeah. Well, that's fantastic. Oh, my goodness. Thank you so, so very much again, for spending time with us today. I'm going to give a big shout-out to our sponsor, ipDTL. You too can connect like a BOSS and find out more at ipdtl.com. You guys, BOSSes, have an amazing week, and we will see you next week. Thanks again. Bye-bye. Jay: Bye, everybody. >> Join us next week for another edition of VO BOSS with your host Anne Ganguzza. And take your business to the next level. Sign up for our mailing list at voboss.com and receive exclusive content, industry revolutionizing tips and strategies, and new ways to rock your business like a BOSS. Redistribution with permission. Coast to Coast connectivity via ipDTL.

CFR On the Record
Academic Webinar: Constraining Putin's Russia

CFR On the Record

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021


Thomas Graham, distinguished fellow at CFR, leads a conversation on constraining Putin's Russia. FASKIANOS: Welcome to today's session of the CFR Fall 2021 Academic Webinar Series. I'm Irina Faskianos, vice president of the National Program and Outreach here at CFR. Today's meeting is on the record, and the video and transcript will be available on our website CFR.org/academic if you would like to share it with your colleagues or classmates. As always, CFR takes no institutional positions on matters of policy. We are delighted to have Thomas Graham with us to talk about Putin's Russia. Mr. Graham is a distinguished fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and a senior advisor at Kissinger Associates, where he focuses on Russian and Eurasian affairs. He is cofounder of the Russian, East European, and Eurasian studies program at Yale University, and is also a research fellow at the MacMillan Center at Yale. He previously served as special assistant to President George W. Bush and senior director for Russia on the National Security Council staff from 2004 to 2007, and director for Russian affairs from 2002 to 2004. His résumé is very distinguished. I will just also say that he is a U.S. diplomat who served two tours of duty in Moscow, where he worked on political affairs. So, Mr. Graham, thanks very much for being with us today. I thought you could get us started by talking about the primary interests at stake in U.S.-Russia relations. GRAHAM: Great. Thank you very much, Irina, for that introduction, and it's a real pleasure to be with all of you here today. I want to start with three broad points that will frame the rest of our discussion. The first is that the problem that the United States faces is not simply with Putin; it is with Russia more generally speaking. The last seven years of very difficult, challenging adversarial relationship is really not an aberration in the history of the relationship between our two countries. In fact, from the moment the United States emerged as a major power on the global stage at the very end of the nineteenth century, we have had a rivalry with Russia. And the issues that divide us today are the ones that divided us 125, 150 years ago: We have opposing worldviews. We have different geopolitical interests. And clearly, we have different systems of values that inform our domestic political systems. This rivalry has intensified, ebbed and flowed during the twentieth century. But the effort we made at partnership after the breakup of the Soviet Union up until 2014, marked by the eruption of the crisis in Ukraine, is really the aberration in the history of relations between our two countries and one that was founded very much on the fact that Russia endured a period of strategic weakness. So the issue we have to deal with Russia and how we're going to deal with Russia well into the future, even after Putin departs—which he will, obviously, at some point, if only for biological reasons. The second point that I would make is that Russia is not going to go away. We hear a lot in the public debate in the United States about Russian decline, about the population/demographic problems it has, about its stagnating economy, and so forth. None of this is necessarily untrue, but I think it tends to exaggerate the problems that Russia faces. It ignores the problems that all other major countries face—including China, the United States, and many major European countries—but it also overlooks the very great strengths that Russia has had for decades that are going to make it a player and an important player on the global stage, nuclear weapons to begin with. We should never forget that Russia remains the only country that can destroy the United States as a functioning society in thirty minutes. Russia has the largest natural endowment of any country in the world, a country that can pretend to self-sufficiency and, in fact, is better placed than most other countries to deal with a breakdown in globalization in the decades to come if that, indeed, happens. It has a veto on the U.N. Security Council, which makes it an important player on issues of importance to the United States, and it has a talented population that has fostered a scientific community that, for example, is capable of taking advances in technology and developing the military applications from them. Just look at the strength that Russia exhibits in cyberspace, for example—again, a major challenge for the United States. So Russia is going to continue to be a challenge. One other thing that I should have mentioned here is that the Russian state throughout history and Putin's Russia today has demonstrated a keen ability to mobilize the resources of their own society for state purposes. So even if in relative terms they may be weaker and weakening vis-à-vis China and the United States, in some ways that political will, that ability to mobilize, allows Russia to play a much larger role than mere indicators of its economic size and population size would suggest. Now, Russia clashes with the United States across a whole range of issues, and as I said that is going to continue for some time. And this brings me to my third point: How we should think about American foreign policy, what our guidelines should be in dealing with Russia. And here there are three, I think, key elements to this. First, the United States needs to preserve strategic stability. We need to have that nuclear balance between us (sic) and the United States. This is an existential question. And as I already mentioned, Russia does have a tremendous nuclear capability. Second, the United States should seek to manage its competition with Russia responsibly. We want to avoid or reduce the risk of a direct military conflict that could escalate to the nuclear level. This is—also, I think, recognizes that the United States is not going to be able to compel Russia to capitulate on issues that are of interest to us, nor are we going to be able to radically change the way they think about their own national interests. So it's a competitive relationship and we need to manage that responsibly. And finally, given the complex world that we live in today—the very real transnational challenges we face: climate change, pandemic diseases, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction—the United States should seek, to the extent possible, ways to cooperate with Russia in dealing with these issues. We should recognize that Russia is not necessarily the only player nor necessarily the most important player in dealing with these challenges, but it does have a role to play along with other major powers in handling these transnational issues. So those, I think, are three sort of broad points that help set the stage for our discussion. Now let me turn sort of very briefly to the questions about U.S. policy. How do we deal with this Russia? What are sort of—the way we should think about American foreign policy? And here the point I would make is that we should think of the policy in terms of what I would call the three Ds: defense, deterrence, and dialogue. Now, defense and deterrence in many ways go together. If you have a very good defense, if you demonstrate an ability and willingness to defend your interests effectively and deliberately, then you tend to deter another power. They have less reason to want to attack you. But if deterrence fails, you very much need to be able to defend yourself—to disrupt Russian operations in cyberspace, for example, or disrupt military operations by the Russians that you find problematic in some way. So defense and deterrence go together, and we need to think about that. Now, you build these elements on a number of other things that we're all familiar with. A strong military—strong, capable military—is, obviously, an element of both defense and deterrence, and something that we have managed quite well in the past and I imagine will manage quite well going into the future. Cyber defenses are also an important element of constraining Russia on the global stage. Now, here the United States really has much room for improvement. We built our internet, our cyberspace largely for the accessibility, the ability to pass information from one entity to another, and we spent much less attention to the security of that system. As cyberspace has become more important to our socioeconomic and political lives, we really need to devote much more attention to cybersecurity, hardening our commuter—computer networks, for example, making sure we have strong passwords and so forth, something that I think we now recognize but we need to put a much greater effort into doing that. Third area of defense and deterrence is strong alliances. When we're thinking about Russia, this is clearly the transatlantic community, NATO, our relations with our other European partners. And here, we need to develop the types of military/defense cooperation that we need to demonstrate quite clearly that the United States, along with the rest of the NATO allies, is ready and prepared to meet its Article 5 guarantees to collective security should the Russians do something that is untoward in our neighborhood. And then, finally, and I think of increasing importance, is the question of national unity. National unity, national resilience, has really become a key element in defense and deterrence at this point. We need to demonstrate to the Russians that we have sufficient national unity to clearly identify what our interests are and pursue them on the international stage. One of Putin's close colleagues several years ago said that what Putin is doing is messing with the Americans' minds, and certainly we've seen that over the past several years. Putin hasn't sowed the discord in the United States, but he certainly has tried to exploit it for Russian purposes. And this is something that he's going to concentrate on in the future, in part because he recognizes the dangers of military confrontation with the United States. So great-power competition, from the Kremlin's standpoint, is going to move very, very quickly from the kinetic realm to the cyber realm, and we need to be able to deal with that. So building national unity at home, overcoming our polarization, is really perhaps one of the key steps in constraining Russia on the global stage. And then, finally, some very brief words about dialogue. We tend to downplay this in our national discussion. Many believe that diplomatic relations are—should not be branded as a reward for bad behavior. But I think if you look at this objectively, you'll see that diplomatic relations are very important as a way of defending and advancing our national concerns. It's a way that we can convey clearly to the Russians what our expectations are, what our goals are, what our redlines are, and the responses that we're capable of taking if Russia crosses them. At the same time, we can learn from the Russians what their goals are, what their motivations are, what their redlines are, and we can factor that into our own policy. This is a major element of managing the competition between our two countries responsibly. You'll see that we have begun to engage in negotiations and diplomacy with the Russians much more under President Biden than we did under President Trump. We've already launched strategic stability talks with the aim of coming up with a new concept of strategic stability that's adequate to the strategic environment of the present day and the near future. We've engaged in cybersecurity talks, which my understanding is have, in fact, had some success over the past several weeks. Where we, I think, have lagged is in the discussion of regional issues—Europe, Ukraine, the Middle East, for example. These are areas where there is still potential for conflict, and the United States and Russia ought to be sitting down and talking about these issues on a regular basis. So three Ds—defense, deterrence, and diplomacy or dialogue—are the ways that we should be thinking about our relationship with Russia. And obviously, we'll need to adjust each of these three elements to the specific issue at hand, whether it be in Europe, whether it be in the nuclear realm, cyberspace, and so forth. Now, with that as a way—by way of introduction, I am very pleased to entertain your questions. FASKIANOS: Tom, thanks very much for that terrific overview and analysis. We're going to go to all of you now for your questions. You can either raise your hand by clicking on the icon, and I will call on you, and you can tell us what institution you are with; or you can type your question in the Q&A box, although if you want to ask it you can raise your hand. We encourage that. And if you're typing your question, please let us know what college or university you're with. So I'm going to take the first raised-hand question from Babak Salimitari. And unmute yourself. Q: Can you guys hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Hello. I'm a third-year UCI student, economics. I have a question. I'm going to sound a bit like Sean Hannity here, so please forgive me, but I have a question about that Nord Stream 2 pipeline that you constantly hear on the news, and it just doesn't make that much sense for me of why this pipeline was allowed to be completed into the heart of Europe considering Russia's strength with natural gases and the leverage that they have over Europe with that pipeline. Why was that allowed to be completed? GRAHAM: Well, I think from the standpoint of the Biden administration this was a matter of what we call alliance management. Germany is clearly a key ally for the United States in Europe, and the Germans were very committed to the completion of that pipeline, starting with Chancellor Angela Merkel down through I think both the leading political parties and the German business community. So I think they made the decision for that. But let me step back because I'd like to challenge a lot of the assumptions about the Nord Stream 2 project here in the United States, which I think misconceive it, misframe the question, and tend to exaggerate the dangers that is poses. The first point that I would make is that Europe now and in the future will have and need Russian gas. It's taken a substantial amount in the past—in the past decades, and even as it moves forward towards a green revolution it will continue to take considerable amounts of Russian gas. It can't do without that gas. So the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, contrary to what you hear in the United States or at the U.S. Congress, I don't think poses an additional threat to Europe's energy security, no larger than the threat that was posed before that pipeline was completed. The Europeans, I think are aware of the problems that that poses, and they've taken steps over the past several years to integrate the gas—the gas distribution network in Europe, to build facilities to import liquified natural gas, all as a way of eroding the leverage that Gazprom might have had over energy markets in Europe. And that has been quite successful over the past—over the past several years. Now, I think, you know, the other issue that comes up in the discussion in the United States is Ukraine, because Nord Stream 2 clearly provides Russia with a way to import the gas into Europe and bypass Ukraine at the—at the same time. And Ukraine is going to suffer a significant loss in budgetary revenue because of the decline in transit fees that it gets from the transportation of Russian gas across its territory. You know, that is a problem, but there are ways of dealing with that: by helping Ukraine fill the budgetary gap, by helping Ukraine transition away from a reliance on gas to other forms of energy, of helping Ukraine develop the green-energy resources that will make it a much more important partner in the European energy equation than it is now. And then finally, you know, it strikes me as somewhat wrongheaded for Ukraine to put itself in a position where it is reliant on a country that is clearly a belligerent for a significant part of its federal revenue. So we need to think hard with the Ukrainians about how they deal with this issue, how they wean themselves off Russian transit fees, and then I think we have a situation where we can help Ukraine, we can manage the energy-security situation in Europe, we can reduce any leverage that Russia might have, and that Nord Stream 2 really doesn't pose a significant risk to the United States or our European allies over the long run. FASKIANOS: Thank you. We're going to take the next question from the written queue from Kenneth Mayers, who's at St Francis—sorry, that just popped away; oh, sorry—St. Francis College. Thinking beyond this triangular framework, what pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually, even globally, beneficial ways? GRAHAM: What triangular relationship are we talking about? FASKIANOS: His—thinking beyond this triangular framework and— GRAHAM: Oh, OK. So I think it's defense, deterrence, and diplomacy is the— FASKIANOS: Correct. GRAHAM: OK. Can you repeat the final part of the question, then? FASKIANOS: What pathways and possibilities can be envisioned for a more positive dimension of working together in mutually beneficial ways? GRAHAM: Well, there are a number of areas in which we can work together beneficially. If you think about proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, for example, the United States and Russia over the past two decades have played a major role in both securing weapons that were located in Russia, but also in securing highly-enriched uranium that was in Soviet-designed reactors throughout the former Soviet space. We have taken a lead together in setting down rules and procedures that reduce the risk of nuclear material—fissile material getting into the hands of terrorist organizations. And we have played a role together in trying to constrain the Iranian nuclear program. Russia played an instrumental role in the conclusion of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action that we signed in 2015 that the Trump administration walked away with, but they will continue to play a role in constraining Iranians' nuclear ambitions going forward. And we've also worked in a cooperative fashion in dealing with the North Korean nuclear program. So there are areas in nonproliferation where the two countries can work together. On climate change, I mean, I think the big challenge for the United States is actually persuading Russia that climate change is a significant threat to their own security. They're slowly beginning to change that view, but as they come around to recognizing that they have to deal with climate change there are a number of areas where the two countries can cooperate. One of the things that climate is doing is melting the permafrost. That is destabilizing the foundation of much of Russia's energy infrastructure in areas where gas and oil are extracted for export abroad. The United States has dome technologies that the Russians might find of interest in stabilizing that infrastructure. They suffer from problems of Siberian fires—peat-bog fires, forest fires—an area that, obviously, is of concern to the United States as well. And there may be room for cooperation there, two. And then, finally, you know, the United States and Russia have two of the leading scientific communities in the entire world. We ought to be working together on ways that we can help mitigate the consequences of climate change going forward. So I see an array of areas where the two countries could cooperate, but that will depend on good diplomacy in Washington and a receptivity on the part of the Russians which we haven't seen quite yet. FASKIANOS: Thank you. Let's go next to Jeffrey Ko. You can unmute yourself. Thank you. Q: Hi. So I'm Jeffrey Ko. I'm an international relations master's student at Carnegie Mellon. And my question has to deal with these private military forces, and especially the Wagner Group. And so I would like to know, you know, how does this play into our security strategy regarding Russia in countries that have seen proxy warfare? And how does this—how difficult will it be to engage with Russia either diplomatically or militarily on the use of these gray-zone tactics, and specifically utilizing the Wagner Group as an informal branch of Russia's military? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, I do think that we need, one, to sit down and have a discussion with Russia about the use of these private military forces, particularly the Wagner firm, which has played a significant role in a number of conflicts across the globe in the Middle East, Africa, and in Latin America. But we also ought to help the countries that are of interest to us deal with the problems that the Wagner Group causes. You know, the United States had to deal with the Wagner Group in Syria during the Syrian civil war. You know, despite the fact that we had a deconfliction exercise with the Russians at that point, tried to prevent military conflicts between our two militaries operating in close proximity, when the Wagner forces violated those strictures and actually began to attack a U.S. facility, we had no hesitation about using the force that we had to basically obliterate that enemy. And the Wagner Group suffered casualties numbering in the hundreds, one to two hundred. I think the Russians got the message about that, that you don't—you don't mess with the United States military, certainly not while using a private military company like Wagner. You know, in places like Libya, where Wagner is quite active, I think the United States needs a major diplomatic effort to try to defuse the Libyan crisis. And part of the solution to that would be negotiating an agreement that calls for the withdrawal of all foreign military forces and certainly private military groups from Libyan territory, and lean on the Russians to carry that through. In any event, you know, this is not going to be an easy issue to resolve. I think we deal with this by—country by country, and we focus our attention on those countries where our national interests are greatest. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Jill Dougherty, who's at Georgetown University. The Putin administration appears to be hardening its control of Russia's society with the purpose of keeping Putin in power at least until 2036. Most recent example is the Duma elections that just took place. Will this crackdown domestically affect or damage U.S.-Russia relations? GRAHAM: Thank you, Jill. Always a good question and always a difficult question to answer. You know, I think the issue here is the extent to which the Biden administration wants to make the domestic political situation in Russia a key item on its agenda with Russia over the next—over the next few years. You know, my impression from the conversations I've had with people in the administration—in and around the administration is that President Biden is not going to focus on this. You know, his focus really is going to be China, and what he wants to do is maintain something of a status quo in the relationship with Russia. You will notice that the second round of sanctions that the United States levied with regard to the poisoning of Alexei Navalny, something that was mandated by U.S. law, were actually quite mild—much less extreme, much less punitive than the legislation allowed—I think a signal that the Biden administration was not going to let domestic political issues in Russia overwhelm the agenda that the United States has, which is going to be focused on strategic stability, cyber issues, and so forth. So my immediate reaction is that the Duma election is really not going to have a dramatic impact on the state of the relationship between our two countries. We accept the fact that Russia is an authoritarian system. It is becoming more authoritarian. We will continue to try to find ways to support those elements of civil society we can, but always being careful not to do it in ways that causes the Russian government to crack down even harder on those individuals. This is a very sort of difficult needle to thread for the United States, but I think that's the way we'll go and you won't see this as a major impediment to the improvement of relations—which, as we all know, are at a very low level at this point in any event. FASKIANOS: Great. Thank you. Let's go next to Sujay Utkarsh. Q: Hi, yeah. Can you hear me? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. So, regarding the issue about cyber warfare, I was wondering if you can go into more detail about what advantages the Russians have in cyberspace and what the United States can do to compete with those advantages. GRAHAM: A good question and a difficult question for people outside the government to answer, since we're not privy to all the information about Russian cyber capabilities nor are we privy to the information about American cyber capabilities. Both countries cloak those programs in a great deal of secrecy. You know, it seemed to me that one of the advantages that perhaps Russia has is that it's a much more closed society than the United States. Now, I'm thinking simply in terms of the way societies can be disrupted through cyberspace. We're a much more open society. It's easier to access our internet. We are—just as I mentioned before, we are a polarized society right now. That allows Russia many avenues into our domestic political system in order to exacerbate the tensions between various elements in our society. The United States can't reply in the same way in dealing with Russia. You know, second, Russia, in building its own internet, its own cyberspace, has paid much more attention to security than the United States has. So, you know, I would presume that its computer systems are somewhat harder to penetrate than American systems are at this point, although another factor to take into account here is that much of the initial effort in building up cyberspace—the Web, the computer networks—in Russia was built with American technology. You know, the Googles, the Intels, and others played an instrumental role in providing those types of—that type of equipment to the Russians. So I wouldn't exaggerate how much stronger they are there. And then, finally, I think what is probably one of the strengths, if you want to call it that, is that Russia is probably a little more risk-prone in using its cyber tools than the United States is at this point, in part because we think as a society we're more vulnerable. And that does give Russia a slight advantage. That said, this shouldn't be a problem that's beyond the capability of the United States to manage if we put our minds to it. We have done a lot more over the past several years. We are getting better at this. And I think we'll continue to improve in time and with the appropriate programs, the appropriate education of American society. FASKIANOS: Thank you. The next question is a written one from Kim-Leigh Tursi, a third-year undergraduate at Temple University. Where do you see Russia in relation to the rise of China, and how does that affect how the U.S. might approach foreign policy toward Russia? GRAHAM: Well, you know, that's an important question, obviously one that a lot of people have focused on recently. You know, Russia and China have developed a very close working strategic relationship over the—over the past several years, but I think we should note that the Russian effort to rebuild its relations with China go back to the late Soviet period to overcome the disadvantages that then the Soviet Union felt they had because of the poor relationship with China and the ability of the United States to exploit that relationship to Moscow's detriment. So relations have been improving for the past twenty-five, thirty years; obviously, a dramatic acceleration in that improvement after 2014 and the breakdown in relations between Russia and the West. Now, there are a number of reasons for this alignment at this point. One, the two countries do share at a very general level a basic view of for—a basic dislike of what they see as American ambitions to dominate the global—the global security and economic environment. They don't like what they consider to be American hegemonic goals. Second, the economies seem to be complementary at this point. Russia does have a wealth of natural resources that the Chinese need to fuel their robust economic growth. You have similar domestic political systems. And all of this, I think, is reinforced by what appears to be a very good personal relationship between President Putin and President Xi Jinping. These two leaders have met dozens of times over the past five to seven years and have maintained, I think, very robust contact even during the—during the pandemic. So there are very good strategic reasons why these two countries enjoy good relations. They are going to step those up in the near term. The Russians are continuing to provide the Chinese with significant sophisticated military equipment. They've also undertaken to help the Chinese build an early warning system for ballistic missiles, and when that's completed it will make China only the third country in the world to have such a system along with Russia and the United States. Now, I would argue that this strategic alignment does pose something of a challenge to the United States. If you look at American foreign policy or American foreign policy tradition, one of the principles that has guided the United States since the end of the nineteenth century, certainly throughout the twentieth century, was that we needed to prevent the—any hostile country or coalition of hostile countries from dominating areas of great strategic importance, principally Europe, East Asia, and more recently the Middle East. A Russian-Chinese strategic alignment certainly increases the chances of China dominating East Asia. Depending on how close that relationship grows, it also could have significant impact on Europe and the way Europe relates to this Russian-Chinese bloc, and therefore to the United States as a whole. So we should have an interest in trying to sort of attenuate the relationship between the two countries. At a minimum, we shouldn't be pursuing a set of policies that would push Russia closer to China. Second, I think we ought to try to normalize our diplomatic relationship with the Russians. Not that we're necessarily going to agree on a—on a range of issues at this point, but we need to give the Russians a sense that they have other strategic options than China going forward—something that would, I think, enhance their bargaining position with the Chinese going forward and would complicate China's own strategic calculus, which would be to our advantage. I think we also should play on Russia's concerns about strategic autonomy, this idea that Russia needs to be an independent great power on the global stage, that it doesn't want to be the junior partner or overly dependent on any one country as a way, again, of attenuating the tie with China. The one thing that I don't think we can do is drive a wedge between those two countries, in part because of the strategic reasons that I've mentioned already that bring these two countries together. And any very crude, I think, effort to do that will actually be counterproductive. Both Beijing and Moscow will see through that, quite clearly, and that will only lead to a closing of the ranks between those two countries, which as I said is a strategic challenge for the United States going forward. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Holli Semetko, who's at Emory University. Polarization is something we must overcome, as you said, but those of us working on social media have some evidence to suggest that social media has fostered political polarization in the U.S. Yuri Milner, a Russian Israeli entrepreneur, invested in an early round of Facebook funding with help from VTB, a Russian state-controlled bank, as well as his investment in Jared Kushner's real estate firm. What is the level of FDI from Russia in the U.S. and do you see it as a threat to national security? GRAHAM: Well, look, I mean, the actual level of Russian FDI in the United States is quite small. You know, you have some few, I think, good examples of it—the one that you've mentioned with Yuri Milner, for example. There was some investment in a steel factory some years ago. But by and large, there hasn't been a significant amount of Russian foreign direct investment in the United States. I think our growing concerns about Russia have made us even more leery of allowing Russian investment, particularly in sectors that we consider critical to American national security. So I'm not deeply concerned about that going forward. I think we probably face a much greater challenge from the Chinese in that regard. Of course, you've seen efforts by the United States to deal more harshly or look more closely at Chinese investment in the United States over the past several years. Let me just make one sort of final point on social media since it's come up. You know, Russia is a problem. We need to pay attention to Russia in that space. But again, I don't think that we should exaggerate Russia's influence, nor should we focus simply on Russia as the problem in this area. There is a major problem with disinformation in social media in the United States, much of that propagated by sources within the United States, but there are a host of other countries that also will try to affect U.S. public opinion through their intrusions into American social media. You know, given our concerns about First Amendment rights, freedom of speech and so forth, you know, I think we have problems in sort of really clamping down on this. But what we need to do, certainly, is better educate the American public about how to deal with the information that crosses their electronic devices day in and day out. Americans need to be aware of how they can be manipulated, and they need to understand and know where they can go to find reliable information. Again, given the political polarization in our country today, this is a very real challenge and difficult one. But I think if we think long term about this problem, the key really is educating the American public. An educated American public is going to be the best defense against foreign countries, other hostile forces trying to use social media to undermine our national unity and exacerbate the politics of our country. FASKIANOS: Thank you. I'm going to take the next question from Eoin Wilson-Manion, who's raised his hand. Q: Hello. Can you hear me now? GRAHAM: Yes. FASKIANOS: Yes. Q: Awesome. Well, thank you. I just wanted to ask if you could touch a little bit more on Russia's presence in Syria and what that means for U.S. interests in Syria and I guess the larger Middle East. I'm Eoin from Carnegie Mellon University. Thanks very much. GRAHAM: Well, you know, the Russians entered Syria in 2015 militarily largely to save Assad from what they thought was imminent overthrow by what they considered a radical Islamic force, a group of terrorists that they thought would challenge Russian interests not only in Syria but would fuel extremist forces inside Russia itself, particularly in the North Caucasus but farther afield than that—even into Moscow, into areas that were Muslim-dominated inside Russia itself. So they had very good national security reasons for going in. Those ran—I mean, the Russian presence in Syria clearly has run counter to what the United States was trying to do at that point since we clearly aligned against Assad in favor of what we considered moderate reformist forces that were seeking a more sort of democratic future for Syria as part of this broader Arab Spring at that time. So there was a clear conflict at that point. You know, subsequently and in parallel with its continued presence in Syria, the Russians have extended their diplomatic—their diplomatic effort to other countries in the region. Russia enjoys a fairly robust diplomatic relationship with Israel, for example, that has been grounded in counterterrorism cooperation, for example. They have a sort of strange relationship, largely positive, with Turkey that they have pursued over the past several years. We know of the ties that they've had in Tehran, in Iran for some time. They have reached out to the Saudis and the Saudis have bought some military equipment from them. We see them in Egypt and Libya, for example. So they're a growing presence, a growing diplomatic presence in the Middle East, and this does pose some problems for the United States. From the middle of the 1970s onward, one of the basic thrusts of American foreign policy was to limit the role the Russians played in the Middle East. We sidelined them in the negotiations between the Arabs and the Israelis in the 1970s and in the 1980s. We limited their diplomatic contacts to countries that we considered critical partners and allies in that part of the world. Now I think the geopolitical situation has changed. Our own interest in the Middle East has diminished over time, in part because of the fracking revolution here in the United States. Gas and oil, we've got close to being independent in that area. We're not as dependent on the Middle East as we once were for energy sources. And also, as, you know, the Biden administration has been clear, we do want to pivot away from the Middle East and Europe to focus more of our energies on what we see as the rising and continuing strategic challenge posed by China. So I think that means that going forward the United States is going to have to deal with Russia in a different fashion in the Middle East than in the past. We're going to have to recognize them as a continuing presence. We're not going to be able to push them out, in part because we're not prepared to devote the resources to it. We have countries that are still important to us—Saudi Arabia, Israel for example—that do want a Russian presence in the Middle East. And so what we ought to do, it seems to me, is to begin that discussion about how we're going to manage the rivalry in the Middle East. Now, it's not all simply competition. There are areas for cooperation. We can cooperate in dealing with Iran, for example, the Iran nuclear dossier, as we have had in the past. Neither country has an interest in Iran developing nuclear weapons. Second, I think the two countries also would like to see a Middle East that's not dominated by a single regional power. So despite the fact that the Russians have worked together quite closely with the Iranians in Syria, they don't share Iranian ambitions elsewhere in the Middle East. And if you look at the diplomatic ties that the Russians have nurtured over the past with Turkey, with Israel, Saudi Arabia for example, none of these are friends of Iran, to put it mildly. So we can talk, I think, to the Russians of how our—you know, we can conduct ourselves so as to foster the development of a regional equilibrium in the Middle East that tends to stabilize that region, makes it less of a threat to either country, less of a threat to America's European allies, and use this as a basis for, again, sort of not escalating the tension in the region but moderating it in some ways that works to the long-term advantage of the United States. FASKIANOS: Next question from Michael Strmiska, who's a professor at Orange County Community College in New York state. Do you see any hope of persuading Russia to abandon its occupation of Crimea in the near term? Or do you think this is like the occupation of the Baltic states of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia after World War II, where a very long timespan was needed before any liberation was realistically possible? GRAHAM: Well, I guess my answer to those two questions would be yes and no, or no and yes. On Crimea, you know, I see no sort of near-term scenario that would lead to the Russians agreeing to the return of Crimea to Ukraine. Quite the contrary, Russia has taken steps since 2014 they continue at this point to further integrate Crimea into the Russian Federation politically, economically, socially, and so forth. The Russians have also built up their military presence in Crimea as a way of enhancing their domination or their influence in the greater Black Sea region. So I see no set of circumstances that would change that, certainly not in the—in the near term. And I think, you know, the Ukrainian effort to focus attention on Crimea is not going to, in fact, gain a great deal of traction with Europe nor with the United States going forward, though we will maintain the principled position of not recognizing Russia's incorporation or annexation of Crimea. You know, I don't think that the Crimean and Baltic situations are necessarily analogous. You know, in the Baltic states there was a significant indigenous element, governments in exile, that supported the independence of those countries. There was a fulcrum that the United States or a lever that the United States could use over time to continue pressure on the Soviets that eventually led to the independence of those countries as the Soviet Union broke down and ultimately collapsed at the end of the 1980s into 1991. I don't see any significant indigenous element in Crimea nor a movement of inhabitants of Crimea outside Crimea that wants Crimea to be returned to Ukraine. I think we need to remember that a significant part of the population in Ukraine is Russian military, retired Russian military, that feels quite comfortable in—within the Russian Federation at this point. So if I were being quite frank about this, although I think the United States should maintain its principled position and not recognize annexation of Crimea, I don't see anything over the long term, barring the collapse of Russia itself, that will change that situation and see Ukraine (sic; Crimea) reincorporated into the Ukrainian state. FASKIANOS: So there are a couple questions in the chat about Russia's economy: What is their economy like today? And what are the effects of the sanctions? And from Steve Shinkel at the Naval War College: How do you assess the tie between Russia's economy and being able to continue to modernize its military and ensure a stable economy? And will economic factors and Russia's demographic challenges be a future constraining factor? So if you could— GRAHAM: Yeah. No, no, just take the economy. Obviously, a big issue, and it will be a constraining factor. I mean, the Russian economy is stagnating and it has for some—for some time. They enjoyed—the Russian economy enjoyed a very rapid period of growth during President Putin's first presidential—two presidential terms in the 2000s, but since the financial crisis of 2008 and 2009 Russia has run into very difficult economic times. In fact, it's never really recovered from that crisis. If you look at the past ten years, barely any growth in the Russian economy at all. If you look at the impact that that has had on Russians themselves, there's basically been no growth in real disposable income; rather, a decline over the past six or seven years. I think the Russians recognize that. The question is whether they can come up with a set of policies that actually will reverse that and that lead to a more robustly growing economy. Now, what the Kremlin has tried to do is not so much reform the economy—which I think is necessary if they're going to enjoy robust economic growth—as much as professionalize the economy; that is—that is, bring in a younger sort of cadre who are well educated, many of them educated in the West, who understand how modern economies function and can keep the economy stable at least at the macro level. And this is one of the reasons that Western sanctions have not had nearly the impact on Russian behavior that many had hoped for or anticipated back in 2014 when we began to turn repeatedly to this tool in response to Russian activities and operations against Ukraine. You know, it has had some impact. I think the IMF would say that it's probably taken a percentage point off—or, not a percentage point, but a tenth of a percentage point off of Russia's GDP growth over the past several years. That certainly hasn't been enough to change Russian behavior. But it hasn't been more, in fact, because the governors of the—of the central bank have dealt quite adeptly with that, and maintain said Russian macroeconomic stability and some sort of foundation for the economy to grow going forward. I imagine that's going to continue into the—into the future as well. So it is a constraining factor. Then I would end with what I—with a point that I made in my introduction. Russia does have a tremendous ability to mobilize its resources for state purposes, to extract what it needs from society at large to modernize the military, to maintain certainly Russia's defenses and also some capability to project power abroad. So I wouldn't write them off because of that. I think it's going—still going to be a serious power, but not nearly as great a challenge to the United States as if it, in fact, solved its demographic problems, its economic problems, and had a robustly growing economy, greater resources that it could devote to a whole range of things that would improve its standing on the global stage vis-à-vis the United States and vis-à-vis China. FASKIANOS: Well, with that we are at the end of our time. And I apologize to everybody. We had over twenty written questions still pending and raised hands. I'm sorry we couldn't get to all of you, but we do try to end on time. So, Thomas Graham, thank you very much for sharing your insights and analysis with us today. We appreciate it. And to all of you for your terrific questions and comments, we appreciate it. Our next Academic Webinar will be on Wednesday, October 6, at 1:00 p.m. Eastern Time. And we will focus on the Indo-Pacific with Dhruva Jaishankar, who is the executive director of the Observer Research Foundation America and nonresident fellow at the Lowy Institute. And in the meantime, I encourage you to follow CFR at @CFR_Academic and visit CFR.org, ForeignAffairs.com, and ThinkGlobalHealth.org for new research and analysis on global issues. So, Tom, thank you very much. GRAHAM: Thank you. Good luck to all of you. (END)

FiringTheMan
How an FBA Aggregator Bought a 100M+ Business with Chris Bell, CEO of Perch

FiringTheMan

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 42:01


Episode 92Chris Bell is Founder and Chief Executive Officer at Perch, a technology-enabled consumer products company that acquires and operates Amazon FBA businesses with winning products in their respective categories. Chris had designed and built the Wayfair Delivery Network, which has delivered over 3 million heavy bulky orders annually, before starting Perch. At Bain & Company, Chris worked with Fortune 500 companies on growth strategy and leading private equity firms on M&A, working on over 40 transactions, representing $90B+ in value, including the largest tech merger in history. Prior to business school, Chris was a leading sales rep of office hardware and software and he started his career at GE Healthcare. Chris has a BS in Computer Engineering from Georgia Tech and an MBA from Carnegie Mellon.Listen to Chris and learn the secrets of an expert FBA aggregator![00:01 - 05:40] Opening SegmentLet's get to know Chris BellChris shares his thoughts why people buy from Amazon[05:41 - 14:31] Starting His Entrepreneurial JourneyChris shares the humble beginnings of PerchHow he overcame his fears and start his entrepreneurial journeyHe walks us through the process of quitting his job[14:32 - 25:03] Bringing Your Business To New HeightsDo you work hard at everything you do?Here's a piece of advice from ChrisIf you want to sell your business, try PerchChris tells us whyWant some Amazon refunds? Check out GetidaPromo code: FTM400Chris shares their approach in buying businesses[25:04 - 37:49] Why Contact Perch NowSell your business to Perch with this one easy step!When to contact brokers and when to call Perch directlyChris talks about this acquisition and the lessons you can learn from itPrepare for an exit with this great tip from Chris[37:50 - 42:01] Closing Segment Know more about Chris in the Fire Round!Connect with Chris. Links belowFinal words Tweetable Quotes:“If you are a hard worker and you have some tenacity, take risks.” - Chris Bell“You gotta understand that the goal of whatever business you're in is almost always to delight the customer.” - Chris BellResources mentionedAmazonWayfair Delivery NetworkFiring the Man episode 91: How to Scale from $0 to $80 million on Amazon with Adam Feinberg from Web Deals DirectAdam FeinbergBook: How to win Friends & Influence PeopleEmail cbell@tepper.cmu.edu to connect with Chris or follow him on LinkedIn. Bring your business to new heights by getting in touch with Perch!------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Send us a voice message and let us know how we can help you fire the man! FacebookYouTubeInstagramEmail us --> support@firingtheman.comLEAVE US A REVIEW!

Revelations Radio Network

Canary Cry News Talk ep. 394 - 09.27.2021 - OCCULTECH MAGIK: Black Goo Greta, $ADA Mystery Religions, Anti-Jab Jocks, X-Men Nephilites - CCNT 394 Our LINK TREE: CanaryCry.Party SUBSCRIBE TO US ON: NewPodcastApps.com SUPPORT: CanaryCryRadio.com/Support MEET UPS: CanaryCryMeetUps.com Basil's other project: Ravel Podcast INTRO Biden gets booster on air Black Goo Greta Cover (Your Celeb Mag) Hamster has been trading crypto, out-performing S&P 500 (Biz Insider)   FLIPPY 0:25:31 Can football (soccer) playing robots beat world cup winners by 2050? (BBC)   GREAT RESET/CRYPTO0:37:03 Chinese News: China cuts power and production (Bloomberg) Note: Gov't must relieve supply chain turmoil (Financial Times) Huge news from Cardano $ADA during summit (Bloomberg) -Hoskinson donates $20 mil to Carnegie Mellon (Carnegie was a Mason, Mellon ties) -Partnership with Dish Network (Dishfire of NSA, $5 bil deal w/ AT&T, AWT 5G partnership) -Acala PRISM to offer DID on $ADA (PRISM of the NSA, DID traditional) -COTI to issue Djed algorithmic stablecoin on $ADA (Djed ancient Egypt) -Ouroboros PoS protocol for $ADA Australia order $14 million Ouroboros sculpture   COVID 19 JINGLE/PANDEMIC SPECIAL 1:09:46 Clip: More tyranny in Australia (Brisbane military airplane drive by) Clip: Even more tyranny in Australia (photo of mask police going viral) Clip: “Get him, he's leaving his house!” Clip: UK protest with thousands Clip: NY Gov says NG to replace unvaccinated medical Ohio State HP “aware and monitoring” possible trucker protest (Fox19) R1 Variant starting to spread (SF Chronicle) Thousands dying but not from C19 (Yahoo/Telegraph) Clip: Natural Immunity potential legal challenge to federal mandates (Yahoo)   I AM WACCINE 1:54:44 Clip: Scientist Dr. Ryan Cole, jab autopsies Headline: Court blocks NY city school mandates (WHBI) Unjabbed clash in NBA, Kyrie Irving satanic conspiracy (Sports Illustrated) Headline: GS Warriors, Andrew Wiggins denied religious exemption (NY Times)   BREAK (producer party) 2:15:31   POLYTICKS 3:20:26 Newsom Science/Alien: CA to replace the word “Alien” for “noncitizen” and “immigrant” Harry Legs: Biden purchases drones from China (National Pulse)   NEPHILIM UPDATE 3:30:55 X-Men could join MCU as Nephilites, not mutants (Screen Rant, MCL)   ADDITIONAL STORIES Church at planned parenthood permanently ordered away from clinic (Spokesman Review) Joe Rogan says Trump will probably win 2024 (DailyMail) Robot Arm milking cows (ChipPewa) Not financial advice, Airport robots to rise to $2.5 bn by 2030 (Global News Wire) Mental Health: Use economic, medical, and social data for policy (WEF) India covering up snake bite massacres (Daily Beast) Proud Boys in contact with FBI on Insurrection Day (Yahoo) Inside CIA secret war against Wikileaks (Yahoo) Facebook Ray-Ban Smart Glasses solves problem, but privacy issue (Yahoo) Will robots be able to have children, celebrate mothers day? (Analytics Insights) The Army is modeling future robots on…squirrels (Pop. Mechanics) Robot designs inspired by nature (Design Boom) Scientists create genetically modified coffee (DailyMail) Waccines C19 death toll surpasses 1918 Spanish flu estimates (Smithsonian) National Guard ready to replace health care workers (Reuters) Gates Foundation, NIH, CDC funded C19 jab effectiveness study (MedRxiv)   PRODUCERS ep. 394: Scott K**, Brian D, Anonymous, Aaron J, Sam W, Sir Sammons Knight of the Fishes, Sir Casey the Shield Knight, JC, Heatheruss, Sarah P, GiantsBane16, Brandt W, Veronica D, Big Tank, Juan A, Gail M, Doughty the Coyote, Runksmash, Ciara, Rob TIMESTAMPS: Christine C ART: Dame Allie of the Skillet Nation Sir Dove, Knight of Rustbeltia Ryan N Mike B Christine C

One Woman Today
A CEO's Perspective, Followership with Priya Narasimhan

One Woman Today

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 43:18


A CEO's Perspective, Followership with Priya NarasimhanThis week, in the continuation of the CEO followership series, Jeanie is joined by CEO, Priya Narasimhan, the founder and CEO of Yinzcam. Priya shares her perspective of followership as not only an executive within her organization, but she also shares how she integrates the idea of followership in the classroom with her students at Carnegie Mellon University. Priya's energy and conviction around followership is one that is sure to inspire anyone who listens to this episode. Priya Narasimhan is a Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. Her research interests lie in the fields of dependable distributed systems, fault-tolerance, embedded systems, mobile systems and sports technology. She serves as the academic lead of the Intel Science and Technology Center in Embedded Computing (ISTC-EC) that comprises Carnegie Mellon, Penn State, UIUC, University of Pennsylvania, Cornell, UC Berkeley and Georgia Tech. Priya Narasimhan is the CEO and Founder of YinzCam, Inc., a company focused on mobile live streaming and scalable video technologies to provide the ultimate mobile fan experience to 40+ professional sports teams/venues.Enjoy today's episode! 3:12 Introduction to Priya3:48 How Priya describes herself as a CEO and a professor5:44 Priya shares what it looks like for her to operate at her best as a CEO and a professor7:12 Priya defines followership10:21 The concept of silent coaching 12:05 Generational differences around followership13:55 How having the awareness of what you love and what you're good at can change the trajectory of your future.15:43 Priya shares the impact the pandemic has had on her organization21:46 Attributes that fueled Priya's motivation to keep her business alive during its most difficult times24:57 An executive leadership perspective on the future of work during the pandemic27:39 The importance of supporting employees who want to pivot and evolve as the company evolves29:15 Priya shares her experience of teaching and implementing followership within the classroom 32:28 How Priya's students describe her teaching style33:59 Grading by the size of ambition vs perfecting solutions38:00 Priya talks about how she creates a culture of ambition at Yinzcam40:14 Who Priya is following and whyConnect with Priya Narasimhan:https://priyanarasimhan.com/about-me-new/ https://www.linkedin.com/in/priyanarasimhan/ Subscribe: Warriors At Work PodcastsWebsite: Jeaniecoomber.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/986666321719033/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jeanie_coomber/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/jeanie_coomberLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jeanie-coomber-90973b4/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbMZ2HyNNyPoeCSqKClBC_w

Education - VOA Learning English
Carnegie Mellon Robotics Programs Return to In-Person Work - September 23, 2021

Education - VOA Learning English

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 7:09


Women on The Move Podcast
Head of AI research sees a collaborative future

Women on The Move Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 29:00


A world-renowned expert in the fields of robotics and artificial intelligence (AI), Dr. Manuela Veloso was a professor in the computer science department at Carnegie Mellon University and she took a leave of absence three years ago to be head of artificial intelligence research at JPMorgan Chase. In this role, she has applied AI to problems in economics, data management, and gender equity. She sits down with WOTM's Sam Saperstein to talk about her journey, what she loves about her job, and the future of AI and robotics. Working as a team Manuela Veloso earned her Master of Science in electrical engineering in Lisbon, Portugal, before coming to the United States in 1984 to begin work on a PhD. She made the switch to computer science after she came to see how computers can solve problems for people, a purpose that still resonates for her today. She became interested in robotics because while computers and AI could create plans, it took robots to execute them. She tells Sam that she never had interest in science fiction or robots before that. “I began addressing the robotics only because of my interest in seeing these plans that we'd created theoretically eventually, through a generation of actions, being executed,” she says. In 1996, Manuela cofounded a robotics soccer competition known as RoboCup, bringing together people's love of games, and soccer in particular, as a way of promoting robotics and AI research. The RoboCup is still held every year and has advanced from the days of single robots on wheels acting independently to today, where humanoid robots work as a team. A collaborative future Manuela sees a future in which humans and intelligence systems are inseparable. She relates this vision to a breakthrough she had at Carnegie Mellon about ten years ago when she was developing robots that would not be able to solve certain novel problems. “These robots would move down these corridors and then they would face a closed door, or they would have to press an elevator button or someone talked with them and they didn't understand what people were saying.” The robots would never be autonomous if they kept being stymied by these problems. “And then one day I decided that we wouldn't be able to solve this problem with more arms for the robots or better language technology. There will always be these limitations, intrinsic limitations in the robots.”  Her solution was “cohort robots,” or robots that work together with humans to solve problems. Manuela explains: “Basically if there was an obstacle in front of them, they would say, please, can you help me please? Excuse me, get out of my way, open the door, press the elevator button. They became autonomous, but asking for help.” She calls it “symbiotic autonomy.” She also calls it “the secret of the future.” “One day I believe that we will be always asking for assistance from AI,” she says. Because of the huge amount of data we've accumulated and continue to accumulate, the scale of our problems—whether it's at work, getting advice from a financial advisory, or just sorting the photos on our iPhones—is only getting bigger. Manuela says that humans who leverage AI to make decisions will be more trustworthy. Advice and Legacy Manuela hopes her legacy will be the simple notion that “problems can be solved.” But not even AI can solve them easily or right away. We have to put in the work, but we can celebrate progress. “And this is true for women in the job,” she adds. “This is the advice I always give: Break the difficult problems into pieces. Try to reward yourself, be happy when little pieces are accomplished. It's perfectly fine that the big piece is not there yet.” Take satisfaction in the steps along the way.  

Revision Path
Dr. Christina N. Harrington

Revision Path

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 78:27


Our back to school theme continues this week with a conversation with Dr. Christina N. Harrington. I first met Dr. Harrington as a contributor to the first volume of RECOGNIZE, and now she's an assistant professor in the HCI Institute at Carnegie Mellon University and the director of their Equity and Health Innovations Design Research Lab! Impressive! After a brief pandemic check-in, Dr. Harrington talked about some of the design research work she's doing at Carnegie Mellon, and spoke about how her past teaching experiences helped prepare her for this opportunity. We also talked about how she got into design via engineering, the utility of design Ph.Ds, and some of her latest obsessions. I'm glad we have educators like Dr. Harrington who can expand the concepts of design for the next generation!LinksDr. Christina N. Harrington's WebsiteDr. Christina N. Harrington on TwitterFor extended show notes, including a full transcript of this interview, visit revisionpath.com.==========Sponsored by AdobeSupport for Revision Path comes from Adobe MAX.Adobe MAX is the annual global creativity conference and it's going online this year -- October 26th through the 28th. This is sure to be a creative experience like no other. Plus, it's all free. Yep - 100% free!With over 25 hours of keynotes, luminary speakers, breakout sessions, workshops, musical performances and even a few celebrity appearances, it's going to be one-stop shopping for your inspiration, goals and creative tune-ups.Did I mention it's free?Explore over 300 sessions across 11 tracks, hear from amazing speakers and learn new creative skills… all totally free and online this October.To register, head to max.adobe.com.==========Sponsored by Black in Design 2021 ConferenceOn the weekend of October 8-10th, join the Harvard Graduate School of Design virtually for the Black in Design 2021 Conference!  This year's theme, Black Matter, is a celebration of Black space and creativity from the magical to the mundane. Our speakers, performers, and panelists will bring nuance to the trope of Black excellence and acknowledge the urgent political, spatial, and ecological crises facing Black communities across the diaspora. You don't want to miss out on this weekend of learning, community, and connection!  Visit them online at blackmatter.tv to learn more and be a part of the event.==========Sponsored by Brevity & WitBrevity & Wit is a strategy and design firm committed to designing a more inclusive and equitable world.We accomplish this through graphic design, presentations and workshops around I-D-E-A: inclusion, diversity, equity, and accessibility.If you're curious to learn how to combine a passion for I-D-E-A with design, check us out at brevityandwit.com.Brevity & Wit — creative excellence without the grind.==========Follow and SubscribeLike this episode? Then subscribe to us on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you find your favorite shows.Follow us there, and leave us a 5-star rating and a review! Thanks so much to all of you who have already rated and reviewed us!You can also follow Revision Path on Instagram and Twitter.==========CreditsRevision Path is brought to you by Lunch, a multidisciplinary creative studio in Atlanta, GA.It is produced by Maurice Cherry and engineered and edited by RJ Basilio. Our intro voiceover is by Music Man Dre, with intro and outro music by Yellow Speaker.Thank you for listening!

SUPERTILT : the podcast
Ep 29 - Hackathons + High Intensity Living with Lucy Guo

SUPERTILT : the podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 34:18


 Being named Forbes 30 Under 30 may be a pinnacle in the journey of life for some, but for Lucy Guo, she just keeps attacking life with dynamism and tenacity. After dropping out of Carnegie Mellon for the Thiel Fellowship, later becoming the first female product designer at Snapchat, Lucy co-founded Scale AI, a billion dollar startup, earning her 30 under 30 position. She now invests in startups through Backend Capital, and nurtures budding technologists through hackathons. Lucy's energetic AF and we had a super fun conversation with her. We discussed:Learning to code as a 7-year-oldHer journey to becoming a tech founderRunning Miami Hack Week + the resurgence of Miami as a tech hubNFT ownership + building relationships with artistsMaximizing time as a super busy humanMaking it as a female in the tech spaceShow Links:Lucy's TwitterLucy's WebsiteBackend CapitalTune in, share with your pals, and #tiltwithusWhere to find us:The TILT on SubstackTwitterInstagram@blaiseturnbull@mahoney_magic

Beyond the Lights: A Conversation with Theater Professionals
48. CAROLYN MAZUCA - Costume Designer

Beyond the Lights: A Conversation with Theater Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 47:13


On today's show, I speak with costume designer Carolyn Mazuca. We talk about everything from our love of San Antonio and the Southwest, to imposter syndrome, to the differences between working in film and television vs. theater. I absolutely loved chatting with Carolyn and I know you'll enjoy our conversation as much as I did.For a full transcript of this episode visit beyondthelightspodcast.com.Mentioned in this Episode[00:07:55]  Old Town Albuquerque[00:08:17]  Carnegie Mellon[00:17:34]  Oregon Shakespeare Festival[00:38:34]  Cambodian Rock Band at OSF[00:40:03]  Mother RoadFollow CarolynWebsiteInstagramFollow Beyond the LightsWebsiteFacebookTwitterInstagram

Innovation Talks
Corporate Start Ups and the Importance of Entrepreneurial Thinking

Innovation Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 36:42


Sean Ammirati is a distinguished Service Professor of Entrepreneurship at Carnegie Mellon University - Tepper School of Business. But teaching is only one of the many hats Sean wears in his professional career. He is the Co-Founder and Director of the Carnegie Mellon Corporate Startup Lab, sits on the Board of a venture capitalist investment fund, and delivers keynotes and workshops for startups and global brands. Sean is also a published author, having published his first book: The Science of Growth: How Facebook Beat Friendster - and How Nine Other Startups Left the Rest in the Dust in April 2016 which explains why some innovative ideas scale to change the world while others remain as just a good idea. Sean earned his Bachelor's degree in Computer Information Systems from Grove City College and completed his research fellowship at Carnegie Mellon University in Computer Science & Organizational Behavior. Sean joins me today to discuss the importance of encouraging and embracing the entrepreneurial culture and thinking within your organization. We discuss the differences between entrepreneurs and startups, the different types of entrepreneurial ventures, and why startup entrepreneurship is truly the only type that moves the needle for large corporations. We discuss the differences between how raising venture capital works compared to raising funds for corporate entrepreneurship projects. We also highlight the importance of creating high-quality pitch decks, how Carnegie Mellon's Corporate Startup Lab helps large organizations embrace entrepreneurship within their organizations, and the industries that are most ripe for transformational innovation. “There are a lot of problems that the world needs solved. Think about the ways you can be part of that solution by helping your company be more entrepreneurial.” - Sean Ammirati This week on Innovation Talks: What prompted Sean to write his book, The Science of Growth The definition of product market fit How to maintain the spirit of a startup as a large corporate company The difference between entrepreneurship and startups Why startup entrepreneurship is the only type that moves the needle for large corporations Sean's concerns with entrepreneurship education today Creating transformational change within your organization from the bottom up The difference between how venture capitalism and funding for corporate entrepreneurship work Why it's crucial to create amazing pitch decks How Carnegie Mellon's Corporate Startup Lab engages with organizations and how they help large companies embrace entrepreneurship within their organizations Industries that are most ripe for transformational innovation Connect with Sean Ammirati: Sean Ammirati's Website Carnegie Mellon Corporate Startup Lab Podcast: Agile Giants Book: The Science of Growth: How Facebook Beat Friendster - and How Nine Other Startups Left the Rest in the Dust Sean Ammirati on LinkedIn Sean Ammirati on Twitter This Podcast is brought to you by Sopheon Thanks for tuning into this week's episode of Innovation Talks. If you enjoyed this episode, please subscribe and leave a review wherever you get your podcasts. Apple Podcasts | TuneIn | GooglePlay | Stitcher | Spotify | iHeart Be sure to connect with us on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, and share your favorite episodes on social media to help us reach more listeners, like you. For additional information around new product development or corporate innovation, sign up for Sopheon's newsletter where we share news and industry best practices monthly! The fastest way to do this is to go to sopheon.com and click here.

Times Higher Education
THE Campus: Bridging universities‘ new digital divide

Times Higher Education

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 26:30


Universities are going into the 2021-22 academic year with a greater capacity to deliver online and hybrid teaching. But just as existing digital divides presented complex teaching challenges during the pandemic, faculty's lack of digital literacy and of pedagogical training could render universities' digital transformations ineffective.    Lauren Herckis, an anthropologist at Carnegie Mellon, discusses her research into the new digital divide in higher education and how universities can work to fill it.    Explore our Spotlight collection of resources on the new academic skill set. And you can read Lauren's chapter in the Global Learning Council's latest report Digital Transformation of Higher Education

Beyond the Lights: A Conversation with Theater Professionals
47. *REBROADCAST* ERICA HEMMINGER - Associate Set Designer of MOULIN ROUGE

Beyond the Lights: A Conversation with Theater Professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 51:20


I'm so excited for you to listen to (or revisit) my conversation with Erica Hemminger, associate set designer of Moulin Rouge. A lot has happened since we recorded this a year ago, but my fascination with the elephant continues. Please enjoy this rebroadcast of episode four of Beyond the Lights.Please note, the next new episode will premiere on Tuesday, September 7th, and then alternate Mondays moving forward.___________________________________________________________This week we have Erica Hemminger an associate set designer on Broadway.  If you've been to a Broadway show within the last 10 years you've probably seen something she's worked on, including but not limited to Anything Goes, Beautiful, American Son, and the biggest one to date Moulin Rouge.  We discuss how she got started in set design, why we should all be discussing our salaries more, and just how many elephants are on the Moulin Rouge set. For a full transcript of today's episode visit beyondthelightspodcast.com.Mentioned in this Episode[00:01:02] Derek McLane[00:03:17] Carnegie Mellon [00:03:22] DePaul University[00:10:17] I Am My Own Wife[00:17:46] Moulin Rouge! The Musical[00:28:52] The Elephant of the Moulin Rouge[00:31:13] Catherine Martin[00:35:14] The Wiz Live[00:35:20] Hairspray Live[00:36:22] Kenny Leon[00:36:25] Harvey Fierstein[00:44:40] Anything Goes[00:45:45] Buffy the Vampire Slayer Musical EpisodeFollow Erica HemmingerInstagramFollow Beyond the LightsFacebookTwitterInstagram

Life in the Cloud
The Math of the Future with Eric Daimler of Conexus

Life in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 34:13


What is Category Theory, and why is it called the math of the 21st century?We're fortunate to have the CEO and Co-Founder of Conexus, Eric Daimler, join us for this episode. Eric carries a wide breadth of experience, from Professional Investing to Policy Advisor and Author. He taught at Carnegie Mellon and worked under the Obama Administration.Eric emphatically speaks on the potent potential of Category Theory. When working with billions and even trillions of data points, this branch of math holds the key to faultless data.Eric provides real-world applications where Conexus is using Category Theory, including ride-sharing apps such as Uber, investing applications, and diabetes datasets. When looking at big data, there's a necessity for zero mistake data. With thousands of ambiguities, this becomes impractical.Category theory's relevance and applications are only taking off. Eric recommends his Co-Founder's book to learn more on the subject, which you can check out at the link below.Listen to the episode to learn more now!Don't forget to subscribe to the show on iTunes, Spotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. See you in the next episode! Resources:https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/category-theory-sciences 

TechVibe Radio
One Mic Stand: Joe Zeff Talks About Coming Back to Pittsburgh

TechVibe Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 31:27


Joe Zeff left Pittsburgh more than 30 years ago to pursue his career in journalism. Now, he's coming back and bringing his business along with him. Find out more about his pursuit to make Pittsburgh home again. Below is more about his Pittsburgh test: Today is the last day of The Pittsburgh Test, a life experiment to see what would happen if I were to drop everything and move back to my hometown for the month of July. My wife and I left Pittsburgh 29 years ago to pursue newspaper jobs in Detroit, then New York City. A decade later I shifted my focus from traditional journalism to interactive storytelling, starting a company that helps the world's biggest companies make their products and services more relatable to employees, customers and investors. When Covid hit, my business moved from rooms to Zooms, which meant I could work and live anywhere. So why not Pittsburgh? On July 1, The Pittsburgh Test began. I rented an apartment in Shadyside and an office in Bakery Square, directly across from Google. I launched a website; plastered my face on socks, hats and cardboard masks; and put up a billboard on Bigelow Boulevard. I connected with dozens of Pittsburghers — creators, investors, educators, innovators, former colleagues and classmates, and complete strangers. Along the way I uncovered storylines I hadn't expected. I've done my best to stay on top of changes in my hometown, but hadn't fully appreciated what Pittsburgh had become: A technology center that is redefining transportation and manufacturing through artificial intelligence and robotics.  A beachhead for giants like Facebook, Google and Zoom, which have significant footprints and plenty of room to expand. A bubbling stovetop of innovation and inspiration, stoked by Carnegie Mellon and the University of Pittsburgh and stirred by startups on every street corner. An endless supply of success stories; in July alone, Aurora announced a $2 billion SPAC merger and Duolingo made its NASDAQ debut, filling Times Square with Terrible Towels. A bicycle-friendly city with neighborhoods, waterfronts, vistas and restaurants that rival much larger cities, minus the bumper-to-bumper traffic and inaccessible cost of living. And so much more. It's not all rosy. Companies are growing fast but struggling to attract the talent they need. Diversity and inclusion remain sticking points. Venture capital seems to be looking elsewhere. These are fixable problems, remedied by telling better stories. I help companies sell products and services that customers can't easily see — things like banking, broadband, and cloud computing. In my work with AT&T, I've found that you can't adequately describe the magic of 5G by simply showing a router. Similarly, you can't depict the potential of Pittsburgh with a stock photograph of the Golden Triangle. You need to tell a story. A story that features some of the world's most recognizable companies, and hundreds more that you haven't yet heard of but most certainly will. A story with a through line from the hard-working steelworkers who put this city on the map to the scientists and inventors who continue to do so today. A story that showcases the roles that immigrants, minorities and LGBTQ+ people have played in reshaping this city's workforce. And so many more. These stories aren't being told enough. And if they are, they aren't making it to the people who need to hear them. I had to dig them up myself.  Others shouldn't have to. The results of The Pittsburgh Test have been consequential. I've decided to come home to help Pittsburgh and its companies tell better stories. Joe Zeff Design, Inc., opens for business at One PPG Place on October 1, armed with next-generation capabilities to make these stories resonate. Since making my decision I've been asked again and again why I would leave behind a perfectly good life in the New York City area to work and live in Pittsburgh. More often than not, the first thing people bring up is a sandwich stuffed with french fries. I need to fix that. And so does Pittsburgh. Let's get started.

The Daily Hype: Morning Motivation w/ Hype Girl + Business BFF / Entrepreneur Ashli Pollard
Rising Star Spotlight: Rana Riad - Career + Hiring Expert

The Daily Hype: Morning Motivation w/ Hype Girl + Business BFF / Entrepreneur Ashli Pollard

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 18:45


Rana Riad is a badass with an MBA from Carnegie Mellon...but what she was missing was the step-by-step guide all in one place to level up in her biz. From building out her product suite to the road map to Launch, she shares how Square One truly paved the way for her. Check out Rana here! Are you interested in leveling up your own business so you too can see major results, shifts, organization and community? Click here to learn more about the FINAL group of Square One Accelerator and secure your own spot. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thedailyhype/message

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly
Our power grid is buckling under the weight of climate change

Make Me Smart with Kai and Molly

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 35:45


The power grid isn’t like other infrastructure. It’s a complex system that’s always on, on-demand all over the country. When supply can’t keep up with demand, as in extreme weather, things can go wrong very quickly. Carnegie Mellon assistant professor Destenie Nock studies and helps plan power systems, and on today’s show she’ll tell us about the challenges of maintaining and repairing a power grid in the face of climate change, and the outlook for potential solutions. Here's everything we talked about today: “Recent heat waves show the US power grid is not ready for climate change” from Recode “U.S. electrical grids are not prepared for climate change” from Marketplace “Luntz: ‘I was wrong' on climate change” from Politico “The Luntz Memo and the Framing of Climate Change” from Big Think “Drought in Utah Town Halts Growth” from the New York Times “U.S. judge rules DACA program illegal, suspends new applications” from Reuters A list of 10 dyslexia-friendly fonts Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer. Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Marketplace All-in-One
Our power grid is buckling under the weight of climate change

Marketplace All-in-One

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 35:45


The power grid isn’t like other infrastructure. It’s a complex system that’s always on, on-demand all over the country. When supply can’t keep up with demand, as in extreme weather, things can go wrong very quickly. Carnegie Mellon assistant professor Destenie Nock studies and helps plan power systems, and on today’s show she’ll tell us about the challenges of maintaining and repairing a power grid in the face of climate change, and the outlook for potential solutions. Here's everything we talked about today: “Recent heat waves show the US power grid is not ready for climate change” from Recode “U.S. electrical grids are not prepared for climate change” from Marketplace “Luntz: ‘I was wrong' on climate change” from Politico “The Luntz Memo and the Framing of Climate Change” from Big Think “Drought in Utah Town Halts Growth” from the New York Times “U.S. judge rules DACA program illegal, suspends new applications” from Reuters A list of 10 dyslexia-friendly fonts Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer. Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

My Climate Journey
Ep. 166: Costa Samaras, Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University

My Climate Journey

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 50:44


Today's guest is Costa Samaras, Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University.Costa Samaras began his career as a civil engineer working on several multibillion-dollar infrastructure megaprojects in New York, including rebuilding the subway line underneath the World Trade Center after September 11th. After pursuing his Masters in Public Policy at NYU and his Ph.D. in Public Policy and Civil & Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University, Costa served as a Senior Engineer and Policy Analyst at the RAND Corporation and an Adjust Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon. Costa has also led analyses on energy security, strategic basing, and infrastructure issues faced by the Department of Defense. Since 2014, Costa has been an Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University. He has published studies examining electric and autonomous vehicles, renewable electricity, transitions in the energy sector, was a contributor to the 4th National Climate Assessment and was one of the Lead Author contributors to the Global Energy Assessment. Costa also developed the course "Climate Change Adaptation for Infrastructure," one of the first civil and environmental engineering courses in the world that teaches climate change adaptation to engineers. Costa joins me to talk about the clean energy transition and why climate mitigation and resiliency are paramount as we built the infrastructure of the future. Costa explains his research at Carnegie Mellon and what motivated him to focus on climate as a civil engineer. We also have a lively discussion about voluntary individual action versus significant systems changes and why policy and public engagement is essential to address climate change. Costa is a great guest with a wealth of knowledge on resiliency, automation, and the energy transition.Enjoy the show!You can find me on twitter @jjacobs22 or @mcjpod and email at info@myclimatejourney.co, where I encourage you to share your feedback on episodes and suggestions for future topics or guests.Episode recorded June 23rd, 2021For more information about Costa's research, visit: https://www.costasamaras.com/For more information about this episode, visit: https://myclimatejourney.co/episodes/costa-samaras

The Night Time Show
#200: Kevin Smith- CLERKS, JAY AND SILENT BOB, MASTERS OF THE UNIVERSE

The Night Time Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2021 112:19


It only took us 199 episodes, but we finally got Kevin Smith to join us on the podcast. Find out all about what is happening with Iron Bob, how he got started touring as a standup comedian, his connection to Carnegie Mellon, why Stephen gave Jason Mewes the greatest offer he's ever had, why helping create the new Masters of the Universe is one of his proudest accomplishments, his relationship with Stan Lee, his writing process, and much more! You'll also hear Stephen, Matt, Mike, and Mike reminisce about their favorite moments from the past 4 years of the podcast. It's time to listen to #200 of...THE NIGHT TIME SHOW!Privacy Policy and California Privacy Notice.

Coming Out Loved and Supported
Body-language Coach & Speaker Stephanie Nash

Coming Out Loved and Supported

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2021 50:29


Steph  Nash is a mindfulness & body-language coach & speaker who is a top expert in the Unified Mindfulness system which she used when working with Harvard Medical school on a brain study and in the meditation recordings she made for a Carnegie Mellon stress reduction study.Her face may be familiar from the 30 years playing moms on TV, and it was through her Yale School of Drama training that she became fascinated with the power of body language and laughter to affect how we think & feel. She teaches at UCLArts & Healing – and also for their Social Emotional Arts Program. Just before the pandemic, she co-led UCLA's first ever lab for a Humanities curriculum exploring how mindfulness affects learning.Stephanie specializes in helping people optimize challenges into opportunities, let go of stressful negative thinking, rewire their relationships to food & eating, and create more ease & well-being in their lives.www.strategic-mindfulness.comIG: Stephanie__nashemail: strategicmindfulness@gmail.com--------------------------------------------------------------The group for the LGBTQ+ community and family of LGBTQ+  wanting to learn more and do better!My name is Annie Henderson and I'm a Coming Out Coach here to support the LGBT community and parents of children that have come out.Wherever you are on this journey, I'm glad you are here!Feel free to reach out!AnnieMHenderson.comMessage me at M.me/AnniemhendersonFor LGBT only:www.facebook.com/groups/safeandoutFor LGBT and Allies with pastor support (if wanted):www.facebook.com/groups/lgbtandalliesNeed some 1-on-1 coaching?www.calendly.com/lifecoachannie/1-on-1-coaching

Sunny Side Up Nutrition
Addressing Hunger and Food Insecurity with Dr. Beverley Wheeler

Sunny Side Up Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2021 32:38


In this episode, Elizabeth Davenport and Anna Lutz have a conversation with Beverley Wheeler, Ed.D., the director of D.C. Hunger Solutions, an organization that works to end hunger in the nation's capital. We highlight the pandemic's effect on increased food insecurity and discuss ways in which policies and legislations are working to mitigate this.  We also discuss:  How COVID-19 has had a disproportionate impact on food insecurity in households of color, women, and children.  What public schools are doing to try to combat food insecurity How the pandemic has actually increased access to certain federal nutrition benefits such as SNAP (e.g., with an online application and by mailing Pandemic EBT cards) The biggest challenges for food insecure populations during the pandemic How the Pandemic EBT card has increased access to nutritious food The problem with basing SNAP benefits on the thrifty food plan versus the low cost plan Ways we can de-stigmatize food insecurity and larger bodies The association between food insecurity and adverse health outcomes The findings of the Grocery Store Report in D.C. Beverley Wheeler became the director of D.C. Hunger Solutions in 2015. In this role, she is responsible for leading the efforts to improve public policies to end hunger, reduce poverty, promote nutrition and increase the availability of healthy affordable food in low-income areas; maximize participation in all federal nutrition programs (SNAP, school meals, early childhood nutrition, WIC and summer meals); and educate the public about both the stark reality of hunger's existence in the nation's capital and the real opportunities for effective solutions. Dr. Wheeler has over 30 years of progressive experience in all phases of public and private sector policy development working in process development, crisis resolution, civic engagement, community/economic development and planning as well as policy development and implementation.  She has  20 years of experience working with the District of Columbia (DC) government and the DC Council at the executive level as Executive Director of the State Board of Education and Neighborhood Action; Chief of Staff to Phil Mendelson; and Special Assistant to three City Administrators. She is the former president and CEO of Center City Public Charter Schools.   She holds a B.S. in Social and Decision Science and a M.S. in Management and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University, as well as a Master's and Doctorate in Education from Harvard University.  She has a long history with Carnegie Mellon.  She is a past member of the CMU Board of Trustees and past President of the CMU Alumni Association.  She is currently a member of the Dean's Advisory Council for the H. John Heinz III College and Director of College Engagement for the Carnegie Mellon Black Alumni Association. Links:  D.C. Hunger Solutions Pandemic EBT (P-EBT)  State Anti-Hunger Organizations Grocery Store Gap Report Sunny Side Up Nutrition Podcast  Lutz, Alexander & Associates Nutrition Therapy Pinney Davenport Nutrition

The Interchange
How A.I. Will Revolutionize Climate Tech

The Interchange

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2021 53:59


The array of AI applications within climate tech is staggering -- and rapidly expanding. There are lots of exciting point solutions, but there's no clear example of AI directly and meaningfully reducing GHG emissions on a global scale. Yet.Last year we had Priya Donti on the show. She's a PhD student at Carnegie Mellon and co-chair of the Climate Change AI organization. This week, she came back with her Climate Change AI colleague Lynn Kaack, a postdoc researcher at ETH-Zurich. Priya and Lynn were co-authors on a blockbuster paper on the topic back in June 2019, called “Tackling climate change with machine learning.”They came back on the show to talk about what has changed since that episode -- both the progress and the bottlenecks in applying AI to climate change. They detail the strengths and weaknesses of AI in climate technology using a few case studies: Optimizing power and heating/cooling systemsInsight into large bodies of data, such as analyzing the physical and transition risk to a company's assetsAccelerating technology innovationThey also discuss the organizational approaches to AI: Do you go vertical or horizontal? That is, do you hire AI practitioners to work within an organization with deep domain experience, such as a utility, or is it more effective to leave those challenges to an organization of AI generalists who work across many fields?Lynn points out there's a third way: spinning up an AI group within an organization.The Interchange is brought to you by Smarter Grid Solutions, a leading enterprise energy management software company. Find out how Smarter Grid Solutions' software can give you real control over your clean energy assets at sgsderms.com/interchange.The Interchange is brought to you by Enel X, a leader in energy storage, DER management software, and smart electric vehicle charging stations to increase project value. Learn what Enel X can do for your business.

Outside/In
In Pittsburgh

Outside/In

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2021 39:30


We’re exposed to plenty of invisible risks in our daily life: toxic compounds in the fabric of our couches, contaminants in the water, and pollutants in the air. A lot of the time, we don’t think too much about them. But sometimes, the invisible becomes suddenly, acutely visible. A story about the air we breathe, the risks we can live with, and what it means to become a citizen of a place. Featuring Susan Scott Peterson, Stella Peleato, Dr. Deborah Gentile, Rashmi Baliga, and Linda Wigington. Links and Resources To learn ways to improve your indoor air quality wherever you are, here’s a link to the ROCIS guide. For open-source air quality data in your location, visit the Purple Air monitoring network map. For more on air quality in the Pittsburgh region, start with Breathe Project and the Smell PGH and Plume PGH apps by Carnegie Mellon’s CREATE Lab. To learn more about air quality activism in Pittsburgh, visit the Group Against Smog and Pollution and Breathe Project. Sign up for the biweekly Outside/In newsletter. Outside/In is a member-supported production of New Hampshire Public Radio. To support work like this, please consider a donation to the show.

Science Friday
Sand Sustainability, Jane Goodall, Morphing Pasta, Cicada Snacks. May 28, 2021, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 47:15


Shifting The Sand Business To Greener Practices Sand is one of the most in-demand natural materials on the planet—some 50 billion tons of sand and gravel are mined every year. It’s because the humble sand is a key ingredient in many materials, from concrete and asphalt to microchips and glass. But sand is also heavy, needed in large quantities, and costly to ship—meaning that in some regions, local demand for sand outstrips supply. A ‘sand mafia’ exists in parts of the globe, and in others, international conflicts have arisen over accusations of illicit cross-border beach theft.Dr. Aurora Torres, a postdoctoral researcher in Michigan State University’s Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability and at the Catholic University of Louvain, joins host John Dankosky to talk about ways to make the business of sand extraction more ecologically-friendly—from manufacturing sand via high-tech rock crushing machines to reducing demand by recycling construction materials.  A Trip Back In Time With Jane Goodall On September 27, 2002, Ira sat down for his first interview with the pioneering conservationist and primatologist Jane Goodall, to hear about her life, work, and vision for our relationship with our environment. Goodall is the 2021 recipient of the prestigious Templeton Prize for her work with animals and her contributions to humanity. When this interview originally aired, Goodall was already 40 years distant from her initial breakthrough discovery of tool use in chimpanzees, was the subject of a newly released IMAX movie, and had just been named a UN Ambassador for Peace. Learn more about her in the latest Science Friday Rewind, a series exploring historic interviews and scientific discoveries captured in our audio archives. A Bowl Full Of Pasta Engineering When you walk down the pasta aisle at the supermarket, there are so many tasty choices: There’s the humble spaghetti, the tubes of ziti, the tiny shells, and the butterfly-like farfalle. But every pound of pasta is not created equal—some of the boxes pack mostly air.In recent work published in the journal Science Advances, Dr. Lining Yao of Carnegie Mellon’s Morphing Matter Lab and her colleagues discuss an innovative way to solve the problem of puffed-up pasta boxes: What if different pasta shapes could be flat-packed into containers like DIY IKEA furniture?   The researchers developed a way to map out tiny grooves and ridges on the surface of a flat noodle sheet. When the pasta is cooked in hot water, it swells at different rates around the ridges and grooves, causing it to fold on its own into shapes such as boxes, rose-like flowers, and helix curls. Yao joins SciFri’s Charles Bergquist to talk about the research, and the challenges of making your dinnertime pasta plate into an origami craft project.  How To Take A Bite Of The Brood X Cicada Swarm After 17 years underground, billions, maybe even trillions, of cicadas are finally emerging in a group that scientists are calling Brood X. The cicadas will mate and die all within about six weeks—filling the air with a collective hum, and leaving behind their exoskeletons.  For some this might sound like a horror movie, but for Bun Lai, chef at Miya’s Sushi in Connecticut, he sees this as an opportunity for a sustainable snack. He talks about how to hunt and cook a cicada, and how they fit in as a sustainable food source.        

Champagne Sharks
CS 378: Creatives Bubble pt 1

Champagne Sharks

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2021 56:18


This is Part 1 of a two-part episode. Part 2 is free to all paid subscribers over at www.patreon.com/posts/51424876. Become a paid subscriber for $5/month over at patreon.com/champagnesharks and get access to the entire archive of subscriber-only episodes, the Discord voice and chat server for patrons, detailed show notes for certain episodes, and our newsletter. This episode is hosted by Trevor. Today we have Jason A England, an Assistant Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon back on the show to talk about the "creatives bubbles" and the bubbles within those bubbles. The glut of content on the hopes of making a fast grab of cash. As social media tycoons grab up book and entertainment deals, the questions have to be asked... "who does this appeal, and who is making these decisions?" And though you may hear them in the background, this episode is NOT for the birds. Co-produced & edited by Aaron C. Schroeder / Pierced Ears Recording Co, Seattle WA (www.piercedearsrec.com). Opening theme composed by T. Beaulieu. Closing theme composed by Dustfingaz (https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRazhu_)

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas
147 | Rachel Laudan on Cuisine, Culture, and Empire

Sean Carroll's Mindscape: Science, Society, Philosophy, Culture, Arts, and Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 76:30


For as much as people talk about food, a good case can be made that we don’t give it the attention or respect it actually deserves. Food is central to human life, and how we go about the process of creating and consuming it — from agriculture to distribution to cooking to dining — touches the most mundane aspects of our daily routines as well as large-scale questions of geopolitics and culture. Rachel Laudan is a historian of science whose masterful book, Cuisine and Empire, traces the development of the major world cuisines and how they intersect with politics, religion, and war. We talk about all this, and Rachel gives her pitch for granting more respect to “middling cuisine” around the world.Support Mindscape on Patreon.Rachel Laudan received a Ph. D. in History and Philosophy of Science from University College London. She retired from academia after teaching at Carnegie-Mellon, the University of Pittsburgh, Virginia Tech, and the University of Hawaii. Among her awards are the Jane Grigson/Julia Child prize of the International Association of Culinary Professionals and the IACP Cookbook Award for Best Book in Culinary History.Web siteBlogAmazon author pageWikipediaTwitter

Culture Gabfest
Working: How Actor Blair Underwood Gets Inside His Characters’ Heads

Culture Gabfest

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2021 48:52


This week host Isaac Butler talks to actor Blair Underwood about performing for the stage and screen. In the interview, Blair talks about landing a role on the legal drama L.A. Law when he was still an undergraduate student at Carnegie Mellon. He also explains how he prepares for roles and how he gets in the right mindset to play tormented characters.  After the interview, Isaac and co-host Rumaan Alam discuss the mysterious craft of acting.  In the exclusive Slate Plus segment, Blair tells the story of the time he found himself sitting next to Sidney Poitier on a flight from New York to L.A.  Send your questions about creativity and any other feedback to working@slate.com or give us a call at (304) 933-9675.  Podcast production by Cameron Drews. If you enjoy this show, please consider signing up for Slate Plus. Slate Plus members get benefits like zero ads on any Slate podcast, bonus episodes of shows like Slow Burn and Dear Prudence—and you’ll be supporting the work we do here on Working. Sign up now to help support our work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices