Podcasts about Sargent

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  • 556PODCASTS
  • 933EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Nov 23, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about Sargent

Latest podcast episodes about Sargent

The Steve Warne Project
644: Sens Lose a Shootout in Colorado, LeBron James Gets Off Easy; Drill Sargent Coaching is Dead

The Steve Warne Project

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 31:22


We discuss our latest TV binges. We had no expectations for the Senators in Denver but they still found a way to disappoint us. LeBron James gets off easy after punching an opponent in the face. In fact, he somehow ended up with a smaller suspension than the guy he punched. We also talk about how ineffective the drill Sargent coach has become.

Dear Young Married Couple
Living Above AVERAGE w/ Darin Sargent, Author + Speaker

Dear Young Married Couple

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 49:47


No one is born average. We're all fearfully and wonderfully made. Join us as we chat with Author + Speaker, Darin Sargent, on “Living Above Average”.  You can contact Darin Sargent: www.darinsargent.com IG: @darinsargent Podcast: The Darin Sargent Show “Nobody is Born Average” Course: www.nobodyisbornaverage.com “Thank you, Mr. Jenkins” (Children's Storybook by Darin Sargent) “Mr. Jenkins Interview” on YouTube (4th Grade Teacher) Other Recommendations “Storyworthy” by Matthew Dicks Sample of a Bullet Journal: https://amzn.to/2YacBsG My favorite brand for Mamas: KINDRED BRAVELY www.kindredbravely.com Use code DYMC20 for 20% off your purchase! Stay in conversation with us on IG: @dearyoungmarriedcouple or on our website: https://www.dearyoungmarriedcouple.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FLIPPING THE BARREL
“The ultimate touch down… My story from the NFL to the Oilfield” with Sallie Sargent- COO of the 23rd World Petroleum Congress.

FLIPPING THE BARREL

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021


Thank you to our Official Podcast Sponsor- TechnipFMC. Today's episode is an exclusive interview with Sallie Sargent. The CEO for the upcoming 23rd World Petroleum Congress event, taking place in Houston TX on December 5- 9th . The event is a global symposium assembling more than 100 nations, the World Petroleum Congress convenes every three years bringing together the industry under one roof to solve the problems we are facing today and talk about the future of energy. Over the past 30 years, Sallie has enjoyed a diverse career planning and managing major events, including six Super Bowls, 14 Fiesta Bowls and the first College Football National Championship. Her exhibition experience includes some of the largest and most recognizable conventions in the world Sallie opens up about her life and how she became involved in the sports industry in the first place. She was the President and CEO of the Super Bowl host committee for 5 years. She tells us how the 51st Super Bowl put her on the map in Houston. Under the leadership of Sallie the Super Bowl generated $347M in economic impact for Houston. The relationships she built while planning and executing one of the largest events in Houston set her up to become the CEO of the World Petroleum Congress. This event is essentially the Olympics for Oil and Gas. Sallie is an expert relationship builder, she tells us how fostering those relationships is essential to your success. To find out more about the 23rd World Petroleum Congress and get your tickets, please visit: www.23wpchouston.comCome hang out with us:Download on Apple Podcast——>> ClickDownload on Spotify———>>ClickConnect with Maisy and Jamie:Connect with Massiel Diez: Instagram | LinkedInConnect with Jamie Elrod: Instagram | LinkedInFollow FTB on Instagram | LinkedInJoin FTB NationIf your interested in working with us, please contact : flippingthebarrel@gmail.com To find out more about our sponsor TechnipFMC please visit www.technipfmc.com

Home Base Nation
Serving Country, Family and Health - Featuring Major General (Ret.) Patrick Sargent, SVP DoD Healthcare at OptumServe

Home Base Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 50:28


If you are your loved one is experiencing any emotional, mental health struggles, you are not alone and please contact Home Base 617-724-5202, or www.homebase.org  SUBSCRIBE to Home Base NationTo learn more and connect with us at Home Base Nation:www.homebase.org/homebasenationTwitter,Facebook,Instagram, LinkedInHome Base Nation Team: Steve Monaco, Maureen Roderick, Laurie Gallagher, Karianne Kraus, Lucy Little, and COO Michael Allard and Brigadier General  Jack HammondProducer and Host: Dr. Ron HirschbergAssistant Producer, Editor: Lucy LittleHome Base Nation is the official podcast of Home Base Program for Veterans and Military Families, a partnership of the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Red Sox Foundation.The views expressed by guests to the Home Base Nation podcast are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent. Views and opinions expressed by guests are those of the guests and do not necessarily reflect the view of the Massachusetts General Hospital, Home Base, the Red Sox Foundation or any of its officials.

Tootell & Nuanez
Nuanez Now November 10, 2021 - Hour 1 - Rob Stanton, Tyson Rostad, Montana State Minute, Tucker Sargent

Tootell & Nuanez

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 59:57


In a prep-focused first half of the show, Colter Nuanez welcomes in Billings West head football coach Rob Stanton and Andrew Houghton gets on the phone with Hamilton quarterback Tyson Rostad as both teams prepare for state semifinals this weekend. Colter also talks with Alex Eschelman of SWX Montana for the Montana State Minute after the Bobcats football team beat Eastern Washington and the men's basketball team nearly walked out of Boulder with a win over the Colorado Buffaloes. Tucker Sargent, GM of Griz Hockey, also visits the studio to discuss the continuing popularity of the first-year team.

Showgirl’s Life Podcast
The enduring magic of being a wardrobe technician with Elaine Sargent

Showgirl’s Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 54:40


Today, I have the honor of sharing an interview with a woman who worked behind the scenes with Showgirls in most of Greg Thompson's productions in Reno. Elaine Sargent used her degree in theatre to immerse herself in the glamour backstage as a wardrobe technician. I had a lot of fun talking with Elaine about costumes, Showgirls, what they are and are not, and of course, why they went away. If you are a fan of Reno, make sure to listen as Elaine shares lots of insights into the good old days of Reno! Enjoy!Let's keep the conversation going! Join the conversation on the show notes page and share what you enjoyed about this episode. I look forward to connecting with you!

The Daily Gardener
November 1, 2021 Lee Smith, James Sherard, Charles Eliot, Dyed Flowers, Mary Rose O'Reilley, Flora by DK, and Stephen Crane

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 33:29


Today in botanical history, we celebrate a wealthy gardener and Apothecary whose garden became his legacy, a ​​pioneering Landscape architect who left his mark on the world in his all-too-short life, and the fine fine fun that can be had dying flowers - a hobby that's been around for quite a longe time. We'll hear an excerpt from a book by a Quaker woman who spent a year tending sheep. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a book about flowers in all their glory, and it takes us inside the Secret World of Plants... And then we'll wrap things up with a little poem written by an American writer, and it's a little poignant - so kleenex should be on standby. “If you're the first of November, you're Scorpio. A large reporter of his owne Acts. Prudent of behaviour in owne affairs. A lover of Quarrels and theevery, a promoter of frayes and commotions. As wavery as the wind; neither fearing God or caring for Man.' ‘Better,' said Lymond coldly, ‘to be stung by a nettle than pricked by a rose.” ― Dorothy Dunnett, Checkmate Maggie Dietz poem 1995  Rosemary Verey's Making of a Garden 1995 The Unsung Season: Gardens and Gardeners in Winter: Sydney Eddison, Karen Bussolini 2001 A Garden from Hundred Packets of Seed by James Fenton What plants would you choose to grow, given a blank slate of a garden, and given the stipulation that everything you grow in this garden must be raised by you from seed? 2009 Jane Colden: America's First Woman Botanist Paperback – November 1, 2009 Curated News Interview with Lee Smith, Southern Writer | Southern Environmental Law Center 1944 Here's a short clip with writer Lee Smith about the importance of the natural world for writers and inspiration. In the video Lee says that the South does have a very strong literary tradition that is grounded in place and specifically a rural place. Lee says the land is so important to southern writing. Land not only shows up in southern stories but also in southern music and southern culture. Lee tells how her father used to fight her when she tried to get him to leave the mountains and move to her home in North Carolina and so he would always say I could never leave the mountains he said I need me a mountain to rest my eyes against and That resinates with lee who went on to say that there's something in the contemplation of mountains of nature  of natural places that leads us to think of things that are really important that leads us to think of the real questions and issues and things that people need to be working on. And so Lee, like many of us, gets her inspiration from the natural world To borrow her phrase, I need me a garden to rest my eyes against... Important Events November 1, 1666Birth of James Sherard, English apothecary, botanist, amateur musician, and composer. His older brother, William, was also a botanist. James served as an apprentice to an apothecary named Charles Watts at Chelsea Physic Garden. He later followed his entrepreneurial instincts and started his own business, which made him quite wealthy.  In August of 1716, he wrote that, “the love of Botany has so far prevailed as to divert my mind from things I formerly thought more material.” After retiring, he purchased three residences - two manor homes and a place in London. At his London residence, he established a garden and began collecting and cultivating rare plants. Around the time his garden was becoming one of England's top gardens, James's brother William invited the German botanist Johann Jacob Dillenius to visit England. Dillenius created an illustrated catalog that described the plants cultivated in James's collection in London. The English botanical writer Blanche Henrey called Dillenius's book, “the most important book published in England during the eighteenth century on the plants growing in a private garden." Today, the walls of the Herbarium Room at the Oxford Botanic Garden and Arboretum are graced with the illustrations from Dillenius's book - so the plants in James Sherard's beautiful garden live on in that marvelous place. November 1, 1859Birth of Charles Eliot, American landscape architect. In his brief career, Charles established principles for regional planning and natural systems for landscape architecture. He also helped set up the world's first land trust and the Boston Metropolitan Park System. He was a prolific writer and observer of nature and Landscapes. His work set the stage for conservancies across the world. Charles was born into a prominent Boston family. In 1869, the year his mother died, his father, Charles William Eliot, became the president of Harvard University. In 1882 Charles went to Harvard to study botany. A year later, he began apprenticing with the landscape firm of Frederick Law Olmsted. As a young landscape architect, Charles enjoyed visiting different natural areas, and he conducted regular walking tours of different nature areas around Boston. In his diary, Charles made a charming list titled, "A Partial List of Saturday Walks before 1878". Early in his career, Charles spent 13 months touring England and Europe between 1885 and 1886. The trip was actually Olmsted's idea, and it was a great training ground for Charles's understanding of various landscape concepts. During this trip, Charles kept a journal where he wrote down his thoughts and sketches of the places he was visiting. During his time in Europe, Charles's benchmark was always Boston. Throughout his writings, he continually compared new landscapes to the beauty of his native landscape in New England. Charles's story ended too soon. He died at 37 from spinal meningitis. Before his death, Charles had worked with Charles Sprague Sargent to plan The Arnold Arboretum. When Charles died, Sargent wrote a tribute to him and featured it in his weekly journal called Garden and Forest. Charles's death had a significant impact on his father, Charles Eliot Senior. At times, the two men had struggled to connect. Charles hadn't liked it when his dad remarried and, their personalities were very different. Charles, the architect, could be a little melancholy. After Charles died, his dad, Charles Sr., started culling through his son's work. In April 1897, Charles Sr. confided to a friend, "I am examining his letters and papers, and I am filled with wonder at what he accomplished in the ten years of professional life. I should've died without ever having appreciated his influence. His death has shown it to me." Despite his heavy workload as the president of Harvard, Charles Sr. immediately set about compiling all of his son's work. He used it to write a book called Charles Eliot Landscape Architect. The book came out in 1902, and today it is considered a classic work in the field of landscape architecture. November 1, 1883On this day, the Brown County World (Hiawatha, Kansas) published a little blurb that said, A distinguished botanist has found that by simply soaking the stems of cut flowers in a weak dye solution, their colors can be altered at will without the perfume and the freshness being destroyed. Unearthed Words On the first day of November last year, sacred to many religious calendars but especially the Celtic, I went for a walk among bare oaks and birch. Nothing much was going on. Scarlet sumac had passed, and the bees were dead. The pond had slicked overnight into that shiny and deceptive glaze of delusion, first ice. It made me remember skates and conjure a vision of myself skimming backward on one foot, the other extended; the arms become wings. Minnesota girls know that this is not a difficult maneuver if one's limber and practices even a little after school before the boys claim the rink for hockey. I think I can still do it - one thinks many foolish things when November's bright sun skips over the entrancing first freeze. A flock of sparrows reels through the air looking more like a flying net than seventy conscious birds, a black veil thrown on the wind. When one sparrow dodges, the whole net swerves, dips: one mind. Am I part of anything like that? Maybe not. [...] It's an ugly woods, I was saying to myself, padding along a trail where other walkers had broken ground before me. And then I found an extraordinary bouquet. Someone had bound an offering of dry seed pods, yew, lyme grass, red berries, and brown fern and laid it on the path: "nothing special," as Buddhists say, meaning "everything." Gathered to formality, each dry stalk proclaimed a slant, an attitude, infinite shades of neutral. All contemplative acts, silences, poems, honor the world this way. Brought together by the eye of love, a milkweed pod, a twig, allow us to see how things have been all along. A feast of being. ― Mary Rose O'Reilley, The Barn at the End of the World: The Apprenticeship of a Quaker, Buddhist Shepherd   Grow That Garden Library Flora by DK Flora was also contributed to by Kew,the Royal Botanic Gardens. This book was published back in 2018, and the subtitle is Inside the Secret World of Plants. Well, let me tell you that when I got my copy of this book, I was so pleasantly surprised. This is a big book - it's a coffee table book. The cover is predominantly white, and then it just has a single flower featured on the cover - and it is stunning. I like to think about this fantastic book as a floral scrapbook. So imagine if you were to put together a book of flowers, and on each page, you feature: a different blossom, details about the plant, the history and some outstanding characteristics of the flower, and other various aspects of the plant. This book also reviews a little bit of the science behind why plants do what they do and how they do what they do. Flora is beautifully illustrated with modern photography and also some incredible botanical art from the ages. And it is just a joy to leaf through. So whether you are a gardener or even a non-gardener, I think you would enjoy this book. You can get a copy of Flora by DK and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $12. Today's Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart November 1, 1871 Birth of Stephen Crane, American poet, novelist, and short-story writer. Stephen started writing at the tender age of four.  As a young adult, he dropped out of college at Syracuse and started working as a reporter and writer. By 1895 his Civil War novel The Red Badge of Courage won acclaim despite Stephen never having any personal experience as a soldier.   The following year he was asked to go to Cuba as a war correspondent. During the voyage, his ship, the SS Commodore, sank off the coast of Florida. Stephen survived after spending thirty hours adrift at sea in a small dinghy along with other survivors.  The experience became the basis for his book called, The Open Boat. Despite surviving the shipwreck, Stephen Crane died young of tuberculosis at the age of 28. Today, The Red Badge of Courage is considered an American classic. But Stephen also wrote short stories and poetry. One of his biggest fans was Ernest Hemingway, who credited Stephen as a source of his inspiration. In Stephen's poem, The Black Riders and Other Lines (1895), Stephen wrote, There was set before me a mighty hill, And long days I climbed Through regions of snow. When I had before me the summit-view, It seemed that my labour Had been to see gardens Lying at impossible distances. Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."

Cryptic Chronicles
Episode 59: Halloween Special “Werewolf Magick” with Denny Sargent

Cryptic Chronicles

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 75:02


Werewolf lore goes back before recorded history and has been a part of all human cultures throughout time. Joining us is Denny Sargent to talk about his book "Werewolf Magick" and look into the deeper aspects of the collective unconscious and how our ancestral memories still influence us on a primal level. So look out for vampires, werewolves, and the most dangerous threat, TOO MUCH CANDY, and enjoy Halloween to the fullest! Oh, and also Ashley joins us for the first time from behind the scenes (even though she is quiet). CLICK HERE FOR THE BOOK! FOLLOW ALL OF DENNY'S WORK AND SOCIAL MEDIA HERE: www.werewolfmagick.com Insta:  #dennysargentauthor FB:  Denny Sargent Author @werewolf

Kingdom Speak with Pastor Daniel McKillop

Born with a gift, Darin Sargent had every right to question God and despise his identity. Instead, he has turned his personal problem into a motivational story that has encouraged untold amounts of people. Darin joins Kingdom Speak this week to shred the victim mentality and inspire us to be everything God has created us to be.   #KingdomSpeak #Podcast #Podcaster #NewEpisode #Sargent #Disappointment

Elearning Scenario Design Podcast
Everything is Figure-Outable | Interview with Dr. Robin Sargent

Elearning Scenario Design Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 41:56


THE SCENARIO SECRETS PODCAST When you first meet Dr. Robin Sargent she might intimidate you... I mean she's so well put together, she's direct, and there's this aura of confidence about her. Then she somehow disarms you with that contagious laugh of hers and you feel completely at ease.  Robin is a successful entrepreneur, instructional designer and mom of three boys. I loved digging into her journey, because I think the lessons from how she approaches life are spectacular and valuable for both men and women.  In this interview we talked about perseverance, investing in yourself, academia vs. corporate, her work and much much more... hope you enjoy and share.  Connect with Robin here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robinsargent/ To learn more Interactive Storytelling: https://scenariosecrets.com/ To talk about joining my coaching program: https://calendly.com/elearningsecrets/45m-call ABOUT:  Anna Sabramowicz is an instructional designer and coach. She fell into the profession after losing her last year of university funding to be a chemistry and english teacher. She's worked and consulted in both academia and corporate environments for over a decade. Stakeholders include adidas, Thomas & Betts, Sony, Michelin, Rubbermaid, Emerson, VIHA, RRC, Queen's University, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Save the Children, Norwegian Refugee Council, and the Tanzanian Government. She runs a coaching program with her partner, Ryan Martin. It helps Instructional Designers unleash their creative superpowers and develop immersive learning experiences with Storyline 360, using her Narrative Scenario Dynamics framework.  Anna developed Broken Co-Worker - an immersive anti-harassment elearning experience which was awarded an Articulate Guru Award, she earned the League of Innovation award through Apprenticeship Manitoba for first Online Electrical Carpentry elearning Program. She's also earned a Best in Show and Audience Award at the eACH Toronto for creating a Code Orange Emergency learning experience for Vancouver Island Health Authority. You can find Anna on LinkedIn or on watch her instructional videos on YouTube

The Outdoor Biz Podcast
How To Future - Proof Your Outdoor Business In The Digital Age With SIA President Nick Sargent [EP 299]

The Outdoor Biz Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 40:29


The unexpected pandemic impacted a large number of businesses, most especially in the outdoor industry. So the question everyone now asks is, how can you future-proof your business with such seemingly fickle circumstances? Today's guest is Nick Sargent, President of SnowSports Industries America(SIA). SIA is an organization on a mission to help the winter outdoor community thrive by delivering invaluable education, data, and research. Nick joins host Rick Saez to offer advice on how businesses can adapt as the world moves toward a more digital and consumer-centric approach. He also speaks on why it's important to value diversity, inclusion, and sustainable action as we dive into the future. Tune in to learn more!   Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! https://ricksaez.com/listen/

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast
USMNT Talk with Grant Wahl: Pulisic and Reyna absences will hamstring US against Mexico (Soccer 10/26)

¡Qué Golazo! A Daily CBS Soccer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 34:27


Luis Miguel Echegaray welcomes in Grant Wahl to discuss the Stars and Stripes and the CONCACAF World Cup qualifying campaign. 03:28 Main takeaways from the first 6 matchdays 05:13 Berhalter's rotation policy 07:01 Verticality: GGG's favorite buzzword 08:52 Pulisic's injury woes / Roster wishlist 13:15 Tyler "The Indispensable" Adams 15:20 Turner vs. Steffen 18:11 Sargent running out of opportunities 20:48 The USMNT's last competitive cycle? 23:10 Mexico in Cincinnati 26:07 Canada better than the sum of their parts 28:52 Jamaica: The Ocho's Wild Card Qué Golazo' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Google Podcasts, Castbox and wherever else you listen to podcasts.  Follow the Qué Golazo team on Twitter: @quegolazopod, @lmechegaray, @JimmyConrad, @FabrizioRomano, @Jon_LeGossip, @jamesbenge, @heathpearce, @LRoman32, @PartidoPooper For more soccer coverage from CBS Sports, visit https://www.cbssports.com/soccer/ To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/ Follow Grant Wahl on Twitter @GrantWahl and support his work: https://grantwahl.substack.com/subscribe Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Profiles in Franceformation
Episode 14: Listen to David Sargent's experience moving to France over 15 years ago and learning the differences between the American vs French way of doing things. “It's not about language, it's about culture.”

Profiles in Franceformation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 47:29


Today, David Sargent is going to tell us about his experience moving to France from the US over 15 years ago as the spouse of a French citizen, and his experiences adapting to living and working in France. We're going to learn about:How his job at a technology company was able to transfer David to France and what type of work contract was needed.He registered his marriage in France, obtained a livret de famille, and whether or not he has applied for French nationality at this time.The differences in attitudes between Americans and French people.Challenges he faced in moving to France, including driving cars in France and experiencing a minor snow storm in Toulouse.David's favorite things about living in France, what he enjoys most about Toulouse, and the first restaurant he plans to visit once the French government allows for eateries to reopen.His advice for anyone moving to France.If you are considering moving to France like David, Foolproof French Visas can help you navigate the path toward finding the right visa for you. It can be purchased here: https://www.yourfranceformation.com/books or in paperback on Amazon. If you would like to pursue your own Franceformation, you can also request a free 30-minute clarity call with Allison to review your visa options and decide how to move toward creating your ideal life in France: https://www.yourfranceformation.com/free-call If you liked this episode, please leave a positive review and be sure to subscribe so you won't miss next week's episode!

Sport Radio - Australia
Tom Sargent steps up Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Car

Sport Radio - Australia

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 9:50


Tom Sargent (Tegra Australia / CHE Racing Team) has become the Victorian Formula Ford Champion, he is preparing for the remainer of the NSW and Australian Formula Ford Championships, and will next year be stepping up to the Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Car series.

World Hockey Report
World Hockey Report - Featuring Adam Ehrmantraut and Tucker Sargent (October 19th, 2021)

World Hockey Report

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 54:01


The World Hockey Report Podcast is the leading hockey podcast covering the sport hockey on a global scale presented by The Hockey Podcast Network With your host: Cody Janzen, presented by Lordco Auto Parts. Show Rundown: -Adam Ehrmantraut  -Tucker Sargent -TEXT Line ALWAYS open Presented by Draftkings.com USE promo code THPN for signup bonuses & weekly deals for Daily Fantasy & SportsBook App. World Hockey Report is LIVE on 12oz Sports, Zingo TV Channel 761, and 12ozSportsNetwork.com/live. World Hockey Podcast is Presented by The Hockey Podcast Network BUY MERCH TODAY: Premium Pullover Hoodie Classic Crewneck Sweatshirt Women's Classic V-Neck Tee Classic Tee NHL Teams Anaheim Ducks Arizona Coyotes Boston Bruins Buffalo Sabres Calgary Flames Carolina Hurricanes Chicago Blackhawks Colorado Avalanche Columbus Blue Jackets Dallas Stars Detroit Red Wings Edmonton Oilers Florida Panthers Los Angeles Kings Minnesota Wild Montreal Canadiens Nashville Predators New Jersey Devils New York Islanders New York Rangers Ottawa Senators Philadelphia Flyers Pittsburgh Penguins San Jose Sharks Seattle Kraken St Louis Blues Tampa Bay Lightning Toronto Maple Leafs Vancouver Canucks Vegas Golden Knights Washington Capitals Winnipeg Jets

Unleashed the Jeremy Hanson show
House of Representatives staffer STEFAN BIERET "program manager" charged with 10 felonies for illicit images of children

Unleashed the Jeremy Hanson show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 50:49


Unleashed Jeremy Hanson 10/19/21 Staffer Stefan Bieret who works as program manager under Sargent at Arms for the House of Representatives has been charged with 10 felonies related to child illicit images. The supply chain disruption will have you paying more "much more" according to billionaire grocer - oil baron. Why we must try to understand the point of views from millenials and other sub groups across America!!

Tootell & Nuanez
Nuanez Now October 18, 2021 - Hour 2 - Monday Afternoon Quarterback with Coach Marty, Griz Hockey with Tucker Sargent

Tootell & Nuanez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 51:04


Colter Nuanez is joined by longtime NFL coach Marty Mornhinweg for the Monday Afternoon Quarterback, where the two discuss Montana's offensive struggles, which NFL quarterback he coached reminds Marty of Griz freshman Kris Brown, and the surprising teams on the early NFL season. Later in the show, Colter welcomes in Tucker Sargent, GM of the Griz hockey team, to rehash the team's crazy comeback win over Montana State from the weekend.

Dead Souls Social Club
27: This Flat Earth?

Dead Souls Social Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 61:18


Is Planet Earth flat and surrounded by a dome? Our guest on tonights episode thinks so - Listen to our interview with Mark K. Sargent head of the global Flat Earth Movement. Stay tuned for our personal thoughts on conspiracies and the psychology that creates them.

Fringe Radio Network
Julian Charles - Flattening the Flat Earth

Fringe Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 100:05


Julian Charles talks with Graham of the excellent "FiveRedPears" YouTube channel, for a fascinating and entertaining discussion on contemporary Flat-Earth Theory. Julian and his guest talk about well-known flat-Earth proponets, such as Eric Dubay, Mark Sargent, jeranism and TheMorgile, and I ask Graham (a mathematics teacher by profession) to assess some of their key arguments, using the logic, observation and straightforward geometry so characteristic of his video presentations. Graham also explains why the standard, spherical Earth model is in every way to be preferred, and shares with us from his experience of interacting with people caught up in the flat-Earth scene.

The PinkUn Norwich City Podcast
395: #463 Sargent's major miss sums up battle with Brighton | PinkUn Norwich City Podcast

The PinkUn Norwich City Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 17, 2021 55:17


Back-to-back goalless draws have given Norwich City some Premier League positives to build on but the Carrow Road faithful were left ruing wasted chances during an action-packed battle with Brighton & Hove Albion. Canaries correspondents David Freezer, Paddy Davitt and Connor Southwell review the dramatic battle, featuring a particularly painful mistake from USA striker Josh Sargent, missing an open goal just before half-time. *** Picture: Paul Chesterton/Focus Images *** You can also hear the Pink Un Podcast on Norwich's Community radio station, Future Radio 107.8FM. *** To get in touch with the podcast now and in future, send any comments and questions into the crew with an email to norfolksport@archant.co.uk or get in touch with us @pinkun on Twitter, where are our direct messages are open. And if you're interested in sponsoring the pod, or placing an advert in one of our shows, email Matt.Withers@archant.co.uk For all the latest Norwich City news, opinions, features and videos visit: pinkun.com ALSO FIND US AT THE FOLLOWING: Subscribe: pinkun.com/podcast Twitter: twitter.com/pinkun Facebook: fb.me/thepinkun Instagram: instagram.com/the_pinkun #NCFC #Norwich #City #NorwichCityFC #Norfolk #Football #Soccer #Canaries #OTBC #COYY #Premier #League #EPL #NORBHA #BHAFC #Seagulls #Chelsea #Billy #Gilmour #Daniel #Farke #Mathias #Normann

HealthMatters
E70: President of Sargent College Alumni Board Shares Parting Advice for Class of 2020

HealthMatters

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 19:41


In this episode, we welcome Kelly Pesanelli, PT, MSPT, a Senior Lecturer at Sargent College in the Department of Health Sciences and the President of the Sargent College Alumni Board. As the Class of 2020 Sargent College Commencement Speaker, Kelly shared her parting advice for the seniors as they move on to a new stage of their lives. The moderator of the podcast is Dr. Karen Jacobs (kjacobs@bu.edu), who is the Associate Dean, Digital Learning and Innovation, a Clinical Professor and the Program Director for the online post-professional doctorate in the occupational therapy program at Sargent College. Marial Williams (marialw@bu.edu), a Boston University entry-level occupational therapy doctoral student, composed the music for the podcast.

Profiles in Franceformation
Episode 13: our conversation with Annie Sargent, host of the podcast, "Join Us In France", continues: “That's the flag I claim, is the French person who can speak English and wants to talk about France the way French people see France."

Profiles in Franceformation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 39:13


Our conversation with Annie Sargent is actually broken into two episodes, so be sure to continue listening along to Episode #13 with Annie to hear more about her podcast including:Her recommendations of places to visit within France.How she created a cookbook and tested recipes with the help of her podcast listeners.What types of foods she misses most from the US.Her love for audio mediums like podcasts and how this inspired her to become a self-guided audio tour guide.The importance of the word “bonjour” in French culture.Her advice to someone wanting to move to France.For more information about Annie's podcast, as well as her self-guided audio tours and books, visit her website at joinusinfrance.com  If you are considering moving to France like Annie, Foolproof French Visas can help you navigate the path toward finding the right visa for you. It can be purchased here: https://www.yourfranceformation.com/books or in paperback on Amazon. If you would like to pursue your own Franceformation, you can also request a free 30-minute clarity call with Allison to review your visa options and decide how to move toward creating your ideal life in France: https://www.yourfranceformation.com/free-call 

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein
How to overcome the loss of loved ones and limbs with amputee parathlete Marine Corps Sargent John Edward

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 49:08


How to overcome the loss of loved ones and limbs with amputee parathlete Marine Corps Sargent John Edward Former Marine Corps SSgt, Former Naval Academy Coach, Currently training for Adaptive CrossFit Games, Olympics, and Paralympics.  A below-the-knee amputee parathlete.

Inside the Daily Press
Catalytic Converter Thefts with SMPD Sargent Cody Green

Inside the Daily Press

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 33:49


Matt Hall talks to Santa Monica Police Sargent Cody Green about catalytic converter thefts, where they are happening, what cars are targets, and what you can do about it.

Profiles in Franceformation
Episode 12: Learn how French native, Annie Sargent, host of the podcast, "Join Us In France" reintegrated back into French life and culture after living in the US for 16 years. “I could understand all of the words, but none of the concepts.”

Profiles in Franceformation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 58:31


Today, Annie Sargent she tells us about her journey from France, to Utah, and back to France again. We'll learn about her experiences in the US and in France including:Why she moved to Utah and her experience living in the US as a technical translator.What prompted her move back to France and the impact the move had on her family, including her young daughter in school.The inspiration behind starting her podcast, Join Us in France.What sort of challenges she experienced when reintegrating back into French life, including her thoughts of French administration and how important it was to have both she and her husband's names on bills.The things she misses from America, including American service.For more information about Annie's podcast, as well as her self-guided audio tours and books, visit her website at joinusinfrance.com If you are considering moving to France like Annie, Foolproof French Visas can help you navigate the path toward finding the right visa for you. It can be purchased here: https://www.yourfranceformation.com/books or in paperback on Amazon. If you would like to pursue your own Franceformation, you can also request a free 30-minute clarity call with Allison to review your visa options and decide how to move toward creating your ideal life in France: https://www.yourfranceformation.com/free-call 

The King and Eye Life Podcast
Experience With Cancer featuring Cynthia Sargent

The King and Eye Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 29:51


In this bonus episode we welcome Cynthia Sargent for a stepping out of her comfort zone situation. During a family gathering Soul Toucha the Poet convinced his aunt to think about doing a podcast. What came out of it was her deciding to talk about her experience dealing with cancer. Cynthia is a cancer survivor and gives the world a brief background into what she's gone through since 2008. We know that there are many people in the world who have similar experiences and our goal is to give her a platform to share her story and encourage everyone to have the motivation and determination to keep on living because every day that you wake up is a blessing!It's been a great opportunity for us to learn and connect with so many colleagues, new listeners and friends!--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Check out our website: https://www.kingandeyelife.com/Tune in live every Thursday at 7:30 PM EST  on YouTube: The King & Eye Life Podcast - YouTube  Twitter: https://twitter.com/SoulTouchaPoet on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SunSoulX369Follow us on all social media platforms: King & Eye Life PodcastSupport this podcast: Pay $KingAndEyeLife on Cash App

Tootell & Nuanez
Nuanez Now October 5, 2021 - Hour 2 - Griz Hockey, NFL with Tucker Sargent

Tootell & Nuanez

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 42:23


Tucker Sargent of the newly-established Griz Hockey program joins Colter Nuanez after the team beat Montana State 4-2 in its first game over the weekend. Tucker and Colter also talk the NFL, including Tucker's beloved New England Patriots losing to Tampa Bay in Tom Brady's return to Foxborough.

Entrepreneur Network Podcast
Start With Your Audience: Advice from Wondery CEO Jen Sargent

Entrepreneur Network Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 35:03


What makes a great podcast? The same thing that makes a great business: Start with your audience and build from there. In this conversation, I speak with Jen Sargent, CEO of Wondery, a podcast company that has created many big hits (Dirty John, Dr. Death) and was acquired this year by Amazon. We talk about growing during difficult times, building stories that connect with audiences, and taking risks inside the data-driven world of Amazon.

Problem Solvers
Start With Your Audience: Advice from Wondery CEO Jen Sargent

Problem Solvers

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 34:59


What makes a great podcast? The same thing that makes a great business: Start with your audience and build from there. In this conversation, I speak with Jen Sargent, CEO of Wondery, a podcast company that has created many big hits (Dirty John, Dr. Death) and was acquired this year by Amazon. We talk about growing during difficult times, building stories that connect with audiences, and taking risks inside the data-driven world of Amazon.

Artelligence Podcast
New Talent with Antwaun Sargent

Artelligence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 49:02


Art writer, curator, fashion figure and man about town, Antwaun Sargent discusses the May/June 2021 issue of Art in America which focuses on New Talent. In the 1950s and 60s, Art in America ran a series of regular features and issues that sought to identify up-and-coming artists whose work would be lasting and meaningful for the future. Instead of approaching the idea of New Talent as a singular benchmark, Sargent talks about how he took the approach of assembling a group of artists and writers who could better show the multiplicity of what New Talent means. Sargent argues against the idea of equating the idea of New Talent with youth. Instead, this issue features artists ranging from painters Deborah Roberts and Amy Sherald to photographers Tyler Mitchell and Clifford Prince King and artists working in different media like Precious Okoyomon or Allana Clarke or Qualeasha Wood. Above all, the issue brings new voices into the conversation about art. “We talk about audiences all the time,” Sargent says, “but we're still allowing all of that to be defined by a very limited number of folks. This magazine is an opportunity to push back against some of those notions—about what a critic can be, about what an art writer can be.”

Construction Genius
ESOP Excellence: An Insider's View of Executing an Employee Ownership Plan

Construction Genius

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 40:41


What does it take to execute an ESOP successfully?    To get a clear perspective about this topic, I talk with Herb Sargent, the President and CEO of an ESOP, Sargent Corporation, a construction company based in Maine. This podcast addresses some of the following essential points:   the importance of distinguishing your runway for ownership transition and management or leadership transition to execute an ESOP successfully; the importance of identifying the why and why Herb's “why” is unique; how you go about the process of exploring an Aesop and why understanding the mechanics of an ESOP is essential; identifying a mentor in your particular construction vertical so that you can look at the pros and cons of an ESOP structure I believe this episode will significantly benefit those interested in the mechanics in the implementation of an ESOP in their construction companies. Tune in to this today!     Discussion Points: 0:00 Introduction  3:55 Herb Sargent's background and how he got into ESOP  6:09 Options when you decide to get out of construction  6:51 Herb's emotional response to the sale of H.E. Sargent  8:17 How the sale of H.E. Sargent influenced Herb's future decisions  9:18 Herb's experience starting his own company  10:14 Why Herb bought back H.E. Sargent  12:49 The motivation behind purchasing H.E. Sargent  14:29 The decision to do ESOP  16:10 Separating the ownership transition from the management transition  17:16 Ensuring smooth turnover   18:15 Where Herb found models and mentors for the ESOP transition  19:36 How employees can start buying into the ESOP  23:09 ESOPs struggle when owners just want to make money  25:36 How seasonality of the business affect people's ability to build value in the ESOP 28:51 Starting an internal podcast  30:45 Communicating the ESOP life to employees  31:30 Initial steps to take if you're considering ESOP  35:37 Working hard to build credibility with your crew  35:52 Herb's journey in finding the next CEO of his company  37:59 BONUS: Herb's restaurant recommendation in Stillwater, Maine    About the Guest:  Herb Sargent is the President and CEO of Sargent Corporation. It is an employee-owned earthwork construction company that traces its beginning to 1926 in Alton, Maine. They have nearly 400 employees working in seven states, specializing in commercial, industrial, and institutional site preparation, landfill construction, utility projects, airports, athletic facilities, and wind power access.    Resources:  Check out Sargent Corporation's website https://sargent.us/employee-owned/   Herb's restaurant recommendation https://masonsbrewingcompany.com/    Do Your Project Executives Need to Become Better Leaders?    Book a 10-minute call with Eric Anderton to see if/how he can help (https://10minutes.youcanbook.me/)    Connect with me on LinkedIn. For more podcast episodes, you may also visit my website. Tune in and subscribe to the Construction Genius: A Leadership Master-Class Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, and Stitcher. Thank you for tuning in! 

Out with Suzi Ruffell
OWSR - Emily Sargent / Thinking Straight

Out with Suzi Ruffell

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 27:12


OWSR - Emily Sargent / Thinking Straight Joining me in the studio for a special bonus episode ahead of series 4 is the brilliant journalist Emily Sargent whose recent investigations into conversion therapy and her incredible podcast series 'Thinking Straight' that accompany it are a must listen. You can find the podcast on all platforms and I can't recommend it highly enough. Follow Emily on twitter @EmSargent We'll be back on the 4th October with series 4 of Out with Suzi and another fantastic line-up of amazing guests I'm delighted and honoured shared their story with me (and you!) Thanks. SuzixxPlease subscribe and leave a review.And if you want to get in touch with me on the show, here's how...email: hello@outwithsuziruffell.comtwitter: @outwithsuzi  A 'Keep It Light Media' ProductionSales, advertising and general enquiries: hello@keepitlightmedia.com

Explain Me
What Does a Return to the Art World Mean?

Explain Me

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 119:54


In this episode artist Chloe Bass's tweet pointing to the hypocrisy of the art world leads to a discussion of labor, the New York art fairs, and unions.  We discuss: Max Lankin's observations for ArtForum on the Armory Fair about how the new digs at the Javits Center improve upon the Piers, which were literally falling into the water.  Funny how easy it is to forget that the Javits Center, just two months ago, served as a mass vaccination center, and the year prior a makeshift hospital for COVID victims. Mostly people were just happy to see each other again.  Dana Kopel's piece in the Baffler Magazine, Against Artsploitation, which chronicles the unionization efforts at the New Museum, and the museum executive's endless gaslighting of employees.  The New York Art Fairs. We talk about the art at The Armory Show, The Independent, and Spring Break. The work discussed below:    THE ARMORY SHOW Jeffrey Gibson at Tandem Press Wendy Redstar at Sargent's Daughters Tau Lewis at Night Gallery Tony Matelli - Maruani Mercier Theresa Chromati at The Kravets Wehby Gallery Jennifer Bartlett at Locks Gallery Kamrooz Aram at Green . Art . Gallery Jose Davilas at Sean Kelly Sara Greenberger Rafferty at Rachel Uffner Susumu Kamijo at Jack Hanley Hayley Barker at Shrine Dontae Hayes at Mindy Solomon Gallery Michael Rakowitz at Jane Lombard INDEPENDENT Julian Schnabel at Vito Schnabel Sedrick Chisom at New American Painting Jo Nigoghossian at Broadway Gallery Erik Parker at Ross+Kramer Amy Feldman at Galerie Eva Presenhuber The Ranch SPRING BREAK Guy Richards Smit  Jennifer Catron and Paul Outlaw - curated by Magda Sawon Chapel - curated by M. Charlene Stevens with work by Sophie Kahn and Colette Robins Outliars, curated by Elisabeth Smolarz, work by Angie Waller Gather Rusted Satellites curated by Amanda Nedham Tristam Lasndwone, Kyle Hittmeirer Nicholas Cueva  Loren Erdrich Willa Wasserman James Razko Tammie Rubin Steve Locke

Gill Athletics: Track and Field Connections
#121: Paul Sargent-Sargent Distribution

Gill Athletics: Track and Field Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 107:31


Paul is the former head coach of Franklin (IN) College. Today he joins us to talk about his unique background in the sport of track and field and how that led him to eventually be the first full time director of track and field for the Franklin Grizzlies. After overseeing the development and building of a new home facility and winning multiple conference champions, Paul decided to retire from coaching and open up his own track equipment selling business. Want to have an exploratory conversation about YOUR track equipment needs? Connect with us: Host Mike Cunningham on Twitter: @mikecunningham Email: sales@gillathletics.com Phone: 800-637-3090 Twitter: @GillAthletics Instagram: @GillAthletics1918 Facebook: facebook.com/gillathletics LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/gillathletics/

Helga
Antwaun Sargent

Helga

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 33:17


“There's a real potential in art making to have someone reassess everything that they had thought about a history.” Curator, critic and writer, Antwaun Sargent engages Helga in a discussion around the motivations behind his work as a curator and the circuitous path that led him to a life in and around art.  Antwaun Sargent is writer, editor and curator living in New York City. Sargent is the author of “The New BlackVanguard: Photography between Art and Fashion” (Aperture) and the editor of “Young, Gifted andBlack: A New Generation of Artists” (DAP). Recently, he was hired as a director at Gagosian Gallery.

Valley View Church
Lane Sargent | Special Guest

Valley View Church

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 43:18


message by special guest Lane Sargent. Valley View Church. 9.5.21.

MEMIC Safety Experts
Moments Make the Leader with Patrick Nelson

MEMIC Safety Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 65:34


In 2005 Patrick Nelson, while serving in the US Army paratroops, had an experience that changed his life and his perspective on being a leader.  Leadership, good or bad, is made up of moments.  On this podcast, Patrick helps us see the impact of those moments and how leaders can engage safety through story telling.   Peter Koch: [00:00:04] Hello, listeners, and welcome to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast, I'm your host, Peter Koch. It was a summer a while ago, and my wife Laura, pregnant with our first daughter and I were traveling back from a quick trip to visit my family and celebrate a birthday. It's about a five hour drive one way, and we're like, we always do with family trying to fit it in with an increasingly hectic work schedule. So we had left late from my family's house and our ETA back to Maine was somewhere around two a.m. and as was my habit, I was driving and around two hours or so out from our home. Laura asked if I wanted to take a break and have her drive. And I remember in the moment choosing to tell her, nah I'm OK. And then she should go ahead and catch some sleep so she would be all set for work in the morning. Leading my family, right? I remember telling her that, and then she asked me if I was sure and she had this look on her face like, Are you really sure you're OK? And [00:01:00] the next thing I remember is her screaming at me, and then we were in the guardrail. So leadership, good or bad is made up of moments, and these moments are where decisions and choices get made. Sometimes they're obviously critical to the team's path, while other times the purpose of those moments is not so obvious. Sometimes the choice in the moment is easy, and sometimes it's hard. Sometimes you can clearly see the potential impact of the choice, while in other moments the future of that choice is cloudy, but always. In hindsight, if we look closely enough, we can see the choice or choices in the moments that were made that were the cause of the success or failure and the night that we crashed into the guardrail. I was given at least two of those moments, and it's only by the grace of God and my wife screaming at me that my family has more. So as a leader, whether you're a spouse, your coach or manager, supervisor, [00:02:00] CEO, Commander, Sargent doesn't matter. You will have leadership moments where you're going to be at a crossroads and have the opportunity to choose to act or pass on that moment. And when it comes to safety, these moments are all around us. You think about a moment where you saw one of your team maybe not wearing safety glasses or choosing to take a shortcut that you yourself had taken just the day before, or maybe even with that employee together? Or that employee might be rushing to get the job done, making normal work a crisis. And you didn't take a moment, you name it. I expect we've all had an experience like this to reflect on. And then when you do choose to act on that moment, especially in the workplace for workplace safety, what do you get in the response when you act on that moment? It's my experience that that receiver is not always gushing to thank you and really appreciative of you stopping to have them put his safety glasses on. Most likely, they're [00:03:00] sullen and possibly can't understand why you're bringing the nanny state to bear in this particular opportunity, because it was just for a moment that they weren't wearing their PPE or that it took too long. And why are we doing it this way here anyway? Or add your excuse, you can find any excuse so you don't act or you don't act in a way that can engage the individual or your team, and the cycle of moments start all over again. Well, today I have the distinct privilege of speaking to someone who sees the importance of recognizing these moments and choosing to engage. Joining me on the podcast is Patrick Nelson. Patrick is an experienced leader, having served as a paratrooper in the U.S. Army, leading soldiers through three combat deployments earning a Bronze Star and a Purple Heart. Beyond his military career, he has a master's degree in sports management from Minnesota state and another in organizational development from Pepperdine University. Patrick [00:04:00] lives in Minnesota and is the CEO of Loyalty Point Leadership, working with small businesses and Fortune 500 companies to deploy leadership development programs. There's a ton to Patrick's story, and we're only going to scratch the surface today. So with that introduction, Patrick, welcome to the podcast today. Patrick Nelson: [00:04:20] Thanks, Peter. It is great to be here, and I just want to thank you for sharing that very personal story at the beginning because I think as you'll find throughout our short time together today that sharing stories is very important to me to really move the needle on safety. So I think it's awesome that you did that. Thank you. Peter Koch: [00:04:40] I appreciate that. And yeah, I noticed that like we, we just met a couple of days ago talking over WebEx and trying to figure out, Hey, so how does this all fit in with the safety podcast? And I have found that you speak the truth like stories are very important to you. And you found that it really does make [00:05:00] an impact. And that's going to be part of what we talk about today because, I don't know, engaging in safety. I have found in my career it's been 18 years with MEMIC. Now, as a safety management consultant, engaging people in safety is really important and I think you've had a similar experience as well with trying to engage people regardless of what that is. Patrick Nelson: [00:05:22] I did, yeah, you know, when I was in the military, I used to have to give pre-mission briefings before every combat mission we rolled out on, much like the civilian world, whether it's a start up meeting the shift change a tower talk whatever you want to call it. I was faced with the same challenge that many people are faced keeping people engaged in those meetings. You're providing some valuable information, but a lot of times that information is the same thing those employees are hearing every single day. And I sat in on a couple of these with different clients throughout the country, in different industries, and it seemed [00:06:00] like people were more worried about finding the pen to sign in than they were listening to what the person had to say. And one of the things that I learned in my time in the military giving these briefings is the power of being able to use personal stories to keep people engaged. I knew that I had to get creative and think outside the box instead of just going through my little checklist. And you know, hey guys, make sure you got your helmet on. You got your eye protection, everybody's got their gloves on. Telling very personal and brief is a very key word because we don't have the longest attention spans, but personal and brief stories related to those topics that people can specifically relate to is really what's going to get people engaged. Peter Koch: [00:06:46] Yeah, right on. So like when you were given those pre mission briefings and possibly before you started seeing the value of telling those stories, like how did you know that you were getting the message across? [00:07:00] Or maybe that you weren't getting the message across? Like, what was the what were the team's reaction when they were like, All right, Patrick, I've had enough of this. Let's just get going on the mission. Patrick Nelson: [00:07:09] Yeah, that's a good question. You can tell, by the way, people look at you. I mean, you can tell when people are fully engaged in a conversation with you. Or you could also tell when they're kind of just stared at you blankly and their mind is thinking about 12 different other things. And that's something that I realize, especially in a combat situation where even though you're in a very dangerous place, it's still very easy to get complacent. Guys are thinking about home. They're thinking about their families, their mind can wander and the same thing happens whether you're working in construction or on the manufacturing line, especially what I found during COVID. People are thinking about their kids that are, you know, there's a kid have to home school. They're thinking about their parents that, you know, might be in an age population that may be at a higher [00:08:00] risk. It's easy to get distracted from the very important stuff. And so one of the things is just having that eye contact and making sure that people are engaged. And another thing that I actually used to do was I have one of my soldiers leave that briefing. I let him know the day before, Hey, tomorrow you're going to go ahead and leave the briefing, and I'd sit down right next to them and help them prepare. And I would stand right next to them when they were doing it to throw them a lifeline in case they needed some help to make sure that everything was covered. Worst case scenario, they were going to get up there and they were going to stink it up. However, it was going to be an opportunity for them to step outside of their comfort zone and a huge learning opportunity for them and to keep them engaged in the process. Peter Koch: [00:08:43] Yeah, that's awesome. That's that leadership moment. Like, here's the moment I have. I can either do it myself or I can. I can recognize that somebody else might have a better story to tell or have better impact with my team since, you know, they've been listening to me for the last, however many weeks or days. And then what I like to about [00:09:00] that particular instance that you described was you didn't just throw them the checklist and say, All right, buddy tag, you're it. It's OK, here's the day. Here's your responsibility. This is what we're going to go through. Let's talk it through. Let's make sure we can figure it out so that you're giving them the resource to be successful in that point, which is another great leadership piece, whether it's in safety or just leadership in general. Awesome. Awesome part there. Patrick Nelson: [00:09:26] Yeah, absolutely. I mean, as you know, Peter, it's inherent in anybody who considers himself a leader to be able to coach and mentor those that follow them. Peter Koch: [00:09:37] You know, we're initially talking about leadership here and you know, your experience in the military when you talked about it, it's a combat zone. So the choices that are made within that particular venue for combat, you can connect the consequences really easily. And even though you said you get complacent, you don't always see [00:10:00] it. Sometimes it happens surprisingly. But looking in at from the outside, there's more implications to not taking advantage of the moment in those situations that than there are, say, maybe in construction or maybe in manufacturing or something else where you doing the same thing day after day after day, but honestly. Even though you might not have the same number of opportunities to lose your life as you do in combat, you have a myriad of opportunities in any industry to be injured to change your life in an instant. You had a particular experience, I'm sure, out of many different experiences across your seven years in the military where you saw the impact of a moment. And I wonder if you might take some time and relate that story so that we can hear it and kind of get an idea where you're coming from. And then we can talk [00:11:00] about that story and how it's impacted you and how you see things differently for current and future. Patrick Nelson: [00:11:09] Yeah, absolutely, Peter. You know, I have that one traumatic experience that has changed my life, and it's been that experience from 15, 16 years ago that has led me to right here being a guest on your podcast right now. And it was June 8th, 2005. I was operating out of a small forward operating base near the Pakistani border. So I was in Afghanistan. This was the type of place we were short on everything except the enemy. We faced regular indirect fire attacks participate in several large battles that saw between 50 to one hundred enemy fighters each time. And on this particular morning, we were getting resupplied with some ammunition by a chinook helicopter. Resupply procedures were a common part of what we did, and our platoon was divided into two sections. So any time a resupply [00:12:00] would come in, one of those sessions would be designated as the hot gun. Basically, they were responsible for standing by to respond to any type of attack. The other section, which responds with unloading the supplies from the helicopter. So on this particular morning, my section was the hot gun. We're going to get resupplied with some ammunition. But the other section had a sergeant leaving to go on R&R and I was going to go ahead and backfill his position with them. So as the helicopter approached, I hopped in the Humvee with my good friend Luke. And just as we were about to drive out to the landing zone, my soldier Emmanuel Hernandez, hopped in the back. Now he was supposed to be back with the hot gun, so I turned around and I was about to yell at him. But I thought for a second, you know what, I value that kind of work ethic. He wants to come lift some heavy boxes and help out the team. I know that our section will be fine without him. I value that in [00:13:00] my soldiers, so I didn't say anything. And as I was turning around. I noticed that he didn't have his helmet on, and so I literally opened my mouth. But I quickly realized I don't have mine on, either. It's kind of hard for me to say something if I'm not doing the right thing, so I said nothing. As we got out to the landing zone, a group of 10 of us stepped to the side of the aircraft so they could take a machine gun off the back ramp. The rotors on the helicopter were turning, couldn't hear each other. My platoon sergeant handed me a piece of paper with some serial numbers to items we were expecting, basically saying, Hey, it's your responsibility to make sure we get these specific items. So I grab that piece of paper from him and I turn my back to that group so I could ground guide Luke in the Humvee to back them up a little bit closer to the helicopter. And the next thing I remember. Everything went dark, and as I was laying on the ground, disoriented, unable to [00:14:00] hear. I thought maybe somebody came up behind me and had just hit me on the back of the head maybe played a joke that went too far. Patrick Nelson: [00:14:09] But then I looked up and there were bodies of blood all over the ground in my hearing came back, the helicopter quickly powered down and I heard that very distinct whistle of an incoming rocket. And so I got up and I dove underneath the Humvee for cover as rockets started to impact all around. And as I was laying there, I realized there's a rocket that had landed next to it, instead it knocked me to the ground. So as the barrage finally ended. I crawled out from underneath the Humvee, started making my way back to the soldiers that were still on the ground, unsure of what I was going to find. And as I was doing that, a marine yelled from behind me that I'd been hit. Now, up until that point, I had not felt any pain, but I turned my head and look at the back of my uniform and it was shredded and blood was starting to pour out. And it was at that moment that the pain all of a sudden hit me. The other soldiers quickly [00:15:00] triage those of us that were hurt, loaded us into whatever type of vehicle they could find and brought us to this small clinic on our base that was ran by an Afghan doctor who treated locals. Now my wounds were very, very minor compared to everybody else. I was peppered in the back with shrapnel, small holes in there, nothing too serious, but it definitely hurt. And I was quickly bandaged up by Luke, and I saw Sergeant Michael Kelly, a supply sergeant from the Massachusetts National Guard, who is recently attached to our unit. Patrick Nelson: [00:15:33] He was laying on this elevated stretcher off the ground, and the local Afghan doctor who worked in that clinic was performing CPR on him. He's standing on this. I'll never forget this red milk crate because he was like five feet, two inches tall. And so he's standing on this red milk crate performing CPR on Michael. And I did a quick lap around the clinic to see who else was hurt. I came across my platoon sergeant, one of the just handed me the piece of paper right before [00:16:00] the explosion. He's laying on a stretcher, on the ground, on the outside of the clinic because the inside was already full of others who were hurt. The femoral artery and his leg was severed along with other severe wounds. And by the time I came back around, I couldn't have been more than thirty or forty five seconds and they have lowered Michael to the ground and we're zipping them up into a body bag. And I found my way into a small room in the back of the clinic where I found my soldier, Emmanuel Hernandez, he's laying on a table. His head is bandaged. He's unconscious. But we were fortunate to have a special forces battalion surgeon in our area that day who responded, so I knew he was giving the best care available and I could see his chest rise and fall. So I knew that he was breathing and I just I grabbed him by the hand, whispered to him everything was going to be OK. Patrick Nelson: [00:16:52] Medevac helicopters arrived brought us to four surgical teams spread throughout the country. I was on a helicopter ride with my platoon sergeant, [00:17:00] who had by then lost consciousness. But thanks to the quick thinking of the soldiers on the ground, we're putting a tourniquet on his leg and the medical staff that treated him. He survived and he kept his leg. The surgical team removed several pieces of shrapnel from my back. They left a few souvenirs in there that were little too deep to get out that I still carry with me. But they stitched me up and bandaged me up, sent me back to the landing zone for another helicopter ride to Bagram Airfield for some more advanced care. And as I was waiting there, my commander approach to see how I was doing. I said, I'm going to be just fine. How is? How is Emmanuel? And he looked at me. He said he was going to be OK. I just felt such relief. And he turned to walk away, and he got about four or five steps. And he turned around. And with tears coming down his cheeks. He said, I'm sorry that I lied. Hernandez didn't make it. And [00:18:00] my knees got weak as I hit the ground, my commander embraced me. Emanuel died because shrapnel from the explosion hit him in the head. He died because I was not doing the right thing. Because I didn't have the courage to speak up and to say something, and there's been so many days where I thought how simple it would have been if I would have just said, Hey guys, wait, let's go get our helmets quick. Patrick Nelson: [00:18:27] I mean, nothing would have been delayed. It would have taken a matter of moments just this morning at breakfast. Emanuel was telling another soldier how he couldn't wait to get home and started having kids with his wife. And if only I would have stopped and said something. His wife, Jessica, would still have her husband. His mother would still have her son. And Emmanuel would still have his life ahead of him. But guess what, we've done it like that hundreds and times before. And nothing has ever happened. It's so [00:19:00] easy, I don't care whether you're in a combat zone or you're out there, you know, paving roads or working on some type of line or swinging a hammer. It's so easy to get complacent and to sort of fall and get that tunnel vision and get used to doing things a certain way, especially if it's the wrong way. You know, if you stay in your industry long enough, you might have some lucky days, but you may not have a lucky career because sooner or later, whether it's your fault or not. Something can happen to you. I know it's such a cliche. So one in a million chance. But Peter, I'm here to tell you that it absolutely can happen. You know, I like to ask people this when I'm working with clients, I'll say, Hey, who here has ever bought a lottery ticket in their life like a Powerball Mega million? And most people raise their hand, right? And we bought that ticket knowing that the chances of us winning [00:20:00] are astronomical.   Patrick Nelson: [00:20:03] But we have this sliver of belief that maybe just maybe it might be us. Well, let me tell you, if you have that attitude towards winning a lottery jackpot that it could happen to you. I definitely hope you have that attitude towards workplace safety because the chances of you getting hurt at work are a heck of a lot higher than you winning a lottery jackpot. Again, it's so easy to get comfortable to get used to doing things one way or another. And there's a phenomenon called the diffusion of responsibility when you're in groups of people. You're less likely to speak up to say something or to lend a hand. And why is that? Because you think somebody else is going to do it? Peter Koch: [00:20:55] It's not my job. Patrick Nelson: [00:20:56] It's not my job, right? It's not my responsibility. Nobody [00:21:00] else is speaking up. So I guess everything's OK. And it doesn't matter to me if it's your second day on the job or if you've been there for twenty five years, you can get sucked into that diffusion of responsibility. I got another story that I'll share later here with you where that happened to me just two short years ago. But thankfully, I have an awesome wife just like yours, who spoke up and was able to help change that situation. Peter Koch: [00:21:30] Right on. Oh my gosh, that that is a hugely powerful story, and I thank you for sharing that and realize you're on the podcast to help share things, but that to share the story in the way that you did and for us to realize all of the all the decisions that that went into that one moment, like in that that hindsight 20 20 analysis of the plan and what happened [00:22:00] all the way back to that moment where you look back at them and you open your mouth and you were like, not this time. And then the story goes on from there. So that's a hugely powerful story, and it resonates, resonates for me. I know the diffusion of responsibility kind of thinking about that. I geez, I could go through my career and find hundreds of times where that's happened, where I almost raised my hand, but I didn't quite feel like it was my job. And as a leader, right, do you think about as a leader, it is your job, but that is your only job. So take away everything else that you have as a leader, if you're in charge of a family, you're in charge of a platoon, you're in charge of a team. Whatever it is, you're only job is to make sure that your team is properly equipped for success. And [00:23:00] if you don't take that moment to say something. Like you said, you buy the lottery ticket and some days you win and some days you lose, but as a leader, you really can't take those chances. Patrick Nelson: [00:23:14] Yeah, absolutely. For everybody listening right now. You're listening to this because more than likely you work in an industry or, you know, somebody that works in an industry where the consequences are very real if something happens. And again, it's not a matter of if a lot of times, unfortunately, it's a matter of when. Again, when I go into clients, I love to ask people. It used to be a variety of people. It might be that second day employee in there or that's employee who's been there 10, 15, 20 years. But I'll ask them who here has ever taken a shortcut when it comes to safety or not wearing the proper PPE? Been complacent been negligent not follow procedure and every hand in that room [00:24:00] goes up. We've all been guilty of it at one point in our career or another. But again, go back to what I said. You might have some lucky days, but if you stay in that industry long enough, you may not have a lucky career. We got sucked in to that comfort zone of being and we were in a combat zone where our lives are on the line. Twenty four seven. And we got sucked into it. So if it can happen to me during combat operations in Afghanistan, I know that it absolutely can happen to you. Peter Koch: [00:24:35] Yeah, complacency it's the bane of what we do. I mean, even if your job is different day to day, hour to hour, there's still things that are going to pull your mind away from it. There's still things that are going to force you into position where you're going to recognize a moment and then need to make a choice. And then when we get complacent, you start to think about, well, like coming [00:25:00] up to a yellow light. What do you do? Right. So the yellow light means, do I speed up and get through it before it turns red? Or do I slow down and pay attention, or maybe even stop and let the traffic go through? So if I've had the experience of being lucky time after time, after time, I might not take that opportunity to say something or to go back and get my helmet or to put my PPE on or, you know, I think we could probably swap stories for a few hours about successes and failures personally that we've seen and then that we've heard other people tell us about or things that I've had to go and investigate as loss control consultant of a fatality that has occurred on the work site where the same thing if we walk back to. The critical decision that was made that allowed the scenario to unfold the way it did. It was a leadership failure. Almost always, it's a leadership failure. Patrick Nelson: [00:26:00] Yep, [00:26:00] I absolutely agree with you, you know, the research is clear, ninety nine point some percent of all incidents are completely preventable. Yeah, save those lone acts of God. But there are opportunities there when you're doing, whether it's your root cause analysis, you're asking why five times whatever process it is that you're using, you're going to get back to that situation where that could have easily been prevented. And you'll probably find about five or six different situations where somebody could have easily raise their hand or spoke up, and they didn't for whatever reason it is. And so, yes, as leaders, absolutely again, our inherent responsibility to take care of those around us. Peter Koch: [00:26:45] Yeah. And so beyond the diffusion of responsibility, like why in your experience talking to all, all your clients and having your experience within the military and even outside that, why do you think leaders don't [00:27:00] make that choice? I mean, you have your personal experience. I've had my personal experiences where I haven't stepped up and made that choice. Why else do you think leaders don't step into the breach to say something? Patrick Nelson: [00:27:15] Well, first of all, you chose your words very apropos there, because you said choice, because I like to say safety is not an option, but it's still a choice. It still comes down to that individual. And I think there's a plethora of reasons of why and a lot of the ones that I see is. Pressure. We have to meet our numbers, we don't want to come in and have to work this weekend, and a lot of times that pressure is driven internally. Now there can absolutely be external factors and it's the way a lot of times it's even the way people choose their words. You're not going to go into a company that's [00:28:00] going to tell you blatantly, you know, we disregard safety so we can meet our numbers. You know, a lot of them are going to expose like, Oh, no, safety is our number one priority. And if you need to slow down, go ahead and slow down, we support you. But yet the words that they're choosing are being received by the people that are out there doing the dangerous work as, Oh boy, we need to get this done and we need to get people to realize you don't need to compromise safety for performance or vice versa. You can be a very high performing team and be really safe at your job as well. We can do both at the same time. That is absolutely possible. So there's definitely that idea of the pressure driven situations where leaders may not want to step up and say something. Leaders may not want to what they see as rock the boat, and that was one of my things that held me back with not speaking up with Emmanuel. Patrick Nelson: [00:28:59] Look, we're [00:29:00] we're in a combat zone. I don't want to have to yell at him. You know, he's just trying to come and help. I don't want to say anything and have to get into him and. It's like I found out the consequences of not speaking up, and so one of the things is not knowing how to have those difficult conversations with people we don't like as humans. We don't like conflict. The majority of us, we do not like conflict. We're going to shy away from it. And again, one of the reasons is because we think, you know, if we go tell somebody that they're doing something wrong or give them that negative developmental critical or whatever nomenclature you put on that feedback is it's going to cause some adversity or tension there in that relationship, and we don't want that. However, there are absolutely ways to be able to have those conversations to take sort of that judgment that comes out of it, and it's really just focusing on the behavior of that person and try to make it as objective as possible. [00:30:00] And for me, it really starts with empathy, and empathy is really kind of been a buzzword in leadership circles over the last couple of years. But it comes down to empathy, and a lot of people think of empathy as this very soft and cuddly type thing. And you know, I come from I was in a unit full of paratroopers, one hundred and twenty alpha males in that unit, and I can tell you, I learned a lot about empathy. Patrick Nelson: [00:30:26] It's just what it really is. It's being able to see things from somebody else's perspective. You know, I'm not for treating everybody the same. I'm for treating everybody fairly. And its leadership is not a one size fits all approach to everybody, I had the opportunity to work with the diverse team of soldiers from all different walks of life and from all different areas across our country and even the world. And the one size fits all approach doesn't always work. You know, I'd have those soldiers where I could yell at them till I'm [00:31:00] blue in the face and it just would not get across or I'd have them where I just had to raise my voice just a little bit. And that was it. They understood. And so it's being able to really know your people and how to have those conversations. You got to know what motivates them. And I'm not talking about, you know, money or bonuses, right? Nobody's coming to work if they're not getting paid. We know that. But there are still reasons that people have chosen that job, especially in the market. Today, you can go out there and you can get a paycheck down the road. Almost any other place right now. There are reasons that they are right there in your organization and you need to find out what those intrinsic motivators are and really leverage those in your relationship and how you communicate with that person. Peter Koch: [00:31:50] Let's take a quick break. In our experience here at MEMIC, successful companies are safe companies, and those companies have good leaders from front line seasonal supervisors [00:32:00] to middle management and beyond. Growing the leadership team is a critical part of that success. MEMIC recognizes the value of leadership and safety, and that not all supervisors and managers have had formal leadership training. That's why we've created a series of resources and workshops specifically for supervisors and managers called integrating safety into business goals from the breakdown of three basic skills every supervisor needs through how recognition works and conflict management. Integrating safety into business goals is a great starting point for developing your leadership team. Already, a MEMIC policyholder then reach out to your MEMIC Safety Management consultant for more information about these resources. And if you're not already a policyholder and you're interested in how MEMIC can partner with you for workplace safety, contact your independent insurance agent and ask about MEMIC. Now, let's get back to today's episode. Peter Koch: [00:33:00] Yeah, [00:33:00] it's great, so tie in for me, like how you how you use the power of stories to connect in and bring the message of safety because. I think it's easy to talk about success as a company and you can get recognition because you're successful as a company and we met our numbers here, but safety is one of those weird things where it's the measurement of the negative right. It's the measurement of the thing that doesn't happen. And yeah, you can only save so much money from an insurance standpoint, and you can show that you saved this much money because we didn't have this many people get hurt, but there are people who will look at that and go, Well, it's because we worked harder because we were luckier because of this or because of that. So. Engaging people in safety with the power of a story to help with that empathy, I think is key. So how does that how does that work together for you? How do you see using a story to tie [00:34:00] safety or make safety important for people? Patrick Nelson: [00:34:03] Yeah, again, it absolutely comes down to engaging people, and in my experiences, I found that telling those personal brief, powerful stories is what really can get people's attention. And you know what? Three weeks or three months down the road, they may not remember every single word that you said, but they're going to remember how you made them feel. And so I really focus on that emotional aspect of it, things that people can easily relate to any time you start telling a story and you're using the words my son or daughter, my mother or father, brother, sister, right? People start to be able to pay attention. And through some of the work that I've done with some clients is I helped equip some of those people with the stories. And at first, I honestly did not know how it would translate into the civilian world again. [00:35:00] I had all that great experience in the military, very bureaucratic organization. My soldiers had to listen to me. They didn't have much of a choice. But again, I think a leader is somebody who influences outcomes and inspires others. Is that about being in control or having power, notoriety, prestige? Anyways, I digress. Telling personal stories and equipping them with every single person, I saw the impact that it can have. So these organizations I work with, they've the numbers are there, right? They've seen that decrease in their recordable incident rate. Like you were saying, the business case, we all know the business case for safety is there. But more than anything, it's that personal and moral obligation that we all have to take care of each other. And what's even more interesting, Peter. Is that I help equip these people with their own what I call a safety stump speech and some of the most powerful ones that I [00:36:00] heard and ones that really helped move the needle on safety had nothing to do with an incident on a job site. I've heard people tell very personal stories of, you know, accidents at home, accidents or situations that they even heard about, or that one of their friends or family were involved. And those are the type of stories when somebody can get up there and they start getting tears in their eyes and they tell these people, Look, I care about you. And I'm here to help you and to keep you safe. It's really developing that connection and engagement with the person. Again, it may not be remembering every single word that that person says in that story, but it's really that connection that's built. And it gets people to start to take ownership over safety. I mean, again, that I go into all these clients and that's what they say. We want our employees to start taking ownership of safety and in order to get their, [00:37:00] well one, it obviously has to start at the top and be mirrored up there because as humans, we have a tendency to mirror the behavior of others around us. So if people up there are not doing the right thing, I can expect others to be able to do the same. And the second thing is it's being able to empower people. To be able to tell their story and to share it with others, giving them the opportunities, and again, as you know, as a safety expert, Peter. It's about being proactive. Peter Koch: [00:37:31] Yeah, it really is. As you were talking about that, what was coming to mind for me is something you said earlier on was the words that you use are important when you are addressing somebody. From a safety standpoint, because it helps them engage, and if you promote that storytelling within your company and again, whether it's storytelling that happens because of an incident that occurred at your business or it's a personal story. I think that emotional connection can almost be like [00:38:00] this guy or gal cares. So when you're going to build that kind of emotional trust bank up with that person so that when you come back to them later on and you're in that moment, you have that, only you have that millisecond to make a decision. And you might not be able to be warm and fuzzy in that moment to tell that person that put their PPE back on or to put the lockout back on that or to get off the frickin top of the ladder or whatever it is. Patrick Nelson: [00:38:31] Right Peter Koch: [00:38:33] They are going to know that you have their back and they're going to look at you and go, OK, he's not just being a jerk. He really cares and I'm going to do that and that's going to pay it forward later on. I think there's a key part in that. That's an awesome thought using stories that way. Patrick, thanks for connecting that for me. Patrick Nelson: [00:38:54] Yeah. Well, you're welcome. I love that you said the emotional trust bank. I never heard that before, [00:39:00] but I am going to be taking that now, and I'm going to help people open their own emotional trust bank in those relationships because I think that's important. What's interesting is you're reminded me of the very first platoon leader I had on my first deployment to Afghanistan. He was a guy by the name of John Post. And a young lieutenant, a few years removed from West Point, what this guy lacked in experience he more than made up for in his leadership behavior. So this was the type of guy and I've seen him do it. He could sit you down and tell you the 12 different ways you sucked at life, but you leave the conversation with a smile on your face. Ready to charge up that proverbial hill because you knew he cared about you. You knew he had your best interests in mind, and he was going to give you every single resource that you needed to be successful. Peter Koch: [00:39:48] Yeah, and that's hard work as a leader. I mean, it really is hard. It's harder than going and doing the job that your, that your guys are doing or your gals are doing like that technical [00:40:00] skill of doing the job is one thing and you as a leader, you probably came from that world. You came, you got your job as a leader, as a foreman or a supervisor or a manager because you were good at that job or you were good at the tasks that you are now leading people in. But I think the harder part is connecting with those people and making sure that you are able to motivate them to do the right thing when you're not there, right? So that, you know, as a leader, when you go away and you have to manage the other project that these people understand what the expectations are and they're doing it for the right reasons. Because if they're only doing it, going back to our initial part of this conversation, when you're doing the pre shift meeting or pre-deployment meeting. And you're just checking the boxes if they're only doing it because they're checking the boxes that guaranteed at [00:41:00] some point in time, they're going to take that shortcut. And if you're not there to take advantage of the moment, somebody else on your team needs to be there to take advantage of the moment and if you haven't built that, trust up. It's not going to happen. It's just not going to happen. Patrick Nelson: [00:41:14] Absolutely. Peter Koch: [00:41:15] Right on. You know, thinking about influence there before I became the risk manager at the ski area that I worked at. You know, I was the patrol director and I was like, Oh, I figured all this safety stuff out and I got responsibility for being the risk manager. And the first phone call that I took as the risk manager was from a father. And it was a father of a young, like a 16 year old girl who was getting her first job as a lift operator or a lift attendant at the ski area. And he called me up and he had worked in the local mill. We have a paper mill within our area. And he was a supervisor and a manager up there. And so he gets working around equipment. I mean, he knows what [00:42:00] can happen if you make a mistake, if you get in the way of equipment is not going to stop, you know, equipment plus people, you add them together the equipment's almost always going to win and in the phone call, he said to me, it's like I expect you to make sure that my daughter has all the tools that she needs in order to be safe on the job. And I remember that meeting with this guy, I don't remember his name because it was a fairly brief, it might have been a five or six minute phone call. But I remember that conversation because it really made me think about the responsibility that I had, even just as a safety person who has. And if there's a safety person and I know there are listening to this podcast today, you are that individual that has all the responsibility for safety, but no authority. So I'm thinking, Wow, now I'm this guy is looking at me and I'm [00:43:00] responsible for his daughter's safety, and I need to know whether or not the lift op. supervisor has all the tools to help keep this guy safe. So then I have to develop a relationship with the lift ops. manager, a supervisor, so that I can influence him to make changes if he needs to. Because I didn't have any authority over his position, all I could do is offer him resources. And if I hadn't built up trust with him so that he knows that I've got his back, then it's just going to be a head nod. And as soon as I go away, he's back to his old jobs and tasks. And the successful part of that story was that the girl was successful. She had a great season. She enjoyed it really well. Got a thank you note from the dad at the at the end of the season and we went on from there. That was 25 or so years ago, but those little, those little connections of who is going to influence you. And it's typically because you will remember the [00:44:00] emotional connection of that particular story. That's pretty awesome. Patrick Nelson: [00:44:06] Yeah, absolutely, I mean, again, that's just reinforces exactly what we're talking about here. It happens in moments and we remember again, like you said, that emotional connection that we build with another person, that's what we're going to carry forward. Peter Koch: [00:44:19] Yeah, awesome. So I have another thought here to maybe explore with you a little bit. And it's about it's about role perception, right? And how that affects an individual's decision to say something or not say something. And it kind of goes back to that that leaders piece, right? So if I'm a leader and you might be the designated leader or you might be working in a team where you are all peers. So the leader is not physically present in your work group at that time and you're all peers. The diffusion of responsibility, right? So it's not my job type [00:45:00] of piece. How does role perception like somebody's role perception fit into their choosing to take advantage of the moment and say something or hide in the background and not take advantage of that? I'm not sure if I've asked that question well enough, but can you? You think about that and maybe throw that around in the safety mix for a bit? Patrick Nelson: [00:45:22] Yeah. Well, you know, I can relate it to my experiences that I've had, especially here in the civilian world with the companies that I've had the pleasure of working with in a lot of it comes down honestly to culture. And again, if people are taking ownership, are we empowering these employees to be able to speak up, to be able to make decisions in the absence of maybe that person who's technically in charge? And there's several different ways. Are we empowering people to stop the job? I mean, it never fails when I go into an organization and [00:46:00] I start asking, Hey, who here can stop the job? And they said, Well, anybody can. And then I said, Well, how do they know? We tell them every single day. And then I ask them if they one hundred percent believe that every single person out there would stop the job if they saw an incident or didn't know something. And of course, the answer is no right. You can tell them to your blue in the face, but there's misconceptions out there where people don't feel empowered. One of them is when it comes to stop the job. There are some people, unfortunately, that think when you say stop the job or whatever again nomenclature you put on, it means you're hitting this big red button and you're shutting everything down. Stopping the job could mean those are the very rare circumstances, right? Right. Stopping the job. You mean you're just taking a step back. You're asking a question to get some clarity or something may have changed. And then you diving back into your work. Another thing that hampers that empowerment of people is they think they're going to get in trouble if they stop the job. [00:47:00] And a lot of that kind of comes back to that having that pressure on us to perform to meet some type of number. People think they're going to get in trouble. Now again, that's usually not happening. But as humans, we have this innate fear that if we do something wrong or if we slow things down, or if it's not the right reason, we're going to get in trouble for it. And so one thing that I tried to make clear to people is you need to go out there and you need to stop the job and you stop the job one. Maybe it's for no reason, but to show them you're not hitting this big red button. And that's OK to do so because I would rather have somebody out in the job nine hundred and ninety nine times out of a thousand because they didn't know something in order to catch up. One reason that prevented an immediate incident from happening. Because those nine hundred and ninety nine other times are learning opportunities, chances for us as leaders to help grow and develop those around us. So it's really [00:48:00] about being able to empower people to make those decisions to feel comfortable, to be able to speak up. And again, a lot of it points back to just people taking individual ownership over their safety at work. Nobody is getting paid enough to not go home at the end of their shift. Nobody wants to be that person knocking on the door, picking up that phone, letting that little girl or boy know their mommy or daddy is not coming home. Nobody ever wants to be in that position. But yet we don't talk about it. And so I think whether you're a large organization or a small organization is having those conversations. And again, just I think a lot of it goes back to being proactive when it comes to safety. Peter Koch: [00:48:48] That's interesting. I want to clarify something here. I think I heard you say that. As an example to kind of lead by that example, to stop the job, to get people to understand is as a leader, [00:49:00] go and stop a job. Right. Patrick Nelson: [00:49:04] Ya. Absolutely. Peter Koch: [00:49:05] How many leaders do that like? I think so. If you're listening and you're a leader, how many times have you gone onto a job and stop the job to ask a question? And that's all you're asking. That's all you're doing. You're just asking a question for clarification. And it might be you're stopping the job for a moment, and it might be your stopping the job for 15 minutes because of the complexity of the question that you're asking. But have you actually done that? And whether it be because you see a problem or because you're just going to show that it is possible to stop the job? Patrick Nelson: [00:49:39] Yeah, absolutely. And another point with that is whether you are a HSC safety professional or that's an additional duty or you're just a leader coming around and checking on your people. People should not pucker up when you come around thinking you're coming to catch them doing something wrong. If people are doing that, [00:50:00] then your visibility on the floor on the job site could use some work. You know, Peter Koch: [00:50:08] Agreed. Patrick Nelson: [00:50:10] People should get excited when you come around, they should, you know, like, all right, he's here, you know, it shouldn't be some big surprise, like you're once a year sort of visit again. I know you've got other tasks and responsibilities that might tie you to the desk for a little bit. And I always have people say, Well, I wish I was able to spend more time in the field with my guys. Well, apparently you're not making it a priority. Peter Koch: [00:50:31] Surprise, right? Patrick Nelson: [00:50:33] Some of those other tasks are tasks that are tying down to that desk and delegate them to somebody else. Peter Koch: [00:50:39] Yeah, that's you know, that was when I went from and again, so interesting job career path for me to get where I am. But I was a ski bum to start with, got a job as a ski school instructor, was a patroller for a while and then I moved from a patroller to the patrol director's job. And when I got the patrol director's job, I had [00:51:00] gone from skiing. I don't know, maybe one hundred and twenty to one hundred and thirty days a year, which is I'm pretty excited about that. Like, I like doing that to pushing a lot of paper right and dealing with all that stuff. And I remember having that same thought. I wish I could get out more. And so the thing that got me to do that was when I got in in the morning. The first thing that I did before I did anything else was I put my ski boots on, and if I hadn't, if I didn't put my ski boots on, I was destined to ride desk jockey for the rest of the day and deal with stuff that's happened in the office. But if I had my boots on, I had an excuse to go out and almost ninety five percent of the time if I had my boots on, I was going to be out for a few hours to be able to go out with my guys and gals and see what was going on out there and build that relationship. But I had to choose to do it. It didn't just happen magically, and you can't look at your boss and go, I don't have enough time [00:52:00] to be out there in the field because I have so much stuff to do. Your boss isn't going to go well. We'll take away some of that responsibility, pay you the same amount so that you can go deal with your people, you have to be able to figure that out. You might be able to go to your boss and talk about strategy. But don't expect the responsibilities to get lessened so that you can go out and do that, part of a leader is figuring out how you connect with your people. Patrick Nelson: [00:52:26] Yeah, that's absolutely what it is. And I like to ask people, I say, Look, are you a manager or a leader? Now you can be both. But those are very distinct positions. You manage things, data processes, equipment schedules, but you lead people. And it's kind of hard to lead people if you're not out there with them. Peter Koch: [00:52:47] Yep. Great point, great point. And I think we lose that in the in the cluster of everything that's going on, I think we do lose that and to be a good leader, there's a balance because in order to be a good leader, you [00:53:00] need to be able to spend some of that focus time to understand the impact of the product of the work that your people are doing. So you have those conceptual skills to be able to see where things are going. But then you also have to have some of those human and technical skills to be in the field, to ask good questions, to lend a hand. Maybe if you need to lend a hand in the field, that's awesome. Patrick Nelson: [00:53:22] Right. Absolutely. And you know, you can ask anybody what good leadership looks like and we all know it. We all know what good leadership looks like. I'll sit there and I'll ask people, I'll give them a piece of paper and say, Build me a perfect leader right there right now, whether they're accountable and empathetic and good communicators, good listeners, and that laundry list of things that we know go into making somebody good leader now look. I've been a leader in the military, I've lead people in combat. I teach leadership now and I don't encompass all of those things. We know a good leadership looks like. But it takes work to be able to do that [00:54:00] and exactly like you're saying. I mean, there's twenty five different other things that are pulling us in different directions. You got emails and reports and conference calls and meetings and. Again, it's being able to as a leader to find that balance. And again, a lot of it might come down to being able to delegate. And one thing I like to say is like, Look, you can delegate authority, but you can't delegate responsibility as a leader because when it comes down to it, it is still your responsibility. Peter Koch: [00:54:30] Yeah, your responsibility to make that choice, to see the moment and act in that moment, act in that moment. That's great. Awesome. Well, gosh, it's almost been an hour. Holy cow. This has gone really fast, actually. So I guess, you know, we started this thing talking about stories and how the power of stories can really connect with your with your team and help build [00:55:00] that emotional trust up and then be able to help you connect with them to make safety important. You had mentioned you had another story that you might want to share, and I wonder if you want to lay that on us here? Patrick Nelson: [00:55:13] Yeah, absolutely. You know, I love sharing this story because again, it just shows the impact that we can have on those around us. So this was February of 2019. My wife and I are coming home from church on a Sunday morning. We're making it right at a stoplight and it goes into two lanes. And I can see ahead that something is blocking traffic. People are starting to merge over. And as we creep closer, there's about five or six guys from the instant oil change business that's right there on the side of the street, and they're pounding on the windows of this car that's blocking traffic. And as I get closer, I see there's an older gentleman slumped over in the driver's seat. Again, they're pounding on the windows, trying to get this guy's attention traffic's blocking [00:56:00] like these guys got this under control, so I shoot right on by. But I did not get very far because my wife turns to me and she said, if that was you or my dad, I want you to stop because you know what you're doing. And she was right. I came back around the block. I parked, I ran out there by then. They had busted the back window. They had gotten the guy out onto the road. One guy was doing chest compressions. Five others were standing around their thumbs up there you know what? So I did what we're trained to do, I went up to his head, I put my jacket under a head tilt and lift, started clearing his airway with all the chest compressions, food and other not nice stuff were coming and blocking that airway. So I'm fish hook in some nasty stuff out of this guy's throat to clear that airway. Me and this guy are tag-team and CPR. I still hadn't heard the siren, so I started to question, OK, did anybody even call 9-1-1? I could barely detect [00:57:00] a pulse on this guy. He looked like he was dead. But Peter, out of nowhere, like Clark Kent coming out of the phone booth, this guy shows up with an AED, a guy driving in a car. He's not an off duty EMT, he's not part of a volunteer fire department. He's a guy in a car driving by. And he stops and he gets the AED, and I'm sure most people listening have been through the training. If you haven't, it talks you through it. It is dummy proof. We get it hooked up, give them a big old shock. We continue CPR. Finally, the ambulance arrives. We let them take over. I go back to my car and go home. And of course, now all I'm thinking about is that guy. Like, What's his status? Later that afternoon, I call the non-emergency number and the Public Safety Office because I have to ask knowing that they're probably not going to tell me anything, but I have to ask. And they said when we dropped him off at the hospital. Things [00:58:00] weren't looking too good. He had gone over 10 minutes without oxygen to his brain. Later that evening on a neighborhood Facebook page, people are talking about this incident and somebody shares in the comments, they said, Yeah, that was Carl from the Home Depot. So Monday morning, I wake up and I'm in Home Depot and I'm asking around about Carl if anybody knows anything and they said yeah, it's not looking too good. And Tuesday morning, I go back into the Home Depot. Same thing Wednesday, same thing. Thursday, I go in and they said Carl's sitting up in his hospital bed telling jokes. He had a major clog the Windowmaker artery that put a couple of stents, then he was going to be OK. Now, fast forward four months later, and I'm in Home Depot for like the fourth or fifth time that day because I'm not a DIY guy. I can barely change the light bulb in my house, according to my wife. We needed something hung up on the wall. We call her dad. But anyways, again, I [00:59:00] digress and I run into Carl. And I said, Carl, the last time I saw you, you were laying in the middle of the road and fish hooking pieces of your lunch out of your throat. And now I like to share that story, Peter, because. First of all, I could not save Carl's life, I played a very, very minor role, but a role that would not have happened basically if my wife didn't have the courage to speak up. To kind of stop the job and say, Hey. We need to do something. The guy with the AED is the one who saved Carl's life. He had the courage to stop. He could have easily been sucked into the diffusion of responsibility been like, Oh, that crowd over there. They got that under control. The ambulance is probably going to be here in like forty five seconds. And he could have just shot right on by that guy, had the courage to stop and to do something. Our words and our actions can have such a tremendous impact [01:00:00] on those around us or our lack thereof. Now, if you speak up and say something. Point out a safety incident you may not never know. What you truly prevented from happening, but if you don't speak up. Sooner or later, you're going to find out, just like I did, by not speaking up and telling Emanuel to put on his helmet by me, not wearing my helmet. Sooner or later, you're going to find out what your inaction can cause and so, you know, sharing that it's almost sort of the circle of life almost right, it's my decision to not speak up because again, it was a decision that I made to not say something. And Emanuel losing his life, but then that man in that car who stopped at the AED who made the decision to stop and to put into [01:01:00] action that AED and save Carl's life. I mean, that's the kind of stuff that's really going to move the needle on safety. It's not going to be. Here's the hottest new piece of PPE that's going to save your life. Here's the newest OSHA regulation that's going to move the needle. It's going to be getting people to start taking safety, personal, Peter Koch: [01:01:18] Personal and relational, personal and relational. You've got to connect it back with them. Thank you very much for sharing that, and it is cool how there is that circle in there where you know the lack of choice versus the. Even though it was kind of a forced choice because, you know, sometimes you have that like you, you will see the moment. And you will start to pass by the moment choosing not to act, but then there'll be somebody or something else that'll smack you upside the head and go, Hey, dummy. That's your moment. That's your moment. And we all have those moments. And I think out of all of this, I'm hoping that people will [01:02:00] recognize the different moments that they have as they go through their life and as they go through their work that they can substantially influence the outcome of someone else's life if they take advantage of that moment. Awesome, thank you so much, Patrick, for sharing, for sharing your expertise and sharing your stories with us very, very engaging. I really have enjoyed listening and talking with you. So before we go, where can our listeners find out more about loyalty point leadership and more about you? As you know, as a speaker, as a leader, as a connector for leadership and for safety. Patrick Nelson: [01:02:47] Yeah, absolutely. You know, www.loyaltypointleadership.com find me on LinkedIn, Patrick Nelson loyalty point leadership. I'd love [01:03:00] to engage with anybody that wants to talk safety. I'd love to be a resource for you going forward and I'd love to learn from you. It's important leadership, a journey. It's not a destination. It's not like you go to some sort of leadership class and you get blessed off and now your leader go forth. You're good to go. We learn something from everybody, and I learned something from being on the podcast here today with you, Peter, that emotional trust bank. I'm going to carry that with me. That's going to be something. You can find me 10 years down the road and I'm going to be talking about that. So I appreciate that. And yes, would love for people to stay in touch. Peter Koch: [01:03:37] Thank you, Patrick. Thank you very much. Thanks for joining us today and to all of our listeners out there today on the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast, we've been speaking about leadership and engaging people in safety with Patrick Nelson, CEO of Loyalty Point Leadership, and about engaging your team. And he's been gracious enough to spend an hour with us today and talk about that. So again, thank you for [01:04:00] that, Patrick. Patrick Nelson: [01:04:01] You're welcome. Have a great day. Peter Koch: [01:04:03] Thanks. And if you all have any questions about leadership, safety or like to hear more about a particular topic on our podcast, email me at podcast@MEMIC.com. Also, check out our show notes for today's podcast at MEMIC.com/podcast, where you can find out more about Patrick or other leadership podcasts that we've had, and then our entire podcast archive. And while you're there, sign up for our safety net blog so you never miss any of our articles or safety news updates, and if you haven't done so already, I'd appreciate it. If you took a minute to review us on Stitcher, iTunes or whatever podcast service that you found us on. And if you've already done that, thanks because it really, truly helps us spread the word about safety. So please consider sharing the show with a business associate friend or family member who you think will get something out of it. And as always, thank you for the continued support and until next time, this is Peter Koch reminding you that listening to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast is good, but using what you [01:05:00] learned here is even better.

Author William Sargent talks #CrabWars on #ConversationsLIVE

"Conversations LIVE!" with Cyrus Webb

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 21:00


Host Cyrus Webb welcomes author William Sargent to #ConversationsLIVE to discuss the work that resulted in the book CRAB WARS. 

Growing Harvest Ag Network
Farm Talk: Southeastern North Dakota farmer provides a corn crop update from Sargent county

Growing Harvest Ag Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 2:50


This Farm Talk Segment is brought to you by the North Dakota Corn Utilization Council. Terry Wehlander, Secretary Treasurer of the ND Corn Council and farmer from Delamere, discusses how the corn crop looks in Sargent County, and when he thinks farmers will start harvesting in his area. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

In The Frame: Theatre Interviews from West End Frame
S5 Ep7: Landi Oshinowo, Mrs Phelps in Matilda The Musical

In The Frame: Theatre Interviews from West End Frame

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 58:59


Landi Oshinowo is starring as Mrs Phelps in Matilda The Musical which resumes its record-breaking West End run at the Cambridge Theatre from Thursday 16th September 2021.Landi was part of the original cast of Sister Act (London Palladium), understudying Deloris. She went on to star as Dragon/Ugly Duckling in the original West End production of Shrek The Musical (Theatre Royal Drury Lane). Most recently she played Jarene in The Color Purple (Leicester Curve/Birmingham Hippodrome).Landi's other credits include: Nell in Ain't Misbehavin' (Mercury Colchester/Southwark Playhouse); Widow Zuma in A Little Princess (Royal Festival Hall); The Witch/Jenny Hill in Big Fish (The Other Palace); Hattie in Kiss Me Kate (Welsh National Opera); Joyce Heath in Barnum (UK tour); Miss Sherman in Fame (UK tour); understudy Sargent in The Light Princess (National Theatre); Poopsie in The Pajama Game (Chichester Festival Theatre) and Rafiki/Nala in The Legend of Lion King (Euro Disney). She also appeared on I'd Do Anything  (BBC). Matilda The Musical runs at the Cambridge Theatre, visit www.uk.matildathemusical.com for info and tickets. Hosted by Andrew Tomlins. @Andrew_Tomlins Thanks for listening! Email: andrew@westendframe.co.ukVisit westendframe.co.uk for more info about our podcasts. 

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York
William Sargent on Crab Wars: A Tale of Horseshoe Crabs, Ecology, and Human Health

Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI Radio in New York

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 55:09


(9/1/21) Every drug certified by the FDA must be tested using the horseshoe crab derivative known as Limulus lysate. Because of this, a multimillion-dollar industry has emerged involving the license to bleed horseshoe crabs and the rights to their breeding grounds. In the latest edition of his book Crab Wars: A Tale of Horseshoe Crabs, Ecology, and Human Health, William Sargent breaks down this exploitation of the horseshoe crab at the hands of multinational pharmaceutical conglomerates. Join us for a look at an issue with profound implications not only for the future of the crabs themselves but for the ecosystems that depend on them in this installment of Leonard Lopate at Large on WBAI.

Where The Lotus Grows
Interview: Jeffery Sargent, MS, C-IAYT, E-RYT, YACEP

Where The Lotus Grows

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 55:01


Jeffrey Sargent, retired Major with the U.S. Army, MS Yoga Therapy, E-RYT, YACEP, has 20 years of military service, including combat tours in Iraq as a tactical intelligence officer and in Kuwait & Iraq as a Military Intelligence Company Commander. He is the recipient of The Defense Meritorious Service Medal, and numerous other awards including being selected as the #1 ROTC graduate in the United States in 1996. Jeff enlisted in the Army in 1986 and earned the rank of Staff Sergeant before entering officer training. After retiring from the Army in 2009 Jeff worked as a government contractor for five years training military personnel who were preparing to deploy to Iraq and Afghanistan. During this time Jeff discovered yoga and immediately recognized the potential physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual benefits. It has had tremendous impact on his life including helping him with his own battles with military service related PTSD and a 30 year struggle with eating disorders. Most recently Jeff stepped down as a full time yoga therapist for the Army in the Integrative Pain Management Center at Madigan Army Medical Center in Tacoma, Washington and now works with them as an independent consultant and sees clients in his own private practice. If you 're interested in working with Jeff, he can be found here: www.jeffreysargent.comhttps://www.facebook.com/jeffreysargentyoga/ Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=13598261)

Thecuriousmanspodcast
William Sargent Interview Episode 65

Thecuriousmanspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 65:55


In this interview Matt Crawford speaks with author William Sargent about his book Crab Wars. Who knew Horseshoe Crabs were so integral to the healthcare industry? 450 million years old these creatures have blood that is the building block for the most reliable test for deadly bacteria. Every drug certified by the FDA must be tested by using this horseshoe crab derivative. Sargent shares his life long fascination with these beautiful animals and chronicles their plight. The COVID-19 pandemic has made horseshoe crabs even more in demand and we owe them quite a lot. Start by reading this book.

HealthMatters
E67: Leading Interprofessional Teams in Healthcare Settings

HealthMatters

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 18:00


In this episode, we welcome Margie Pettingell (m_pettingell@yahoo.com), a social worker and Sargent alumni. She discussed the importance of leadership skills in the healthcare field. Margie was one of the 30 alumni who piloted the online Interprofessional Leadership in Healthcare Certificate. The certificate will start on September 13, 2021. About the Program: This five-month, fully online certificate program equips learners with the knowledge and skills to effectively lead interprofessional teams. Our program is designed for individuals with three or more years of professional experience in any health profession or setting, who lead, or aspire to lead, interprofessional teams. Learners participate in weekly live, online classrooms and engage with self-paced online learning modules featuring interactive exercises, videos, and journals. The online live classroom sessions use Project ECHO® to facilitate technology-enabled, peer-to-peer, collaborative learning, which adopts an ‘all teach, all learn' approach. Online classrooms are facilitated by mentors who are Boston University alumni from Sargent College, School of Social Work, School of Public Health, and School of Medicine. Each of the alumni mentors have vast experience leading interprofessional teams and have clinical backgrounds in a range of professions, including occupational therapy, nutrition, public health, medicine, physical therapy, athletic training, physician assistant, social work and speech language pathology. The moderator of the podcast is Dr. Karen Jacobs (kjacobs@bu.edu), who is the Associate Dean, Digital Learning and Innovation, a Clinical Professor and the Program Director for the on-line post-professional doctorate in the occupational therapy program at Sargent College. Marial Williams (marialw@bu.edu), a Boston University entry-level occupational therapy doctoral student, composed the music for the podcast.

The Chip Franklin Show
August 24, 2021: Chip Franklin - Sargent Ray Kelly

The Chip Franklin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 20:10


Chip follows up on the story of Philip Kraycheck, teh Bay Area runner who went missing while running in extreme heat. His body was found, and now we have information from his smart watch about the conditions which contributed to his death. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The New Abnormal
Jeet Heer: It Shouldn't Shock You That Afghanistan Collapsed So Quickly

The New Abnormal

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 59:11


“The fact that everything collapsed so quickly to me vindicates Biden's decision,” Jeet Heer says on this week's second episode of The New Abnormal. “If you read the Afghanistan Papers, none of what's happening is shocking. One of the big things that comes out of [the story] is the weakness of the Afghan government, which is really a pumpkin government,” he tells Molly Jong-Fast and Jesse Cannon. “Like it's like a bunch of guys with a phony-baloney jobs and offices and big sacks of money.” Then they are joined by supermodel Carré Otis, who earlier this month filed a lawsuit accusing former Elite Model Management executive Gerald Marie of sexually assaulting her multiple times in the 1980s. Also joining the podcast is The Washington Post's Greg Sargent, who in large part agreed with Heer. “This is kind of a real disastrous mess, but I think it probably was inevitable given all the failures that have led up to this point,” Sargent says. “And there's probably no neat and tidy way to do this. And in the end that, you know, it had to be done. That would be where a good chunk of mainstream Americans ends up landing.” If you haven't heard, every single week The New Abnormal does a special bonus episode for Beast Inside, the Daily Beast's membership program. where Sometimes we interview Senators like Cory Booker or the folks who explain our world in media like Jim Acosta or Soledad O'Brien. Sometimes we just have fun and talk to our favorite comedians and actors like Busy Phillips or Billy Eichner and sometimes its just discussing the fuckery. You can get all of our episodes in your favorite podcast app of choice by becoming a Beast Inside member where you'll support The Beast's fearless journalism. Plus! You'll also get full access to podcasts and articles. To become a member head to newabnormal.thedailybeast.com  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

I Like Birds
90. The Real Church - A Sunday Conversation with Sharon Sargent

I Like Birds

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 75:28


A conversation with a human being I love dearly! My sister-in-law Sharon Sargent is anointed! Walks in her authority! Seeks Christ above all else daily. She is spiritually in tune with what God is doing in this world and in the heavenly realms. We discuss everything from prophecy, deliverance, church, boldness, truth, love, and just dive super deep! An episode for the ages and I look forward to having her on again soon!  Listen when you can. Share this Show with Souls. Follow Christ. Support this Ministry BUY BIRD MERCH

Gucci Podcast
Writer and curator Antwaun Sargent on the multi-sensory exhibit Gucci Garden Archetypes.

Gucci Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 10:07


To celebrate the Gucci Garden Archetypes exhibition, Antwaun Sargent, a New York-based writer and curator recites ‘To Make A Picture'—an essay he wrote for the catalogue of the exhibition—and offers a brief commentary on the history, content and progression of the House's advertising campaigns under the creative manifesto of Alessandro Michele. The exhibition itself is a multi-sensory space journeying through time as well as out of it, exploring the diverse inspirations and archetypes that range from art and music to modern metropolises and utopian worlds. The exhibition is held permanently at the Gucci Garden in Florence and temporarily in many cities around the world including Hong Kong and Shanghai. Experience the virtual tour here: https://bit.ly/375Xxgq

The Best Soccer Show
USMNT Questions Ahead of WCQ: Sargent in the Premier League, Dike Value Down, Hoppe Hopes to Move and Pulisic at Wingback?!

The Best Soccer Show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 50:42


From The Stands, is officially back! For our return episode, Jason welcomes on Sam Stokes from Yank Report to look at some of the biggest questions for the USMNT ahead of World Cup Qualifying, which begins in a matter of weeks. With Lukaku on the brink of a move to Chelsea, is Christian Pulisic destined to play as a wingback in Tuchel's system? How will this effect his standing with the USMNT? Josh Sargent finally got his move out of Werder Bremen and lands at Norwich - what does he need to do to claim ownership of the #9 shirt for the Stars & Stripes? Speaking of strikers, Dike has had a rough month after playing non-stop for the past 18 months - will he regain form ahead of WCQ? Finally, will Hoppe move on from Schalke or does he have something to gain in the Bundesliga 2.  Subscribe to Yank Report on YouTube! From The Stands is a weekly show where Jason Davis talks to podcasters, bloggers, journalists and supporters of clubs that are home to some of the United States' current and legendary players.

Rabbi Shmuel Silber - Institute for Jewish Continuity

All Learning for the month of Av has been generously sponsored by: TALMUD TORAH: Jack Bennett in honor of Sargent עומר טביב z'l, who was killed by a Hamas Anti-Tank Missile on the Gaza border on May 12, 2021. Riva Mitzner on commemoration of the first yarzheit of her father, Larry Schneck, MD Aryeh Ben Chaim, z'l. Dr. Max and Dr. Brenda Lapkovsky in honor of Yitzchak Meir's upcoming bar mitzvah. WEEK OF LEARNING sponsor by Shmuel and Shira Artman in honor of the birth of a baby girl to Jesse and Rivkah Meyerowitz If you would like to sponsor a shiur, please contact our office at office@suburbanorthodox.org.