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French painter

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X Of Words
Who Is Monet? (ft @unimpressedfave)

X Of Words

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 5:38


Your loss is their gain. The episodes you didn't choose are going live on Patreon.com/xofwords. So here's a little taste of what you're missing! Remember, the mutants always win! 

Black Love: The Interviews
Monet & Clarence Daniels

Black Love: The Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 47:59


When Monet and Clarence sat down for this 2017 interview for Black Love Doc they had been married for 46(!) years. However, we start at the very beginning when the two were just students at Bowling Green State University. From a surprise meeting, to their eventual marriage, Monet and Clarence share what they have learned along their journey and what has helped them make it alonf the way.========Season 3 of Couch Conversations is HERE and it's featuring your favorite Auntie and Uncle, Tabitha and Chance Brown! The only place to watch it RIGHT NOW is on  Black Love+  . Black Love+ is the premier destination for all things Black Love. Download it today from your favorite app store and join in on the conversation!Connect with us:@blacklove on Instagram@blacklovedoc on Facebook@blacklovedoc on Twitter

The SneakyArt Podcast
Ep 43 - Inventing Life's Meaning with James Richards (Part 1)

The SneakyArt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 20, 2022 102:29


On his website, James Richard says - "I never saw myself as Monet in the studio. I wanted to be Anthony Bourdain with a sketchbook." What was the meaning of art in James' life? How far was Monet, and the world of fine art, from the world in which he grew up? What did it mean to be like Anthony Bourdain … but with a sketchbook? In many ways, this conversation is the long process of unpacking this beautiful quote. Storyteller, artist, architect, educator - Jim has worn many hats in an epic and fascinating life. He speaks about growing up in Louisiana, learning to draw from Mad Magazine, and his close association with the built environment. We learn what it means to create a life that reflects our values, and the places we can go when guided by interests and curiosities. Visit James Richards' website.

Sibling Rivalry
The One About Glamour

Sibling Rivalry

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 77:14


Glamour....ever heard of it?! Fresh from DragCon and Press Week, Monet and Bob catch up on all the latest drag queen drama. The two discuss some of their favorite glamour looks, their favorite full glam drag queen's, and so much more! You won't want to miss this heated episode!! To score 15% off your Blenders purchase, visit BlendersEyewear.com and enter promo code siblingvip. Get 30 days of full access for free when you go to DipseaStories.com/RIVALRY. See Monét and Bob on tour this summer by going to bobandmonet.com !! Want to see exclusive Sibling Rivalry Bonus Content? Head over to www.patreon.com/siblingrivalrypodcast to be the first to see our latest Sibling Rivalry Podcast Videos! @BobTheDragQueen @MonetXChange Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Itaú Morning Call
17/05/22 | Melhora no quadro de Covid na China, Política Monetária nos EUA e na Zona do Euro.

Itaú Morning Call

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 3:57


Análise do cenário do dia com o economista Fabio Diniz.

The Daily Gardener
May 17, 2022 Sandro Botticelli, Montreal, Robert Tannahill, Elvin Charles Stakman, 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek, and Louisa Yeomans King on Peony Pruning

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 17:33


Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart   Support The Daily Gardener Buy Me A Coffee    Connect for FREE! The Friday Newsletter |  Daily Gardener Community   Historical Events 1510 Death of Sandro Botticelli, Italian Renaissance master.  His painting Allegory of Abundance or Autumn is one of his most elaborate and detailed drawings, and it depicts an abundance of flowers and fruits. Sandro painted idyllic garden scenes filled with beautiful women and men from the classical period. His painting, Primavera, depicts nine springtime gods and goddesses from classical mythology in a garden. Venus, the goddess of love, presides over the Garden of the Hesperides. To her right, Flora, the goddess of flowers, sprinkles roses. The garden features orange and laurel trees and dozens of other species of plants.   1642 On this day, Paul de Chomedey, Sieur de Maisonneuve, French military officer, catches his first glimpse of Montreal's landscape. He is recognized as the founder of Fort Ville-Marie (modern-day Montreal) in New France (Province of Quebec, Canada). In George Waldo Browne's 1905 book, The St. Lawrence River: Historical, Legendary, Picturesque, he wrote, On the 17th of May, the rounded slopes of Mount Royal, clad in the delicate green foliage of spring, burst into sight, stirring the hearts of the anxious beholders with newfound joy. They were delighted with the scenery. The fragrance of the springing forest permeated the balmy air, and, what was dearer far to them, over the water and over the landscape, rested an air of peace quite in keeping with their pious purpose. Maisonneuve was the first to step upon the land, and as the others followed him... they fell upon their knees, sending up their songs of praise and thanksgiving. Their first work was to erect an altar at a favorable spot within sight and sound of the riverbank, the women decorating the rough woodwork with some of the wildflowers growing in abundance upon the island, until the whole, looked very beautiful.  Then every member of the party... knelt in solemn silence while M. Barthelemy Vimont... performed ...high mass. As he closed, he addressed his little congregation with these prophetic words: You are a grain of mustard seed that shall rise and grow till its branches overshadow the earth.   1810 Death of Robert Tannahill, Scottish poet, and lyricist. Remembered as the 'Weaver Poet,' Robert was born in Paisley and is often hailed as Paisley's own Robert Burns, as his work is said to rival Robert Burns.  Today in Paisley, a stunning 50ft high mural of a young Robert Tannahill was painted by Mark Worst, collaborating with Paisley Housing Association. The mural overlooks where Robert Tannahill was born on Castle Street in 1774. One of Robert's most beloved songs is Will Ye Go Lassie, Go. The lyrics mention picking Wild Mountain Thyme, a plant known botanically as Thymus serpyllum (TY-mus sir-PIE-lum). Wild Mountain Thyme is a showy, wide growing groundcover from the Old World and has beautiful rose-red flowers and glossy deep green, mat-forming foliage. In the song, the thyme has grown in and around the heather. O the summer time has come And the trees are sweetly bloomin' The wild mountain thyme Grows around the bloomin' heather Will ye go, lassie, go? And we'll all go together To pull wild mountain thyme All around the bloomin' heather Will ye go, lassie, go?   1885 Birth of Elvin Charles Stakman, American plant pathologist. Elvin is remembered for his work identifying and combatting diseases in wheat. In 1917, he married fellow a  plant pathologist named Estelle Louise Jensen. He also encouraged Norman Borlaug to pursue his career in phytopathology after Norman's job at the Forest Service was eliminated due to budget cuts. Elvin was Norman's teacher. And Norman went on to win the Nobel Peace Prize (1970) after discovering dwarf wheat varieties that reduced famine in India, Pakistan, and other third world countries. In 1938, Elvin gave a speech entitled These Shifty Little Enemies that Destroy our Food Crops. During his talk, Elvin focused on one shifty little enemy in particular: rust. Rust is a parasitic fungus that feeds on phytonutrients in grain crops like wheat, oat, and barley. Today, Elvin is remembered with the naming of Stakman Hall - the building where Plant Pathology is taught - at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus.  In The Wizard and the Prophet: Two Remarkable Scientists and Their Dueling Visions to Shape Tomorrow's World, Charles Mann reflected, Stakman did not view science as a disinterested quest for knowledge. It was a tool—may be the tool—for human betterment. Not all sciences were equally valuable, as he liked to explain. “Botany,” he said, “is the most important of all sciences, and plant pathology is one of its most essential branches.   Grow That Garden Library™ Book Recommendation 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek  This book came out in 2022. Stefanie writes in her introduction: In 150 Gardens You Need to Visit Before You Die, I've shared a vast range of gardens, from immense botanical institutions with thousands of specimens, to smaller plots for quiet meditations, to museums that combine both artworks and plantings. I hope these brief introductions inspire you to plan a visit or two, whether in your hometown or on your global travels, so that you can enjoy the sights, smells, sounds, and stories of the world's best gardens.   The publisher writes: From Kew Gardens in London to the Singapore Botanical Gardens, and from Monet's garden at Giverny to the Zen garden of the Ryoan-ji Temple in Kyoto, this handsomely bound book captures in words and images the most notable features of these 150 glorious, not-to-be-missed gardens. An essential bucket list book for garden lovers! You can get a copy of 150 Gardens You Need To Visit Before You Die by Stefanie Waldek and support the show using the Amazon link in today's show notes.   Botanic Spark 1905 On this day, Louisa Yeomans King wrote in her garden journal about peonies. She published a year's worth of entries in her book, The Flower Garden Day by Day.  In 1902, Louisa and her husband moved to Michigan, where they built a home called Orchard House. With the help of a gardener named Frank Ackney, Louisa began to plan and create her garden. She also began writing about her Gardens. Soon, she gave lectures, contributed pieces to magazines, wrote columns, and organized garden clubs. She even became friends with prominent gardeners of her time like Gertrude Jekyll, Charles Sprague Sargent, and the landscape architects Fletcher Steele and Ellen Biddle Shipman. Louisa learned to garden during the heyday of American Garden Culture. Her garden writing in newspaper columns and magazine publications made her the most widely read American Garden author in the United States. Louisa's first book, "The Well-Considered Garden," the preface was written by her dear friend Gertrude Jekyll. In 1915, when the book debuted, it was considered an instant classic in garden literature. Louisa would go on to write a total of nine books. The garden estate known as Blithewold has a copy of "The Well-Considered Garden." Their particular text also contains a handwritten inscription along with Louisa's signature. The inscription borrows a quote from Sir William Temple, who said, "Gardening is an enjoyment and a possession for which no man is too high or too low." Louisa changed the quote and wrote, "Gardening is an enjoyment and a possession for which no woman is too high or too low." Louisa helped start the Garden Club of America and the Women's National Farm and Garden Association. She held leadership positions in both organizations. When her husband died suddenly in 1927, Louisa was forced to sell Orchard House. She moved to Hartford, New York, and bought a property she called Kingstree. This time, she set up a smaller garden. The size meant less work, which accommodated her writing and speaking commitments better. On this day, Louisa wrote in her journal this note of advice about the Peony: May 17. Disbud most of your peonies now; that is, of a cluster of buds, cut off all but the larger central one. Certain varieties, however, are considered more beautiful if left alone to flower as they will. Among these are Alsace Lorraine and La Rosiere.   Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener And remember: For a happy, healthy life, garden every day.

Alabama's Morning News with JT
Andie Monet 051322

Alabama's Morning News with JT

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 5:20


Speaker, consultant and leadership expert Andi Monet discusses a story where a CEO offered incentives for employees to lose weight.

The Jayme Starr Podcast
Learning About Monet Lerner

The Jayme Starr Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 32:09


Monet Lerner is an actress and singer. Fans may recognize her from when she had a guest starring role on Disney Channel's the Suite Life of Zack and Cody, where she played Matisse in an episode called "What they Hey." Besides working on the Disney Channel, Lerner also had a guest starring spot on Zoey 101, and she can be seen in the background in one of the episodes of the show. On top of working on these two popular networks, Lerner has been featured in different short films that have been seen in different film festivals in different parts of the country. In addition to acting, Lerner also has a passion for music and singing. She hopes to plan on releasing new original music for the world to enjoy in the future.  --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/jayme-starr/support

Skip the Queue
Guided tours and making it personal at the National Gallery, with Katie Weller

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 36:17


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this episode.Competition ends October 1st 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/https://www.linkedin.com/in/katie-weller-8171688b/ Katie Weller has been appointed Travel Trade Sales Manager at the National Gallery. Joining the fascinating world of art, she is excited to be embarking on a new challenge. Having worked in the tourism, entertainment and leisure industry for over 18 years, her roles have ranged from working at James Villa Holidays as a Travel Advisor, Tour Guide at Shakespeare's Globe to PA for the critically acclaimed band Westlife. Starting her trade career at a top ten visitor attraction- Royal Museums Greenwich as Trade Sales Executive, she developed an award-winning product for the international education market and gained a wealth of knowledge about trade. Katie then went on to work as Trade Manager at the iconic Westminster Abbey and went on to open her own business as a successful sweet shop during the pandemic. She is now very excited to be developing and launching new products at the National Gallery.  Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host, Kelly Molson. Each episode, I speak with industry experts from the attractions world. In today's episode I speak with Katie Weller, Travel Trade Sales Manager at The National Gallery. We discuss the process of developing new paid for guided tours, making the gallery inclusive for all and how travel trade works for attractions. If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the usual channels by searching to Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Katie, thank you so much for coming on the podcast today. It's lovely to meet you.Katie Weller: Thank you so much. I'm really excited to be here.Kelly Molson: Ah, me too. We've been chatting for a little while on LinkedIn, haven't we? So I'm glad that we've got this booked in the diary now. So I'm going to ask you loads of questions. We've got something really exciting to talk about but first, icebreaker questions.Katie Weller: Yes, go for it.Kelly Molson: Okay. What sport would you compete in if you were in the Olympics?Katie Weller: Oh gosh, that's a hard one, isn't it? I'm actually rubbish at sports. Oh gosh. What would I go for? I was always good at javelin. Is that a sport?Kelly Molson: Yeah.Katie Weller: Can I compete in that?Kelly Molson: Absolutely.Katie Weller: Let's go for it. I'm going javelin.Kelly Molson: All right. I like it. Take your anger out.Katie Weller: Exactly.Kelly Molson: All right. Last place that you went on holiday?Katie Weller: Oh, we went to Mykonos in Greece.Kelly Molson: Oh, lovely.Katie Weller: Well, so it was supposed to be... So I'm getting married in a couple of months and so it was my hen do. And we managed to do the hen, but not the wedding. I was happy with that as long as I... Kelly Molson: This bit.Katie Weller: Exactly. And do you know what? It was just so lovely to get on a plane and travel again. So yeah, we had a brilliant time. Spent way too much money, but yeah, absolutely fantastic.Kelly Molson: Oh, lovely. What a treat. I'll bet you had a whale of a time.Katie Weller: Oh, we did.Kelly Molson: We won't ask because what goes on in hen stays on hen.Katie Weller: Exactly. I think it's for the best.Kelly Molson: All right. If you could choose any two famous people to have dinner with, who would they be?Katie Weller: Gosh. Leonardo DiCaprio, just because he's always been my number one. I'd always have him at the table there. And the second one, who would I... Does it have to be someone alive?Kelly Molson: No, it can be anyone you want.Katie Weller: I would go for Van Gogh.Kelly Molson: Wow.Katie Weller: It would be a bit of a messy dinner party, but I think he would just be so amazing to talk with, try and get into his brain. Yeah, I'm going to go Van Gogh and Leo. What a party. Do you like an invite?Kelly Molson: What a mix. Will there be cocktails?Katie Weller: I think we'll need it.Kelly Molson: I'm there. All right. Katie, what is your unpopular opinion?Katie Weller: Oh, do you know what? I've really been thinking about this and I didn't think it was an unpopular opinion, but it clearly is and I've got a lot of passion about it. Crocs should stay in hospitals. I can't even look at them. They're just the most ugliest shoes. How last year they were like trending number one? Why people put them on their feet? It really upsets me. You will never, ever see me in Crocs, ever.Kelly Molson: Wow. That is a massive passion.Katie Weller: Can you feel my anger? This is why I want to do javelin.Kelly Molson: Now, listen, I'm just going to say, I should probably hook you up with Michelle from Eureka, the National Children's Museum, because she was very passionate about wearing Crocs with socks at work.Katie Weller: She wants to do that?Kelly Molson: No, she does do that. Yeah, no, she does.Katie Weller: Each to their own, but not for me.Kelly Molson: All right. Okay.Katie Weller: Fantastic quote.Kelly Molson: They are. Let's see what our listeners feel about that. I think there might be a few people that agree with you on that one.Katie Weller: Yeah, I think since lockdown a lot of people went in that direction. But yeah, not for me. Sorry, guys.Kelly Molson: Those things. Okay. Love it. Katie, tell me a little bit about your background before we get onto what we're going to talk about today.Katie Weller: Yes, really I've been in arts and tourism for about a 20 years, which makes me feel really old now. So I started off as just a theatre steward, so working in the local theatres, and I loved it. How cool to be able to get paid and just watch shows? And back then I thought I was going to be an actor. And obviously life changes, you realise you need to get paid. So I didn't end up going down that route, but I always had a passion for it. So in terms of getting involved in sort of travel trade, that was a bit later on. I was a PA for a very famous boy band, Westlife, if you've heard of them. So I've had lots of random jobs as well. But yeah, it was the Globe Theater. So I was a tour guide there for quite a few years and absolutely loved it. And that's really where I started sort of finding out about travel trade.Katie Weller: We attended a few shows and then from there I started at Royal Museums Greenwich, and that's where I really started my career, built up all of my contacts and really got to learn about travel trade and just loved it. It's such a niche thing. And a lot of people don't understand what travel trade is and how it works.Kelly Molson: Well, actually, for the benefit of our listeners that might not know, can you explain what that actually means?Katie Weller: Yeah, definitely. So you will actually find in a lot of attractions, they have a travel trade and groups department. So travel trade works on a business to business basis. So we would push our product through third party platforms. So I don't know if I'm allowed to mention names on here?Kelly Molson: Yeah, go for it.Katie Weller: Like Virgin Experience Days or Viatour or Golden Tours. I'm not pulling out favourites at all here, but it just means that you are pushing out your reach to new markets, new audiences that you wouldn't necessarily get in otherwise. You pay them a commission and in return they push out your marketing, they'll do campaigns for you and they just drive in different people. So yeah, most attractions have a travel trade team, but a lot of people just don't really understand what it is. But it's a huge income driver to attractions.Kelly Molson: Yeah, great explanation.Katie Weller: I hope that makes sense.Kelly Molson: Yeah, it made perfect sense. And I also really appreciate that you thought we were a little bit like the BBC there and you couldn't mention other brands on it.Katie Weller: I know. I know. Well, just in case. I'm going to get other partners ringing me now like, "Why didn't you mention me?" Sorry.Kelly Molson: All right. So this is really exciting. So we had a little chat on LinkedIn quite a while ago actually now, isn't it? We were chatting. But National Gallery, where you are now, is launching paid for guided tours which are geared towards kind of tourist, domestic and international.Katie Weller: Mm-hmm (affirmative).Kelly Molson: This is really exciting because the National Gallery is a free gallery. So you don't need to pay to go into this. So this is quite a new thing that they're launching. How did this idea come about?Katie Weller: So it's a bit of a long story. With the National Gallery, yes, it's always been free of charge. However, it can be for, not just for an international customer, for a domestic one as well, if you're not necessarily an art buff, you can walk inside the Gallery, it can be quite overwhelming because you don't really know where to start, what to look at. So we know there is a demand for tours because they're coming in anyway. So they're coming in. So other tour companies are charging the customers and they're coming in and doing tours. So the issue with that... It's great because there's a demand there and we know people want to be educated and that's what we want to do. We want to educate them on our amazing collection.Katie Weller: However, sometimes with that, it means that we haven't really got any quality control over what's being said. A lot of people think they're buying an official National Gallery tour and it's not. So we get customers coming through to us. So for us, how it all came about really is my head of department, Claire, she looks after events and our catering team as well. And next year we're closing our Sainsbury Wing. So the entrance is actually going to be the Portico Terrace, so the beautiful steps going up, only because we are just completely redeveloping that side of the Gallery. And it means that we lose a lot of our daytime space. So we would normally get a lot of income coming through from daytime hire, that's going to be lost. So she thought, "Do you know what? Let's bring in travel trade."Katie Weller: We actually worked together at Royal Museums Greenwich so she was head of events there. And she just saw the benefit that travel trade had and she knew there's a demand for tours. So she just decided, "Let's get up and running." So it wasn't really anything off the back of COVID. It was always there as a plan because we knew we had those closures coming up.Kelly Molson: That's interesting. Yeah, because that was going to be one of my questions, actually, was this something that came out of COVID? Because obviously being a free museum during that time, it's really difficult. You've got additional challenges that some of the paid institutes might not have had in terms of raising funding and keeping the building and the paintings safe and looked after. So yeah, it's really interesting that hasn't come from that, which is a good thing.Katie Weller: Yeah.Kelly Molson: I guess an element of it has been about customer feedback, right? Like you said, there is a demand for it because people are already booking tours elsewhere.Katie Weller: Well, yeah, and they're paying anything between 10 pounds... You'll be amazed at what has been pushed down there. PDFs, where customers pay 10 pounds for a PDF and walk around. So that's what I mean about the quality. You think we want to mirror a high quality tour in line with the National Gallery, but some people are paying up to 400 pounds for a tour that's happening during the day. So we want to make sure that it's a fair price but we are delivering a top quality experience as well. I think people... Yes, we are free of charge, but the British Museum, they do the same thing. So you do have paid for tours as well. And I'm such a tourist. When I go abroad, I always pay for a tour because I think it's the best way. You've got an hour, for example. The international market, they're very tight on time. They've got one hour, what's the best way to do it? Actually, not everyone wants to do the free thing where you walk for... People want to have a better understanding of where they are.Kelly Molson: Yeah, that's interesting that you mentioned the time thing, isn't it? Because if you've just got that restriction you would want someone to show you the best of the best, "I'm coming to this gallery. What is the best thing that I need to see while here? What's the thing that I can't leave without seeing?" And actually, if you are kind of left to your own devices, you might not find it. You might not know where it is and your time is then gone.Katie Weller: Exactly. So I just think, with the guided tours, we are really going to ensure that it is a highlights tour. You could go on a tour with a curator or you could have a bespoke experience. Most of these tourists, they just want to get a sense of the Gallery. They want to hear brilliant stories that you just can't pick out of a book or, "Let's talk about the fun stuff." I said to the Blue Badge Guides, I was like, "Sex, drugs, rock and roll." I was like, "That's what they want to hear." I was like, "Maybe not too extreme. It is the National Gallery, but let's tell them just brilliant stories and they'll leave and ..." And when you go on tours, do you remember the dates? Not really. You remember the amazing stories that they tell you. So yeah, the guides have been brilliant at putting this all together and we've sort of left them to their own devices because their knowledge far exceeds mine. So yeah, really, really looking forward to pushing them out.Kelly Molson: It's really the stories thing is something that keeps coming up and up again, again, again on the podcast too. We just spoke to Kelly Wessell from London Zoo and she was kind of talking about the visitor experience and engaging people back, like their team, back to the zoo, getting them to fall back in love with the zoo. And she was saying that it is the stories that they know that makes people's experience better on the day. And it's only the stories that the team know, like little things about, I don't know, the giraffe house and how that was constructed. And it's those stories that make the visit more memorable for people. And that's what people are looking for, isn't it? To make that more kind of personalised and more special.Katie Weller: Well, that's it, it's about personalisation. And it does make them feel special because they probably think they might be the only person that's been told that. And also the Blue Badge Guides, we've said to them, "It's flexible. If you want to tell a different story on a different tour, that's absolutely fine." Obviously, they keep to a bit of a structure, but if they've got something cool to tell, go for it.Kelly Molson: So the tours, so how have they been developed? You decided, "We need a tour." How do you work out what are the highlights that people need to see on this tour?Katie Weller: Yeah, so really, it's been six months in the making. I don't know why I gave myself this, but I was like, "April, that's the go." I think it's beginning of financial year. You go, "Yeah, that's fine." But obviously, it's quite hard to push out something new especially in a Gallery as well. So everything can be a bit slower, I guess, and it has to be approved at so many different levels. But really, starting off with the tours, initially, we'd love to have kept it in house, but of course the resource isn't available at the moment. So we decided, "All right, second best thing is to use the Blue Badge Guides." They've just got such a wealth of knowledge and they're accredited. Tourists trusts them. They know what a Blue Badge Guide is. And the joy of having the Blue Badge Guides is that there is such a large pool of them. They can speak in different languages so that means that we can offer multi-language tours as well if you're a private group.Katie Weller: And they guide inside the Gallery anyway so they know the space very well. And they were so excited at this opportunity. I think we went to a show, it was a trade show on the Strand and it was just a happy accident. I bumped into a lovely Blue Badge Guide called Sarah. And she said, "Oh, you're from the National Gallery?" I said, "Oh, well actually I'm looking for some Blue Badge Guides." She was like, "Right, that's it. I'm your main contact going forward." And Sarah Reynolds, her name is, and she's been brilliant at... I just gave her a brief and I just said, "Storytelling." I know I keep going back to this, but I was like, "You need to tell great stories. I don't want the tourists to be drowned in facts. Let's make it fun for them." In terms of highlights, it's a difficult one but it is up to the guide. Obviously, we've got some of the most famous paintings in the world. So we've got Van Gogh Sunflowers. We've got the Turner. We can't guarantee on any given day that they will necessarily see those pieces of art.Katie Weller: So we don't promise that they're going to see those paintings because the paintings move around quite a lot. We might have room closures, depending on what's going on. So the tour is very flexible, so we really do leave it up to them. But as I say, for us, it really is about bringing the Gallery to life and just telling the best stories they can, but yeah, without going into too much depth. It can make people feel unwelcome and a bit out of their comfort zone if you start going into so much detail.Kelly Molson: So this was one of my questions, actually, about accessibility. So I think when we chatted and what you've mentioned at the start of this chat is that the National Gallery, it can seem a bit daunting for people if they're not art buffs or they maybe feel that it's not the place for them.Katie Weller: Yeah.Kelly Molson: So yeah, part of what you've described, in terms of accessibility, different languages and things like that, how do you make people feel that these are inclusive for them, that it is for me or for Joe down the road?Katie Weller: Yeah, I think this is going to be a really interesting year in terms of learning as we go. There's going to be a lot of test and trial. Actually, only last week we had some EDI training, so equality, diversity, inclusivity training that was put on by the Gallery and it really opened my eyes up. It's such a big beast, doesn't it? And there's so many things to tackle. So I think it's really important when you push out a product, you've got to keep developing it. You can't just leave it. It's not done. It's not done with, so we really need to listen to our customer feedback, "How can we make them more inclusive?" So I don't know. I think that would just be a thing as we go and we will have to develop and change it. But we are aware that people have that view of us and we are actually going to be celebrating NG 200 soon and we want to change our customer welcome and we want to make it more friendly.Katie Weller: And that's the whole part with the Sainsbury Wing at the moment, it's not very friendly. It's not a friendly welcome. So we're going to get rid of the big black gates and we're going to make it more open. It's going to feel a lot more airy in there, whereas at the moment it can be, like you say, a bit daunting, I think, for customers. We want the Gallery to be for everyone. So that's really important.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I think that is really important at the moment, because we need to get more people back to seeing these incredible spaces that we have and the incredible artwork that you have. People kind of need to see themselves there to be able to do that, don't they?Katie Weller: Yeah, of course. So we've got a lot of people coming on lunch breaks as well. So if they work around here, people do just come in on their lunch break, which is lovely.Kelly Molson: That is really nice. That's something that I spoke with Jon Young about, from BVA BDRC, which I might have just said wrong because I always say that wrong. But he was saying how he loves that flexibility of just being able to pop somewhere after work because he's in London and I'm like, "Oh yeah, that's really nice." I'm not in London so there isn't really anywhere that you just pop to. And I'm like, "How lovely would that be, just to be on your lunch break and go, 'I'm just going to go and look at Van Gogh on my lunch break?'"Katie Weller: Exactly. Why not? Or Mondays with Monet?Kelly Molson: I love that. Is that a thing? That needs to be a thing.Katie Weller: Do you like it? Yeah, I might do that tour on a Monday, Monday with Monet. I think it's something... I read an article about this. I think that was yesterday, actually. And they were saying people aren't traveling into London as much, maybe two to three times a week, because there's that hybrid way of working which we do at the Gallery as well. And when people are in London, actually, they want to make more of their time while they're here. So I think people are starting to do that. And actually, "What can I do? I'm in London. I've paid to come I'm in. What else can I do when I'm here?" So yeah, I think there's going to be a bit of a change there. But yeah, always welcome. Anyone who's around the National Gallery, come in on your lunch break, come on a tour.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I really love that. Yeah, do the tour. Monet Mondays, like that.Katie Weller: Do you reckon I've got something going there?Kelly Molson: Ticked a massive box there.Katie Weller: Probably right.Kelly Molson: You mentioned the Blue Badge team that you're working with.Katie Weller: Yes.Kelly Molson: And I know that you are leaving it up to them. But there must be some way that you kind of map out what they have to do, like where they take people around the Gallery. Do you have a loose plan of how you work it out or is it just like free reign to them to say, over to you, what do you think you should deliver to someone?Katie Weller: Yeah, as I say, they've got a structure. However, because the Gallery, on any given day, we might have 10 rooms that are shut so it has to be flexible. They can't have set routes. So that's really important because also we are looking at pushing out not only the daytime tours but our exclusive tours as well when we can. So with that, we might have an event being set up. So they might not be able to go in the room that they always go in. So it's really important that they have that flexibility. But they're brilliant at it. And also I've been on the tours obviously just to make sure that they are saying what we want to... Again, it's just reviewing as we go along and really listening to the customer and their feedback and we can change as we go.Katie Weller: But I have full faith in the Blue Badge Guides because they're just so fantastic at what they do. They've got a huge amount of passion for it. So I can't imagine we'll get many complaints from people saying they haven't covered the highlights. Because they've got it, they know what they're doing. It's not in my place to tell them otherwise. But, yeah. But no, we will review as we move forward.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I love that process. It's about iteration, isn't it? So you'll run them, you'll run a feedback process and then find out what your customers are really thinking about it. And then I guess just kind of evolving those tours as you go along.Katie Weller: Absolutely. And it's so important to listen because what if, all of a sudden, well, once international tourism really starts to make a comeback, maybe we can start doing French tours on a Friday. I don't know why I have to make this rhyme, French on Fridays.Kelly Molson: But I like what you do there.Katie Weller: Yeah, I know. I've just realised. So if there's a demand for it, let's go for it. So yeah, that's really an important part of the process for me, just reviewing that feedback on a really regular basis. And next week, we're doing staff tours. So I think it's really important. We are driving out this new product, actually let the staff be part of it. What do they think? What's their feedback? It's just as important.Kelly Molson: That is a really, really relevant point actually, because if they don't know what to expect and they can't answer questions about them either, can they? They don't know what the tour actually holds for them.Katie Weller: Yeah, and working in a big place like the National Gallery, communication is key. And we've actually put together some operational processes in place. We've got some PDFs so if they've got frequently asked questions from customers, they've got something there in front of them. If not, they can obviously come through to me. But that communication element we've really tried to lay the groundwork now so there's not so many issues when the tours do kick off.Kelly Molson: Yeah, you mentioned lates. So you mentioned like evening, after hours or when when the Gallery is not open events, which is really exciting. I think that that is such a treat to go somewhere when it's closed, isn't it? That you are like, "Oh, nobody's in here. This is exciting." And I know that those lates have worked really well for other organisations as well. So prior to the pandemic we worked with Eureka, the National Children's Museum, and they ran a series of lates for adults. And they were incredible. They were so much fun because obviously it's a children's museum so all of the galleries are geared towards children and they're fun and entertainment. But really, the adults just want to get in there and have a bit of a go.Katie Weller: Oh yeah. Well, didn't they do that with their dinosaur sleepovers, that they did it for adults?Kelly Molson: Absolutely. Yes, at the Natural History Museum.Katie Weller: At the Natural History Museum. Yeah.Kelly Molson: And then yoga. They did yoga sessions at the Natural Museum. And I just think that's such a massive opportunity, isn't it? So what might that be that you're going to instill?Katie Weller: So with that, we've had so much excitement. So every time I say, "Oh, the out of hours tours..." Since coming out of the pandemic, people, they want new experiences and they want to do things which are Instagrammable if you like. "Look at me. I'm in an empty National Gallery." It might not be empty. We're probably setting up for events and there's curators walking around and conservation, but that's all part of the experience. Also for me, we're in central London. There's that beautiful hour between six and seven where a lot of the attractions have closed. People are milling about because they're waiting to go to dinner or they're waiting to go to the theatre. Actually. let's plot some tours in and use that time where they can come in and have an absolutely fantastic experience.Katie Weller: People are willing to pay a higher price point because it's more exclusive. So I have no doubt that they will do very well. Our partners are so keen to get those up on sale. And yeah, I can't wait. And we will develop other products as we go, but initially we'll just be pushing out the daytime tours followed by the out of hours.Kelly Molson: Yeah, that's a great time as well, what you said, isn't it? Six to seven, because it is a bit of a dead time while, like you said, you're waiting between stuff or maybe waiting for the later train home so it's not busy.Katie Weller: Exactly. And we're right in the middle of London so it's like all these people wandering about, "Come in, come in." But again, we're going to make sure that it really is about that quality experience. So we'll only have 25 people on that tour which makes it a bit more special as well.Kelly Molson: Yeah, I love that level of exclusivity. It does make it feel like a real treat, doesn't it?Katie Weller: Definitely.Kelly Molson: All right. So let's talk about the benefits. What is this going to bring to the Gallery? Because it's obviously going to bring in revenue, but it's going to hopefully bring in a new audience.Katie Weller: Well, that's it, isn't it? It's bringing in those new markets, those new audiences, which we wouldn't necessarily be able to target otherwise or it would be really, really expensive for us to do so. So that's why we use trade because that maximises our marketing budget as well. So it will be really interesting to sort of review who is coming in and we'll capture all of this data as and when bookings come through. And yeah, we'll just go from there. But I can't remember what your question was now because I've just gone off.Kelly Molson: It was about what is it going to bring the Gallery? But I think one of the things that you just mentioned there is about using trade again. And I think this is quite important to highlight. Because one of the questions that I was going to ask you was where's the price point for these and how do you buy them? Are they available to buy? Can we go and get a tour now? But you're actually going to sell them through a third party.Katie Weller: Yeah, so I guess it's a little bit different here because at the National Gallery, there's no products to necessarily push out. Or there is, but through commercial, like the exhibitions, but we don't touch those. Or they are using us, I guess, as a bit of a trial to see how it goes with the tours, push them out to trade, iron out any problems. And it would make sense for them to sell it B2C, business to client, eventually. So that will probably happen. But initially, if you want to book a ticket it would be through those trade platforms, like I said before, Golden Tours or Expedia or any of those platforms. Because I guess it really is probably geared more towards the international market, but it is domestic as well. And something really important to remember, pre pandemic, the Gallery, 80% were international tourists, 20% were domestic. Obviously, there's been a bit of a change during the pandemic, but it's really important that we don't forget about our international audience.Kelly Molson: Yeah, definitely. And I guess it's a good way to trial it working as well, isn't it, rather than committing? So if you think about the process of where attractions have been able to reopen after the pandemic but it has to be buy a ticket in advance, times ticketing as well. That's a big financial commitment to make in terms of your digital processes. Someone's got to manage that process, get it all up and running. This gives you a way of operating like that but without those digital financial commitments until you know that it's working.Katie Weller: Absolutely. And it makes it nice and easy for the team who will then push it out because everything's done for them. They can just go, "Okay, that process has worked well, that hasn't." And they will review it and I'm positive they will push out the tours. When I say to people that we're doing tours they are, "Has the National Gallery not got tours anyway?" And they do. Sometimes they put on random free tours, but it's not necessarily advertised, "It's this time every day." So it is sort of as and when people will come in, "I'll join this tour." So we just want to put structured tours in place like most other places do, like the British Museum. We did a lot of benchmarking for the price points. I know you mentioned about those. We do have to be careful because we are free of charge. But that's why we did a benchmarking exercise and things might change.Katie Weller: We might push these out and actually those out of hours tours, they might go up in price. They're 35 pounds for the out of hours, which I think is fair. And I think we don't want to outsell... Is that the right word, outsell? Because you think some people, if we go into corporate, they've got a lot of money to spend. But actually your general tourist, you don't want to push it out so that it's not attainable. Does that make sense?Kelly Molson: Yeah, it can't be unaffordable to people, especially to a new demographic that you're hoping to bring to Gallery and that going back to what we said about making it accessible for more people and for all. You don't want to kind of out price yourself. But then also, on the flip side, it is a very exclusive tour. 25 people on a tour, that's very small. That's really kind of exclusive, isn't it, for an out of hours? So yeah, you've got to try and get that balance right to what that's going to look like.Katie Weller: And again, it's all test and trial, isn't it? And I think if they're really in demand, we can push it up a bit, then fantastic. Great. But yeah, again, it's just a matter of reviewing it and seeing what happens. But I'm hoping for lots of sold out tours.Kelly Molson: I have no doubt there will be. But we're recording this. This is the end of March we're recording it. It's the 30th March today. When do the tours go on sale?Katie Weller: So actually one of our partners went live yesterday.Kelly Molson: Oh wow.Katie Weller: So you'll see, over the next couple of weeks, ticketing will go live. It's been a bit challenging because there's been so many loopholes to go through. And there were no contracts in place so I've been working very closely with legal and with finance. And putting these processes in place, it's things that you don't think about when you're developing a product. And we've just had to make sure that we've got that right ahead of going live. And we had to put in a system that would fully support travel trade as well for our ticketing and making sure that we can connect live with partners. So there's been lots of stuff going on in the background. But the tours start April 12th.Kelly Molson: Oh, amazing. Literally, a couple of weeks.Katie Weller: And then I decided to get married a few months... I don't know why I did this to myself.Kelly Molson: When is the wedding?Katie Weller: June, June the 6th. I keep forgetting the date. So obviously, I'm the whole team at the moment. I am travel trade so I've already given Claire, my head of department, the heads up, "I hope you're available because I might need a bit of help." But we'll build and we'll expand as we get into next year and what have you.Kelly Molson: Yeah, definitely. And listen, hopefully, you'll only get married once.Katie Weller: Exactly. Well, let's hope for the best. We got through the pandemic, so...Kelly Molson: Oh, Katie, thank you so much for coming on. It's been a real pleasure to talk to you today. I love the passion and enthusiasm that you've got for this.Katie Weller: It's been lovely. Oh, thank you.Kelly Molson: I'm looking forward to coming and visiting as well.Katie Weller: Yes.Kelly Molson: But before we go, I always ask our guests to recommend a book. So something that they love. It can be a personal choice, it can be a work related book. But yeah, just something that you'd like to share with our listeners.Katie Weller: So this book, you do have to take it with a pinch of salt. But it is such a good talking point. Let me know if you've read it. It's called the Five Love Languages by Gary Chapman.Kelly Molson: I have not read this.Katie Weller: You have to read this. So basically, in a nutshell, without spoiling too much, the Five Love Languages... So basically, he's looking at couples and he says that everyone's got a different love language. So the five of them, I've written them down so I don't forget, words of affirmation. So you might prefer it if your partner is, "Oh, you look lovely today. I love you," that might be your love language. Physical touch, so you might like it if your partner is very touchy, feely. Acts of service, so if they mow the lawn or do the washing up. I know for a lot of all people they're like-Kelly Molson: All of these things.Katie Weller: Yeah, you'd like every one, but they do say you normally have two. Quality time, so going out on day trips, going to the beach and stuff like that. Or receiving gifts, so that might... And they say it fills your love tank. It is a bit cheesy. It fills your love tank. So you normally have one or two that are your most prominent ones. For me, mine is quality time. I love experiencing. That's why I'm in this industry. Experiences and doing things. But my best friend, hers is acts of service. Or if he does the washing up she is so happy. Her love tank is full to the brim.Kelly Molson: That is really funny.Katie Weller: Isn't it?Kelly Molson: I've never heard of this before. I'm going to read this. This is really interesting. Mine would definitely be the time one as well. I think that it's so important. So you find this out about yourself and I guess then that sets you on your path of, "We need to make time for these things in our relationship?"Katie Weller: Well, what's really interesting about it is usually you reflect your love language on someone else because you think that's what they want. And this is where communication breakdown comes from. I think the couples that he's talking about, they're in bad times. And so it's like, "How could you actually communicate? He's cleaned up for you, but actually you are not very touchies because it's not your love language. But if he'd gone on a day trip with you, that might not mean much to him, but to you, "wow." So it's more about understanding what each other's love language is. So actually you might have to do things in a different way to what you would want. Do you know what? It's good for a pub chat.Kelly Molson: Yeah, absolutely. This is a book to read.Katie Weller: Oh, you can read it in a day as well. Yeah.Kelly Molson: Love it. I'm going to pop out and buy a copy of this. Oh, but listeners, if you want to win a copy of this, head over to our Twitter account and retweet this episode announcement with the words, "I want Katie's book," and you will be in the chance of finding out your own love language. I feel like this podcast has gone a whole different way.Katie Weller: Well, I know. I know. I can't wait for you to read it. You have to come to the Gallery and we'll go for a lovely coffee and have a chat.Kelly Molson: I think that would be a treat, Katie. I'm going to do that. Thank you. Thanks so much for coming on today.Katie Weller: Oh, you're so welcome.Kelly Molson: Good luck with the tour launch.Katie Weller: Thank you so much. Thank you, Kelly.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese,, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

FecomercioSP
Episode 355: Economix | Procura-se um teto para a taxa Selic

FecomercioSP

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 14:26


O Comitê de Política Monetária (Copom), do Banco Central (Bacen), elevou a taxa básica de juros em 1 ponto porcentual nesta semana. Com isso, a Selic chegou a 12,75% ao ano (a.a.) – e não deve parar por aí. Com a inflação sem mostrar qualquer sinal de trégua, o colegiado sinalizou que a taxa básica deve subir novamente em junho. Esta edição do Economix analisa a decisão do comitê e estima até onde vai o atual ciclo de alta da Selic.Além disso, o episódio discorre sobre a indústria. Em março, a produção cresceu 0,3% na comparação com fevereiro. No entanto, o primeiro trimestre de 2022 registrou queda significativa de 4,5%, ante os três primeiros meses de 2021.O programa também destaca a alta dos juros nos Estados Unidos. O Federal Reserve (FED), o banco central norte-americano, elevou as taxas de referência em 0,5 ponto porcentual (p.p.) – magnitude que não era vista desde 2000. Deste modo, atualmente, os juros básicos flutuam entre 0,5% e 0,75% a.a. Contudo, ainda há um longo caminho para conter a inflação mais alta dos últimos 40 anos.Ademais, a edição analisa os efeitos da política de Covid Zero na China. Um indicador que mensura a atividade dos serviços mostra que, em razão do rígido confinamento imposto pelo governo, o setor caiu em abril para o menor patamar desde o início da pandemia, o que pode comprometer o desempenho econômico do país em 2022.Acesse: www.fecomercio.com.brConheça: lab.fecomercio.com.br©️FecomercioSP 2022. Todos os direitos reservados.

Podcast Economia - Agência Radioweb
Investimentos em Renda Fixa são opção com Selic a 12,75%

Podcast Economia - Agência Radioweb

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 2:04


A taxa Selic passou por novo reajuste e alcançou 12,75% ao ano. O Comitê de Política Monetária elevou em 1% a taxa, que estava em 11,75%. O especialista em investimentos e criador do canal "Vamos Pra Bolsa" Rodolfo Marques - que é também educador financeiro e autor do best-seller "Perguntas e Respostas sobre Fundos Imobiliários" - afirma que apesar dos investimentos serem mais vantajosos, o momento é de ceticismo. Rodolfo explica que investidores podem querer correr menos riscos.

Buchkritik - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Buchkritik - "Die monetäre Maschine" von Aaron Sahr

Buchkritik - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 6:00


Hühn, Constantinwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, LesartDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Lesart - das Literaturmagazin - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Buchkritik - "Die monetäre Maschine" von Aaron Sahr

Lesart - das Literaturmagazin - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 6:00


Hühn, Constantinwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, LesartDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Notícia no Seu Tempo
Alta de juros no Brasil e nos EUA eleva risco de desaceleração da economia

Notícia no Seu Tempo

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 8:30


No podcast ‘Notícia No Seu Tempo', confira em áudio as principais notícias da edição impressa do jornal ‘O Estado de S. Paulo' desta quinta-feira (05/05/22): O Comitê de Política Monetária (Copom) do Banco Central cumpriu ontem a promessa de elevar a taxa Selic em 1 ponto porcentual, de 11,75% para 12,75% ao ano, e sacramentou o mais longo ciclo de aperto monetário ininterrupto da história do comitê – após 10 aumentos seguidos. A decisão foi tomada horas depois de o Federal Reserve (Fed, o banco central dos Estados Unidos), também preocupado com as pressões sobre os preços, elevar a taxa básica de juros para o intervalo entre 0,75% e 1% – uma alta de 0,5 ponto porcentual.  E mais: Economia: Câmara quer adiar reajuste da luz de Estados para não afetar eleição Política: Emenda parlamentar bancou show de artistas em ato pró-Lula Internacional: Rússia invade usina em Mariupol e ataca envio de armas do Ocidente Metrópole: Contra assaltos, governador dobra número de policiais Esportes: Athletico-PR acerta com Luiz Felipe Scolari após demissão de Fábio Carille See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Breaking Out of Breaking In
Directing For Hire: Branded Content with B. Monet

Breaking Out of Breaking In

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 65:21


Director B. Monet takes us through her process pitching and directing branded and commercial content in our final For Hire series episode! More B: http://www.b-monet.com/   Even more content: Patreon.com/BreakingOutPod Free newsletter: BreakingOutPod.com Email: BreakingOutofBreakingInPod@gmail.com Follow: @BreakingOutPod Music: KelseyRauber.com Art: KaileeCristina.com Editing: instagram.com/ezra.li

QUIVR, Live DJ sets from Fortitude Valley Australia
Luke Brazier b2b Baby Monet | QUIVR | 30-04-22

QUIVR, Live DJ sets from Fortitude Valley Australia

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 135:38


Luke Brazier b2b Baby Monet | QUIVR | 30-04-22 by QUIVR

InvestNews
FLASH #561: MRFG3: analistas apontam resultados bons, mas ação chega a cair 6%; por quê?

InvestNews

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 15:40


Por que as ações da Marfrig (MRFG3) caem, se o balanço do 1º trimestre foi avaliado como positivo por analistas? Entenda no Flash. A Marfrig Global Foods (MRFG3) encerrou o primeiro trimestre de 2022 com lucro líquido de R$ 109 milhões, o que representa uma queda de 61,1% em relação ao mesmo perído do ano passado. Já o Ebitda (lucro antes de juros, impostos, depreciações e amortizações) ajustado teve avanço anual de 60,9%, para R$ 2,749 bilhões, ante R$ 1,708 bilhão em igual período do ano anterior. Analistas da XP e da Genial Investimentos avaliaram os resultados da companhia como fortes, porém, a ação MRFG3 recuava mais de 6% por volta das 11h desta quarta-feira (04). Entre outros destaques de balanços financeiros estão o da Cielo (CIEL3), que teve aumento de 35,9% no lucro no primeiro trimestre, e a da TIM (TIMS3), que lucrou 46,4% mais no período. Além disso, o dia é marcado por decisões de política monetária no Brasil e nos Estados Unidos, com o Comitê de Política Monetária (Copom) e o Federal Open Market Committe (Fomc) anunciando suas decisões para as respectivas taxas de juros dos países.

X-Reads
Ep 74: Generation X #1 with guest artist David Nakayama

X-Reads

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 91:26


The incredible cover artist David Nakayama, known for his iconic character color bleed variants, joins Chris and Chandler to recap Generation X #1 and praise the work by Bachalo and Lobdell in their seminal 90s creation. Together they recite the witty dialog with glee between Monet, Jubilee, Synch, Husk, Skin, Banshee, Emma, and Chamber.Find us on the AIPT Podcast Network. Follow our show to be alerted when new episodes appear the first and third Wednesday of the month. Check us out on social media @xreadspodcast on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook. For business inquiries, email xreadspodcast@gmail.com. Learn more at https://aiptcomics.com

Buenos días madresfera
Feria del Libro Madresférico 2022: Monet y el Impresionismo por Leticia Rodríguez y Ángel de Frutos @angeldef_

Buenos días madresfera

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 22:11


Leticia Rodríguez y Ángel de Frutos @angeldef_Monet y el Impresionismo“Claude Monet era un niño diferente. En lugar de jugar a las canicas, se quedaba maravillado con los reflejos del sol sobre aquellas pequeñas bolitas; en vez de hacer ahogadillas a sus amigos en el mar, se fascinaba con el movimiento de las olas y los colores del agua. De mayor quería ser pintor y plasmar todas aquellas cosas que veía en magníficas obras de arte”.https://mrmomo.es/libro/Monet-y-el-Impresionismo.htm/Aquí tenéis el programa de la Feria del Libro Madresférico 2022https://www.madresfera.com/feria-del-libro-madresferico-2022-programa/Además, en esta edición tendremos como tienda de referencia para que compréis cada libro a Talaria https://www.talarialibros.com/ una librería online donde podéis encontrar todos los títulos y encima es solidaria. Para pedirlos simplemente lo hacéis desde su formulario y os los mandan a casa. A vosotros nos os cuesta más y ellos destinan un % a las ONGs que elijáis de las que trabajan con ellos.Toda la info en https://www.madresfera.com/

Vacation Mavens
210 Paris France

Vacation Mavens

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 53:54


After a long hiatus, we are back with an update! Unfortunately Tamara and Kim both came down with COVID after returning from their respective spring break trips, which has delayed getting a new episode out. But this week Tamara fills us in on her adventures (and misadventures) on spring break and shares some of the highlights and tips from her week in Paris. Paris Trip Highlights This post contains affiliate links. If you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small commission. All opinions are our own. Tamara and her family stayed at Le Relais Saint Germain in the 6th Arrondissement See her full 5 days in Paris itinerary Tamara's Paris trip planning timeline and checklist You can also see Tamara's Paris travel tips One of the highlights was seeing Monet's Water Lilies at the Musee d'la Orangerie, relaxing in the Tuileries Gardens, and an amazing tour of the Louvre The tour was "Mona Lisa at her Quietest" by Take Walks / Walks of France Tamara also recommend the Ultimate Food Tour of the Marais neighborhood with Devour Tours She recommends skipping a river cruise on the Seine, or do it at night when everything is lit up Tamara and her family also didn't enjoy going up the Eiffel Tower, but if you want to do it, make sure you book tickets well in advance for a timed entry Two food highlights were the chef's tasting dinner at Ze Kitchen Galerie and lunch with Hannah at Cafe Recruitment For Paris, Tamara recommends the Bandolier phone case and lanyard as the perfect travel companion for easy access to your phone for taking pictures, directions, etc. She also liked the packable travel backpack from Travelon

No Blackout Dates
S2, Ep. 31: The Joys and Pains of Travel With Kids

No Blackout Dates

Play Episode Listen Later May 3, 2022 39:32


Mother's Day is coming up. For the No Blackout Dates crew, this is a holiday where we celebrate the brave and courageous mothers in our lives. The day is more personal for Monet Hambrick, however – a traveling mother of two who has spent the bulk of the past decade gallivanting across the globe with her family in tow. She's written a children's book about her travels and runs the popular blog The Traveling Child to offer advice (and commiseration) to all the aspiring vagabond families out there. Monet joins the show to talk family travel, and if you plan to hit the road with kids – soon or down the line – it's time to listen to the established expert.On the docket today are such important how-to's as how to get your kids through layovers, long-hauls, and customs with as little hassle as possible. Monet also shares insight into what to bring along to make those long travel days easier, and recalls the one time she totally blew it when flying with her kids. Regular listeners know that Tim recently became a parent, so he has a lot to learn – and just in time, as baby Olivia will be boarding a flight to Mexico in T-Minus three weeks. In case you're wondering, Tim bought his wife Alisha a brand new e-bike for her very first Mother's Day, so he didn't blow it, thank you very much. In Hot Takes, Tim and Eben discuss whether traveling with young children is even worth the hassle, given that they likely won't even remember what happened. They also discuss traveling with their parents as adults, and what they do and don't have in common as travelers.Special Mother's Day shoutouts to our own mothers, Eileen and Lynn. Relevant links: The Traveling Child Monet's Instagram The Traveling Child Goes To Rio De Janeiro via Amazon The Birth of Brunch: Where Did This Meal Come From Anyway? Tim's Instagram Eben's Instagram News of the Day: This Is the First Thing You Should Look Up After Your Flight Is Delayed or Canceled JetBlue Offered Passengers $10,000 To Bump Their Flight To Cancun, and No One Took It

The Quantum Mechanics - Paranormal Podcast
Mica Paris & The Wandsworth Haunting

The Quantum Mechanics - Paranormal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 59:28


In this special investigation we are joined by singer and actress Mica Paris and her daughter Monet, who share their story of living in a haunted house in London. We reveal to them the chilling facts we discovered about the history of the house.  https://bit.ly/MicaParisEpPhotos 

Morning Call
02.05.22 - Bolsas caem forte em abril e iniciam maio mistas de olho na Super Quarta

Morning Call

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 4:15


O #MorningCall da #XPInvestimentos mostra os principais destaques do dia e os impactos para o mercado, antes do pregão. Confira os temas de hoje, 02/05/2022: O principal evento econômico da semana será a definição da taxa de juros americana pelo FOMC, Comitê de Política Monetária do banco central americano. O mercado espera uma elevação de 0,5 p.p., levando a taxa de juros para o intervalo de 0,75% a 1%. Outros destaques serão a inflação ao produtor e a taxa de desemprego na Europa para março, além de dados de emprego de abril nos EUA. Teremos ainda a divulgação dos índices de gerentes de compras de países desenvolvidos, importantes indicadores de atividade econômica.No Brasil, o destaque será a definição da taxa básica de juros também. Esperamos alta de 1p.p., que deve levar a Selic para 12,75%, e que o banco central mantenha as portas abertas para um possível ajuste final em junho. Além disso, serão divulgados o IBC-Br (proxy do PIB) de fevereiro e a Pesquisa Industrial Mensal (PIM) referente a março, estatísticas fiscais de fevereiro e o IGP-DI de abril. Acompanhe todos os conteúdos da XP em https://conteudos.xpi.com.br/ Assine o Expert Pass e tenha acesso a conteúdos exclusivos: https://bit.ly/ExpertPass.

Investir com a XP Investimentos é fácil, basta criar o seu cadastro e em minutos você já pode começar a investir: https://t2m.io/mw7KOHu.

Beauty Me with Charisse Kenion
Ep. 121: TikTok's 'Fave Fragrance Aunty' and full-time therapist Funmi Monet on how to choose the right professional and when to seek help TW

Beauty Me with Charisse Kenion

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 47:45


TW: Before I share details of this episode please be aware that we briefly mention suicide and abuse, so if that could be upsetting please feel free to listen to a different episode. This week's guest is content creator and licensed therapist Funmi Monet. While the Dallas, Texas-based creator has become known as TikTok's ‘fave fragrance Aunty' - she has over 200 perfumes in her collection - we end up spending way more time talking therapy. The former Bobbi Brown makeup artist really breaks down the value of therapy; why it's important to see yourself in your therapist, the signs to look out for when it's time to seek professional help and how we should all learn to listen more. I really hope you gain something from this, and do please share this episode with anyone who might need it. Let me know if this resonates with you and tag me on Instagram @beautymepodcast when you're listening. If you found this episode of value then I'd love it if you could leave a rating on Spotify or a review on Apple Podcasts. To keep up with what's coming next be sure to sign up for my newsletter at beautymenotes.substack.com. See you next time. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/beautyme/message

Warrior vs Zombie Podcast
Warrior vs Zombie Episode 73 with Andie Monet

Warrior vs Zombie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 49:46


Andie Monet – is an Awesome Warrior. Her Warrior journey started as a homeless 16‐year‐old girl, abandoned by her single mom. Working hard to build a life as an entrepreneur with the normal struggles of a teenager, being homeless, and starting college at 16 led to an opportunity for her to work for a “Big 4” accounting firm at 20 years old. Consulting in Hollywood at 25, taking on foreign and domestic governments at 28, and her first Fortune 500 client in her 30s created a foundation for her journey today. With several business degrees and 35 years of helping business, Andie has embraced her inner-entrepreneur and realized that most of the resources available to start and build a business do more damage than good. So, in 2021, she has created many short webinars, planners, workbooks, free or small‐fee trainings and other resources that will help businesses in every stage and phase of “business life”. Join our #BeeKonnected Group for access to all resources and future Live Events https://bkvisionwarrior.com/Warrior

Tiedekulma podcast
Kuinka ihmiskunta ravitaan kestävästi? | Juha Helenius

Tiedekulma podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 31:42


Monet ihmiskunnan tulevaisuuden huolista liittyvät ruokaan. Miten kasvavalle väestölle tuotetaan ruokaa ympäristön kannalta kestävästi, kysyy agroekologian professori Juha Helenius tekstissään. Julkaisemme tiedekustantamo Gaudeamuksen ja Tiedekulman yhteistyössä suunnittelemien Tiedekulmapokkareiden tekstejä ääniversioina. Juha Heleniuksen teksti Kuinka ihmiskunta ravitaan kestävästi? on alun perin ilmestynyt Kuinka maailma pelastetaan? -pokkarissa (Gaudeamus 2020): https://kauppa.gaudeamus.fi/sivu/tuote/kuinka-maailma-pelastetaan-/3229682. Tekstin lukija on Anu Vilhunen.

Modern Architect Radio Show with Tom Dioro
Season 6 Episode 8: Camille Przewodek

Modern Architect Radio Show with Tom Dioro

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022


In this episode of The Modern Architect, Tom talks to Camille Przewodek.Camille is a plein air artist in the tradition of Monet. Her aim is to capture the light key of nature. In addition to her art training at Wayne State University in Detroit, and earning a BFA in Illustration at the Academy of Art College in San Francisco, Camille Przewodek studied painting with master colorist Henry Hensche at the Cape School of Art in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

The Unrestricted Podcast
Getting Unrestricted With Drag Entertainer Monet Love

The Unrestricted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 55:21


On this episode, Ish welcomes Monèt Love, drag entertainer in Houston, Texas. During the conversation with Monèt, they discuss becoming a drag queen; what happens going to a show via Uber or Lyft rides; how to put on a performance; and more! Follow Monèt on Social Media: Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/lqmonet1/ Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/lqmonet.love ✅Best ways to help support The Unrestricted Podcast! ✔️PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/barrimedia ✔️Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/theunrestrictedpodcast ✔️Merch: https://www.tiny.cc/unrestrictedstore To reach the Unrestricted team you can email: Barri.MediaTexas@gmail.com ✅FOLLOW THE UNRESTRICTED PODCAST ✔️INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/unrestricted_podcast ✔️TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/barrimedia_ur ✔️WEBSITE: https://www.barrimediaunrestricted.com ✔️YOUTUBE: https://www.youtube.com/theunrestrictedpodcast --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/unrestrictedpodcast/support

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network
Jennifer Dasal's “Art Curious” Is a Colorful, Entertaining Look at the World of Art History

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 37:07


In this episode 289, we visit with Jennifer Dasal, author of “Art Curious: Stories of the Unexpected, Slightly Odd, and Strangely Wonderful in Art History.” ArtCurious is a colorful look at the world of art history, revealing some of the strangest, funniest, and most fascinating stories behind the world's great artists and masterpieces. We're all familiar with the works of Claude Monet, thanks in no small part to the ubiquitous reproductions of his water lilies on umbrellas, handbags, scarves, and dorm-room posters. But did you also know that Monet and his cohort were trailblazing rebels whose works were originally deemed unbelievably ugly and vulgar? And while you probably know the tale of Vincent van Gogh's suicide, you may not be aware that there's pretty compelling evidence that the artist didn't die by his own hand but was accidentally killed--or even murdered. Or how about the fact that one of Andy Warhol's most enduring legacies involves Caroline Kennedy's moldy birthday cake and a collection of toenail clippings? Publishers Weekly says in its Starred Review, “Dasal reveals in this entertaining survey the weird, wacky, and unbelievable backstories of some of the world's greatest artists and most famous works of art. . . . Both art aficionados and novices will find something to appreciate in this offbeat and informative outing.” Engage with the show here: https://linktr.ee/CharlotteReadersPodcast Detailed show notes here: https://charlottereaderspodcast.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/charlottereaderspodcast Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/charlottereaderspodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/charlottereader Charlotte Readers Podcast is a proud member of the Authors on the Air Global Radio Network and the Queen City Podcast Network. #CharlotteReadersPodcast #podcast #literary #literature #instabooks #goodreads #bookstagram #booklover #amreading #bookreview #bookaddict #bookclub #bookobsessed #booknerd #bookaholic #booklife #bookworm #bookgram #booktography #bookblogger #totalbooknerd #bookishfeatures #creativenonfiction #tellyourstory #podcaster #exploreclt #cltagenda #charlotteagenda #704 #cltiscreative #authorsontheair #queencitypodcastnetwork © Charlotte Readers Podcast and Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast
Engaging Experience Design through Technology

The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 29:21


Josh Goldblum, Founder and CEO, Blue Cadet (Philadelphia, PA and New York City, NY) Josh Goldblum is Founder and CEO at Blue Cadet, an experience design studio with around 30 employees in Philadelphia and 15 in New York.  Twenty-odd years ago, Josh worked in-house at the Smithsonian Institution, producing digital products and integrating technology into physical environments. Unfulfilled because big projects only came around every few years, Josh left and freelanced for a number of museums, doing single-touch Flash design and development. As his on-man Blue Cadet operation became a growing team, projects expanded to encompass touch tables, touch walls, and projection; technology evolved and became increasingly more sophisticated; and the organization's internal systems had to be more formalized to meet the needs of the larger business. Today's experience technology is far more powerful, interesting, and relevant than that in the past. Flash has been replaced by Real Engine, Unity, and JavaScript. The Blue Cadet studio continues to design large-touch surfaces and build immersive experiences but now works with augmented reality, haptics (touch-related communication), and using technology and digital products to make cultural content in physical spaces more immersive, engaging, and “magical.”  Although much of the firm's work is for museums, it has recently expanded to provide these immersive services for executive briefing centers and such brands as Nike and Google. Josh says it's important that the studio creates a “content experience that's not just decorative, but actually tells a story that feels true to the space.” In working with clients, Josh finds it helpful to carve out a little paid research at the beginning of a project to prepare an ideation spread where the studio can research client needs and present ideas. At the end of this initial period, the client can either work with Blue Cadet or take the ideas Blue Cadet developed and work with another studio. Josh says, “It's better to carve off a little space to redirect (the project) than to get into that death march of implementing something that's just not going to be that great.” That time upfront also helps Blue Cadet discover what it is that a client really wants, whether they can provide what the client wants, whether they want to do the project, and whether the parties can develop a solid working relationship. Josh participated in a panel session discussion of Trends and Challenges for Experiential Culture at the 2022 South by Southwest Interactive Festival. He says he is most active on LinkedIn, where he shares a lot of concept prototype material. ROB: Welcome to the Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast. I'm your host, Rob Kischuk, and I'm joined live today at South by Southwest Interactive Festival by Josh Goldblum, Founder and CEO at Blue Cadet based in Philadelphia and New York. Welcome to the podcast, Josh. JOSH: Thanks for having me. ROB: Excellent to have you here. Why don't you start off by telling us about Blue Cadet and what is your superpower? What is your calling card? What do people come to you for? JOSH: Blue Cadet is an experience design studio. Most of us are based in Philadelphia. There's about 30 in Philadelphia, another 15 up in New York, and then actually, when I say “us” based in Philadelphia, we just moved out to LA. So my family moved to LA. We're the only ones out there. We're mostly known for experience design in the cultural space, and also really a lot of technology in physical space. Twenty-odd years ago, I was inhouse at Smithsonian doing digital product work, but also integrated technology into physical environments. So we've been in that experience design space, figuring out how you marry technology into public spaces, how you take cultural content and make it interesting. That's what we've been doing, and we do it across physical space; we also do it across digital products.  ROB: Got it. It rings of museums or themed places, but I can also imagine a building that wants to have something and not just be a hollow shell. What does a typical space look like for you? JOSH: We do a lot of work in the museum space, like the traditional museum space. All the big museums are generally our clients. We've worked with a lot of them. Everything from like science centers to history museums to art museums. We did a Van Gogh projected experience with the Art Institute of Chicago way before they were doing all these projections. ROB: All the immersive experiences. JOSH: Yeah, we've been doing that for a long time. But then recently we've been moving more into brand work. We've been doing some work with Nike, which has been really exciting. We've done work with Google. trying to take a lot of that museum flair, which is an obsession with content and making sure that what we're saying is true, and trying to figure out what's interesting about a brand and giving it that treatment where you're elevating the personalities, elevating the science. You're making something that's smart but also engaging. ROB: Where are they doing those things? JOSH: These are executive briefing centers, sometimes. These are museums or brands. Some of these are online. And then we started doing a little bit of work for real estate companies, just trying to – it's not for me. [laughs] Just to activate some of their public spaces as well. Again, trying to bring in content experience that's not just decorative, but actually tells a story that feels true to the space. ROB: When I think about this space, I start off thinking about the sleepy old kiosk that became a touchscreen and the keyboard is broken. Did it start there and proceed from there? JOSH: Yeah, I would say when we started out – Blue Cadet was my freelance handle. I was at the Smithsonian; I did a pretty cool project there that got a lot of attention. The Smithsonian being what it is, they only had big projects every few years. I was getting kind of bored, so I left and I started going around museum to museum. I was essentially picking up jobs doing Flash design and development. When we first started out, it was a lot of those single touchscreens and those things that were kind of cheap. No one was going to lose their job if we really screwed up. But we overdelivered. We did really great stuff, and we grew on the backs of those reputations and then started doing touch tables and touch walls and projection mapping. These days, we still do a lot of large touch surfaces and things like that, but a lot more thinking about the technologies that are more interesting or relevant. Now we're doing a lot more with AR, things that are haptics, camera vision. Also just trying to figure out how to make an environment more engaging and magical. ROB: Some of the advantage, even, of the march of technology is that probably some of those early Flash things you were doing were still rather expensive and still took a big commitment. I think some of this has allowed the technology to come down into simpler spaces. My team's done really simple electron-based kiosks with a little bit of sound, a little bit of animation, and it makes it more available to more places. JOSH: Yeah. It's interesting because Flash was an amazing tool. Flash really allowed you to do a lot of very, very cool things. When Steve Jobs killed Flash, essentially – which he pretty much singlehandedly did – there was actually a little bit of a lull in experience design where the tools had to catch up. But now you see things like Real Engine, Unity – but even what you can do with JavaScript. You can do everything that you used to be able to do in Flash now to the nth degree. And it's much better. Flash probably should've died. ROB: How often does as client come to you with an idea of what they want? How often do they come to you with a topic – “Here's this topic, here's what we want to show people; surprise us”? Or is it more “We have an idea and a direction”? Do you know how much space you're dealing with? It seems like there's a lot of variables in there. JOSH: A lot of times if we're dealing with a museum client, they might have a big exhibit or something like that. Or even a brand, they have their stories, they know what they want to convey, they have the space. But then they come to us and they're like, “How do we tell the story? How do we do this?” A lot of times even if they come in with very, very fully baked ideas, we'll roll it way back into strategy and be like, let's create a little bit of space to figure out what you can do with contemporary technology, with contemporary tools. What can you do to make sure that content or experience really shines in a way that's not been done in the same way with different content six months before? ROB: It sounds like it's really a consultative opportunity, right? To show them – maybe they start somewhere, but sometimes they don't know what they don't know, in a very good way. You have a broader span of the industry. That's why they come to you. You bring some extra ideas to the plate. JOSH: Yeah. And usually what we do – we've been doing these things called ideation spreads. Sometimes someone will come to us with a pretty big budget and we'll be like “Hey, instead of having to sign the SOW for this real big thing, give us 10% of it and give us three weeks, and let us do a bunch of sprints where we reconceptualize it and see if we land in a better place.”  Sometimes it's better, particularly if you get a brief that you're like, “This is not going to end well. This is not something we want to be working on for the next six months.” It's better to carve off a little space to redirect it than to get into that death march of implementing something that's just not going to be that great. ROB: Right. Do you ever engage in that competitive sales process where you're competing over the big pie and you take the little pie? Does that happen? JOSH: Absolutely. I would say particularly as we were earning our market position and earning our reputation, we weren't always the safe choice. We were always known for doing the creative thing and for doing something cool and new, but there were a lot of people who had done it a million times. And it was riskier for them to work with us. So that was a great way. We'd come in and do these ideation spreads and say, “Look, you don't have to trust us with this giant thing. Bring us in here and let's see if we can set the vision. You're not even obligated to work with us after that.” ROB: Right, “You own the work, go ahead and take it.” I think every creative firm benefits when they find ways essentially to get paid for discovery instead of trying to do all this guesswork upfront. But there's always the tension between “How much are we spending on this?” versus “How likely are we to get the work?” Nobody wants to be in that tension. So, the 10% strategy there makes a lot of sense. JOSH: Also, I'd much rather do that than do spec on RFPs. You don't know anything about the client and really what they want. You don't really know what the problem set is. So if you're doing spec on an RFP, you're really just shooting in the dark. Whereas if you carve out a little bit of space where you can actually collaborate with a client, you usually come up with better creative; you're actually solving the problem. But then also, you get to build that relationship and the rapport, and that's usually what carries you forward. Or you sit there and you're like, “Okay, there's not great relationship or rapport here.” ROB: You can dodge a bullet. JOSH: Yeah, you can be like, “Okay, you really did want that thing. God love ya, go on with it.” ROB: We talked a little bit about the origin story, about you going around to museums. When did you realize it was a thing and you said, “You know what, this is my job now”? What was the inflection point? JOSH: For a while, Blue Cadet was just my freelance handle. I was living in D.C. because I was still at the Smithsonian and I was picking up odd jobs. It was fun. I enjoyed it. The projects I'd get weren't huge budgets, but I was actually making way more money than I was at the Smithsonian. But I finally got a project – a couple friends and I got this grant to do an interactive documentary, like a Flash-based documentary on the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. This was something where we came up with the idea, we went to a foundation, and we were like “Hey, can you pay us some money to put this thing together?” The timeline was such, the budget was such that I kind of had to hire a team. We had videographers, we had professional sound people. We were basically following this high school class – it was the only high school class to reopen after Hurricane Katrina. We were down there basically weeks after the hurricane. It was decimated. But when I was on that project – it was called Yearbook 2006 – I was like, oh man, if I bring in other people, it works way better. I was still doing the stuff that was too expensive to outsource, but I outsourced some other things and it ended up being really successful. It became really popular. I was like, okay, I want to start a studio. So that was the first point where I wanted to do a studio. Then that same team, we got another project the year after that for the Pulitzer Center and we ended up winning a News and Documentary Emmy, which was a pretty big deal at the time. We beat Wolf Blitzer or something. That put us on the map, and that snowballed to where we started getting a lot of work, and I was able to start building the team from there. ROB: It seems like something in that documentary space – of all the things you can fractionalize and take some people, do a project, get done with it, it seems like something in that video space, people are kind of used to it. That's the drill; that's what you do. You film something, then you move on to the next thing. JOSH: Yeah. Basically what happened was I was living in D.C. but I was from Philadelphia; I was turning 30. I was like, okay, I'm getting to an age where maybe I'm ready to settle down a little bit. I didn't really want to settle down in D.C. So I moved up to Philly and I made my first hire. It was someone straight out of college. She actually still works for me, 15 years later. ROB: Wow. JOSH: But that was the thing. We were hiring junior people and training them up, and then we grew very linearly, 20% year over year. There were weird inflection points along the way, but yeah, that's how we got to where we are now. ROB: What's a weird inflection point? JOSH: As you're growing a studio, there are always these different points where the wheels get real shaky and the systems that were working fine in this phase don't really work as well in the next phase. There's a point where you have to get really professional about bill pay, about HR, benefits. You just have to start layering in a lot of systems at various points. And those are the points where you start getting more professional and you start having to have an org chart. You can't just have a bunch of super creative people scrambling around all over the place. ROB: How have you digested that change? Is it something that comes well to you? Is there somebody, or many people, maybe a role that's been integral to making the jumps? JOSH: Yeah, my partner Troy. We both worked as new media specialists at the Smithsonian. He was like my sixth hire or something like that at Blue Cadet. He was living in Denver quite happily, and I sort of dragged him across country to move to Philadelphia and start things. But I love Troy. I'm one of these people who can talk a really good game and I can set a vision or get really excited about the idea and what this thing can be. Troy's the kind of guy who can sit down and actually make it happen. He can actually do it. So, he's invaluable. Over the years, we've been very selective. I spend a lot of time recruiting the people that I want into the team. Very few people necessarily applied to Blue Cadet, particularly at the leadership level. I always sought out people that I thought would really fit into the studio and scale out our capabilities. ROB: That's a great opportunity, because those strategic roles are also the ones where you could actually justify bringing a recruiter to, which you can't always do in the services world. But to find those people and recruit them in . . . . JOSH: I never used a recruiter. Where you find the best people is just like here at SXSW, you're meeting people. Or you meet clients. One of the people I recruited to Blue Cadet, who actually left to take over digital at the Obama Library, was client side, and she left midway through the project and everyone was like, “Oh my God, this place is going to fall apart without her. She is so instrumental to the studio.” This was a studio I was working with, and I was like, “That sucks; the project's going to go sideways.” But then I was like, “I'm going to poach her at some point. I'm going to get her on my team.” And she was fantastic. So, I'm always looking for people that I'm like, “Wow, that person's way smarter than me or better that me at these things.” ROB: That's excellent, especially when you know the capabilities you don't quite need yet, or you don't need another person in that capability yet, and you can keep your head on the swivel, keep the mental library going of who's next. It's a fun journey to have that wish list and then fulfill on it. JOSH: Yeah. ROB: So, you're here and you have a session coming up. It is “Trends and Challenges for Experiential Culture.” What are you looking for people to get out of that? JOSH: Obviously, I've been speaking about experience design for a very, very long time. I was talking about how things were getting completely disrupted with physical space pre-pandemic. I was talking about Meow Wolf and Museum of Ice Cream and the changing face of retail and also some of the things that were happening with museums, and this was like 2018-2019. I was like, man, stuff's really going to change. I saw the trends, I saw this stuff happening. And then obviously the pandemic has accelerated everything. Who knows where the chips are going to fall, but one of the things we're seeing is a lot of people wanting to get back into physical space. Places like SXSW are now filling up again. People want to be around each other. But what are the spaces that bring out the best in us? How could those spaces operate to create better connections between people? That's the sort of thing we're really interested in. And then also, how do you discard the old stuff that doesn't work anymore? Honestly, I love museums but I also kind of hate them. Also, I know for my kids, they're not dying to go to the old-fashioned museum and read a bunch of wall labels. They're really interested in culture because they're my children, our children, but they want to consume it differently. And I want to make sure that they're consuming culture in a way that feels good to them, that's enjoyable and interesting to them. ROB: What do you think they're going to want? Where is it headed? JOSH: It's so funny; my kids like Roblox, they like all those things. I've taken them to a million museums. I've taken my son to Epcot and Disney and all the different – sometimes the things they like are the cheesy, colorful, fun Museum of Ice Cream rip-offs. But also, they would eat candy all day if I let them do that, too. So, it's figuring out, okay, what are the things that have a personality, that are fun, that are interesting, that are enjoyable, but also are not just mind-numbing or consumptive? ROB: Right. Even some of the newish stuff – I'm sure you'll see a lot of it around here at SXSW; there's different activations. There's some integration of different assets, even into the little doodles activation over here that's NFTs plus an actual physical space. How do you think about the difference between using a technology for the sake of the technology and using it because it's actually right for the environment? JOSH: I actually really like the doodles space. I thought they did a really nice job. I think part of it is a lot of times I talk to these museums and I'm like, “You should be looking more to that marketing. You should be taking a lot more inspiration from them,” because they move really fast, they put these things together really quick, they're not super, super precious, they don't expect it to be up in 5 years, let alone 10 years, let alone 2 weeks, and they're able to take more risks. Because it's sort of a one-and-done, they don't have to make sure that it feels the same 10 years from now. Obviously, that marketing is a very different business model than a museum, but I think there are things that can be borrowed. And personally, I think even that doodles exhibit – there were a lot of nods to themed entertainment. There was a lot of stenography, there was a lot of sculptural pieces. There were some really nice light applications of technology. I thought it was really successful. I would like to see museums looking more like that. ROB: Got it. I think there's times when we've probably all seen AR for AR's sake, VR for VR's sake. How do you filter “This is a good place for VR, this is not”? Or “It could be done this way but not that one”? JOSH: I used to take a much harder line on this in the past. Honestly, some of these things, you look at some of these AR experiences and you're like, what's the point? It's not doing anything except demonstrating the technology. It's like, okay, if you've never seen AR, awesome. That's really awesome. But if you have seen AR, you don't care. Same with some of these projection experiences. It's like, if you're never been in a giant room filled with Christie projectors, it's really exciting to be at the Van Gogh and see all this stuff. But then you go back and it's the same thing, but with Klimt or Picasso or Monet; it's like, “I've seen it.” So, I think part of it is I'm actually okay with technology for technology's sake where it serves a spectacle, where you've never seen it before. It makes people excited and engaged. I think where it gets old is where it's already been done before. You're not even doing that. You're just being lazy. The thing I always look at, too, is either you've got to really, really be serving that content in a way that's compelling and really getting people into it – and sometimes that is spectacle. Spectacle gets people excited. It gets them interested. But if you fail at the spectacle and then you don't provide the content, it's just a wasted experience. ROB: It seems like you're very adjacent to not only event marketing, but also perhaps even to entertainment, theme park, that kind of thing. How do you decide where you go and where you don't go in those markets, and where you compete and where you choose to stay in your lane? JOSH: It's funny; I used to be very selective about the types of clients I would take on. I was like, “I'm not working with brands. I'm working with museums and nonprofits and higher ed. That's my tribe.” The thing I realized is sometimes your tribe is not aligned to a sector. It's really just a way of being. There are people at Nike that have way, way more in common with me and how I see technology, how I see content, how I see culture than people at some of these museums. Some of the people in these museums are very, very retrograde, and they're like, “No, we need a clean white room with a painting and 7,000 words of text. Bring your seven-year-old in here and they're going to read my dissertation.” I have less in common with them than somebody who's at a brand, whether it's a technology brand or materials brand or someone selling shoes, that wants to tell this story in an interesting way or find something interesting to elevate out of it. ROB: The brands change, too. That's part of it. Once you're in the game for a while, the brands change. The legend of what Nike is has shifted several times at different inflection points. Shoe Dogs, one moment in time. I interned once upon a time at Chick-fil-A's headquarters. Chick-fil-A's museum was a little room with a trophy case and a fake vault, and they've expanded what that experience is. So, I think the brands change too, and who they are and what they need might be different from the thing you used to react to. JOSH: Yeah, 100%. Often it's just who's there and who's championing the brand, who wants to tell that story, and how they want to tell it. The thing is, there's so many projects at Nike that Blue Cadet should have no part in, but the projects we are working with them are very Blue Cadet-like projects. There's a lot of interesting content, stories. We did one for the LeBron James Innovation Center. It's all about how they use data to inform how they work with athletes, and that's really cool. That's really exciting and something that my team is very, very well-positioned to execute on. ROB: Your session also ties into trends a lot. What's next? What's something you think you're going to end up doing soon at Blue Cadet that you haven't done before? JOSH: I've actually been spending a lot of time looking at Web3 and NFTs and things like that. I think beyond the hype, there's something really interesting stuff there. I think there's something very interesting about digital ownership. I think there's something very interesting about bringing things from the physical world in the digital world, bringing things from the digital world into the physical world. I think NFTs help with that. I think there's some really exciting things happening there. Personally, I think it's a really exciting time to be in experience design because frankly, COVID screwed everything up. Everyone's rethinking things. Like, “Do I shake someone's hand? Do I give them a hug? Do I wear a mask here, do I not wear a mask here?” All the social norms, the way we behaved in physical spaces, have changed. So, now's a really interesting time to direct some innovation and say, okay, now that we're rethinking this, let's put some design thinking to it and figure out how to make these spaces better. ROB: Right. Some people shut everything down for two years, some people built nothing for two years, some people rebuilt everything during those two years. Some stuff was pulled forward, some stuff is waiting in the wings. It's very lumpy. JOSH: Yeah, absolutely. I think what'll be really interesting is we don't really know. We've all been in this one state and now we're entering into another, hopefully, and we're not quite sure how the chips will fall. We don't know what the new behaviors are going to be. It'd be really interesting to see, as you revisit the conference that you went to for 10 years or the restaurant you used to go to every week, as you start going back into those things, does it feel the same? Does it still work the same way? Does it still affect you the same way? I don't know. Does it feel great to go back to a movie theater? Maybe, maybe not. ROB: I haven't tried yet. JOSH: Honestly, I was one of those people like “Ah screw it, I don't need it.” Then I took my kids to see the new Spider-Man and I was like, wait a second. This is actually really nice. It was actually quite enjoyable. ROB: It was probably fairly uncrowded too, which helps. [laughs] JOSH: It was pretty uncrowded, yeah. [laughs] ROB: For me, same thing. We have kids, so me not going to the movies is more about me having kids and not going to the movies as much as I did when we were just a couple with time on our hands and it's like “It's Tuesday, what do we do? Let's go see a movie and get home at 11:00. Fine.” Different seasons. JOSH: Yeah. ROB: Are there any sort of behaviors that were adopted experientially during COVID that you think are going to stick? There's interesting things – I think about some escape rooms did versions of escape rooms where they would do it for you over Zoom. And they're still doing it I guess, but I don't know. Are there weird things that people did that you think might stick around? JOSH: I mean, I think remote work is not going anywhere. ROB: You're betting on it. JOSH: Yeah, I'm living in California and my studio is entirely on the East Coast. We started hiring people out of market, which we never did before. We have people who moved into the Hudson River Valley or out in the Poconos, moving away from the city, away from our offices. And it hasn't been affecting the work. So, I think that's going to be really interesting. I think also how we're thinking about the studios themselves – we have this beautiful, beautiful office in Philadelphia and New York with lots of desks, but we're like, do we all need these desks if we're not going to be there every day? Can we optimize this for prototyping spaces? We build a lot of things in physical space, lots of hardware in the office. We need that. That's part of our process. But it's like, do we need all these desks? ROB: Do you find you're still pulling people together to actually get hands on with the experience? You can do a lot of the design in your own place, but there's a point where it still has to get physical and maybe that's a good time to convene the team anyhow to build rapport? JOSH: Yeah, absolutely. And honestly, I love it. It's great to bring people together in physical space. But when there's a reason. Let's bring them in physical space to prototype, but we don't have to bring them into shared space just for another meeting. That's not worth it. [laughs] That stuff can go to Zoom. ROB: Josh, all very interesting stuff. When people want to connect with you and with Blue Cadet, where should they go to find you? JOSH: I'm probably most active on LinkedIn. Just look me up on LinkedIn. I actually spend a lot of time sharing a lot of prototypes. ROB: I was going to say, you probably share some cool stuff. JOSH: I share some really cool stuff. I at one point realized that the Blue Cadet internal Slack where we're just sharing prototypes and process stuff was way more interesting than anything I was sharing on social media, so I was like, I'm just going to share that stuff. The Blue Cadet Slack is way more interesting than any social feed I follow. So, I share the stuff I'm allowed to share off that. ROB: That turns out to be great marketing on LinkedIn, too. Some stuff people won't connect with, some stuff probably goes to the moon, and then people are like, “Who did that?” “Blue Cadet did that.” “Hey, I need that.” I don't know if it's scalable, but it also doesn't have to. I don't know how many days a week you're LinkedIn posting, but it's one or two or three days a week. JOSH: Yeah. The LinkedIn posts I'm putting up are early prototypes. They're super messy. It's a lot of cardboard and projection and things taped together. But usually then there's some really interesting technology in there, and I feel like it's an easier way to see how this actually gets made. ROB: Excellent. Josh, thank you so much for meeting up, for coming on the podcast. JOSH: Absolutely. ROB: Wish you the best on your talk in a couple of days as well. JOSH: Hope you make it out there. It'd be great. ROB: Thanks so much. JOSH: Thanks for having me. ROB: Thank you for listening. The Marketing Agency Leadership Podcast is presented by Converge. Converge helps digital marketing agencies and brands automate their reporting so they can be more profitable, accurate, and responsive. To learn more about how Converge can automate your marketing reporting, email info@convergehq.com, or visit us on the web at convergehq.com.

Fazit - Kultur vom Tage - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Performance in Zürich - Milo Rau vertreibt Geister der Nazi-Vergangenheit

Fazit - Kultur vom Tage - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 5:56


Gegen das schlechte Karma von Bildern mit Raubkunst-Vergangenheit im Kunsthaus Zürich hat Theatermann Milo Rau dort eine Perfomance inszeniert. Dabei kam auch ein Schamane zum Einsatz, um Bilder von Monet und Manet von negativen Energien zu befreien.Müller, Tobiwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, FazitDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

Sibling Rivalry
Sibling Watchery - All Stars 7 - Cast Reveal

Sibling Rivalry

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 45:01


Drag Race All Stars is back which means Watchery is too! Listen in as Bob and Monet break down the Cast Reveal episode from entrance lines to promo outfits. They also share their predictions for who will lead the race this season and who they are excited to see compete!! To score 15% off your Blenders purchase, visit BLENDERSEYEWEAR.com and enter promo code siblingvip. Want to see exclusive Sibling Rivalry Bonus Content? Head over to www.patreon.com/siblingrivalrypodcast to be the first to see our latest Sibling Rivalry Podcast Videos! @BobTheDragQueen @MonetXChange Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

My Point Of View
Spilling The Legal Tea about the Influencer Marketing Industry with Kameron Monet

My Point Of View

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 41:52


Today I'm joined by Kameron M. Buckner, Esq., licensed attorney, content creator, and influencer marketing consultant. Kameron began her career as an Associate Attorney practicing Employment Litigation, while simultaneously using social media to create content around fashion, beauty, lifestyle, as well as female professionalism and career building. Kameron has built an engaging and organic audience with over 140,000 followers across her platforms @kameronmonet, working with brands from Dove to McDonalds to Ulta Beauty. After realizing her social media expertise and license to practice law could provide value for aspiring “Lawyer Influencers”, as well as educate content creators about the power of contracts when signing brand deals; Kameron quit her 9-to-5 law firm job, founded The Legal Tea, and now lives what she calls the best of both worlds. We talked about: - Her career as a licensed attorney, content creator and influencer marketing consultant: when did she decided she wanted to be a lawyer and why, when she started social media and youtube, and how does she balances all of her jobs and keeps her mental health in check - The Legal Tea: what's the legal tea, why she decided to found it and what she loves the most about it The business side of influencing: What are some basics that influencers should keep an eye for when it comes to influencer contracts with brands, what are some ways that influencers can get screwed over with their contracts, can influencers make more money by changing some terms on their contracts, what's your advice for smaller influencers just starting out working with brands? Kameron's IG: https://www.instagram.com/kameronmonet/ Kameron's Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCSp52HvdllyUqLXsdwwOkTA Follow me: https://www.instagram.com/mypointofview.podcast/ Music: Cheese, prod. by Lukrembo https://soundcloud.com/lukrembo/cheese

Who ARTed
Claude Monet - Water Lilies

Who ARTed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 30:52


The Impressionist movement was named after one of Claude Monet's paintings. In this episode, we discussed a bit about Monet and his life as well as one of his most famous series of works, Water Lilies. Monet loved painting his garden and over his lifetime, he created about 250 paintings of Water Lilies. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show.

Who ARTed
Claude Monet - Water Lilies

Who ARTed

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 28:07


This is an encore presentation of my episode about Claude Monet and his painting of water lilies. During his lifetime, Monet created about 250 paintings of water lilies. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show.

Musical Theatre Radio presents
Be Our Guest with Joan Ross Sorkin

Musical Theatre Radio presents "Be Our Guest"

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 55:56


Joan is a playwright, musical theatre bookwriter and lyricist, opera librettist, and screenwriter. She is currently writing the book and lyrics for a new blues-infused musical, Black Swan Blues with composer Randy Klein, excerpts of which have been presented by Music Theatre of Connecticut. Other musicals include Imagining Monet (previously titled Monet) with composer/lyricist Carmel Owen, developed at The York Theatre, CAP21 with a generous grant from the Florence Gould Foundation, and at the French Consulate in an evening of songs and story; and In The Theatre with composer/lyricist/co-bookwriter Steven Fisher, developed at The York Theatre and The BMI Musical Theatre Workshop. joanrosssorkin.com

Morning Call
14.04.22 - Atenções voltadas para a decisão de política monetária na Europa

Morning Call

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 3:43


O #MorningCall da #XPInvestimentos mostra os principais destaques do dia e os impactos para o mercado, antes do pregão. Confira os temas de hoje: As atenções do dia estarão sobre a decisão de política monetária do Banco Central Europeu (BCE) e a divulgação de novos resultados nos EUA, com brandes bancos publicando seus balanços. No Brasil, investidores aguardam a proposta da Lei de Diretrizes Orçamentárias (LDO) a ser apresentada pelo governo. O feriado de sexta-feira Santa mantém os mercados fechados amanhã no Brasil, EUA e Europa. Acompanhe todos os conteúdos da XP em https://conteudos.xpi.com.br/ Assine o Expert Pass e tenha acesso a conteúdos exclusivos: https://bit.ly/ExpertPass.
Investir com a XP Investimentos é fácil, basta criar o seu cadastro e em minutos você já pode começar a investir: https://t2m.io/mw7KOHu.

Investir com SIM
Como funciona o atrelamento de ciclo monetário brasileiro e americano? - Live 158 (11/04/22) - Visão

Investir com SIM

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 5:56


Atenção (disclaimer): Os dados aqui apresentados representam minha opinião pessoal. Não são de forma alguma indicações de compra ou venda de ativos no mercado financeiro. Seleção das partes mais interessantes das Lives de segunda. Live 158 - Visão do Estrategista https://youtu.be/2do0LnPtQrw

Inbox Besties With Kate Doster
Making Money as an Artist and Maker with Elisabeth Young and Cami Monet

Inbox Besties With Kate Doster

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 56:28


Are you an artist or maker who wants to expand your business and make more money? If you're an artist or maker who sells on Etsy or other platforms, you might be wondering how you can expand your business and make more money. Courses and passive income streams are a great way to do just that! In this episode of Inbox Besties, Elisabeth Young & Cami Monet share their best tips for making money as an Artist including: How to create passive income streams from your artisan business How they turned their passion into profits Why teaching helps you hone your craft The hidden benefits of creating "how-to" courses The mindset that sees them through their obstacles And more! So if you're ready to start making more money from your art or craft, be sure to listen to this episode of Inbox Besties now! https://www.katedoster.com/making-money-as-an-artist-maker/ Elisabeth and Cami met in a stationery Facebook group in the fall of 2016. They bonded over the fact they had both gone full-time on the same day just a few weeks earlier, Sept. 16th! After building their friendship long-distance via text, DM, and facetime, they decided to meet in person in Savannah to celebrate their 1st business anniversaries in 2017. During this trip, they hosted their first "Biz Birthday Bash" in the form of a free webinar. More than 500 people signed up to attend! That weekend Biz Birthday Bash was born (yes, the name stuck) and since then Cami & Elisabeth have offered creative paper people resources that help make biz strategy a piece of cake. They are the creators & hosts of The Stationer's Summit and the A-Z Directory Membership. 4 Essentials You Need to Turn Your Biz Into a Profit Party (free training) Website: bizbirthdaybash.com/ The Biz Birthday Bash Podcast: bizbirthdaybash.com/podcast Instagram: @bizbirthdaybash  

Norton Simon Museum Podcasts
Virtual Tour: Richard Hunt: Details

Norton Simon Museum Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 7:27


7:27 https://www.nortonsimon.org/learn/watch-and-listen/videos-podcasts-and-lectures/virtual-tour-richard-hunt-details/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 12:00:00 -0700 nortonsimon4057 ldenk@nortonsimon.org (Norton Simon Museum)

Beauty Me with Charisse Kenion
Ep. 118: What is UK Black Girl Makeup? With Uche Natori, Funmi Monet and more

Beauty Me with Charisse Kenion

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 39:29


This week's episode has been a while in the making and it all started with a voice note. My friend, beauty editor Ava Welsing-Kitcher, who recently moved to the US, told me how popular the UK Black Girl makeup look was becoming on TikTok and that I needed to take a look. A few hours later and I was hooked; not just on the makeup style itself, which we'll go into in this episode, but I loved the supportive comments shared between the US and UK creators. The two key names that came up over and over again when I started researching the trend that's racked up 38million views on TikTok, were that of Uche Natori and Melachild. Both creators are based in the UK and have been called the originators of the look that's centred on a highlighted under-eye and seamless blending. I invited both of them onto the pod and I'm happy to say that Uche said yes and our ensuing conversation felt so refreshing and real. At no point did Uche take credit for anything; in fact she paid homage to the makeup artists of the '90s, to drag makeup techniques, makeup artists such as Makeup By Mario and Melachild herself and also commented that American women like makeup artist King Mali Magic are the ones who have long been influencing the trends. Also in this episode, I speak with Funmi Monet, a Dallas, Texas-based creator and therapist, about why she thinks American women are falling in love with UK Black Girl makeup and there are also some clips from the inimitable Melachild and I share UK makeup artist @v A note: When I commented on social media that I was putting the episode together and that Uche was part of it, someone sent a screenshot of a 'post and delete' that the UK version of The Shade Room had shared (The Shade Room is like the online black version of a gossip magazine you might find in a supermarket - I think that's the best way I can describe it). In it Uche had commented that the 'clean girl look is low key anti-black' and said black women need 'coverage and structure'. As she deleted it, I'm guessing she realised it was a bit off, because when we spoke, she was very detailed about why black women might prefer fuller coverage for reasons such as hyperpigmentation. I'm mentioning it here in case any listeners thought I wasn't aware. I'm definitely aware but I feel what Uche has to say in this episode has more importance than what she posted. If you disagree then my DMs are always open @beautymepodcast or you can email me at beautymepodcast@gmail.com. Stay tuned to @beautymepodcast on Instagram and my TikTok @charissek because I'll be sharing some iconic video content too! If you enjoyed this episode please rate and review and be sure to tag me when you're listening. See you next time. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/beautyme/message

WBAP Morning News Podcast
WBAP Morning News: Andie Monet

WBAP Morning News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 5:37


Nearly a year after COVID vaccines became freely available in the U.S., one fourth of American adults remain unvaccinated, and a picture of the economic cost of vaccine hesitancy is emerging. It points to financial risk for individuals, companies and publicly funded programs.  Vaccine hesitancy likely already accounts for tens of billions of dollars in preventable U.S. hospitalization costs and up to hundreds of thousands of preventable deaths, say public health experts.  For individuals forgoing vaccination, the risks can include layoffs and ineligibility to collect unemployment, higher insurance premiums, growing out-of-pocket medical costs or loss of academic scholarships.  For employers, vaccine hesitancy can contribute to short-staffed workplaces. For taxpayers, it could mean a financial drain on programs such as Medicare, which provides healthcare for seniors. Speaker, Consultant // helps businesses create explosive growth without adding new costs or hours to the day // Expert on Small Businesses ANDIE MONET joins The Morning News. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How to Sell Art: The Abundant Artist Podcast
What it's like to sell 100,000 paintings with Jose Trujillo

How to Sell Art: The Abundant Artist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 1, 2022 46:27


Welcome back to The Abundant Artist, the show that dispels the myth of “the starving artist” and shares how you can live an abundant life as an artist and make a living from your talent one interview at a time.   This week, Cory welcomes Jose Trujillo to the podcast! Jose is an impressionist painter that is one-of-a-kind in that he has been selling his art on eBay for over 10 years and has sold over 100,000 original art pieces online. Considered a modern Monet, Jose's art has been described as “dream-like,” fast-paced, musical, and a “fantasy of colors.”   Jose shares both the highlights and the lowlights with his experiences of selling his artwork on eBay, how he keeps up with selling only original paintings online, his personal approach to painting, his journey and discovery with impressionist painting, and his unique philosophy on “finding the gems in the volume.”   Key Takeaways: [:30] Cory welcomes Jose Trujillo to the podcast! [:47] Cory reads a quote about Jose on his website. [1:28] Jose shares his experiences with selling his art on eBay for the last 10 years. [5:22] Why does Jose consider himself “not known” in the art world even though he's sold over 100,000 art pieces in the last 10‒12 years? [7:10] Jose shares about his 4,000 square foot art studio space and his team behind the scenes. [9:56] Why and how Jose only sells original artwork, and the system he created to keep up with his eBay sales. [12:25] Where does Jose's work ethic come from? [14:41] Why Jose and his wife opened a clothing shop. [16:14] When and why did Jose begin to sell his art on Craigslist? [20:21] Jose shares his thoughts on Cory's theory on whether or not impressionist artists are more willing to approach different ways of selling. [23:22] How and why Jose learned how to paint and why impressionism, in particular, interested him. [31:22] When did Jose begin to paint? How did he initially start practicing? [33:38] Jose's philosophy on “finding the gems in the volume” regarding art. [35:22] What Jose's schedule looks like now vs. earlier on in his career. [36:16] Jose explains the quote on his website, “To see without the interruption of thought.” [40:30] How Jose feels about his current work/life schedule. [42:00] About Jose's regular gratitude practice and how it helps him with his art. [45:30] Cory thanks Jose for joining the podcast.   Mentioned in This Episode:Jose Trujillo' Art Jose Trujillo on eBay Jose Trujillo's Youtube Video of how Jose created his messaging on Craigslist Ugly Delicious (Netflix Series)   Find More Episodes Over on TheAbundantArtist.com  

The Samuel Andreyev Podcast
La naissance de la musique spectrale : Hugues Dufourt

The Samuel Andreyev Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 102:38


**EPISODE IN FRENCH / EPISODE EN FRANÇAIS**Hugues Dufourt privilégie les continuités et les lentes transformations d'un discours musical qui n'est que rarement interrompu. Il conçoit des formes par évolution de masses et travaille sur les notions de seuils, d'oscillations, d'interférences et de processus orientés. Pionnier du mouvement spectral, il lui accorde toutefois une définition plus large, cherchant à mettre en valeur l'instabilité que le timbre introduit dans l'orchestration. Sa musique repose sur une richesse de constellations sonores et harmoniques et s'appuie sur une dialectique du timbre et du temps. Il puise une partie de son inspiration dans l'art pictural, dont il retient essentiellement le rôle de la couleur, des matières et de la lumière (Dawn flight, quatuor à cordes créé en 2008 à Musica, Le Cyprès blanc et L'Origine du monde, créés à Musica 2004). Marqué par l'avant-garde française des années soixante, Hugues Dufourt participe aux activités de L'Itinéraire (1975-81) et fonde en 1977 le Collectif de Recherche Instrumentale et de Synthèse Sonore (CRISS) avec Alain Bancquart et Tristan Murail. Agrégé de Philosophie en 1967, il publie de nombreux écrits. Il est chargé de recherche (1973-85) puis directeur de recherche au CNRS (1985-2009) et crée en 1982 l'Unité Mixte de Recherche "Recherche Musicale" qu'il dirige jusqu'en 1995. Hugues Dufourt a reçu de nombreux prix, notamment en 2000 le Prix du Président de la République pour l'ensemble de son oeuvre, décerné par l'Académie Charles Cros. Ces dernières années, Hugues Dufourt a composé des oeuvres aux formations diverses, du piano seul (Tombeau de Debussy créé au Festival Musica 2018) au grand orchestre (Ur-Geräusch, créé en 2016 par l'Orchestre de la WDR, Les deux saules d'après Monet créé en 2020 à Vienne par l'Orchestre symphonique de la Radio), en passant par des petites formations (L'atelier rouge d'après Matisse, créé en 2020 à Varsovie par l'Ensemble Nikel) ou les percussions (Burning Bright, créé par les Percussions de Strasbourg au Festival Musica 2014). La Horde d'après Max Ernst, pour orchestre, commande du Lemanic Modern Ensemble et de Radio France sera créé au Festival Présences 2022.SUPPORT THIS PODCASTPatreonDonorboxORDER SAMUEL ANDREYEV'S NEWEST RELEASEIridescent NotationLINKSYouTube channelOfficial WebsiteTwitterInstagramEdition Impronta, publisher of Samuel Andreyev's scoresEPISODE CREDITSPost production: Marek IwaszkiewiczPodcast artwork photograph © 2019 Philippe StirnweissSupport the show (http://www.patreon.com/samuelandreyev)

Sibling Rivalry
Sibling Advicery: Balding/Straight Bars

Sibling Rivalry

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 69:54


This week, Bob and Monet give advice to a listener with thinning hair, a guy who wants to start dating outside his type, a woman who is feeling overlooked by her peers, and so much more! Go to PrettyLitter.com/rivalry to save 20% on your 1st order! Want to see exclusive Sibling Rivalry Bonus Content? Head over to www.patreon.com/siblingrivalrypodcast to be the first to see our latest Sibling Rivalry Podcast Videos! @BobTheDragQueen @MonetXChange Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Perfume Room
42. Making Content, Perfume, Money, & Moves (w/ Exalté Perfume Creator & TikToker Funmi Monet)

Perfume Room

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 22, 2022 75:06


Your Fave Fragrance Auntie, Funmi Monet, is in the Perfume Room! By day, Funmi is a licensed therapist and by night— a fragrance star. She's not just a fragrance content creator, she is a fragrance creator AND a content creator. In one short year on TikTok, Funmi has amassed well over 100K followers as well as launched her own fragrance, Exalté. UM, let that sink in for a sec. Funmi shares the fragrance she stopped a stranger for; the ones that get her stopped; her first, second and third date fragrance picks (hint: they are not the same); the inspiration for Exalté; and, PERFUMETOK — TAKE NOTES: Funmi talks everything from rates, to negotiating, to different ways to partner with brands, and ultimately, how to grow your brand and monetize your content. FRAGS MENTIONED: Kierin NY Pier NY, D.S. & Durga Bistro Waters, Maya Njie Tobak, Phlur Lost Cause, Oribe Cote D'Azur, Henry Rose Jake's House, Henry Rose Smyth, Electimuss Mercurial Cashmere, Dior Oud Ispahan, Viktor & Rolf Flowerbomb, MFK Baccarat Rouge, JHAG Not A Perfume, Ariana Grande Cloud, Carolina Herrera Good Girl, YSL Black Opium, Elizabeth Taylor White Diamonds, Estee Lauder Pleasures, Britney Spears Fantasy, Marc Jacobs Daisy, Juicy Couture Viva La Juicy, Funmi Monet Exalte, Givenchy L'Interdit Rouge, Simone Andreoli Leisure in Paradise, PdM Delina Exclusif, Dior Hypnotic Poison, MFK Oud Satin Mood, Penhaligon's Cairo, Amouroud Mysterious Rose, Frederic Malle Musc Ravageur, Tom Ford Lost Cherry, Dior Poison Girl, Dior Sauvage, Dior Sauvage Elixir, Givenchy L'Interdit, YSL Libre, YSL Libre Intense, Lancome LVEB, Lancome LVEB Intonement, Viktor & Rolf Flowerbomb Ruby Orchid, Carolina Herrera Very Good Girl, Dior Dune, Kayali Vanilla 28, La Botica Soho, Dior Eden-roc FOLLOW FUNMI: @funmimonet on all platforms SHOP EXALTE: www.bellaaura.com SHOP MY DISCOUNTS: linktr.ee/emmavern FOLLOW PERFUME ROOM: @perfumeroompod

Sibling Rivalry
Sibling Advicery: Body Hair/New York City

Sibling Rivalry

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 74:38


On this week's Advicery, Bob and Monét help a listener embarking on their own podcast journey, discuss how they navigated befriending drag queens in the scene when they were just starting out, and offer some interesting advice to a woman who has had been stuck in a dry spell. Tune in to hear Bob and Monet give advice on starting a business, napping, where to go when visiting NYC, and how to set healthy boundaries with your parents!! Head to Squarespace.com for a free trial, and when you're ready to launch, go to squarespace.com/RIVALRY to save 10% off your 1st purchase of a website or domain. Visit blenderseyewear.com and use code “siblingvip” for 15% off. Go to LivingProof.com/SIBLING and use code SIBLING for 10% off your 1st purchase! Want to see exclusive Sibling Rivalry Bonus Content? Head over to www.patreon.com/siblingrivalrypodcast to be the first to see our latest Sibling Rivalry Podcast Videos! @BobTheDragQueen @MonetXChange Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Dr. Mobi on Lifestyle Tv usa
Bullying epidemic with Shannon Monet

Dr. Mobi on Lifestyle Tv usa

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 19, 2022 26:31


Yes it is very important to recognize growing problem in schools which is bullying. We have to understand it can have short-term in downtown consequences let's listen to one teenager who turned this into a mission --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/lifestyletvusa/support

Sibling Rivalry
Sibling Advicery: Twitter Alts/Breakup

Sibling Rivalry

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 7, 2022 65:48


Live from Stereo, Bob and Monet listen to fan submitted voicemails and bring them onto the livestream to give them their advice! What would you do if you accidentally found out your best friend has an alt twitter account for gay p*rn?! How can you own who you are and where you come from when you don't agree with the politics of your hometown? How long should it take for you to get over your ex? Tune in to hear Bob and Monét answer all these questions and much more!! Go to LivingProof.com/SIBLING and use code SIBLING for 10% off your 1st purchase! Go to TODAYTIX.com/rivalry and use promo code rivalry to get $10 off your first TodayTix purchase! Visit SquareSpace.com for a free trial, and when you are ready to launch, go to SquareSpace.com/rivalry to save 10% of your first purchase of a website or domain! Want to see exclusive Sibling Rivalry Bonus Content? Head over to www.patreon.com/siblingrivalrypodcast to be the first to see our latest Sibling Rivalry Podcast Videos! @BobTheDragQueen @MonetXChange Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices