Podcasts about eap

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Best podcasts about eap

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Latest podcast episodes about eap

The Emerging Cricket Podcast
T20WC Prep, Women's Asia Cup, Men's U19Qs, South American championships, EAP Sub-Regional B and more!

The Emerging Cricket Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2022 44:51


It's a global game! Action in EAP, Asia, Africa, and the Americas all discussed this week!

You Learn You Turn
Cal Beyer, Rich Jones, and Hamilton Baiden talk Prevention, Saving Lives, and reducing stigma

You Learn You Turn

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 53:51


Cal Beyer is Vice President of Workforce Risk & Worker Wellbeing at Holmes Murphy & Associates. He has over 30 years of experience in safety, risk management & insurance. Cal has seen firsthand the stigma associated with Substance Use Disorder and Mental health in the workplace, especially in the construction industry. Cal is an advocate for bringing awareness, education, and support to the workplace. Today, Cal speaks with the top two executives at Youturn Health, Rich Jones and Hamilton Baiden, who are on a mission to save lives, using their lived experiences and the power of Youturn Health and its coaches. Listen as they debunk myths about having to hit Rock Bottom and discuss real solutions while illustrating how the implementation of Youturn Health in businesses is already saving lives.

FloWrestling Radio Live
FRL 843 - James Green Talks His Journey Through Golden Era Of USA Wrestling

FloWrestling Radio Live

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2022 76:48


James Green joins the show to talk about his role in the "Golden Era of USA Wrestling" both as an athlete and the EAP coach. Send in user submissions to 515-509-5071 or FRLsubmissions@flosports.tv! (0:00) James Green talks about life pre and post retiring from competitive wrestling, Nebraska, coaching, Burroughs, and more (35:50) Rudis + would we do shoeys? (44:00) AWA Duals live on Flo this weekend (50:28) questions Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The EAPA Podcast
Episode 27: A State of the State with EAPA’s New President Dan Boissonneault

The EAPA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2022 19:01


We're joined by Dan Boissonneault, District 26 Senior EAP Coordinator with the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, and the new EAPA President.  Dan discusses his goals as EAPA President, the need to underscore and communicate the body of evidence-based methodologies EAP brings to the workplace, a candid overview of the industry's key challenges in the years ahead, and the role technology can play as EAPs evolve to meet these challenges.  

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast
203: How to Turn the Tide on Burnout with Nationally Renowned Expert Dr. Tina Shah

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2022 35:19


“Burnout is an occupational condition, right? So, to try and treat burnout like a mental health condition and tell us, ‘Okay, something's wrong with you, just go seek mental health care' is just not enough. There's this whole bucket of work where we really need to be supported when we have mental health issues, but it's not enough just to have this 24/7 hotline. You actually need to help us stay well while we're on the job.” - Dr. Tina Shah A lot of things have happened in healthcare over the last decade that have made it one of the hardest times ever to practice medicine in a sustainable way without burning out. This drove Dr. Tina Shah and some of her colleagues to come together to create actionable steps that healthcare organizations can take now to do their part to reduce physician burnout. In this episode, cohost and Lead Coach Jill Farmer speaks with Dr. Tina Shah about these actionable steps, and what drives Dr. Shah's work on burnout in healthcare. Dr. Tina Shah is a pulmonary and critical care physician with over ten years of experience in clinical burnout, health policy, and digital health. She recently served as senior advisor to the U.S. Surgeon General, where she was the chief architect of the nation's first strategy to address burnout and the great resignation among health workers. She's also served in the White House over two presidential administrations and, as an operator during the pandemic, oversaw the launch of telemedicine across a large health care system. Dr. Shah also now advises health systems and technology companies on how to redesign care for better outcomes while continuing to practice on the front lines in the ICU. She's a founding member of the National Academy of Medicine's Clinician Wellbeing Collaborative and recently hosted the country's premier conference on clinician burnout. Although she did well in residency in terms of well-being, Dr. Shah reached a point during her pulmonary critical care fellowship that made her feel that she couldn't go any further. This is a relatable feeling for many in medicine.  Dr. Shah developed what she calls a top five hit list of recommendations to help combat physician burnout and we dive into them in detail. Adjusting expectations is fundamental, and the pandemic has forced the field to practice medicine in a completely different way, with different pressures attached. Improving documentation and technology is also key to making physicians' jobs easier and decreasing the administrative burden. We talk about the concept of GROSS (getting rid of stupid stuff) and how it can improve physician satisfaction as well as radically rethinking staffing and scheduling. A healthcare facility's EAP (employee assistance program) is simply not enough to combat physician burnout, and Dr. Shah's advocacy is exactly what we need.   What's Inside: Dr. Shah's journey and what inspired her to become an advocate for physician well-being. The top five recommendations to combat burnout and enhance medical professional well-being on the job. How technological enhancements can prevent physician stress and overwhelm. Mentioned In This Episode: DocWorking.com ALL IN: WellBeing First for Healthcare Surgeon General's Advisory on Health Worker Burnout   Find full transcripts of DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast episodes on the DocWorking Blog The past few weeks have been busy at DocWorking! We have been working behind the scenes to add even more CME credits to the THRIVE memberships. Let your CME budget help you prioritize your own wellness so you can get on with living your best life on your own terms, as defined by you, with DocWorking THRIVE. You can take the first step today by taking our 2 Minute Balance to Burnout Quiz! Where are you on the Balance to Burnout Continuum? Take the quiz and find out today! DocWorking empowers physicians and entire health care teams to get on the path to achieving their dreams, both in and outside of work, with programs designed to help you maximize life with minimal time. If you like our podcast and would like to subscribe and leave us a 5-star review, we would be extremely grateful! We're everywhere you like to get your podcasts! Apple iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google, Pandora, Stitcher, PlayerFM, ListenNotes, Amazon, YouTube, Podbean. You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter. Some links in our blogs and show notes are affiliate links, and purchases made via those links may result in payments to DocWorking. These help toward our production costs. Thank you for supporting DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast!

Work Smart Live Smart with Beverly Beuermann-King

“You can't do anything right”. “This is your fault – It's always your fault”. Those who are emotionally abusive, are just as dangerous as those who are physically abusive. People can be emotionally abusive by: Rejecting the person by undermining self-esteem, criticizing, humiliating, blaming, or ridiculing They can withhold affection or threaten to take away possessions Abuse my also be restricting access to people or money, or exposing the person to inappropriate situations Emotional Abuse can lead to many emotional, physical, cognitive, and behavioural issues. It can impact social development, future success, and relationships outside of the abusive relationship. Take One Action Today To Build Your #Resiliency!      Here are today's Tips For Building Resiliency and Bringing Awareness To Emotional Abuse: People who are the target of emotional abuse are made to feel insignificant and incapable. Often, having an advocate or a person that they can confide in, can help them to see the abuse is not their fault. If you are being emotionally abused, talk to someone – find someone you can trust – a family member, friend, co-worker, EAP, supervisor, spiritual leader, community advisor or health professional. These resources can help you to examine all of your options so that you can decide what is best for you. Emotional abuse is a serious issue faced by many, but help is available. Recognition is the key. If you like today's wellness tips, let me know. You can leave me a review on amazon or through your #alexa app. Looking for more ways to build your resiliency? Take my free on-line resiliency test at worksmartlivesmart.com under the resources and courses tab. #mentalhealth #hr

Therapeutic Girlfriends
Episode 89: Let's Celebrate

Therapeutic Girlfriends

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 31:25


Welcome back Girlfriends….. This week we are discussing how to celebrate you and have supportive people around you. Please follow your Therapeutic Girlfriends Jessica @itsme_jessicat and Chrissy @drchrissyfabiola Feel free to email us at: Therapeuticgirlfriends@gmail.com Please Subscribe, rate, and comment on the streaming platform you listen on. ***Resources for therapeutic services*** local insurance (EAP)program, www.psychologytoday.com and www.therapyforblackgirls.com

For Real - Le Podcast
EAP par Antone Justin

For Real - Le Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 16:06


Premier invité de cette saison 04, EAP n'est pas ici par hasard, rappeur ultra prometteur, c'était une évidence de l'avoir dans le premier podcast camerounais sur le rap. Découvrez la playlist IZRAPCAM, la première playlist de rap camerounais linktr.ee/izrapcam Découvrez INBOX la meilleure émission rap au Cameroun avec Fidjil ici Fidjil.com

Above Ground Podcast
Train Kept A Rollin" w/Andrew Leece

Above Ground Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 80:04


“How can I be thinking about suicide, when I preach suicide prevention!? queries  Andrew Leece on episode one hundred seventy of Above Ground Podcast. For our second Suicide Survivor September InnerView. Our guest this week is, Andrew Leece. Andrew is a Board Member and Treasurer for the Capital Region Chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention,  Andrew is also, the co-chair of 2022's AFSP Out of the Darkness Walk for RITA , on Sunday, September 25th at Saratoga State Park and he lives with passive suicidal ideation.  Andrew Leece is a friend of the show, but he is also considered a personal friend. Andrew's story is of the tallest engine that could.  Standing at 7'2. Andrew's height equals the strength he possesses as a man with a mental illness to overcome his negative voice to end his life and receive the help he needed to save it instead.  Andrew takes us through his crisis from a lucky appointment with his prescriber, which lead to treatment. From inpatient to outpatient and back into the world. Touting the help he received  from Four Winds of Saratoga, NY.  “The work on your{model railroad} layout is never done and neither is the work on yourself” emphasizes Andrew. Andrew uses his love of model railroads as a positive coping skill and the momentary relief for his mental health. Andrew's life and       Train Kept A Rollin', because of his ability to ask for help, his treatment and his support system.  If you or someone you know needs help immediately dial 911. If not in immediate danger, go to the nearest Emergency Room. Dial the new 988 Crisis and Suicide Hotline, 24 hours a day. Call your Primary Care Physician. Inquire with your employer about your EAP program, if you have one available. Seek out a peer group for your diagnosis or one that you feel would serve you.  Andrew shares with us the struggle with his diagnosis. The roller coaster he rides and tries to hold on to daily. Andrew says thank you to some folks he states were integral in his recovery. Andrew speaks on the importance having the language to talk about your emotions, needs and feelings. Here is a good place to start with Byron Katie's List of Emotions. These lists are the best on the internet and her website The Work is a great place to start your journey of healing.  Andrew is a dedicated Board Member and Treasurer of the Capital Region Chapter of AFSP. Sunday September 25th 2022 at Saratoga Spa State Park is AFSP Capital Region                  2022 Out of the Darkness Walk for RITA, with the walk starting at 10:30am. Andrew and Above Ground Podcast will be there for our third RITA. Come out and support, remember and celebrate the spirit of those we have lost.  September is Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month.  Thanks for listening to Above Ground Podcast. Please continue to like, share, rate, review, follow and friend. Until next time  get Well, be Safe, stay ABOVE.   

Therapeutic Girlfriends
Episode 88:The art of not losing it

Therapeutic Girlfriends

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 40:33


Welcome back Girlfriends….. This week we are discussing how slowing down helps you not lose your ISH. Life is moving fast and stress is a natural consequence but what if you could slow down life, what would you start to appreciate? Please follow your Therapeutic Girlfriends Jessica @itsme_jessicat and Chrissy @drchrissyfabiola Feel free to email us at: Therapeuticgirlfriends@gmail.com Please Subscribe, rate, and comment on the streaming platform you listen on. ***Resources for therapeutic services*** local insurance (EAP)program, www.psychologytoday.com and www.therapyforblackgirls.com

The EAPA Podcast
Episode 26: Kaoru Dreams of EAP: the Rise of Employee Assistance Programs in Japan

The EAPA Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 22:55


We speak with Dr. Kaoru Ichikawa, CEO of Resilie Laboratory Inc., board member of EAPA International, chairperson of EAPA's Japan Branch and co-editor of the just published EAP Handbook, an EAP “primer” on promoting health and productivity management for Japanese workplaces.  Kaoru is joined by Dr. Mark Attridge, President of Attridge Consulting, the lone non-Japanese contributor to the handbook. We talk about EAP in Japan, EAPA's online CEAP Credentialing Program for Japanese EAPs, how to measure EAP effectiveness and the future of EAP in Japan.  https://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/4760821902/

HerCsuite™ Radio - For Women Leaders On The Move
Bounce Back from Burnout with Kara Dennison

HerCsuite™ Radio - For Women Leaders On The Move

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 23:21


Have you been feeling stressed, overworked, overwhelmed, and burnt out? You're not alone. Take a listen as Kara Dennison and host Natalie Benamou as they share personal experiences of working to the point of ending up in the hospital..and how to bounce back. Kara's passion is empowering high achievers and leaders to live impactful lives, starting with their careers. Kara is the CEO of Optimized Career Solutions, an Executive Career and Leadership Coach and a Forbes Contributor. She is a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) who has spent her career as a Corporate Recruiting Leader, working closely with decision-makers. Throughout her career, Kara has personally reviewed over 300,000 resumes. Through her executive coaching programs, she has helped thousands of professionals land their dream jobs and has been responsible for negotiating over $10 million in salary increases over the last few years. Find out what happened to Kara twice in her career and how she recovered from being in the hospital to bounce back from burnout. Signs of Burnout Working 12+ hours in a day Weekends aren't are no longer days off Your health and wellbeing is suffering Your doctor is telling you something has to change...or worse you end up in the hospital Self-Care Strategies Stop working weekends and long hours Empower your team Make a commitment to yourself How Leaders Can Help Your Teams Be vulnerable with your team. Create an open relationship for your team to talk to you. Look for signs that your team is experiencing fatigue, are disengaging and need help "If you're a leader and you're seeing burnout on your team, encourage your team members to take advantage of EAP programs. Especially if you have free EAP programs where they can go and talk to a therapist or talk to someone or a burnout coach." -Kara Dennison Find Kara Dennison | TikTok @karadennisonsphr | Optimized Career Solutions Thank you Kara Dennison for being a guest on HerCsuite™ Radio! Are you feeling overwhelmed? You are invited to join women just like you, who need support and encouragement at every career phase! Find out how every member feels valued inside our community. We are advancing and engaging more women at every career phase. The secret is expert speakers combined with facilitated peer-to-peer advice in only one hour a month, Wherever you are in your career- You Belong Here. Natalie Benamou is the Founder of HerCsuite™. Natalie is a speaker, podcast guest, board advisor and CEO of HerPower2, Inc. Reach out if you would like her to speak or be on this podcast at info@hercsuite.com. LinkedIn: Natalie Benamou | HerPower2 Lead | HerCsuite™ This podcast is sponsored by HerCsuite™ Events. Join us at our next program, September 23! Credits: Thanks to Julie Deem and the Business Podcast Editor for editing our podcast! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/natalie109/message

Set to Lead Podcast
48. How to Support Your Mental Wellbeing with Dr. Courtney Williams

Set to Lead Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 30:06


Dr. Courtney Williams discusses how to support mental health in the workplace and all walks of life.

Snap Out of It! The Mental Illness in the Workplace Podcast with Natasha Tracy
How a Population Health Scientist Helps Those with Mental Illness at Work (Including Herself)

Snap Out of It! The Mental Illness in the Workplace Podcast with Natasha Tracy

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 42:18


Cara McNulty is a population health scientist and the President, Behavioral Health and Employee Assistance Programs at Aetna, a CVS Health Company. She's also a woman who has experienced mental illness. This week, Snap Out of It! The Mental Illness in the Workplace Podcast with Natasha Tracy is talking with Cara McNulty about her own experience with mental illness, amplifying her passion for helping others with mental illness. We're also going to be talking about what place an employer should have when dealing with employees with mental illness and how voices with mental illness are shamed and silenced. Helping People with Mental Illness at Work We're going to be discussing things like: Cara's personal experience of mental illness Passion for helping people with mental illness at work Why employers should support people with mental illness What employers should be doing to help people with mental illness Changing the silencing and shaming of those with mental illness Whether you are in human resources, a c-suite executive, or simply want to ensure that people with mental illness get what they need at work, you don't want to miss this episode. For more information and the transcript, go to http://snapoutofitpodcast.com Cara McNulty's Bio Cara McNulty, DPA, is President of Behavioral Health and Employee Assistance Programs at CVS Health, a leading provider of mental health and employee assistance program (EAP) solutions to members and communities around the globe. She oversees a national team that spearheads the development of CVS Health and Aetna's programs, products, and capabilities designed to offer individuals easy access to quality, innovative treatments and meet people wherever they are along the continuum of mental wellbeing. Cara is a highly-regarded executive leader and population health scientist whose success in driving population wellbeing outcomes spans the employer, government, payer/provider, start-up, and education sectors. She is known for her ability to integrate confirmed health science into practical business models that drive measurable outcomes. Focused on the increased need for mental wellbeing resources exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic, Cara leads CVS Health's strategy to expand mental health services and resources. Most recently, this included Aetna offering members cost-sharing waivers for mental and behavioral health telemedicine visits at the onset of the pandemic, as well as opening Aetna's Resources For Living crisis and health support lines to all consumers regardless of health plan. Cara previously served as the North American leader of Integrated Wellbeing for Willis Towers Watson. Her responsibilities included advising clients on strategies focusing on employee engagement, clinical outcomes, and productivity. She sat on the company's Health and Benefits Specialty Practice Leadership team and focused on integrated wellbeing, intellectual capital, and service development across physical, emotional, financial, and social dimensions. As the former Head of Population Health, Team Member Wellbeing and Guest Wellness for Target Corporation, she led efforts to implement the company's health agenda. She developed strategies that improved all team members' health, driving value and business growth while decreasing health care expenditures. [ . . .]

Therapeutic Girlfriends
Episode 87: When crunchy goes wrong

Therapeutic Girlfriends

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 41:40


Welcome back Girlfriends….. This week we are discussing when being natural and granola goes completely wrong. Have you ever experienced a time when you thought going natural was the best thing to do and your body rejected it? If that's you then this episode is definitely for you. Please follow your Therapeutic Girlfriends Jessica @itsme_jessicat and Chrissy @drchrissyfabiola Feel free to email us at: Therapeuticgirlfriends@gmail.com Please Subscribe, rate, and comment on the streaming platform you listen on. ***Resources for therapeutic services*** local insurance (EAP)program, www.psychologytoday.com, and www.therapyforblackgirls.com

Criminal Justice Evolution Podcast  - Hosted by Patrick Fitzgibbons
Criminal Justice Evolution Podcast: Dr. Tina Jaeckle - Crisis and Trauma Consultant / EAP Counselor / First Responders

Criminal Justice Evolution Podcast - Hosted by Patrick Fitzgibbons

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 30:04


Hello everyone and welcome back to The CJEvolution Podcast. A top ranked show because of you the listener and supporter. Thank you. If you love the show please share this episode and others with your family and friends, and give us that 5-Star Rating and Review on Apple Podcasts. If you are struggling with addiction, mental health challenges, or both please reach out. My life changed for the better when I took that step forward. I am so grateful for FHE Health and The Shatterproof Program for First Responders. Reach out at 844-650-1399 or contact me directly at 303-960- 9819.  https://fherehab.com/services/first-responders/ I am so excited to have my friend Dr. Tina Jaeckle on the show. Tina Jaeckle, Ph. D. is a licensed clinical social worker in Florida, and Georgia and has over two decades of mental health experience. Dr. Jaeckle has presented nationally on issues of crisis/trauma/stress/critical incidents, officer involved shootings resiliency, and suicide (law enforcement). She serves as the mental health/training coordinator for several CISM/Peer Support and hostage/crisis negotiation teams. Dr. Jaeckle is also a current EAP counselor for police/corrections for the Jacksonville (Florida) Sheriff's Office. Dr. Jaeckle has extensive experience in the development, coordination, and training of law enforcement and fire rescue CISM programs.  A very informative show =)   You can find Dr. Jaeckle here: https://www.drtinajaeckle.com/  https://www.linkedin.com/in/dr-tina-jaeckle-a19b834b/    Stay tuned for more great guests on The CJEvolution Podcast www.cjevolution.com   Patrick  

BachTalk
Nathan Jones - Elevation Athletic Performance

BachTalk

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 68:16


Season 4 Episode 27 is out with Nathan Jones. Nathan owns Elevation Athletic Performance located in Cassville, MO. Nathan prides his facility on quality Strength & Conditioning programs to help athletes reach their full potential. Nathan started EAP in 2021 and has seen a lot of growth in the last year. Nathan goes in-depth talking about how to start a facility but more importantly knowing your population demographic. Nathan found his niche in Cassville, MO by offering best quality training programs and atmosphere. Nathan spent time as an OPP Intern (Optimal Power Performance located in Tempe, AZ) in 2021. Nathan talks about how this was such an eye-opening experience for him and what quality player development entails. Nathan talks about how his experience gave him the confidence to learn and explore the field of strength & conditioning in a positive manner. Nathan is a huge proponent of the conjugate method for athletes. Nathan goes on to talk about why he uses this method and why it is so helpful to all athletes no matter what season they are currently in (Off-Season, Preseason, In season, Postseason). Please join me in listening to Nathan and his shared experiences about Strength & Conditioning! Timestamps: Ian's Experience with Elevation Performance  Background: Baseball background 2:15 Before Elevation 5:20 Elevation Performance  What made you start your own facility 8:50 Facility backbone (Conjugate system or Conjugate for athletes) 15:50 What have you learned from your first year? 20:58 What are going to be your keys to having a successful facility 28:05 OPP Internship Experience 32:12 Working with AJ Arroyo (you can go as in-depth as you want. He is very respected in the S/C field that's why) 33:45 Hitting and the style? 42:00 Conjugate for athletes Favorite keys towards program (example: AMRAP Method) 49:40 Player development  What have you been exploring within player development recently 55:20 What are you looking to implement over the next year with your facility 59:50 Closing 61:04

Therapeutic Girlfriends
Episode 86: It's all about your Mindset

Therapeutic Girlfriends

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 42:57


Welcome back Girlfriends….. This week we are discussing approaching life that is the most authentic to you. Remember you get to choose the lifestyle that best fits you. What makes sense for your lifestyle? Please follow your Therapeutic Girlfriends Jessica @itsme_jessicat and Chrissy @drchrissyfabiola Feel free to email us at: Therapeuticgirlfriends@gmail.com Please Subscribe, rate, and comment on the streaming platform you listen on. ***Resources for therapeutic services*** local insurance (EAP)program, www.psychologytoday.com and www.therapyforblackgirls.com

Path to Well-Being in Law
Path to Well-Being in Law - Episode 24: Kori Carew

Path to Well-Being in Law

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 57:12


CHRIS NEWBOLD: Hello, wellbeing friends. Welcome to the Path To Well-Being In Law Podcast, an initiative of the Institute for Well-Being in Law. As you know, my name is Chris Newbold. I serve as executive vice president of ALPS Malpractice Insurance. You know, our goal here on the podcast is to introduce you to thought leaders doing meaningful work in the wellbeing space within the legal profession, and in the process, build and nurture a national network of wellbeing advocates intent on creating a culture shift within the profession. As always, I am joined by my co-host, Bree Buchanan. Bree, how are you doing today? BREE BUCHANAN: I'm doing great, Chris. Great to be here. CHRIS: Good, good. As you all know, Bree is the president of the Institute for Well-Being in Law. Bree, we have some really exciting news to share about the institute and the journey that we're on to engineer this culture shift. Would you maybe give us a clue as to the breaking news that I think that we were so excited about? BREE: Nobody could be more excited than me because you said, you know, Bree is the board president. Well, up until this news, I had two jobs. I was the acting executive director, so I am just delighted to let people know we have hired our first full-time staff person and that is our inaugural executive director. Her name is Jennifer DiSanza. She comes to us with a whole host of experience in wellbeing issues and particularly with the law students. For many reasons, we wanted to bring Jennifer on board, but also strategically, we really realized that's where she's coming from is the future of our profession. And also, aside of where we know there's a lot of behavioral health distress and stress on the youngest members of our profession and the law students. So we're just thrilled to have Jennifer on board. CHRIS: Yeah. See, I had the privilege of serving with you Bree on the hiring committee. Boy, we have a dynamic leader now that will be working day-to-day to think about advancing wellbeing in our profession. You know, there's so much work to be done as you well know. We're actually planning on having Jennifer as our next podcast guest, which will be awesome to be able to just talk about the vision, why she's passionate about this work. It will also happen to be after the conclusion of some strategic planning that we as a board will be doing. So things are just really aligning well with both what has transpired, where we're going, and then focusing on what lies ahead in terms of some big issues that we have to tackle as we think about the wellbeing of lawyers and legal professionals in the profession. With that, today we're going to circle back to, we've spent considerable time in the area of diversity, equity, and inclusion. You know, we had anticipated a three part series on this, but sometimes you extend an offer and you get somebody who's so awesome that you sit there and go, we have to expand this even further. Right? BREE: Along came Kori. Yeah. CHRIS: That's right. Along came Kori. And when Kori came along, we're like, okay, we're breaking the rules. We're totally bringing Kori into the mix. And so we were really excited to welcome Kori Carew to the podcast. Bree, would you be so kind to introduce Kori? And again, this is I know a podcast that we've been very excited and looking forward to. BREE: Absolutely. So Kori is a people inclusion strategist, an advocate, a speaker, a writer, a status quo disruptor. Got to love that. Child of God, wife and mother of two curly-haired, wise, energetic, fierce, spitfire daughters. Her family is multi-ethnic, multi-racial, multi-religious and spans multiple nationalities. She brings a fierce love of community and belonging that transcends differences to work, ministry and life. She loves to sing, cook, entertain, dance in the hallways at work, we need a video component of that, and read. Equipping leaders to be inclusive, to interrupt bias and disrupt the status quo. At her day job, she focuses on developing and implementing strategies for individual career and diversity and inclusion success, and helps organizations build bridges across differences and improve inclusion. BREE: When she's not working, she focuses her voice and talent on issues of gender equity and rights, inclusion, and human and civil rights, serving in her church and community, and cherishing her phenomenal tribe and community. She's energized by helping people live their very best lives. Kori was the Director of Strategic Diversity Initiatives for seven years at Shook, Hardy. And then she came over to Seyfarth and is now the Chief Inclusion and Diversity Officer there and oversees their really spectacular wellbeing program, Seyfarth Life, and a whole host of other initiatives we're going to hear about. So Kori, welcome to the podcast. CHRIS: Yay. KORI CAREW: Thank you. I appreciate you inviting me to be on this podcast and also very much the work that you are doing. This conversation of wellbeing for attorneys is such an important conversation. It's one that we probably started having too late, and it's one where diversity and inclusion, there's more work to be done than time. I'm super thankful for all that you do and all that you do to help our profession be better, so thank you very much. BREE: You bet. Kori, I'm going to start off. We ask all of our guests a variation of this question. What experiences in your life are drivers behind your passion for work around diversity, equity, and inclusion and belonging and wellbeing? KORI: Thank you for that question. And of course, you're causing me to go down a bit of memory lane. You would think this is an easy question, but it actually is not. It's not as easy because it forces you to look in the rear view mirror and try to understand where the dots connected to where you are. Before I do that, I do want to make one small correction. Seyfarth Life is an incredible initiative at Seyfarth that I am super proud of and one of the things that energized me about joining the firm. It has a steering committee that leads it. It's four partners at the firm, all of whom have a connection to wellbeing and mindfulness. My department and my role actually does not oversee Seyfarth Life, but we do work very closely with them. Because as one of the founding members, Laura Maechtlen noted from the very beginning, there's that intersection between inclusion and diversity and belonging and wellbeing, and the two work very closely together. But my department does not oversee Seyfarth Life. So just wanted to make sure I give credit to the right people. BREE: Absolutely, give credit where it's due. KORI: You know, because they're awesome and they do great work. In fact, if I may brag on them, out of the steering committee members, one of them is the chair of the largest department in the firm and an executive committee member and co-chair of the national diversity and inclusion action team. Oh, wait a minute. No, that's not right. Three are office managing partners. They're part of this steering committee, this leadership group, because they actually practice wellbeing and mindfulness and meditation in their own personal lives and allow it to influence how they lead. So I know Seyfarth didn't pay me to do a promotion, but I felt like I needed to shout some guys out. BREE: Absolutely. KORI: Our talent team helps them quite a bit in terms of organizing programs and handling the administrative and logistic things. Okay. So to answer your question, what are the experiences? I often say this and it is true that when I look at my life in the rear view mirror, how I ended up where I am makes a lot more sense as I connect the dots in ways that I probably couldn't have foreseen. For example, I never intended to be a diversity and inclusion professional. I actually never intended to go to law school. I started my university career as an electrical engineering major. When I came to the U.S., I wanted to build planes. That was my thing. I wanted to be an aeronautical engineer. I wanted to build planes. I loved science. I could spend hours in the lab. One of the best gifts I ever got was a lab coat. My dad had a custom drawing board built for me when I was a teenager that I carried with me everywhere because technical drawing, engineering drawing was one of my top subjects. KORI: So a lot of things make sense in hindsight. I look at my family composition and my sisters and I were all born in different countries. We have different passports. We grew up in Nigeria, a country with over 300 different ethnic groups with different languages and traditions and customs, so there's that. My family is multi-religious, multi-ethnic, multi-national, multi-racial and there's just so much diversity there. You know, in the family tree, there's a granduncle that's a Methodist church bishop, and one that's an Imam. And my grandfather's father was a teacher, was a teacher of the Quran. And so all of that diversity is there in the family, but it probably influenced how my parents raised my sisters and I and how even through childhood, I was always the person who was connecting the dots between similarities between people. And today we would call that cultural fluency, this ability to recognize cultural differences and not judge them but just adapt to them and be able to say, okay, you know what? KORI: It looks to me like person A is looking through a lens that's different than person B, but they're looking at the same thing. So how can I get these two people to be on the same page? So there's that family dynamic. But another thing that happened when I was growing up that I do think influenced me quite a bit. I grew up in Nigeria. Most of my childhood, we had one military dictator after another. So I grew up with coos happening more often than I would prefer. There were times that things broke out into religious violence. You're talking about incidents where a few people are killed or a lot of people are killed and everything goes to standstill, everybody's on edge. You don't leave your home. When the students go on riots because they're protesting something and things get out of hand, you're turning off the lights in your home and sort of huddled together, trying to make sure that you stay together as a family until everything passes over. So that was also something that I grew up around and experiencing. KORI: And then my parents are from Sierra Leone. Sierra Leone is actually my home country. If you ask me where I'm from, I will tell you I was born in Canada, grew up in Nigeria, but I'm from Sierra Leone. Because in my culture, you're where your father's from. So my entire identity has always been that I am from Sierra Leone. In the '90s, Sierra Leone began to experience a very brutal civil war, which calling it a civil war is actually inaccurate. You have a bunch of people with weapons who terrorize the population for 11 years. And it's been one of the most brutal wars that the world has seen at least in recent times. And that impacted my family in the sense that we lost people, in the sense that I hadn't been back to Sierra Leone for a long time. And it kind of started with my mom not feeling it was safe enough for us to go and visit, with grandparents living on the run and being sick and dying and me not seeing them in a long time because of just this state of chaos. KORI: And all of this fueled how I ended up going to law school, wanting to do human rights work, wanting to be a human rights lawyer, feeling as if I learned so much about the American system and the role that the legal profession played in terms of maintaining democracy and freedom and wanting to multiply that. Right. But then I go to law school. I graduate. I fall in love with a boy who I actually started dating in college, and I ended up in Kansas City because I followed a boy. You know, career took a different turn, ended up being a defense lawyer. And then you fast forward to doing an evaluation and me going through a process of saying, okay, I've done a lot of the things I wanted to do. I've achieved a lot of the things I wanted to achieve. I wanted to try cases. I wanted to build this reputation. I wanted to be successful in A, B, C, D. KORI: And I started taking inventory of the things I was passionate about, the skills I developed, the experiences I had and where I was losing time. You know, where was I given my time in community? What were the things that I could lose myself doing in such deep flow that I don't even recognize that time has gone by? And that journey ended up leading me to inclusion and diversity work and I haven't turned back since. There's some aspects of the legal profession I miss. I miss trying cases. I miss solving problems for clients. It may sound like the weirdest thing, but boy, playing around with evidence, rules, and figuring out how to get things in or keep things out is a nerdy love of mine. And so those are just some of the experiences that I would say led me to this love for helping people build bridges and I'm empower people to succeed despite the challenges, and being able to create just a level of cultural fluency amongst groups of people so that we understand how much better we are together as opposed to isolated from one another. So that's a long answer. BREE: Well, what an amazing life you've had to date and an incredible background that informs your work at a depth that I know Chris and I can't even begin to imagine. CHRIS: For sure. Kori, how long have you been more squarely centered on the inclusion and diversity side of things? KORI: I have been for 11 years now full-time diversity. What I realized, you know, somebody asked me a question similar to this, how long have you been doing diversity work, which is different from what I usually hear. I actually did the inventory and realized that, you know, 29 years ago, when I first came to the U.S., that was when I actually started doing presentations. At the time, we called them multiculturalism. We started doing presentations on bridging differences, on being able to understand different cultures and how you navigate it. And so I've been actually teaching on diversity, inclusion, cultural fluency leadership topics now for 29, 30 years. But it being my full-time job, that happened when I left litigation and moved over to Shook, Hardy & Bacon. CHRIS: Okay. I think a good point to maybe start the conversation is, you know, again, your perspective is so unique and informed. For diverse members of the profession, can you talk to our listeners about some of the more challenging aspects of the last couple of years? KORI: Yeah. So the last couple of years have been tough for everyone. This pandemic, it's been brutal and it's impacted us in so many different ways. We've lost our sense of certainty to the extent that we didn't had any. We've lost our ability to have some kind of predictability, something that is a core need, a core need for many of us. Well, not for many of us, for everyone. It's actually a core human need. And so we've been sort of thrown into this whirlwind of uncertainty with no deadline, right? We went from thinking, well, I'll speak for myself. You know, since I'm not a scientist, I foolishly thought, well, maybe in two weeks I'll go back to the office. And then it was a month. And then I thought six weeks. And then I thought for sure by summer 2020 we'd be able to go out and about and things would be quasi under control. And here we are, you know, some 28, 29 months later and we still have COVID. I'm sick right now recovering from COVID after avoiding it for almost 30 months, I get it. KORI: So you have that benchmark that is impacting everyone and the uncertainty that we've seen with everything going on around us. But as with everything, I think people from historically underrepresented and marginalized groups, what happens is the things that... There's this saying that the things, and I'm going to probably say it wrong. And it may be an African American saying, but it's this thing that what gives some people a cold will give others the flu. And so what you've seen then is populations that have been historically marginalized and underrepresented and haven't had access to full equity, had been impacted very differently by the same storm that we're all in. So we're all in the same storm, but we're not in the same boat. We're experiencing it differently. So communities of color, we know got hit by COVID much harder. KORI: And you have that intersection between race, between housing inequity, between education inequity, between healthcare inequity and healthcare access, all of those things coming together to adversely impact some groups more. So if you are someone who is Brown or Black, or from one of these historically marginalized communities, and you are going to work during the pandemic, or you're working from home, you are more likely to have family members who have been directly impacted by COVID, right? You are more likely to have lost family members. You also, generally speaking are more likely to be in a position where you are in an extended family situation where you are responsible for more people than just yourself. You know, one of the things that we know, for example, that impacts generational wealth is that those of us from communities of color oftentimes are responsible not just for ourselves, but for extended family members. KORI: So you have that dynamic playing, then you have the racial pandemic, which has been going on, but in the last two years have come to fevered pitch. And so the daily trauma of dealing with racism and microaggressions then gets compounded by all the incidents, George Floyd, Charles Cooper, and all the other incidents that have been bombarding us from our television screens, from the news reports, from articles. And so now all of a sudden everything is right in your face and you're dealing with all of it at the same time. And so those are some of the things that are professionals from "diverse communities," from underrepresented marginalized communities have been dealing with. And our reserves have been tapped into and overstretched to where for some of us, it feels like it's been just too much. BREE: Absolutely. It's unimaginable just how much to carry on in that space. All of the things that you just described, this litany of horrors is on top of just the day-to-day difficulty as been expressed to me, and reading in my friends of people of color, just the microaggressions and just how hard it is. Just take away pandemic and everything else and the racial reckoning, how hard it can be just to get through the day. I can't even imagine. It is absolutely just too, too much. Kori, there's so much to unpack here. I wanted to kind of pushing us along here talking about diversity, equity, and inclusion and talking about belonging and overlaying that. I mean, when I started looking in the legal profession, we talk about DEI, it was diversity then DEI, and now we're getting into some of the really, to me, needy and interesting stuff around belonging. I know that you created a belonging project at Seyfarth. Could you talk to us about the importance of that, and also about this project that you got started at Seyfarth? KORI: Sure. Let me separate them out. Belonging is a conversation that more and more of us are having, and it is fairly new to the conversation when you're talking about diversity and inclusion. It started with we talked about diversity, and then we started talking about diversity and inclusion, and now we've included equity and belonging. Belonging goes to that sense, that feeling that each of us have when we belong and we feel like we are part of a group and that we belong to something that is bigger than us. It is also a core human need. Brené Brown has this phrase that she says that we have three irreducible needs, and they are to be loved, to connect, and to belong. What we know from the research is that when we don't have belonging, it impacts us. It is wired into our DNA to belong to something. KORI: So we will either have healthy belonging, or we will seek a belonging that may not be healthy and may not be good. This is where you can queue in hate groups and cult because they will do anything to belong. We will also conform to fit in so that we have a quasi sense of belonging. The problem though is that when we don't have belonging, we actually see physiological, physical, spiritual, mental, psychological impact on our wellbeing. It impacts our sense of health. Forget our sense of health. It actually impacts our health, right? We know that exclusion and the lack of belonging actually results in increased depression, increased high blood pressure, increased diabetes. Incidentally, a lot of the same things that racial trauma and microaggressions also causes on the human body. And so if we don't have that sense of belonging, then we are not able to actually actualize that sense of inclusion where everyone is able to be leveraged and their differences and their strengths leveraged so that they can succeed as they want to succeed. KORI: And without belonging, you don't get wellbeing. But conversely, without wellbeing, you can't cultivate that sense of belonging. And so those two things are intertwined as well as this concept of engagement, which also is in the mix, right? You can't create engagement unless you have social connection and belonging. And so all of these things come together. Unfortunately, in many of our organizations, they're treated as separate, right? In many organizations, you have the wellbeing function being managed in a way that it doesn't speak to diversity, doesn't speak to belonging at all. So imagine now we just talked about COVID and we talked about how COVID has impacted everyone. Then imagine you're developing a wellness initiative or a wellbeing initiative and you're not stopping to think, oh, wait a minute, because of diversity, this pandemic has impacted people in different ways. KORI: And so I can't just trot out a wellbeing program without factoring in diversity and how diversity has resulted in different people experiencing this pandemic differently. Similarly, we fail when we try to, for example, have a wellbeing initiative that doesn't stop and think, oh, wow, we're not talking about racial trauma. We're not talking about microaggressions. We're not talking about the impact of implicit bias and exclusion on the psychological and physical wellbeing of the people in our organization. And so what's happening is these concepts are tied together, but in our organizations and most of our organizations, we're not doing DEI and incorporating wellbeing and we're not doing wellbeing incorporating DEIB. Instead, we're acting as if they're completely separate and they're not. CHRIS: I mean, I think it goes without saying, we, I think as human beings, sometimes we compartmentalize of there's this and then there's that. I think that from the infancy of the institute, I think we've emphasized the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion as part of, has to flow through everything, every lens that we look at from the wellbeing perspective. But I have to admit, it's been more challenging than I think, than we've appreciated because sometimes we look a little bit myopically at some of these issues without broadening our lens. That's the perspective that I think that you can bring our listeners that, again, this intersection of diversity, equity, inclusion, belonging with wellbeing, I guess I'd be curious on just, how can we merge? Right? Because again, even the fact that there's organizations that work over here and organizations that work over here, and we really should be just the coalition and the umbrella and the totality of how it all works together is something that I don't know that we appreciate the magnitude of. KORI: Well, and the only way we can appreciate the magnitude is if we have these honest conversations. But we also have to have the conversations around the structural and the cultural underpinnings, right? How do we have conversations about wellbeing that take into consideration differences? That take into consideration, okay, we're telling people, hey, we have therapy or we have EAP, or we have whatever the organization offers. But how do you do that and also acknowledge that for some communities that there is a stigma around maybe going to a therapist? How do you have that conversation with those communities? Or that racial bias and racial aggressions are having an impact on people, but you have an entire generation of Black people, for example, who have survived by plowing through all the challenges that the world has put in front of us. And to sit down and talk about the way in which racism has impacted us is asking us to put our shields down, which means opening up ourselves to attack, which means possibly being accused of playing the race card. Right? KORI: All of things that you may have grown up in a time where we just didn't talk about that in mixed company, we only talked about that with each other. And so there are all these layers, all these layers. I recently listened to a friend of mine, Ratu Basin, and she was talking about how it feels for her as someone of Indian heritage to see how much yoga, for example, has been whitewashed. There's so many conversations to be had even in the wellbeing space, even when we're talking to people about things like self-care. Well, what are you recommending? Because some of the things we tell people to do for self-care, go get a massage, who can afford that? What culture support that kind of self-care? And is that really self-care or is that treating a symptom? Should self-care and wellbeing be about a way of life and a way of working such that we don't need these emergency [inaudible 00:32:26] like solutions to fix the symptoms, right? KORI: And that's the big conversation and that's the conversation I'm hearing some lawyers begin to ask where they say, the organization says they care about wellbeing, but we're getting these other messages that say it's productivity and hours and billables that matter, right? How do we shift the culture and how we're embracing these topics in a way that makes it more meaningful? I just realized, I didn't even answer your second question about the belonging project, but yeah, this is the stuff that to me, I see a lot of potential for us to have really good conversations that can lead to solutions that are more inclusive of a diverse profession. BREE: Kori, you're clearly such a thought leader and a visionary in this space. Can you talk a little bit about how do we get change to occur in a profession, the legal profession that is so reluctant to change? Even more so than general society. Where do you see the bright points of really being able to make some change? KORI: Can you repeat that question? BREE: Yeah. Just about how do we get change to occur in the legal profession? You know, this is a profession that is just so stayed and slow and bound up in tradition. This is the way we do it, that sort of thing. And here you are with these fabulous ideas, working with a very large law firm, having come from another very large law firm so you're in this space. What are your ideas for actually getting real change to occur? Where are the pressure points, I guess? KORI: Well, I think some of the pressure points are actually external. You asked me a question earlier about the last two years, something that I didn't mention that has impacted a lot. It's impacting individuals from underrepresented groups, but it's also impacting our organizations. Is this fake cultural war that is also going on, you know, regardless of what political party you're in, I think we can acknowledge that for the last six years, there has been an attack on everything that we are trying to accomplish in diversity and inclusion. White is now Black, Black is now white. And if we are in a state of being, for example, where I'll use Florida as an example where someone can say, we want to ban any training if it makes someone uncomfortable. What you're essentially saying is let's keep the status quo the way it is, even if the status quo supports white supremacy. KORI: Even if the status quo is inequitable. You would rather keep the status quo than have an uncomfortable conversation. When it comes to the legal profession, in particular, law firms, because of how we are constructed. A law firm essentially has multiple owners. It's not like a corporation that has a board of directors and has shareholders. Let's say you have a law firm of a thousand people and 300 of them are partners. You have 300 people running around who think that everybody should have an equal say in every single decision. It's one of the reasons that law firms function so differently from other companies and why decision making is so different. Everything we do is different. You know, we put people in leadership positions not because they're leaders, but because they're great trial attorneys or they're great business generators or whatever, whatever the criteria is, but rarely is it because someone actually is a good leader. KORI: And so we have this culture that we have built that really makes it difficult for us to have real hard conversations on the things that really matter, on the things that really can make change. So imagine that law firm now sitting in the last six years and even more so in the last three years. I can tell you when it comes to diversity, inclusion, many of us are throwing our hands up and saying, so how in the hell are we supposed to have this conversation then? If you're saying, oh, we can't talk about white privilege because someone says, oh, that offends me. Or we can't talk about systemic racism because someone's going to say, oh, wait a minute, if you say systemic racism is real, then that's anti-American. So we are living in a time where the terms racism, the terms CRT have been completely redefined to where they mean nothing that even resembles what they actually mean. KORI: And then we're over here arguing about these fictitious decisions, these fictitious definitions, and we're not actually doing the hard work that needs to be done, right. Because if you won't even acknowledge that systemic racism is real, then how do we evaluate the systems to see where we may be having inequitable results and then changing those systems? Because if you deny a thing exists, then we can't even address it. BREE: Absolutely. KORI: And so that's probably one of the biggest challenges I see, but also the biggest opportunity. And if anything is going to change when it comes to diversity, we have got to get more courageous about having difficult conversations, but conversations that are worthwhile, they are important. Nothing about creating equity is comfortable and cozy and touchy-feely, it's hard work. It requires us to say some things that we maybe may not have faced before, but we don't get to change what we won't face, what we won't acknowledge, and what we won't be honest about. It's like, you can't write a new end into the story if you won't acknowledge the truth of the story. That's the whirlwind that I think we are in now, not just as a profession, but as a country and a society. BREE: Absolutely. What an incredibly difficult place to be? Yeah, go ahead, Chris. CHRIS: Well, I was just going to say, I want to unpack that more. Let's do this. Let's take a quick break and come back because I mean, my burning question and Kori began to sort of thinking about it, which is what's the pathway to better, more productive, honest conversations, right? Because I think that you're right. The question is, how do we create the environments for ultimately that societal discussion to occur in the most productive way? So let's take a quick break and we'll come right back. — ADVERTISEMENT: Meet VERA, your firm's Virtual Ethics Risk Assessment Guide developed by ALPS. VERA's purpose is to help you uncover risk management blind spots from client intake to calendaring, to cybersecurity, and more. VERA: I require only your honest input to my short series of questions. I will offer you a summary of recommendations to provide course corrections if needed, and to keep your firm on the right path. Generous and discreet, VERA is a free and anonymous risk management guide from ALPS to help firms like yours be their best. Visit VERA at alpsinsurance.com/vera.   — CHRIS: Okay. We are back with Kori Carew, our esteemed guests and the chief inclusion and diversity officer at Seyfarth Shaw. Kori, we were just getting into the, I think the discussion. I feel like we're going deeper than even I had thought we would in the conversation, which I love. You know, as we think now about we need to have the honest conversations, right. And so I would just be curious on your opinion as what's the pathway to get there. If we appreciate that there's a lot of noise and the volume levels are high, and there's a lot of yelling, frankly, on both sides of the equation. What's the pathway toward problem solving, thoughtful discussion, intentional discussion that ultimately advances the dialogue? KORI: Thank you very much for that question. Honestly, it's one I've been thinking a lot about. You know, I did do a TEDx in 2017 and the impetus for that TED really was that question that you just asked, which was, there's a lot of yelling and not enough dialogue that allows us to move into action. Since I gave that TED, I've sort of watched what's been going on in organizations and in the country. I don't think I would change anything about that TED, except that there are a few more things that I would emphasize. One of the first things that we have to do if we truly want to make progress, and I'm going to steal a Nigerian thing, tell the truth and shame the devil. We are avoiding being honest with ourself about so many things. Whether it is just being honest about the experiences people have in the organization, or being honest about where the gaps are, or being honest about what the failures are, or even individual honesty. KORI: That self-awareness to say, you know Kori, you talk a lot about wellbeing and you talk a lot about leadership, but the reason you talk about those things is because you were searching for something that you did not have in the leaders that you grew up under, right? So you were trying to create something for others that you didn't have, but you are also trying to create it for yourself. And there are many days that you totally suck. There are many days that you are making very bad wellbeing decisions. There are days that you are not as inclusive as you would want to be, but it's okay. And the only way you're going to get better is by acknowledging where you're not doing it right. Now, think about that when we're talking about gender or race or LGBT inclusion or disability inclusion. If we as individuals and we as organizations are not willing to be honest about our history, what has happened and what is happening, then we don't even have a starting point. KORI: And the way that we do that is very, very cliché. Getting comfortable with what is uncomfortable. I remember when I first started saying that, when I was at Shook, Hardy & Bacon and it wasn't even a thing many people were saying, and now people say it so often that it has lost its meaning. But it truly is the beginning point. And in too many of our organizations, we are shutting down any discussion or any movement in the name of trying to get consensus, or in trying to water things so much that they're meaningless, right? Or being so hyperworried about future possible hypothetical litigation that somebody may have over something that they don't like that they heard as opposed to possible litigation over people who do not feel like they are being treated equitably. You know, it's like we have to choose our heart. And so it's either the heart of sitting in the discomfort and learning things we may not want to learn, challenging ourselves, reaching deep to say, you know what? I don't really like that. KORI: When you talk to me about Christian privilege, this is a true story. Okay. True story. A [inaudible 00:46:22] of mine talked about Christian privilege. We're talking about something. She said, "Yeah, but there's also Christian privilege and people never talk about that." And can I admit to you that I was like, "Oh, is she for real? We're talking about racism and she's talking about Christian privilege." That was my initial reaction. But I sat with it. You know what? She was right. Because she was Pagan and I'm Christian. I've never had to use PTO for Christmas. My holidays are respected, they are recognized, they are centered, they are prioritized. But other people in this country who are not Christian do not have those privileges. Now that's a benign example because it's not one that makes people get as upset as some of the other topics. KORI: But the first step has to be a commitment to sit through the discomfort, sit through what may rub you wrong, and acknowledge that just because something is uncomfortable or just because something offends you does not mean the thing is wrong or it is offensive. And in many of our organizations, we haven't even gotten past that first part. Then the next part has to be a commitment to learn more. We have to operationalize being able to say to each other, tell me more, and not just, oh, I didn't like that training, or I didn't like what I was learning. But to say to yourself internally, okay, I didn't like that. But rather than projecting how I'm feeling it in this moment, I'm going to put myself in the position of saying, tell me more, help me understand why that bothered you, help me understand why you feel that way. Because until we're willing to do that, we're not going to learn. KORI: And without knowledge, we have no opportunity for growth. Growth comes with new knowledge. Growth comes with practicing new skill sets. Growth comes with trying things that you haven't done before. But if you're more invested in protecting the status quo than you are fighting for change, then the status quo will always win. And the status quo right now, it's not working for a lot of people from a lot of underrepresented and marginalized communities. Those are some of the things that have to happen. Oh, Chris, something else I want to add. Both sides. We got to talk about this both sides thing. Not every opinion and argument is equal, and that's something else that we're not willing to address head on. We've allowed inclusion to be so redefined that some people think it means anything and everything is of equal footing, right. KORI: But someone saying in the workplace, we need to be more inclusive of people with disabilities is not the same as someone saying, I don't think disabled people should have to work here. And sometimes what is crouching in is people want to hide behind inclusion to spew hate or bigotry or an excuse not to make the change and growth that is consistent with the so-called values of our organizations. I'll pause there because you're about [inaudible 00:50:05]. BREE: Yeah. I just want to comment to our listeners Kori's TED Talk, just in your browser, put in Kori Carew and TED Talk. I really encourage people to check it out. It is powerful and profound. So Kori, I'm going to ask you a question here that we also tend to ask this sometimes near the end, if you could look for, I don't know, five years or even a decade. If we can do a decent job around changing hearts and minds and attitudes around diversity, equity, inclusion, and belonging and wellbeing too, hopefully, how would the profession be different? What do you want to see? KORI: My goodness, my goodness, my goodness. Excuse me. That cough came up. If we could actually accomplish all these things that we've been talking about for 20 years, we would see leadership teams that are more humble in their approach, leadership teams that are people-centric, organizations that are listening to employees and actually care about what employees want. We would no longer be having conversations as if it's either you focus on the bottom line or you focus on employee happiness. Like we will understand that without happy employees who are engaged and doing fulfilling and meaningful work, we actually don't have a great bottom line to talk about. Right? Our organizations would look like inclusion and wellbeing and belonging, it's just part of the business strategy. It's not this separate siloed thing. It's not this thing that we talk about when we are worried about how the woman or the gays may react. Right. KORI: But it's just something that is operationalized into our values, into our competencies, into how we evaluate people, into how we promote people, and that we are constantly in humility, learning from each other. Right. So that even when somebody who's a chief inclusion and diversity officer, here's a phrase and someone says, "Did you realize that that was ableist?" That I would say, "I didn't. Tell me more." And once you tell me more, I changed my language, because we understand that we're always going to be moving. We're always going to be learning something new and there's always an opportunity to be better. And if we do that, we will also see different representation at all levels. We will actually have critical mass of diversity in our organizations. And then I would be unemployed. CHRIS: I was going to wrap up with this though, Kori, like if I was to serve up to you 500 managing partners, that were, again, I think one of the things that you've already mentioned is every individual in an organization is either additive or perhaps distracts from the culture that you're ultimately trying to create. A lot of the wellbeing discussion is about connecting and emphasizing wellbeing with decision makers and those who set the tone of organizations. And so my question to you is this, if I served up 500 managing partners of all sizes of firms around the country and they came and Kori was the keynote, what would be your message to them? KORI: My message to them would be that they are ridiculously in charge, that things happen in their organizations because they allow it, or they create it. And that by choosing to focus a hundred percent on their inclusive leadership skills and up in their ability to interrupt bias, to be culturally fluent, they could transform their organizations because where the leader goes, everyone else follows. BREE: Right. CHRIS: That's great. That's awesome. Well, again, Kori, you have certainly cultivated my curiosity, which I know is one of the things that you strongly advocate for. Couldn't be prouder to have you on the podcast and the sharing of your perspective. We got to get you more platforms for you to be able to shout loudly about these particular issues, because again, we got a lot of work to do, right. We know that there's a lot to be done in terms of realizing the potential of this profession, to realizing the potential of historically underrepresented and marginalized lawyers within our profession. Bree, I think that we all would agree that even as we pursue our wellbeing mission, that so much more has to be done on the diversity, equity, and inclusion perspective that integrates in the intersection there between those two that lanes need to merge in a much more substantive way. KORI: Thank you. CHRIS: Thank you, Kori. KORI: I appreciate it. I appreciate you having me. I appreciate you allowing Justin to come and hold my hand because she's my blinky today. I appreciate you inviting us to talk about what we're doing at Seyfarth and just my perspective as an individual separate from Seyfarth. Again, I've said this before, the work you're doing is so critically important. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you for everything that you do to promote wellbeing in the profession. So important. CHRIS: Awesome. Well, again, thanks for joining us. We will be back with the podcast probably in a couple weeks with our executive director, Jennifer DiSanza, which we are so excited to be having her join us as we talk about the future of where this movement is going. Thanks again, Kori. And to all our friends out there, we will be back in a couple weeks.

IELTS Podcast
IELTS Writing tips for Chinese students with Phil

IELTS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 7, 2022 29:17


  In this episode, we discuss the top 5 IELTS writing tips for Chinese students with Phil Longwell, an EAP and Study Skills Tutor from the University of Central Lancashire. We discuss: Phil's experience teaching Chinese students how to write in English 5 tips for Chinese students preparing for IELTS writing exams Common mistakes Chinese […] The post Top 5 IELTS Writing tips for Chinese students with Phil appeared first on IELTS Podcast.

PFFA Pod
Chatting with VP Mariya Fuge

PFFA Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022 34:25


Vice President Mariya Fuge and Kyle sit down to talk about her assignments at Local 43. We discuss Wellness, EAP, Legislative issues and more. Thanks for listening.

Therapeutic Girlfriends
Episode 85: The Joy of Walking Away

Therapeutic Girlfriends

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 23:32


Welcome back Girlfriends….. This week we are discussing welcoming change and walking away. Girlfriends, can you think of a time you felt joy walking away? Hidden Gem: We enjoyed a beautiful dark roast from @lovehotcoffee a minority-owned gourmet coffee company. Get your Hot Coffee at www.lovehotcoffee.com and enjoy a lush, velvety, and rich cup of joy. Please follow your Therapeutic Girlfriends Jessica @itsme_jessicat and Chrissy @drchrissyfabiola Feel free to email us at: Therapeuticgirlfriends@gmail.com Please Subscribe, rate, and comment on the streaming platform you listen on. ***Resources for therapeutic services*** local insurance (EAP)program, www.psychologytoday.com and www.therapyforblackgirls.com

Adventure Media & Events Podcasts
Power Kid Podcast: Chrissy Fagerholt | EAP Toys & Games

Adventure Media & Events Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2022 32:01


In this week's episode of the "Power Kid Podcast," host Phil Albritton of Power Kid Design welcomes Chrissy Fagerholt of EAP Toys & Games to the show. EAP produces a range of games — including You Who?, Friend or Faux, and The Lunch Room Game — that pair a hint of strategy and humor into a play pattern that requires a little luck. On the show, Fagerholt and Albritton discuss the nuances of developing games with friends and finding a definitive reason to make games. Additionally, Fagerholt delves into her backstory and reveals how she tackled early challenges and her collaboration with Albritton to create the sculpt and packaging for The Lunch Room Game, which is now available at Barnes and Noble. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/adventuremedia/message

Quirky HR
Ep 25 | Yes, You Need an EAP (Employee Assistance Program)!

Quirky HR

Play Episode Play 30 sec Highlight Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 18:37 Transcription Available


On this week's episode, we are doing things a bit differently. Tune in to catch this solo episode with our creator, the one and only Dana Dowdell. At one point early on in her career, Dana was faced with a challenge that proved she needed help and wasn't sure where to get it. Thankfully, her employer had the answer.Throughout her experience in Human Resources, Dana has seen some real success in companies who provide their employees with EAPs. EAPs are Employee Assistance Programs that for a small price, provide your staff with just about any resource they could need. Whether it be mental health, caring for an elderly parent, or otherwise, you can implement an EAP to provide your employees support through any and everything.To connect with Dana, you can find her on LinkedIn.To check out one of our favorite EAP providers, visit the Coastline website.Remember, there is always someone to talk to, but if you get to the point where it all feels to be too much, the National Suicide Prevention Hotline has updated their number. Just dial 988.

The Eye Believe Podcast
Recapping the ASCO + ISOO Experience

The Eye Believe Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 68:03


Join A Cure in Sight on The Eye Believe Podcast and various research experts and clinicians who attended American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Conference early June 4-6, 2022, as well as the 20th Congress of the International Society of Ocular Oncology (ISOO), June 17-21, 2022. A Cure in Sight attended both to gather updates in research and present a united, collaborative front for the sake of patient advocacy in the field of ocular melanoma. In this episode, you'll hear from the experts about what's new in ocular melanoma and uveal melanoma. You'll also hear news of new clinical trials, and upcoming expanded access programs for treatments for metastatic uveal melanoma. Tune in for updates from: Jerry Wu with Ascentage Pharma, focused on an abstract from Dr. Meredith McKean of the Sarah Cannon Cancer Center in Nashville discussing a novel cancer treatment for uveal melanoma called APG-115. Search “APG-115 melanoma” on ascentage.com, or listed on clinicaltrials.gov. Dr. Johnny John from Delcath discusses the presentation of data from the FOCUS Trial at ASCO and the opening of Delcath's Expanded Access Program for patients with Metastatic Ocular Melanoma. Information on EAP sites may be found on  https://delcath.com/clinical-trials/expanded-access-program/ Karin Hellsvik with Foghorn Therapeutics, discussing uveal melanoma patient advocacy, as well as the existing study for uveal melanoma patients, found by searching FHD-286 on clinicaltrials.gov.   Dr. Justin Moser with HonorHealth Research and Innovation Institute in Scottsdale AZ, discussing a new West Coast clinical trial for metastatic uveal melanoma patients. Info on this trial can be found here: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT05004025 Danet Peterson, sharing about her personal ocular melanoma journey in a brief ASCO interview with i3Health.   Dr. Cadmus Rich with Aura Biosciences discussing the AU-011 (belzupacap serotalocan) program, including an upcoming pivotal study for primary choroidal melanoma treatment. Search AU-011 on clinicaltrials.gov for more info. Dr. Johnny John from Delcath along with Dr. Ellen Kapiteijn and Dr. Thaïs Tong from the Leiden University Medical Center discusses the presentation of data from the Chopin Trial in which Delcath's percutaneous hepatic perfusion treatment is combined with immunotherapy for patients with Metastatic Ocular Melanoma. Preliminary data from the trial was presented at the ASCO conference and was also presented at the ISOO conference.   Steven Katz, Chief Medical Officer at TriSalus Life Sciences discussing early safety data from the PERIO-01 clinical study. See www.periotrial.com for more info. ANNOUNCEMENTS: Lookin' For a Cure Arizona 5K Walk for Ocular Melanoma  COMING UP September 24, 8 AM  Register here and be sure to bring friends and family to walk with us! (Virtual option coming soon) Eye Believe Survivorship Seminar in Nashville, Tennessee October 14-15. REGISTER HERE! (Welcome reception for in person attendees on October 13, 6:00 PM) (Virtual and in person options.) Lookin' For a Cure TEXAS 5K Walk for Ocular Melanoma  NOVEMBER 5, 2022; 8 AM  Register here and be sure to bring friends and family to walk with us! (Virtual option available) Email contact@acureinsight.org for questions regarding the event! ********* Be sure to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Linked In, or  Instagram @acureinsight, for more stories, tips, research news, and ideas to help you navigate this journey with OM! *A Cure in Sight is a 501c3 organization. All donations made can help fund our podcast to educate patients, fund research, aid patients, and more! Donate $10 $15 $20 today to help A Cure in Sight in their quest to find a cure. Contribute via  PAYPAL OR VENMO or reach out directly to contact@acureinsight.org  The Eye Believe Podcast is brought to you by Castle Biosciences. Castle Biosciences is a leading diagnostics company improving health through innovative tests that guide patient care. The Company aims to transform disease management by keeping people first: patients, clinicians, employees and investors.  This podcast was hosted by Danet Peterson and produced by Agora Media.

Therapeutic Girlfriends
Episode 84: That's what Taraji said

Therapeutic Girlfriends

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2022 40:37


Welcome back Girlfriends….. This week we are discussing Taraji's comment relationships and being claimed. What makes you ready and want to claim someone. Please follow your Therapeutic Girlfriends Jessica @itsme_jessicat and Chrissy @drchrissyfabiola Feel free to email us at: Therapeuticgirlfriends@gmail.com Please Subscribe, rate, and comment on the streaming platform you listen on. ***Resources for therapeutic services*** local insurance (EAP)program, www.psychologytoday.com and www.therapyforblackgirls.com

Self-Funded With Spencer
Mental Health, Burnout, & EAP - A Conversation with John Troutman - Episode 52

Self-Funded With Spencer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 51:22


John shares his own experience with Burnout at 41, which nearly cost him his life, and we discuss the challenges that men have in discussing their mental health with others, even with the typical EAP offerings most employers provide their employees today. It is even harder for people like John, who had been a pastor at a church for his whole career up that point, and who was perceived as a community leader, to express feelings of fear, weakness, emotional pain, etc. because of concerns of how his peers would perceive his vulnerability. This is one of the most important conversations I have ever had on the podcast, and I hope it helps foster meaningful discussions about mental health in men. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/spencer-harlan-smith/support

Self-Funded With Spencer
Mental Health, Burnout, & EAP - A Conversation with John Troutman - Episode 52

Self-Funded With Spencer

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 51:22


John shares his own experience with Burnout at 41, which nearly cost him his life, and we discuss the challenges that men have in discussing their mental health with others, even with the typical EAP offerings most employers provide their employees today. It is even harder for people like John, who had been a pastor at a church for his whole career up that point, and who was perceived as a community leader, to express feelings of fear, weakness, emotional pain, etc. because of concerns of how his peers would perceive his vulnerability. This is one of the most important conversations I have ever had on the podcast, and I hope it helps foster meaningful discussions about mental health in men. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/spencer-harlan-smith/support

Les Cast Codeurs Podcast
LCC 281 - Apérikube apomorphique - partie 1

Les Cast Codeurs Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 80:34


Cet épisode marathon sera découpé en deux morceaux pour éviter à vos oreilles une écoute marathon. Dans cet épisode on y parle Brian Goetz, Bian Goetz, Brian Goetz, usages des threads virtuels, OpenAPI, Kubernetes, KNative, copilot et Tekton. La deuxième partie couvrira des sujets d'architecture et de loi société et organisation ainsi que les conférences à venir. Enregistré le 8 juillet 2022 Téléchargement de l'épisode LesCastCodeurs-Episode–281.mp3 News Langages Peut-être une nouvelle syntaxe spécifique aux Records Java pour tordre le cou aux builders Brian Goetz discute de l'idée d'avoir une syntaxe spécifique pour les records pour facilement créer un record dérivé, potentiellement avec des valeurs par défaut, mais en paramétrant certains champs Point shadowPos = shape.position() with { x = 0 } Cela évite de créer la notion de paramètre par défaut dans les constructeurs ou les méthodes Il y a l'article Data Oriented Programming de Brian Goetz, sur InfoQ projet Amber amène des changements qui combinés permet de faire du data oriented programming en Java et pas que du OOP OO combine état et comportement (code) OO est super utile pour défendre des limites (programme large en des limites plus petites et plus gérable) mais on s'oriente vers des applications plus petites (microservices) data oriented programming: modélise data immuable et le code de la logique métier est séparée records -> data en tant que classe, sealed classes -> définir des choix, pattern matching -> raisonne sur des data polymorphiques algebraic data: hiérarchie de sealed classes dont les feuilles sont des records: nommées, immuable, testable (pas de code) Un nouveau JEP pour intégrer une Classfile API Le JDK inclut déjà des forks de ASM, de BCEL, et d'autres APIs internes, pour manipuler / produire / lire le bytecode Mais l'idée ici c'est que le JDK vienne avec sa propre API officielle, et qui soit plus sympa à utiliser aussi que le pattern visiteur de ASM par exemple La version d'ASM intégrée était toujours en retard d'une version (problème de poule et d'oeuf, car ASM doit supporter la dernière version de Java, mais Java n+1 n'est pas encore sorti) Lilian nous montre à quoi va ressembler les Record Patterns de JEP 405 Apache Groovy et les virtual threads, et aussi Groovy et le Deep Learning Paul King, qui dirige actuellement le PMC de Apache Groovy, a partagé récemment plusieurs articles sur le blog d'Apache sur des intégrations intéressantes avec Groovy Groovy et sa librairie GPars pour la programmation concurrente et parallèle s'intègre facilement avec les Virtual Threads de JEP 425 / JDK 19 https://blogs.apache.org/groovy/entry/gpars-meets-virtual-threads Groovy avec Apache Wayang et Apache Spark pour classifier des Whiskey par clusterisation KMeans https://blogs.apache.org/groovy/entry/using-groovy-with-apache-wayang Et aussi Groovy avec différentes librairies de Deep Learning pour la classification https://blogs.apache.org/groovy/entry/classifying-iris-flowers-with-deep Le jargon (en anglais) de la programmation fonctionnelle, si vous avez rêvé d'avoir sous la main la définition de foncteur, de monoïde, et j'en passe avec des exemples en JavaScript des pointeurs vers des librairies fonctionnelles en JavaScript des traductions dans d'autres langues et d'autres langages de programmation Librairies Spring Boot 2.7 SpringBoot 2.7 Spring GraphQL 1.0 Support pour Podman Gestion de dépendance et auto configuration pour Cache2k nouvelle annotations pour Elasticsearch et CouchBase dernière versions avant SpringBoot 3 qui changera plus de choses. Recommande de migrer une version a la fois. Support pour 2.5 à fini (upstream) Quarkus 2.10.0 Travaux préliminaires sur les threads virtuels de Loom Support non-blocking pour GraphQL Prise en charge des Kubernetes service binding pour les clients SQL réactifs CacheKeyGenerator pour l'extension de cache quarkus-bootstrap-maven-plugin déprécié et remplacé par quarkus-extension-maven-plugin (uniquement utile pour les développeurs d'extensions Quarkus) Nouveaux guides: Using Stork with Kubernetes OpenId Connect Client Reference Guide Using Podman with Quarkus Les différences entre OpenAPI 2 et 3 Introduction de la notion de lien pour créer des relations entre Response et Operations, pratique pour faire des APIs hypermédia La structure du document OpenAPI a été -un peu simplifiée, en combinant par exemple basePath et schemes, ou en rassemblant les securityDefinitions Des améliorations sur les security schemes, autour de OAuth et OpenID Plus de clarté dans la négociation de contenu et les cookies La section des exemples de Request / Response devrait aider les outils qui génèrent par exemple des SDK automatiquement à partir de la description OpenAPI Un support étendu de JSON Schema Introduction d'une notion de Callback, importante pour les APIs asynchrones, en particulier les WebHooks je me demande si ils ont l'intention d'embrasser AsyncAPI ou su la partie asynchrone d'OpenAPI 3 a pour objectif de faire de la competition Infrastructure N'utilisez pas Kubernetes tout de suite ! Kubernetes, c'est bien, mais c'est un gros marteau. Est-ce que vous avez des gros clous à enfoncer ? Ne commencez peut-être pas avec l'artillerie lourde de Kubernetes. Commencez plutôt avec des solutions managées genre serverless, ce sera plus simple, et au fur et à mesure si votre infrastructure a besoin de grossir et dépasse les fonctionnalités des solutions managées, à ce moment là seulement évaluer si Kubernetes peut répondre à votre besoin Choisir Kubernetes, c'est aussi avoir la taille de l'équipe qui va bien avec, et il faut des profils DevOps, SRE, etc, pour gérer un cluster K8S L'auteur suggère grosso modo que ça dépend de l'ordre de magnitude de la taille de l'équipe : avec quelques personnes, préférez des solutions type Google App Engine ou AWS App Runner, avec une dizaine de personne peut-être du Google Cloud Run ou AWS Fargate, avec moins d'une centaine là pourquoi pas du Kubernetes managé comme Google Kubernetes Engine, et si vous dépassez mille, alors peut-être vos propres clusters managés par vos soins et hébergés par vos soins sur votre infra ca impose d'utiliser les services du cloud provider? Parce que la vie ce n'est pas que du code maison. C'est la mode de dire de pas utiliser K8S : https://www.jeremybrown.tech/8-kubernetes-is-a-red-flag-signalling-premature-optimisation/ (mais bon, vu le nombre de fois où il est pas utilisé à b Knative Eventing Devlivery methods on peut faire de la delviery simple 1–1 sans garantie on peut faire de la delivery complexe et persistante en introduisant la notion de channel qui decouple la source de la destination. on peut repondre a la reception d'un message et pousser la réponse dans un second channel mais ca devient compliquer a gérer quand on rajoute des souscripteurs il y a la notiuon de broker qui definit: des flitres, un channel (automatique) et la capacité de répondre les triggers sont un abonnement non pas a un channel mais a un type d'évènement spécifique Cloud AWS is Windows and Kube is Linux pourquoi utilisez Kube qui etait pas stablewa lors qu'AWS offre tout AWS forcé d'offrir EKS MAis pourri Lockin AWSIAM Pourquoi AWS serait le windows economies d'echelles de faire chez soi kube devient rentable une certaine taille de l'organisation besoin alternative a AWS (bus factor) on voit le Kube distro modele arriver Google data center Paris Outillage IntelliJ IDEA 2022.5 EAP 5 amène des nouveautés Frameworks and Technologies Spring 6 and Spring Boot 3 Support for new declarative HTTP Clients in Spring 6 URL completion and navigation for Spring Cloud Gateway routes Experimental GraalVM Native Debugger for Java Code insight improvements for JVM microservices test and mock frameworks Code insight improvements for Spring Shell Improved support for JAX-RS endpoints Support for WebSockets endpoints in HTTP Client Support for GraphQL endpoints in the HTTP Client UI/UX improvements for the HTTP Client Improved navigation between Protobuf and Java sources Kubernetes and Docker Intercept Kubernetes service requests with Telepresence integration Upload local Docker image to Minikube and other connections Docker auto-connection at IDE restart Docker connection options for different docker daemons GitHub copilot est disponible pour tous (les developpeurs) 40% du code écrit est généré par copilot en python (ca calme) gratuit pour les étudiants et les développeurs OSS Revue de Redmonk décrit copilot comme une extension d'intelligence ou auto complete mais qui « comprend » le code autour premiere fois pas une boite de cette taille et à cette échelle l'avantage de copilot en terme de productivité, de qualité de code, de sécurité et de légalité En gros, c'est encore à voir. Mais la qualité impressionne les gens qui l'ont testé ; sécurité pas de retour d'un côté ou de l'autre sauf que les développeurs humains ne sont pas des lumières de sécurité :D GitHub pense que GitHub n'est pas responsable de la violation de code vue que ce sont des machines et des algorithmes qui transforment: cela a l'air d'etre le consensus des avocats GitHub dit qu'on est responsable du code qu'on écrit avec copilot Et implicitement GitHub dit que la licensure du code « source » ne se propage pas au code generé. Et là, c'est pas clair et de la responsibilité de l'utilisateur, mais la encore les avocats sont plutot ok moralement c'est probablement pas ok mais bon et il y a débat autour des licenses copyleft notamment LGPL 1% du temps, code copié verbatim de > 150 caractères Question sur le code non open source sur lequel GitHub Copilot s'appuie mais en gros le marcher s'en fout un peu des licences Risque de reputation de Microsoft la question c'est quand / si les gens seront prêt à accepter cet usage Gradle publie sa roadmap Historiquement, la société Gradle Inc ne publiait pas vraiment de roadmap officielle Outre les tickets que l'on pouvait voir dans Github, cette fois ci, une “roadmap board” est visible et disponible pour tout le monde, et pas seulement pour les clients Tekton est groovy (mais non, il n'utilise pas Groovy !) Un grand tutoriel sur Tekton Une brève histoire de CI/CD (avec un contraste avec Groovy utilisé dans Jenkins) Un aperçu des grands concepts de Tekton, avec ses tâches et ses pipelines (Task, TaskRun, Pipeline, PipelineRun) Comment installer Tekton Les outils CLI Un exemple concret d'utilisation Sortie de Vim 9, surtout avec VimScript 9 des changements incompatibles entre VimScript 8.2 et 9 font qu'il était nécessaire de passer à une version majeure mais l'ancienne version du langage reste supportée pour compatibilité avec la nouvelle, les utilisateurs peuvent s'attendre à des performances x10 voire x100 ! le langage devient pré-compilé, au lieu d'être interprété ligne par ligne l'idée était d'avoir un langage plus proche de ce qu'on trouve dans JavaScript, TypeScript ou Java Conférences De la part de Youen Cette année Codeurs en Seine, c'est le 17 novembre et le cfp est ouvert N'hésitez pas à amener un peu de JVM dans l'appel à orateur. (ca commence à se faire rare). Pour rappel : codeurs en seine c'est 1000 personnes autour des métiers du développement dans une des plus grande salle de Rouen, le kindarena. Nous contacter Soutenez Les Cast Codeurs sur Patreon https://www.patreon.com/LesCastCodeurs Faire un crowdcast ou une crowdquestion Contactez-nous via twitter https://twitter.com/lescastcodeurs sur le groupe Google https://groups.google.com/group/lescastcodeurs ou sur le site web https://lescastcodeurs.com/

Got You Covered
Emergency Action Plans (EAPs) w/ Casey McClain

Got You Covered

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 18:55


Does your company, or your employer, have an Emergency Action Plan (EAP)? In this episode of GYC, Casey McClain teaches us who should have an EAP, what should be included in the plan, and how to implement training around that plan. Casey is a Certified Safety Professional and works for Hickok & Boardman as a Loss Prevention & Risk Advisor. To learn more about Hickok & Boardman Insurance Group, visit us at www.hbinsurance.com. 

#RockstarsRocking
Investing In Your Mental Health with John Troutman

#RockstarsRocking

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 29, 2022 39:41


This episode of the #RockstarsRocking podcast features my rockstar friend, John Troutman; Director of National Marketing & Business Development at MSEAP, a national EAP firm, based out of Harrisburg, PA.   We delve right into a topic near and dear to my heart this week, talking all about mental health and how important it is for people to prioritize in their lives. John opens our interview detailing how he was a pastor for nearly twenty years before burnout forced him to re-evaluate his situation. He ultimately ended up still fulfilling his calling to help others, but through the lens of Employee Assistance Programs (EAP's), which connect employees with resources they need to help them deal with the tensions and stresses in their lives.   John details why mental health and burnout are such important topics for individuals, employers, and brokers to focus and invest in, overcoming the stigma of reaching out for help, as well as what brokers should be looking for in a good EAP partner.   So, are you ready for more? Go ahead and grab your favorite ice-cold beverage and tap that play button, to tune in to this week's edition of the #RockstarsRocking podcast.     Episode Highlights:   -       How being a pastor lead him to the world of EAPs -       You need to invest in your mental health, or you will be forced to deal with it -       Overcoming the stigma surrounding mental health -       EAPs and what brokers should look for -       What sets MSEAP apart from competitors -       Getting a baseball field built for his community Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Tesla Motors Club Podcast
What's Next for Tesla's FSD | Tesla Motors Club Podcast #14

Tesla Motors Club Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 70:11 Very Popular


In TMC Podcast #14, we discussed FSD Beta's exciting v11 update, EAP coming to the U.S. and Canada, and more!0:00 Intro1:27 Louis gets PLAID11:30 The return of Enhanced Autopilot37:57 FSD What's Next49:19 The Future State of EV Ownership1:01:41 Plaids Qualifying on Pikes PeakWatch on YouTube.Co-hosts:Marc @lUtriaNtLouis @nebusoftMike @SteelCloudsProducers:Adam @ElectricAve84James @scrappsJoshua @NoGasNoBrakesDoug @dougDaniel @dannySocial:TwitterFacebookInstagramYouTubeTikTokSupport us-PayPal: Pay Tesla Motors Club LLC using PayPal.MeTeslaMotorsClub website: Account upgradesSupport the showSupport the show

胡聊科技
特斯拉重新開放EAP購買. 4月份美國電動車市場. Apple M2晶片出爐.

胡聊科技

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 9:26


特斯拉重新開放消費者購買EAP輔助駕駛功能。美國4月份電動車銷售數據。蘋果13寸Macbook Pro M2晶片開始販售。 買杯咖啡支持我喔. http://buymeacoff.ee/bosshu YouTube: 胡老闆 BossHu IG: @master_bosshu FB: 胡老闆 Clubhouse: @masterbosshu --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bosshu/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bosshu/support

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis
Index Rebalancing, Credit Suisse, Giga Texas Production, Giga Shanghai, Annual Meeting (06.24.22)

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 18:52 Very Popular


➤ Tesla begins assigning more VINs out of Giga Texas ➤ Credit Suisse updates price target on TSLA stock ➤ Discussion on Russell 1000 and index rebalancing ➤ Updates on Giga Shanghai ➤ Tesla adds EAP to design studio ➤ Annual meeting page posted ➤ Tesla Tequila update Shareloft: https://www.shareloft.com Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/teslapodcast Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/tesladailypodcast Tesla Referral: https://ts.la/robert47283 Executive producer Jeremy Cooke Executive producer Troy Cherasaro Executive producer Andre/Maria Kent Executive producer Jessie Chimni Executive producer Michael Pastrone Executive producer Richard Del Maestro Executive producer John Beans Disclosure: Rob Maurer is long TSLA stock & derivatives

Athletic Equestrian Podcast
#68 Emerging Athletes Program - Amy Center

Athletic Equestrian Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 36:05


Amy Center is the chair of the Lindsay Maxwell Charitable Fund/USHJA Emerging Athletes Program. It was created to provide opportunities for young riders to advance their horsemanship education and riding skills. Amy is the Owner/Trainer at Cavallo Farms as well as a USEF ‘R' Judge

Dear Mind, You Matter
Fighting Burnout Using Nobu with Allison Walsh & Dr. Angela Phillips

Dear Mind, You Matter

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 32:34


Subscribe for more: www.nobu.ai/podcastFollow us on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/nobuappFollow us on Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/3NMIEgjblqmhwT6Uy3l0NmSubscribe to Dear Mind You Matter Podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dear-mind-you-matter/id1573642046Leave us a review: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/dear-mind-you-matter/id1573642046Interested in attending our Educational Events? https://bit.ly/eventsandeducation____Allison Walsh is the Vice President of Business Development and Branding for Advanced Recovery Systems, a national provider and industry leader in behavioral healthcare. She has over 15 years of organizational leadership, mentorship, and coaching experience and has shared her story with over 100,000 live audience members. Dedicated mental health and female empowerment advocate,  she is the co-host of the Dear Mind You Matter podcast, as well as the host of The She Believed She Could podcast.Angela Phillips, Ph.D., LICSW is a licensed therapist, clinical researcher, telehealth director, podcast cohost, content creator, and partner to a firefighter paramedic. She has worked in the mental health field for over 15 years and specializes in tech-based mental health and wellness support and treatment.Social Media Handles: @allisonwalsh @humorist.therapist @therecoveryvillage @nobuapp Publications:Allison WalshHarvard Business ReviewForbesEntrepreneurDr. Angela Phillips Stanford Accelerated Intelligent Neuromodulation Therapy for Treatment-Resistant DepressionrTMS effects in patients with co-morbid somatic pain and depressive mood disordersMemorable Moments: 4:21 Being a leader, you learn so many things, but nobody prepared any leader for leading through COVID and leading through a pandemic.4:31 There was just so much that I put on my shoulders because I wanted to, right? I wanted to help my team, I wanted to help the company, I wanted to help all the people that we serve. But what I wasn't noticing is that as I was slowly or quickly putting on more responsibility, or just trying to get us through, I was chipping away or neglecting some of the things I needed to do for myself to keep myself in an optimal well being status or really taking care of myself.5:08 I've been in the mental health industry for like 20 years, literally. And I was even struggling to recognize some of the warning signs, because they had never presented themselves the way that they were at that point.6:03  I reached out for help immediately when I really recognized like, this isn't good. But it took me, that was probably a year of building or nine months, and really like building and building and building and building and I wasn't realizing it. 6:23 I also realized that there was a deeper situation and something that needed to be addressed. And that was just where I'm at, in this stage and phase of my life and, things needed to look different and feel different. And I needed to show up differently in order to be the best mom and wife and boss and colleague and everything else that I could possibly be. And ultimately, that meant that I needed to have some really brave conversations. 6:50 I had been advised on so many different occasions, well, if you're feeling this way or you're not doing well, maybe you should just quit, maybe this is time for you to start something different, right? Like, from professionals in this space saying this. You know, oftentimes, some people need to do that when they're struggling with burnout. But I was not subscribing to that. I love it here, I'm not ready to move on.7:49 And the farther I get away from that really brave conversation, the more grateful I still become, because, you know, it could have been different, but it wasn't. And now I'm happier, they're happier. I feel like I can show up as my full self again. I've continued to heal from burnout, I've continued to do the work I needed to do and really be mindful of prioritizing myself first, because I can't pour into the cups of anybody else if I'm not taking care of myself first.8:28 You know, it wasn't my first battle with burnout, but it was the first battle that looked like this. And I think that's the other thing to recognize is it's not always going to show up the same way every time.11:42 Because if you're listening to this, and you think it doesn't impact you from that systemic or organizational piece, you're wrong. If you are in the workforce, you know someone who's in the workforce, you plan to become someone in the workforce...all of this impacts us and how we carry and interpret the weight of and burden of what burnout could look like for us.12:13 I found myself in a position where I was not really seeing it. I was kind of blinded to that, and I was just crunching through everything. And then finally had to really take a step back and say, if I want my future to look like x, I cannot continue to do y. It's not going to happen. And like what really are my goals here? Is this the environment? I want to continue in? Why? And so it's asking all of those questions. 13:13 I'm so glad that we're talking about this again, just so that we can have these conversations and really make folks more aware and support one another. Because this isn't anything to be ashamed of. We're not weaker because we need to have a personal life or because we can't, you know? Everyone has a limit, every individual, every team, every organization.15:46 There wasn't just like, one thing, right? It was a lot of different things. It was a lot of different things at different times that helped me. And, you know, ultimately, I had to trust that everything was going to work out too, on the job front side of it, and be okay with things looking different. 16:06  I knew I couldn't sustain at the pace that I was on, and I couldn't continue to take on more. And so being able to really define what was a healthy life gonna look like for me? And what could it look like and still accomplish the goals that we have, and you know, personally and professionally, was really important too. And really being honest and clear about what I can and can't handle.16:47 I had to learn about which are the right yeses, right? And putting up some boundaries for myself and protecting my time and energy and not just saying yes to say yes, but saying yes to make a huge impact, when it's the right time to be able to do so. 20:06 We know people are expecting more support, they're expecting that their employer is going to support their employees, whether it's offering mental health days or just being aware of what's actually contributing towards burnout, and how they can support their employees through whatever it is, EAP other support systems. 23:33 I love the fact that employers are starting to pay attention to this in a more significant way. There's always been, you know, the ones that are leading the pack, but now people are realizing, “wow, I have good people. I don't want to lose them because we're not doing what we need to do to take care of them.” And I think there's just so many more businesses that are finally prioritizing mental wellness.30:57 I think that we have to prioritize our children's mental health just as much as we're prioritizing everybody else's. Because this pandemic impacted us all in so many ways the last couple of years, but I think it's we're just seeing the tip of the iceberg when it comes to, you know, what has it really done to our kids? What is it done to us emotionally and mentally and so I'm very concerned about making sure that they're okay, making sure that I'm okay. And that I'm able to show up for them as the best possible mom that I can be. Dear Mind, You Matter is brought to you by NOBU, a new mental health, and wellness app. To download NOBU, visit the app store or Google Play. This podcast is hosted by Allison Walsh  and Dr. Angela Phillips. It is produced by Allison Walsh, Ashley Tate, and Nicole LaNeve. For more information or if you're interested in being a guest on this podcast, please visit www.therecoveryvillage.com/dearmindyoumatter.

Therapeutic Girlfriends
Episode 83: Defining Prioritizing Joy

Therapeutic Girlfriends

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 28:58


Welcome back, Girlfriends….. This week we are defining what joy means to Therapeutic Girlfriends and identifying your privilege in the pursuit of finding your joy. Please follow your Therapeutic Girlfriends Jessica @itsme_jessicat and Chrissy @drchrissyfabiola  Feel free to email us at: Therapeuticgirlfriends@gmail.com Please Subscribe, rate, and comment on the streaming platform you listen on.  ***Resources for therapeutic services*** local insurance (EAP)program, www.psychologytoday.com, and www.therapyforblackgirls.com

A Way Through
018 - Empowering Families to Live their Fullest, Healthiest, and Authentic Lives with Melanie Flint, LCSW, CGP, EAP

A Way Through

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 44:44


Welcome to A Way Through, a podcast brought to you by Archway Academy! The purpose of this podcast is to remind you that though you may not see it now, something different is possible; Recovery is possible! **The views and opinions expressed by our guests are those of the individual and do not necessarily reflect those of Archway Academy. Any content provided by our student co-host(s) or guests are of their opinion and are not intended to reflect the philosophy and policies of Archway Academy itself. Nor is it intended to malign any recovery method, religion, ethnic group, club, organization, company, individual, or anyone or anything. In this episode of A Way Through, Jamie Edwards, Director of Community Relations at Archway Academy, is joined by Melanie Flint, LCSW, CGP, EAP. Melanie is the Founder and Clinical Director of JEM Wellness and Counseling, located in Houston, TX. During their conversation, both Jamie and Melanie share the importance of holding space for families as they navigate pain, trauma, and addiction. A Way Through invites you to join in on the conversation and hear stories of triumph, self-discovery, and healing. Be sure to subscribe to A Way Through to stay updated on each new episode and leave a review of the show! Topics Discussed: The power of Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy Building healthy relationships through setting boundaries & open conversation Giving adolescents control and empowerment through therapy Understanding the family's needs by supporting both the parent & the teen Connect with Melanie Flint, LCSW, CGP, EAP: Website: https://jemwellnesscenter.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JEM-Wellness-102273004842436/ Instagram: https://www.facebook.com/JEM-Wellness-102273004842436/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/melanie-e-flint-lcsw-cgp-eap-b7a3367/ Additional Resources: Call: (832) 560-9698 Email: mflint@jemwellnesscenter.com Connect with Archway Academy: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archwayacademyhtx/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archwayacademy/ YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVBgxwG5CC6qBcJ3U6KcK5Q Contact Archway Academy: If you or a student you know needs help, visit the website, or call the number below to schedule a tour. We are here to help. Address: 6221 Main Street Houston, TX 77030 Call: 713.328.0780 Email: sasha.coles@archwayacademy.org Website: https://www.archwayacademy.org About Archway Academy: Welcome to A Way Through, brought to you by Archway Academy, "Where Education Meets Recovery." Archway is a sober high school located in the sunny heart of Houston, Texas. We meet the individual educational needs of teens recovering from Substance Use Disorder with care, compassion, respect, and rigor. Archway is the largest recovery high school in the nation. We are here to remind you that though you may not see it now, something different IS POSSIBLE - This is a Way Through. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/archway-academy/message

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast
179: Pros and Cons of a Physician Career in Rural Practice with Mary Wolf

DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 24:24


“Feeling like they can't do enough for their patients, or that they're falling short with their patients, (that) they're disappointing their patients. And as you know, physicians can be very perfectionistic, want to fix things, and I often work with them on what are realistic expectations when you are in a rural setting.” -Mary Wolf, MS, LPC-MH, BCC Master Certified Coach Mary Wolf, president of Veritee Partners LLC, talks with cohost of the podcast Master Certified Coach Jill Farmer about the benefits and drawbacks of practicing medicine in rural settings. Oftentimes with fewer resources in smaller communities, there can be significant physician burnout in rural areas especially since the onset of COVID-19. How might physicians struggle to set boundaries in these communities where they often know their patients personally outside of the work office setting? Mary Wolf is able to offer valuable advice for physicians on how to set these boundaries between work and home so that they can practice medicine in a sustainable way.  Mary Wolf, MS, LPC-MH, BCC    Mary Wolf is the president of Veritee Partners LLC, a coaching and consulting business designed to promote wellbeing and success for physicians, executives, dentists, and the companies they serve.  Veritee Partners offers assessments and consultation for healthcare systems to build wellbeing programs and cultures.      Mary was the Program Director for the Avera Medical Group LIGHT Program, an award-winning wellbeing program for physicians and advanced practice providers. She led multi-strategy wellbeing services and provides executive coaching for physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, residents, and executives.    Before creating LIGHT, Mary was the director of multiple behavioral health programs at Avera including employee assistance program-EAP, addiction recovery, outpatient mental health, and day hospital.    Mary earned a Master's Degree in Counseling and Human Resource Development and is a Licensed Professional Counselor-Mental Health. Mary is a Board Certified Coach and holds certifications in executive, life, and spirituality coaching.       Mary's extensive work with the Coalition for Physician Wellbeing includes being published as a chapter author for their two books:     Transforming the Heart of Practice:  An organizational and personal approach to physician wellbeing    Physician Well-being During Sustained Crisis:  Defusing Burnout, Building Resilience, Restoring Hope     Find full transcripts of DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast episodes on the DocWorking Blog  The past few weeks have been busy at DocWorking! We have been working behind the scenes to add even more CME credits to the THRIVE memberships.    Let your CME budget help you prioritize your own wellness so you can get on with living your best life on your own terms, as defined by you, with DocWorking THRIVE.   You can take the first step today by taking our 2 Minute Balance to Burnout Quiz! Where are you on the Balance to Burnout Continuum? Take the quiz and find out today!   DocWorking empowers physicians and entire health care teams to get on the path to achieving their dreams, both in and outside of work, with programs designed to help you maximize life with minimal time.   Are you a physician who would like to tell your story? Please email Amanda Taran, our producer, at podcast@docworking.com to be considered.   And if you like our podcast and would like to subscribe and leave us a 5 star review, we would be extremely grateful!   We're everywhere you like to get your podcasts! Apple iTunes, Spotify, iHeart Radio, Google, Pandora, Stitcher, PlayerFM, ListenNotes, Amazon, YouTube, Podbean   You can also find us on Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.    Some links in our blogs and show notes are affiliate links, and purchases made via those links may result in payments to DocWorking. These help toward our production costs. Thank you for supporting DocWorking: The Whole Physician Podcast!   Occasionally, we discuss financial and legal topics. We are not financial or legal professionals. Please consult a licensed professional for financial or legal advice regarding your specific situation.   Podcast produced by: Mara Heppard

Therapeutic Girlfriends
Episode 82:Welcome Back

Therapeutic Girlfriends

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 28:48


Welcome back Girlfriends…..we are discussing all things about our break and what is to come with Therapeutic Girlfriends. Feel free to email us at: Therapeuticgirlfriends@gmail.com Please Subscribe, rate, and comment on the streaming platform you listen on.  ***Resources for therapeutic services*** local insurance (EAP)program, www.psychologytoday.com and www.therapyforblackgirls.com

New Books in Literary Studies
Julia Molinari, "What Makes Writing Academic: Rethinking Theory for Practice" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 81:04


Listen to this interview of Julia Molinari, lecturer in professional academic communication at The Open University (UK) and independent researcher. We talk her book What Makes Writing Academic: Rethinking Theory for Practice (Bloomsbury, 2022) and about the things people use academic writing for. Julia Molinari : "We need to ensure that teachers of academic writing have access to scholarship and can do the research that they need to do in order to sensitize themselves to the different ways of conceiving of writing. Because I see scholarship very much as a lever to the change that needs to happen in higher education. Scholarship means, for the teacher of EAP, knowing what has been written about academic writing and knowing that there isn't just one standard form, there isn't just one template that says, 'This is academic. This is not academic.' So, enabling practitioners to do research, to do the scholarship — this is something that requires an institutional commitment: people need to have time built into their contracts, they need to be literally paid to do the scholarship, to be aware of what's at stake when it comes to academic writing." The ebook editions of this book are available open access under a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 licence on bloomsburycollections.com. Open access was funded by Knowledge Unlatched. Contact Daniel at writeyourresearch@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books Network
Julia Molinari, "What Makes Writing Academic: Rethinking Theory for Practice" (Bloomsbury, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 81:04


Listen to this interview of Julia Molinari, lecturer in professional academic communication at The Open University (UK) and independent researcher. We talk her book What Makes Writing Academic: Rethinking Theory for Practice (Bloomsbury, 2022) and about the things people use academic writing for. Julia Molinari : "We need to ensure that teachers of academic writing have access to scholarship and can do the research that they need to do in order to sensitize themselves to the different ways of conceiving of writing. Because I see scholarship very much as a lever to the change that needs to happen in higher education. Scholarship means, for the teacher of EAP, knowing what has been written about academic writing and knowing that there isn't just one standard form, there isn't just one template that says, 'This is academic. This is not academic.' So, enabling practitioners to do research, to do the scholarship — this is something that requires an institutional commitment: people need to have time built into their contracts, they need to be literally paid to do the scholarship, to be aware of what's at stake when it comes to academic writing." The ebook editions of this book are available open access under a CC BY-NC-ND 4.0 licence on bloomsburycollections.com. Open access was funded by Knowledge Unlatched. Contact Daniel at writeyourresearch@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The Great Retention
06. Helping Team Members Combine Unique Passion With A Unified Mission

The Great Retention

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 28:57


Mike Nolte serves as the CEO of Uprise Health, a leader in Digital Mental Health technology and services for employers. He’s a veteran industry leader in healthcare software and services, with a 30-year career spanning marketing, product, and business leadership across several healthcare industry segments. John Duisberg sits down with Mike to help us learn more about… how employee assistance programs (aka EAP) traditionally have worked and how Uprise Health has leveraged innovative technology to make it better to meet the rising concerns around mental health in the workplace the way in which Uprise Health has grown its distributed team through the pandemic and built its culture around a purposeful engagement and a unified purpose and some fundamental lessons learned that will equip us to be better leaders that communicate with clarity and motivate our team members around their unique passions and a central mission as a force multiplier RESOURCES RELATED TO THIS EPISODE Visit uprisehealth.com Follow Mike at https://www.linkedin.com/in/consumerexperience/ CREDITS Theme Music

The Essential Apple Podcast
Essential Apple Podcast 255A: We just “ramble on”

The Essential Apple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 22, 2022 34:12


This is the second part of EAP 255 - Im putting it out as bonus content because it's just Nick and Jim and myself wittering on about stuff that has nothing at all to do with Apple - so if you want Apple related stuff feel free to skip over this and not worry you missed anything!!! GIVEAWAYS & OFFERS Get 2 months on the Kino Premium Plan with offer code KINOWITHJOHNNEMO Why not come and join the Slack community? You can now just click on this Slackroom Link to sign up and join in the chatter! Recorded 15th May 2022 On this week's show NICK RILEY @spligosh on Twitter very occasionally. Sometimes appears on Bart Busschots' Let's Talk Apple Sutton Park Circuit church worship on YouTube Nick's church stream videos on You Tube JAMES ORMISTON MacJim in the Slack Also on Flickr as Ormie (O) Has videos on Vimeo Essential Apple Recommended Services: All Things Secured – Online security made simple by Josh Summers. Pixel Privacy – a fabulous resource full of excellent articles and advice on how to protect yourself online. Doug.ee Blog for Andy J's security tips. Ghostery – protect yourself from trackers, scripts and ads while browsing. Simple Login – Email anonymisation and disposable emails for login/registering with 33mail.com – Never give out your real email address online again. AnonAddy – Disposable email addresses Sudo – get up to 9 “avatars” with email addresses, phone numbers and more to mask your online identity. Free for the first year and priced from $0.99 US / £2.50 UK per month thereafter... You get to keep 2 free avatars though. ProtonMail – end to end encrypted, open source, based in Switzerland. Prices start from FREE... what more can you ask? ProtonVPN – a VPN to go with it perhaps? Prices also starting from nothing! Comparitech DNS Leak Test – simple to use and understand VPN leak test. Fake Name Generator – so much more than names! Create whole identities (for free) with all the information you could ever need. Wire and on the App Stores – free for personal use, open source and end to end encryted messenger and VoIP. Pinecast – a fabulous podcast hosting service with costs that start from nothing. Essential Apple is not affiliated with or paid to promote any of these services... We recommend services that we use ourselves and feel are either unique or outstanding in their field, or in some cases are just the best value for money in our opinion. Social Media and Slack You can follow us on: Twitter / Slack / EssentialApple.com / Soundcloud / Spotify / Facebook / Pinecast Also a big SHOUT OUT to the members of the Slack room without whom we wouldn't have half the stories we actually do – we thank you all for your contributions and engagement. You can always help us out with a few pennies by using our Amazon Affiliate Link so we get a tiny kickback on anything you buy after using it. If you really like the show that much and would like to make a regular donation then please consider joining our Patreon or using the Pinecast Tips Jar (which accepts one off or regular donations) And a HUGE thank you to the patrons who already do. Support The Essential Apple Podcast by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/essential-apple-show This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

The Essential Apple Podcast
S1E255 - Essential Apple Podcast 255: So long iPods… We knew you well

The Essential Apple Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 87:00


Yes, last week was a desert for news after the glut of the week of EAP 254 - also Simon felt a bit under the weather so we decided to take a raincheck... But as ever you can't keep a “good” podcast down so just like the excellent Mac&Forth, Simon, Nick and Jim are also back to fill your ears with inane chatter and “informed” opinions on what went on in the world of Apple and Tech GIVEAWAYS & OFFERS Get 2 months on the Kino Premium Plan with offer code KINOWITHJOHNNEMO Why not come and join the Slack community? You can now just click on this Slackroom Link to sign up and join in the chatter! Recorded 15th May 2022 On this week's show NICK RILEY @spligosh on Twitter very occasionally. Sometimes appears on Bart Busschots' Let's Talk Apple Sutton Park Circuit church worship on YouTube Nick's church stream videos on You Tube JAMES ORMISTON MacJim in the Slack Also on Flickr as Ormie (O) Has videos on Vimeo APPLE The music lives on – Apple Apple Discontinues iPod Touch – MacRumors iPod Touch Completely Sold Out in Apple's US Store – MacRumors You can no longer buy the iPod touch from Apple in the US – Cult of Mac RIP iPod: A Look Back at Apple's Iconic Music Player Over the Years – MacRumors A Visual History of the Apple iPod – PCMag UK I Invited Tim Cook to Speak At My Graduation. He Gave Me This Advice – Elite Daily Tim Cook delivers commencement address at Gallaudet University, highlights accessibility– 9to5Mac Kuo: New Apple TV to Launch in Second Half of 2022, Lower Price Possible – MacRumors Apple @ Work: Apple is building a feature to install non-App Store apps – 9to5Mac iPhone supplier Pegatron issues production warning over COVID lockdowns – AppleInsider Apple Accidentally Leaks Surprise Upgrades In New iPhone Release – Forbes Abandoned apps policy could see one-third of apps removed from App Store and Google Play – 9to5Mac Non-pro look at the entry-level 14-inch MacBook Pro – 9to5Mac Im a die-hard Windows fan, but the M1 Mac Mini converted me – DigitalTrends TECHNOLOGY Google is dropping the headphone jack from its Pixel phones – Business Insider Apple CarPlay Workaround for Tesla Vehicles Now Available to Download – MacRumors SECURITY & PRIVACY Warnings issued over ‘New Profile Pic' app that may send your personal data to Russia – NBC2 Some top 100,000 websites collect everything you type - before you hit submit – ArsTechnica WORTH A CHIRP / ESSENTIAL TIPS Harvard scientists discover the cause of multiple sclerosis – Brighter Side of News How to see where 5G is available near you using Speedtest on iOS – Mashable Essential Apple Recommended Services: All Things Secured – Online security made simple by Josh Summers. Pixel Privacy – a fabulous resource full of excellent articles and advice on how to protect yourself online. Doug.ee Blog for Andy J's security tips. Ghostery – protect yourself from trackers, scripts and ads while browsing. Simple Login – Email anonymisation and disposable emails for login/registering with 33mail.com – Never give out your real email address online again. AnonAddy – Disposable email addresses Sudo – get up to 9 “avatars” with email addresses, phone numbers and more to mask your online identity. Free for the first year and priced from $0.99 US / £2.50 UK per month thereafter... You get to keep 2 free avatars though. ProtonMail – end to end encrypted, open source, based in Switzerland. Prices start from FREE... what more can you ask? ProtonVPN – a VPN to go with it perhaps? Prices also starting from nothing! Comparitech DNS Leak Test – simple to use and understand VPN leak test. Fake Name Generator – so much more than names! Create whole identities (for free) with all the information you could ever need. Wire and on the App Stores – free for personal use, open source and end to end encryted messenger and VoIP. Pinecast – a fabulous podcast hosting service with costs that start from nothing. Essential Apple is not affiliated with or paid to promote any of these services... We recommend services that we use ourselves and feel are either unique or outstanding in their field, or in some cases are just the best value for money in our opinion. Social Media and Slack You can follow us on: Twitter / Slack / EssentialApple.com / Soundcloud / Spotify / Facebook / Pinecast Also a big SHOUT OUT to the members of the Slack room without whom we wouldn't have half the stories we actually do – we thank you all for your contributions and engagement. You can always help us out with a few pennies by using our Amazon Affiliate Link so we get a tiny kickback on anything you buy after using it. If you really like the show that much and would like to make a regular donation then please consider joining our Patreon or using the Pinecast Tips Jar (which accepts one off or regular donations) And a HUGE thank you to the patrons who already do. Support The Essential Apple Podcast by contributing to their tip jar: https://tips.pinecast.com/jar/essential-apple-show This podcast is powered by Pinecast.

The Staff Assistant Podcast
Episode 27: R & R - Rants and Raves

The Staff Assistant Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 50:08


In this episode, we discuss the basics of the healthcare and insurance system, including the difference between PPO and HMO insurance plans. We also discuss how to access mental health services using your own health insurance, the in's and out's of the EAP system and the need to have reasonable expectations about peer support.

Wichita Chamber Business Accelerator
Stacey Winter - empac

Wichita Chamber Business Accelerator

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 33:28


Come join us at the 2022 Wichita Business Expo at Century II on Thursday, September 29!  This is the premiere business-to-business trade show in Wichita.  No matter what you are looking for, you will find it at the Expo! Learn more now!We spend much of our daily time in the workplace.  Often, that is where it's easiest to see that our friends and colleagues need support and help.  Empac CEO Stacey Winter shares with Don and Ebony how her EAP brings that help directly to businesses.   On this episode we discuss: Loving your life and loving your work How an Employee Assistance Program works The origin of EAPs in Wichita Pivoting support services during the pandemic How culture allows Empac to stay healthy Helping supervisors and managers deal with mental health issues Starting an EAP in your business Learn more about Empac:https://empac-eap.com/Facebook ProfileInstagram ProfileTwitter ProfileStacey Winter received her Master of Science in Family Therapy from Friends University in 1996. With over 20 years of clinical experience, Stacey spent much of her career in the child welfare system.As a clinician and as CEO of empac, Stacey assists individuals, couples, families and groups through counseling, training, coaching, and consulting. Throughout her work, Stacey has focused on organizational health, building and maintaining effective teams and the impact of trauma.Other Resources:Join the Wichita Regional Chamber of Commerce! This podcast is brought to you by the Wichita Regional Chamber of Commerce and is powered by Evergy.  To send feedback on this show and/or send suggestions for future guests or topics please e-mail communications@wichitachamber.org. This show is part of the ICT Podcast Network.  For more information visit ictpod.net

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast
How to Use Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 12:38


When patients are not amenable to usual therapy, equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP) might be a good option. In this podcast we'll talk about working with horses as an alternative to, or in conjunction with, traditional therapy.CME: Take the Podcast CME Post-Test here. Not subscribed to earn CME credit for listening? Click here to start earning CME credit for podcast episodes!Published On: 05/16/2022Duration: 12 minutes, 38 secondsReferenced Article: “Using Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy,” The Carlat Child Psychiatry Report, October/November/December 2021Joshua Feder, MD, and Mara Goverman, LCSW, have disclosed no relevant financial or other interests in any commercial companies pertaining to this educational activity.

Women on The Move Podcast
JPMorgan Chase Global Head of EAP talks about prioritizing mental health and encouraging connection

Women on The Move Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 26:27


This podcast is for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your mental health professional or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding your condition.   There's no doubt in Judith Bess's mind that the past two years of pandemic living have been traumatic for nearly all of us. As global head of the employee assistance and work life program at JP Morgan Chase, Judith has been privileged to witness and assist JP Morgan Chase employees as they navigate the impacts on their mental health. In this episode, she sits down with Women on the Move host Sam Saperstein to discuss her journey to leadership, how the pandemic gave people permission to be vulnerable, and how connections with others are so critical to our wellbeing. Two leadership lessons With a social work background, Judith started at JPMorgan Chase early in her career expecting to stay for a short time. Instead, she fell in love with the work and the firm and has stayed for nearly three decades. She's found her background a perfect fit for the employee assistance and work-life programs she heads. “When you're working within an industry like ours, every management triangle is a family. And so you can apply the same systems that you would in a family, right to the corporation,” she tells Sam. Judith discusses her transition from being an EAP counselor to heading the firm's global program, and she shares two invaluable lessons she learned. The first was from a senior HR leader who told her, as she was taking over the management position, that she could build on what had been working well but she could also assess what wasn't working well and what she wanted to do differently; she gave Judith permission to make changes. The second lesson came from outside the firm, from a book by Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign marketing director. “Her book really talked a little bit more about how for Hillary Clinton, they marketed her like they would market a man and they left off her female characteristics, her warmth, her familial attention, her endurance, her ability to bring the community together,” Judith recalls. “And I thought, you know what? I don't have to do it that way. I can come into this with me being a woman and being okay, but being a woman of color and coming into this role.” EAPs and the pandemic Assuming her leadership role just before the pandemic broke out means that “COVID kind of took over my first two years,” Judith says. For one thing, the pandemic highlighted the importance of the assistance program that had been in place for decades. “Once COVID hit in 2020, I think the recognition of the impact to our mental health and our wellbeing became so very clear, and the need for something to really help us learn and not isolate and be able to heal and find coping tips along the way, shot EAP out of a cannon,” she says. One response to the increased need brought on by the pandemic was the introduction of Coping Connections, an online group support model. “We came into Zoom rooms—and still do every week—to support one another, to allow for people to come into the room and say, you know what? I'm not doing great today. And how are you doing? And to really share with one another and break the seal on having to feel like we had to pull it all together all the time,” she describes. “And I saw thousands of people come through. It was amazing.” As employees return to the office, Judith hopes the increased focus on and awareness of the importance of mental health will continue—and that more employees will recognize and utilize the convenience of the EAP. She hopes employees will bring with them the lessons learned from remote work: “You may have 20 things on your to-do list, but how can you listen to good music while you're doing it? Or how can you bring a little bit of sunshine into your day?” In the future, she says, we all have the possibility of changing. “Look what we did to the business world,” she notes. “We're in a hybrid work environment. We can do this. We can make sure that we have an adjustment to our life and our lifestyle, and we can get things done yet push the envelope on what might have been something that was just antiquated at this point. COVID taught us that we could do anything anywhere. So I'm really, really hopeful that we can get creative about what our needs are. How do we bring more joy into everything we do?”   full transcript here

Transform Your Workplace
Starting with Equity with Réland Logan and Katy Byrtus

Transform Your Workplace

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 32:17


In this episode, Brandon Laws sits down with Réland Logan and Katy Byrtus of Cinder, a staffing agency headquartered in Hillsboro, OR. The group discusses the growing emphasis on Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion (EDI) initiatives in today's business world. Instead of just checking the EDI box, learn some best practices for creating an authentic and equitable culture at your business.   TAKEAWAYS By beginning with a goal of equality across all people, companies will inevitably become more diverse and more inclusive. Allowing employees to air out their grievances allows Cinder to get a deeper understanding of what it is that they need.  Leaders must create a common language and understanding because we all come to work with different lived experiences and perceptions. One common challenge in cultivating effective EDI initiatives can be leaders who aren't willing to accept that there are issues that need to be resolved.   A QUICK GLIMPSE INTO OUR PODCAST