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Sound & Vision
Leah Guadagnoli

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 118:45


Leah Guadagnoli lives and works in Hillsdale, NY. She received her BFA in Painting and Art History at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and her MFA in Visual Arts at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University. Recent solo exhibitions include Hollis Taggart (New  York, NY), Asya Geisberg Gallery (New York, NY), Victori + Mo (Brooklyn, NY), Sadie Halie Projects (Minneapolis, MN), and 247365 (New York, NY). Recent group exhibitions include Cooke Latham Gallery (London, England), Hesse Flatow (New York, NY), Allouche Benias Gallery (Athens, Greece), Hollis Taggart Contemporary (New York, NY), Freight and Volume (New York, NY), Hashimoto Contemporary (San Francisco, CA), Ortega y Gasset (Brooklyn, NY), and White Columns (New York, NY). She has been an artist in residence at Yaddo (Saratoga Springs, NY), the Macedonia Institute (Chatham, NY), Wassaic (Wassaic, NY) and the Tilleard Projects Artist Residency (Lamu, Kenya). In 2017 she was awarded the Lighthouse Works Fellowship and in 2016 she received a full fellowship to attend Vermont Studio Center. She currently teaches Painting and Drawing at the University at Albany and has a two-person exhibition on view at One River School with Zuriel Waters in Woodbury, NY. 

La Vie Creative
EP 168: Taylor Scott talks about a Parisian Shakespeare Theatre Group called Cygnet Theatre

La Vie Creative

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021 31:57


Cygnet Theatre was founded in Paris by an international group of theatre artists looking to create, develop, and perform plays in the classical repertoire. The company is run by a board of administration, and all members of the team serve a creative function vital to Cygnet Theatre's ability to thrive.  Following the success of A Midsummer Night's Dream, the decision was made to form a company to produce high quality theatre in the heart of Paris. During the Summer Seasons, Cygnet performs in the beautiful Jardin des Arènes de Montmartre.Taylor Scott:Born and raised in Vancouver, I still struggle to name the surrounding mountains but can list the local theatres with ease. Theatre has always felt like a homecoming to me. After graduating with a BFA in Acting from the University of British Columbia in 2017, the heaviness of a four-year program left little room inside me for creative passion, s0 I did what seemed most logical at that moment… I ran away to Paris. Amidst the culture and chocolate crepes, I discovered it was possible to become a theatre artist on my own terms. Cygnet Theatre is the product of six like-minded individuals, all at different points in our artistic journeys, who came to that same realization. Our varied backgrounds and individual strengths challenge us daily, but ultimately they are also the steadfast foundation of a company that was unimaginable until my feet hit these cobblestone streets. Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/join/Laviecreative)

I Survived Theatre School

Intro: Boz deserves a seat at the table, life coaches, let's be directLet Me Run This By You: Gina versus plots - is it just ADD? Interview: We talk to Kate Dugan about living in Morocco, her playwriting program,  Sandy Shinner, Victory Gardens, shooting yourself in the foot, being ready or not to take advantage of opportunities, Outliers, regret, Sandra Delgado, the Bad Boyfriend years, Austin Film Festival, Ola Rotimi, Actor's Training Center, Meisner, Erica Daniels, Bikram yogaFULL TRANSCRIPT (unedited): 1 (8s):And Jen Bosworth from me this and I'm Gina Polizzi. We went to theater school together. We survived it, but we didn't quite understand it. 20 years later, we're digging deep talking to our guests about their experiences and trying to make sense of it all. We survived theater school and you will too. Are we famous yet? Not a whole hell of a lot. I mean, I'm, I feel I'm right. I just real, really excited to like level up my, my work life game. Like, it doesn't even mean that I, it just means that, like, I actually feel like an adult, like I just feel at 47 right now.1 (55s):I'm 47. I feel at 47. Like I'm ready. Oh girl. Wait, am I 40? No, I had a birthday. October four. Yeah. You turned 40 you're you're you're desperate to be older apparently. Oh, I've been telling people 47. Okay. So what year were you born? 75, but I'm terrible at math for 46 years. Okay. So what was I saying about being the wrong age? Oh, I just feel like at 46, right? That's my age at 46. I am finally ready to get a job, like, okay. I need a writing job, like a, B a real job, a real job of like, of like, I feel like I finally deserve, I just, I'm starting to feel like I finally deserve a seat at the table.1 (1m 47s):I love that. Yeah, I definitely do. Yeah. I mean, I just do deserve it, but like the world needs for you to have that seat at the table. Thank you. And I finally feel like that is a possibility, you know, it's interesting. And I was going to ask you about this. So there are all these Clem coaches in Los Angeles. Oh, that's funny. I was going to ask you if something about coaches, but go ahead. Okay, great. So, so God bless him and I can just see everyone is really trying to earn a living, right? So like, everyone I meet is trying to help. I know a lot of hustlers, right?1 (2m 28s):So coaches now have this language. It's fantastic. First time a coach uses language with me. I thought it was so cool. And I was so special. They all fucking use this language. Good ones, bad ones, whatever. Okay. So they get to the part. I had a free introductory session with a woman who was wonderful, nothing wrong with her. I'm talking about specific coaching language around payment and charging people talking about the fee. Okay. So therapists my in my, you know, the way it was, well, I also worked for a social service agency. So I could like just people please, my way out of it and say, well, the agency charges this, you know, all of this. Okay.1 (3m 8s):But for all the people I've seen as therapists, they're pretty straightforward. They're like, my fee is 180 an hour. This is how much your copay would. I looked up your insurance, whatever coaches have a whole nother situation where they say things like, I don't usually do this. This is what they say more than one coach say this to me. I don't usually do this, but I'm going to do something I don't normally do, which is I'm gonna let you set your fee. How much is this worth to you?2 (3m 36s):Oh God. Oh fuck you. What kind1 (3m 39s):Of invest?2 (3m 40s):$7 and 50 cents.1 (3m 42s):What kind of investment are you willing to make in your future? Whatever, whatever they get. And then2 (3m 51s):If you low ball it, it's like, well, I guess you're not recommend it to your future,1 (3m 54s):Right. Or, and you must not value. You must not yet. Right? You must not think that you're abundant enough to bring it the way. So the first time someone said this to me, I was like, this is brilliant. Like I totally, and I bought in and I was like, and I, and, and I didn't know. I was like, okay, you know, $80 a session. And then she later, and then we did that for a while later, she told me that she charges like $2,000 for, oh my God. Like a packet. And I was like, what? Okay, so right. Okay. This person did not do this the other day. I had a free introductory session. And she said that, you know, when she's a woman of color and I really adore her, but it was the same language.1 (4m 38s):And it's not, it's what they're trained to say. And so I just am, so I was so naive. I thought this was like such a cool thing. And now I'm like, wait, everyone's using the same thing, which is, I'm going to let you set your fee to tell me how much you are invested in yourself. And I'm like, wait, that's manipulative. Just set your fucking fee. And if I just said fan, and if I don't pay it, I don't pay it. And we don't work together because otherwise2 (5m 7s):You're setting up the road. I mean, setting up the dynamic where somebody is going to feel resentful, right? Like if, if you're the coach and you're not charging what you, what you think you're. I mean, what about that? Why wouldn't you turn it back on them and say like, well, I really rely upon providers to tell me what they think they're worth by having an established fee. I mean, this is, it's so crazy. It's, it's like saying actually I've had this before with, I can't think maybe babysitters, like how much you charge. Well, whatever you feel comfortable with, I don't know what to do with that. Like, I mean, I feel comfortable paying you nothing. Does that mean that's what you want to,1 (5m 48s):Right? This is what we get in trouble with when, whenever there's a barter situation as well. Like I remember, oh my God, my dad is a anyway. I remember a psychologist getting into huge trouble at a friend, my dad's friend for bartering with therapy.2 (6m 7s):Oh my God. Like, make me homemade tofu or something like1 (6m 11s):Similar, like out, like you do my yard work. I'll do. I mean, I mean, like you get into trouble. It leads to trouble. I think it's better to be out of vagueness, set your fee and not, and just say, this is my fee. And if someone wants to have a conversation about the fee and do you lower it, and then you have a further conversation, whether you decide to lower it or not is up to you. But like, yeah, I don't like this, this,2 (6m 39s):No. And let's just be direct. I mean, this is another problem that we have, like with just, I don't know, globally with communication. I just feel like people are so darn indirect and it doesn't help. I'm not, I'm not suggesting that like, I can't use more, you know, finesse or be half softer or whatever. But like at the end of the day, I just want to know what it is. You're trying to say to me, you know, and I don't want to guess about it because I'm going to guess wrong. And then you're going to feel a type of way about it. And it's unnecessary.1 (7m 12s):It's unnecessary. And I do, you know, as much as, as much as I, I always think back, I had a therapist at the, at Austin Riggs in Massachusetts and Stockbridge and Dr. Craig Pierce. Right. And he, it was interesting. I wanted to call him Dr. Craig. And he was like, no, that is not my name. And, and I was like, this guy is such a douche, but really he was setting a boundary saying, no, no, no, no, no. I'm not your friend. I'm actually not your dad. I'm not your, this isn't, we're working. We're doing serious work here. And it's either Craig or Dr. Pierce, but you can't. And at the time I was like 21 or something. I don't know what I was, but I thought what a douche, but now I'm like, oh, he actually was, was trying to help me.2 (8m 1s):Let's just get this out of the way. This is how I expect to be referred to this is how much I expect to be paid. My thing about coaches recently is I feel like everybody is doing this group delusion about, like, we can't go to therapy. So we have to say, I mean, we could pay more for a coach than we might for a therapist. We could be more revealing with a coach that we were therapists. It's just turned into the stigma of like, well, I don't want to go to therapy, but you know, I want to have a coach. And the problem with that is it's so wildly unregulated.1 (8m 34s):Yes,2 (8m 34s):Exactly. If anybody can call themselves a coach,1 (8m 37s):Right. And even this, this coach that I saw was like, yeah, it's wild Lynn regulated. And I understand that, you know, so, so there are some, you know, weird coaches and she's lovely and she's trying to make a living. The other thing that is so clear to me is everyone is trying to make a living. So there is right. Everyone's trying, I give them points for trying, like you she's trying to have a coaching business. So, so right. I don't fault her for it, but I did. I was like, so shocked that the language, I was like, oh, here we go. She's going to say the exact thing that this other coach said. So, duh, there's all kinds of like classes that for free structure that could the coaches taste.1 (9m 24s):Are you going to see her again? I mean, I'm not, no, no, no, no, no. I told her, I was like, you know, I'm just really not in a position to do coaching right now. And I'm not, I have a therapy. I have a new therapist. Let me just pay the therapist who told me what our fee was. So it was interesting. The other thing that I think was interesting is like I took, the reason I met this coach was I took a workshop on a free workshop on imposter syndrome, which is another like thing that people are really throwing around now is imposter syndrome. And self-sabotage those kinds of phrases. So I took an imposter syndrome workshop, lovely workshop. And then they said, you know, we're going to have a raffle and see who gets a free coaching session.1 (10m 5s):Well, we all, did. We all won the RAF. I mean,2 (10m 14s):Oh my God. I mean, is everything a play Like a performance piece in Los Angeles?1 (10m 24s):Yeah, it is. It is. And it's so, it's so funny, but like, so yeah, I was talking to my friend, I'm like, who went to the workshop? I'm like, oh, I won the I wasn't coaching says, she goes, so did I? And then I talked to someone else who I met when I networked with like soda. I was like,2 (10m 40s):I really respect how much it seems like people in LA are devoted to self-improvement. I really, really respect that in a way that I just feel like people out here aren't or if they are, they don't talk about it. Maybe it's what it is. But it does seem, it does seem like people in LA are either they're on a health kick or a mental health kick or they're, you know, getting sober or I just feel like there's a lot of, there's a lot of1 (11m 5s):Types here.2 (11m 8s):And I appreciate the fact that everybody talks about that openly. Because if, if people are into that stuff around here, they don't talk about it. So I ended up feeling like, you know, I'm a weirdo.1 (11m 19s):I feel like it's like, like literally like old money versus new money. I swear to God it's like old, old paradigms versus new paradigms. And like, yeah, it's out in the open here, everyone's on some kick, but at the same time, it's also lessened because everybody's talking about it all the time and it becomes like the, like a F like a farce, like not sacred in any way. It's like,2 (11m 47s):Yeah. And I bet there's a lot of people who are doing the most, like in terms of self-help and they're just still the biggest, or they're just lying to themselves about the fact that they're, they feel like they're getting better, but they're really just haven't changed at all. Yeah. I mean, I think that like, living anywhere is a problem. Well, let me get out of here. I feel like, wow, you can really feel the Puritan vibe. I mean, it's yes. You really it's like, we don't talk about feelings. We, we talk about things on the surface. We don't reveal, you know, very much about ourselves. Wow. Yeah. Keep everything. It's all, it's very buttoned up.2 (12m 27s):Wow. When I first moved here, I really appreciated that, you know, I've done some wild swings geographically, like yeah. Growing up in Sacramento was kind of one sort of thing unto itself that doesn't relate that much to California. Yeah. And then going to Chicago was like, oh, okay. I like this. These people are really down to earth. You know, then I got kind of sick of that. And then I moved to back to California, to the bay area. And I really was into that for awhile. And then I felt like, oh my God, this is all. So this is all bullshit. Like talking about everybody was an imposter. I felt like everybody was low key. So aggro. And then just this hippie, you know, talking about free level the time.2 (13m 8s):And then we moved to New York and I was like, oh, people will just get right to the point here. I really appreciate that. And I never got tired of that, but then we moved here and I thought, oh, this is new England. This is what the pilgrims they've decided a way to be. And it's very buttoned up and they haven't changed in, you know, 300 years. For, you know, have like a little ideas folder in my notes where I just make it little snippets of ideas and write them down. And I've had like six or seven that I realized are all circling around the same idea, which is, I want to have a movie or some, or some type of a script where it's a superhero, but the superhero, their power is that they can interact through some type of magic.2 (14m 8s):They can intervene in somebody else's life when they're making bad decisions. This is sort of romantic coaching and like, Hmm, maybe it's virtual reality, but they, they can kind of put themselves into the body of the person who's making the bad decisions and then help them. You know, it's like, it's basically like the therapist having none of the barriers to, you know, wellness or whatever, and just kind of getting right in there at the same time as this is a comment about how we look to other people to tell us how to behave. Anyway, the superheroes name is psyche and I love it. And, and I'm, I'm it, I'm it.2 (14m 49s):I want to kind of continue with this idea, but I am woefully terrible with plot, as I think we've talked about before. I don't know if you're talking about the podcast before and it's such a, it makes perfect sense that my given my own psychology, that plot would be the hardest thing,1 (15m 11s):Because more that,2 (15m 13s):Well, my, my mother is the first person to tell you, she's never done anything with a plan. She's always just reacted to whatever has come her way. In fact, the idea of like having a goal and working towards it was literally something I never learned until I met my husband. Wow. When like a week, a day. And he was like, what are you going to do today? And I said, oh, I think I'm going to sit out in the sun. And he said, what? I thought you were trying to be an actress. I thought you were like, well, you don't have any time to sit down and do anything. Like you have a goal. And that, and that's been my thing is like, I, I have these vague undefined or have had vague undefined goals yet that in some ways I'm working towards, but because there's no sort of master plan or not a conscious one, if don't know how to get from a, to B to C I know everything about what it looks like as you're traveling from a to B to C, I had to describe it and everything like that.2 (16m 10s):But as far as charting a course of like, this is where I'm starting, and this is where I'm going to end up. That's pretty new to me. And I feel like that's why I struggle with clot. Cause I just don't have like a lot of idea of how something unfolds.1 (16m 26s):Seriously. Literally just ADHD. Could that be,2 (16m 30s):Oh, maybe you have ADHD.1 (16m 33s):Did we talk about2 (16m 33s):This? I have add1 (16m 36s):Or add. So if you have that, this is when I talk to writers who have add that this is their exact situation. Oh, okay. Excellent. With dialogue, excellent. With everything except the actual plot pointing to a, to B, to C you just, I think you just need a class in some add meds. Like I'm serious. I, I don't think, Hey, this is not a, this is, this could be a very practical thing. So, so my father had some big problems, but was a brilliant man in a lot of ways, right? His dissertation, he could see the whole thing where it was going to end up.1 (17m 16s):He knew what he wanted people to feel when he read it. He knew he could not write the thing. So my mother ended up writing it for him. Please don't take your degree away possibly anyway, because he couldn't do the, the actual thing. So I I'm wondering, just like my thing was kind of practical of finding a coworking space and not getting a divorce kind of a situation like yours is literally like, could be a physiological response to too much stimuli going on and how to get to, to your vision. So, and maybe2 (17m 54s):I need a coach.1 (17m 56s):Well, Gina funny, you should bring that up because I was going to say to you, how much is it worth for? You know, I tried to tell you as being your coach on our pocket,2 (18m 6s):That would have been so slick. That would have been like, you're like, I, wasn't going to mention this to you, but I'm actually becoming okay.1 (18m 12s):I'm actually a coach now. So anyway, that is my 2 cents. When you start saying, when you start talking about that, I was like, wait a second. This is not a psychological problem. I don't think,2 (18m 25s):Okay. I mean, you know what? That sounds right to me.1 (18m 29s):Well, it makes a lot of work. You're not lazy and you're not, it's not like you don't have ambition. That's not true because you we've talked a lot on the podcast about how, like having some sense of power is really important to you. Maybe not fame, but power, the power that comes with that. So I'm like, all right, so that's not someone that has no ambition, right? So that's gotta be a different mechanism in the brain. That's not connecting in some way because you're also a people pleaser. So if someone, so my guess is if I w I would wonder if we did an experiment, like if you were in a class, right. And the class person was the teacher, the person in authority was like, and you trusted this person or mentor, whoever writing group, whatever the higher power is in that moment said, she said to you, Gita, you must do, you know, act one must be written by this date.1 (19m 18s):I wonder if you do it,2 (19m 20s):I would, I totally would. In fact, that's a part of me has been like, should I try to get into an MFA program? I don't think that's the answer. I class first just take a class,1 (19m 31s):The script anatomy, there's all these classes that like, that we can talk about later, but like take a class. I know I should have taken a class and not enrolled in an MFA program. Like that was what I, I mean, it was,2 (19m 44s):Can I tell you one of my favorite slash least favorite things in the world is when I have a big problem. And the answer is like, something really is. I both love and hate that. I hate it because I think, wow, why didn't I think of that? And why have I spent so much time just like ruminating and cogitating and wringing my hands about something that has like a pretty straightforward answer. Yeah.1 (20m 6s):And a lot of times, a lot of times us, I think kids that weren't really, for whatever reason, didn't get what they needed, emotionally, make all these things. Our brain works overtime to try to figure things out when this solution, like, I remember, like when I started having panic attacks, I thought I had schizophrenia. I thought I went to the doctor. He's like, you have a panic disorder, take this pill. And I was like, what? Yeah.2 (20m 31s):How could it be that easy? How could it be? How could it be? I feel like in that if I were in your shoes, I would think, no, no, no, I don't just have something that everybody else has. I have a truly unique, right. Is that what you were feeling?1 (20m 44s):Yeah. I thought I was going to end up in a state run nursing and I had a panic disorder. It was so I couldn't, and I think it gets wrapped up in shame and wrapped up and I should be able to, I could be, you know, all that shit, but yeah, it, it, it was like, he was like, no, no, no, no, you have something called a panic disorder. It's in this book and it was a DSM. He was like, it's in this book. And he read the, the stuff, the criteria. And I was like, I had that. He was like, no shit. Which is why I'm telling you to take this pill, the Zoloft. And I was like, wow, it didn't even cross my mind. The other thing is, nobody tells you about it. Like a lot of the struggle that we have, I think at, or at least that I have is internal. Right. So I don't, I'm not sharing it with people, which is why I think the podcast is good because maybe someone's listening to the podcast going, oh fuck.1 (21m 29s):Maybe I just have a panic disorder or maybe I have add, or I need a class instead of my life is over.2 (21m 36s):I'm terrible. I'm fundamentally incapable of getting any better. Yeah. Yeah. Totally. Totally. Well, thank you for that. What a gift1 (21m 42s):You gave me? Well, yeah, that's just what came forward. I'm like, wait, this is not a psychological weirdo, psychological pathological emotional problem.0 (21m 55s):Well,4 (22m 0s):Today on the podcast, we're talking to Kate, Dougan a playwriting major from DePaul theater school who currently lives in Morocco, where she teaches English. She is also a performer and has some interesting stories about her road from wanting to be a performer to deciding, to be a writer. So please enjoy our conversation with Kate Dougan2 (22m 27s):Oh my God. You haven't changed you one1 (22m 30s):Tiny bit. Let's say.3 (22m 34s):Thanks. Wow. Nice to see you girls. Do you guys look the same? I can't believe it. 30 years almost, right?2 (22m 41s):Yeah. Don't say it like that.3 (22m 43s): sorry. It's been 30 years since I graduated from high school. 25, since I graduated from college.1 (22m 53s):It's a long2 (22m 54s):You go by Kate.3 (22m 55s):Yeah. I go by Kate now. I grew up from Katie. Yeah. Yeah. That's great. Yeah.2 (23m 3s):Well, Kate Dougan congratulations used for five to theater3 (23m 7s):School. I did. I did.2 (23m 10s):You are now in of all places, Morocco, what the heck's going on in Morocco?3 (23m 15s):I'm teaching a high school here at an American high school. Yeah. My husband is Moroccan. So that's how we ended up here. We met in Chicago, worked together and in 2018. Yeah. We just decided it was, you know, he, his parents are, you know, getting a little older and he had not lived in Morocco for about 20, 25 years. And so he decided, you know, he wanted maybe try to come home for a little while. And so he got a job at an American high school. He's a teacher, he's a math teacher. And so we came and then I, I started sort of in one job that didn't really work for me.3 (24m 2s):Cause I initially thought like I was coming to teach theater. Always. The reality is never quite the same as what everybody says is gonna happen. And so, but when we got here, so I tried to teach a theater class, it didn't school wasn't quite ready for it. Then I sort of morphed into teaching English as a second language. And then last year during, well, during 20 19, 20, 20, I got my teaching accreditation to teach high school English. So I teach English language and literature. So yeah. Yeah. How cool do you like it? I do, actually.3 (24m 43s):I like it a lot. I, you know, everybody says the teaching is the hardest job and in many ways, teaching really is the hardest job. Like you, it's a lot of work and it's kind of, it's almost like doing like five shows a day, but you have to write all of your own material and learn all of your own material. And you know, it, it, you have to sort of, you have to really be ready for like a group of high school kids. I mean, these are, you know, they, they want to be engaged and they want to be entertained and they want to, you know, and if you can do those things and talk to the kids and be real with them, then you know, it works.3 (25m 28s):And on days that you're not quite up for it, it's a little tough. But yeah, I do like it a lot. I mean, I think that if you like to be in the room with the kids, then, then you you're, you're going to win, you know? Yeah. There's, I think that there's unfortunately, a lot of teachers who don't necessarily like children. And so you kind of questioned that sometimes. I'm sure we've all had experiences as students in that kind of situation. But yeah, I liked the kids. I liked being with high school kids, you know, they're alive and interested and you know, they haven't given up yet.3 (26m 11s):It's true. There, there, I read something to them the other day about, yeah, they're not dead yet. They're still alive. So that's, that's what I like about it.1 (26m 21s):The other thing I was going to say is that my, my mom was a teacher and she used to say the first year of teaching, like full-time was the hardest year of her life. And she like cried every day after school and it was the most rewarding. And so I, yeah, yeah.3 (26m 39s):I mean, my first year was 2019 or 20. So 2019 to 2020, I was doing my accreditation and I was teaching part-time and that was March, 2020, obviously it was all online. And then September, we started back, it was my first year teaching full time. And, you know, we had one class that was online and then everybody, you know, the kids had the option to be online if they wanted to. So there was one class online and then there were students in school and yeah, you're just trying to, you know, learn, figure out what you're doing and teach yourself the material and, you know, stay alive and handle whatever it was.3 (27m 20s):It was, it was a very stressful year. Last year I got to the, I got to June and I was really tired and really stressed out. And I just, you know, the good part of that is I have declared this year. I will never let myself get into that state again, you know, whatever I have to do to maintain my balance is really important to me. And so far it seems to be working. I I'm feeling much more on top of things this year, so. Oh, good. Yeah. Yeah.2 (27m 55s):So beef, let's talk about the period of time you decided to go to theater school. You did, you caught up on the east coast.3 (28m 7s):Yeah. I, well, not exactly. I'm from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. I know. I always thought of it as east coast. And then years later I was like, I think Pittsburgh is really Midwest. Like, I mean, it's, it's like this close to Ohio where I was from was like this close to West Virginia. So there's a whole other element going on. So it almost, you know, it is east coast, I guess, officially, but it has sort of a Midwest sort of feel like blue collar, you know, town, but yeah, so I grew up in Pittsburgh. I, I don't know.3 (28m 48s):Do you guys just want me to do grow2 (28m 49s):Performing and I do high school plays3 (28m 52s):And stuff. Okay. So not, not as much as I would've liked. I knew from a very young age that I did want to go into theater. We, we lived up the hill from a small college Washington and Jefferson college. I'm from Washington, Pennsylvania. And you know, they built a new like art center one year. And I remember going to see my first theater show there and it had just opened. And I think it was the Rainmaker. I think my dad knew the guy, the place Starbuck, and I just, you know, like, so we want to see the play and it was just the whole experience of it, you know, going to the theater and sitting in the audience and the lights and the people.3 (29m 36s):And I just remember like when the lights went down at the, at the end, I was just like, that's what I wanna do. I wanna do this, you know, how old were you? I was eight actually. So I, yeah, it got me at an early age. I wish I had gotten set on something else a little bit. But1 (30m 0s):Why Did the theater break your heart?3 (30m 5s):Ah, did the theater break? My heart? Well, I mean, it's, you know, it's, everybody's journey is different. Yeah. I mean, in some ways it's not that it broke my heart now. I feel like I just wish I had no, of course. I mean, I wouldn't change anything. I wouldn't change the trajectory. I wouldn't change that love, you know, like that feeling. But I think just like when you experience something like that, it's such a young age, like your mind gets like really set on that thing. And like, I think it's important to grow and change and you know, obviously I've done that and I've done other things.3 (30m 46s):It just, I don't know. No, because I don't wish it was really different. So I, but I, you know, we all have our moments, right. I'm sure. Of course.1 (30m 57s):Yeah. That's what this whole podcast is about where we were like, what the fuck was that? And theater broke my heart over and over again. I thought it was going to be one thing or the business and I, it was not that thing. So I, for me, it's been a off and on heartbreaking experience with the theater. And that doesn't mean that there hasn't been intense love to, you know what I mean? Like, I think it's all part of the same, but yeah. So you, you, from a young age, you were like, you saw Rainmaker and you were like, that's it? Yeah.3 (31m 25s):So that's what I want to do. And so, I mean, but like I said, it was a small town there wasn't like a whole lot going on there. I never really took any acting classes or anything until I was in high school. You know, I went like there was a, there was an acting teacher at my high school. And I just remember like going to her class and being like super excited to finally like, get to do this thing. And like, you know, she asked everybody to kind of give a spiel like about what they want to do. And so I talked about it. I was like, this is really what I want to do with my life. I'm really excited about it. I, I just, you know, this is it for me.3 (32m 6s):And, and I just remember her, like, it wasn't necessarily that day, but like at some point she just kind of looked at me and she was like, oh, you're the one that wants to be an actress. And it was like that first, like, I'm sure you guys have experienced this. It was like that first experience of like, oh, I guess like me being excited about it, isn't necessarily going to get people to be positive with me. There was certain that there was an element of bitterness, I guess, which I think happens to people, you know, and I think it happens justifiably.3 (32m 53s):And so I think, you know, it's very important to me that I don't become bitter that I, and I'm glad I haven't, but I, I felt it was a very, it was like that first experience, like, okay, this is somebody that I, I, this is something I want to do. And this is somebody that can help me. And she was just not very enthusiastic about being helpful to me, you know, like, yeah. Who knows I was, it was kind of a weird year for me. So maybe I, you know, wasn't a very good student or something, or maybe she,1 (33m 25s):She, she, that's a shitty you you're probably right on. No, no, because I know because I've done that to people. Actually, I, I feel like I've dampened peoples. I do this with my husband all the time where I rain on his parade. And she rained on your parade a little bit. I'm not saying it's not that she doesn't have good reason to rain grades, but she did. And that, that is sort of, we hear it a lot. So I would think for someone to either either blatantly or inadvertently reign on a youngster's parade in terms of their artistic dreams.3 (33m 57s):So like at high school, I wasn't really that, like, I, I think I, we did like a play for my English class or something. So I don't know. I, I try, like I was in speech and debate and I went to one meet. And let me tell you like the power of the mind. Like I got laryngitis that day. Like I got laryngitis on the bus on the way to the meet and couldn't talk all day. And then on the bus on the way home I was able to speak. And so, you know, I think, you know, there's, yeah. I mean, that's a, that's a whole other . I mean, does that mean you1 (34m 37s):Didn't keep going with speech and debate3 (34m 39s):Or you had no, I don't think I did. I don't really remember. I obviously it was not a huge part of my life because I think at some point I was like, okay, this is not the person that's going to help me. I'm not getting feeling very positive vibes here. And so I'm gonna try to, you know, do other things. So then I started taking acting classes.1 (34m 60s):Did she wait to interrupt? Did she run the speech and debate thing too?3 (35m 3s):Yes, she did. Oh, no.1 (35m 5s):So that's, I mean, there you go. I mean, that's3 (35m 8s):How my mom1 (35m 9s):Running.3 (35m 11s):Yeah. Who knows. Anyway, so then I started going to like taking acting classes in downtown Pittsburgh. There was the civic light opera, and they had like an academy of, it was musical theater, but I just took straight acting classes. I was never like really a singer or anything like that. And that was a really positive experience for me. I had a great teacher, Jill, and, you know, we did a lot of scene study and she was, she was the opposite, you know, she was a very positive person, very loving and sweet. And, you know, really, you made me feel good about what I was doing and what I could do.3 (35m 52s):So, you know, there are those people as well that, you know,2 (35m 57s):Who suggested that you could pursue it for college.3 (36m 5s):I mean, I think it was never, for me, it was just never a question like, but I long story, I didn't, I didn't, I wasn't in the acting program at DePaul, I was in the play. I was in the wait. I was in the, I was in the playwriting program. Yeah.2 (36m 27s):Why do I remember you as being in class with me? But I feel like I remember you as being one of the actors. I remember seeing you on Steve.3 (36m 38s):No, I, I, I doubt it. I, I, unless2 (36m 42s):Were you in a play onstage?3 (36m 44s):I don't think so. No. I mean, unless it was like some kind of workshop for one of my plays or something like that, but no,2 (36m 54s):I mean, do you remember me at all? I3 (36m 56s):Do remember. Yeah. I remember you guys. I remember you completely. I just, so I think I graduated. I was a year older than you guys. I think. When did you graduate? I graduated in 96. Okay. So yeah, one year older. You will, so, okay, go ahead.2 (37m 14s):Awesome. Yeah, that happened. What the hell?3 (37m 19s):Well, let me, let me dial back to, to where, cause you asked me if my teacher wanted me to go to college and for me, like there was just no other, I was going to school for theater and there was no stopping me. You know, it was funny. I've listened to some of your podcasts and, and I listened to Caitlin Kiernan's and she was just like, you know, I was 18. Like, what do you, you know, like what did I think? I don't know, but I just, this is what my mind was set on. So, so I'm sure she, she, I remember her telling me that that acting teacher, she was like of all of my, you know, she put me aside and this one other girl, Heather, who I think has actually done pretty well. I think she lives in LA and you know, there's not a lot of TV work.3 (38m 0s):And she was like, you know, she's like of my students. I think you guys have real potential to make something in this business. So she was very positive. So then I started auditioning. I auditioned for probably not enough schools. I should've heard DePaul and like Carnegie Mellon and I think some other, a couple of other schools. And so then I kind of had my mind set in Chicago. My brother lived in Chicago for a couple of years and I had gone to visit him. And I just really like fell in love with the city. And I always knew that I wanted to go to school in a city. So I kind of got my mind set on Chicago. I was like, well, if I get in the car to Carnegie Mellon, I'm from Pittsburgh obviously, but I didn't.3 (38m 45s):So then I auditioned for DePaul and I didn't get in my first, I didn't get in. And so I decided to take a year off and try again, which my dad was not super happy about, but I just had my mindset. I was like, no, I'm going to take year off. And then I'm going to try it again. I'm going to audition again. And that's it. And it ended up being, you know, I think taking your off was a good thing for me. I auditioned again and I didn't get in again. And so, you know, it's funny, like listening to these stories of you guys, like, and all the struggles that you went through and it's like, well, you know, well, at least you, you got in what's true.3 (39m 33s):Like there are different struggles. Yeah. There are different struggles for sure. But then so, and I, when I didn't get in the second time, I was just, I don't know. I think I was just set on Chicago. I was kind of set on DePaul. They'd offered me a place in theater studies program. And so I took it and then I, I decided when I was there to do join the playwriting program, and this is 1996 or 1992. And I was like, at that point I was like, literally like the only person in the playwriting program. My first year, there was like one person who was like a sophomore.3 (40m 14s):I think it was like the second or third year that Dean Corrin was there. He had just been taken on to start this program. And so, yeah. And then as I went through like a few other people joined like Diane Herrera and I think Adam Matthias was also in the writing program. And so while I was there kind of grew a little bit. Yeah. So I, it was, you know, I mean, I don't know. You just want me to keep talking? I feel like2 (40m 51s):I was just ask a question about the theater studies program, because I don't know that we've ever really talked about that program and, and how you just described it, made it sound like that's where people can go to figure out what non-acting thing they want to do in theater.3 (41m 9s):I mean, I think I, to be honest, you know, I mean, let's not kid ourselves college is about making money. Right. For, for most people it's, for-profit, it's private school. I think that they wanted to build the program and yeah. I don't know what it was. I mean, I think I did pretty good on my SATs. My grades were decent and I don't know, maybe my audition was okay. And so it was sort of, yeah, like, you know, they offered it to people like, you know, if you want to come, you're not invited to the acting program, but if you want, you can come to the theater studies program. And so I said, no, the first year, and then the second year I was like, I'm ready to go to school. I mean, sometimes I think I probably would've been better off like going to like a smaller school that didn't necessarily require an audition or something like that, but say levee.3 (41m 57s):Right. And, and so, yeah, I was like, well, I guess I'll do playwriting. And I, I, I mean, I'm glad I did it for many reasons. It was not, it ended up being a really good choice for me. I mean, I think like listening to you guys talk about the competition and, you know, sort of like, I don't do well with rejection. You know, I think you really, I don't, I don't necessarily like love to be the center of attention. And I think like, as an actor or at least to be successful on some level, you have to want that attention.3 (42m 42s):I mean, you guys do, do you feel that you like being the center of attention? She does.1 (42m 49s):Like, I love, I am constantly and mine is, if you listen to the podcast, like we talk about the psychological stuff. Like, I, I still, you know, feel like I wasn't treated right as a kid. So I'm constantly, I'm so transparent about it. I'm constantly trying to get the approval of my mother. Who's dead by the way. So yeah, I, I can say that, like, I want to belong and I want someone to say you are special and I pick you. That's like my dark sort of shadow side. And it always will be for me. I think even if I work through it, I think we all have our shadow sides and that's, and that's mine. And I think it transformed into, oh, maybe if this school likes me, that will give me that sense, but I never got that from DePaul because, you know, one it's that set up for that too.1 (43m 37s):People are bitter and weird and three it's an inside job. Yeah.3 (43m 41s):Yeah. For sure. Yeah. I mean, I think for me, like part of it was, I am the youngest of four and so I think it was like that craving for attention. Like I totally get what you're saying there. So, I mean, I like to be on stage, but like, I don't necessarily like the auditioning part of it and I don't necessarily, you know, like have to be the center of attention to parties or any of those things. But I did, you know, I really did enjoy, I really do enjoy acting like I, I do like it, but so1 (44m 12s):You, you,3 (44m 12s):You were doing a playwriting BFA. Yes. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. You did.1 (44m 18s):And your plays got workshopped.3 (44m 21s):Yeah. I mean, you know, the, the program was still very fledgling and I think because, you know, I wasn't in the acting program, you know, I had a little bit of a chip on my shoulder, I think admitted,1 (44m 43s):Wait, I just have to say, like, there's something really fierce about auditioning twice for the program and then going to theater school, studying theater studies, look at your, at a young age to say, you know what? I fucking want to go to school. So I'm going to, I mean, talk about, I, I see it as, you know, I hate calling people brave, cause I think it's kind of sending, but I think it's fierce to say I'm still going to go to this school. I mean, of course you had, I would have a chip on my shoulder so big. I wouldn't go. Yeah. You went and got an education for God's sake in a degree.3 (45m 16s):Yeah. And I, I, I got a really good education, you know, that's part of what was really positive for me. And I'll go back to the question about workshopping in a second. But what was positive for me is that the theater school had this glitch in their, in their system in because the acting students had to take so many classes cause you guys had yoga and movement to music and scene study and whoever knows what else. So like as part of your tuition, you could take up to 24 credits. And so what I did is I then got a really great liberal arts education.3 (45m 57s):I took poetry writing classes. I took like performance of literature. I took video editing. I took intro to film. I took like,1 (46m 10s):We'll do you could do that Kate? Like, how did you figure out like, oh, I have 24 credits. I'm going to use these.3 (46m 15s):I really don't. I don't know that anybody told me, I think I just figured it out at some point. And I was like, okay, well I guess I'm going to get my money's worth and I'm going to go take these other classes and these other schools and learn how to write and learn how to make films and do intro to film and learn, you know? So like I really loved college. I don't, you know, the theater school was, I don't have anything negative to really say about the theater school either. I knew what I was getting into. Like I said, I sort of had that chip on my shoulder to begin with about being part of the theater school about feeling like Jen, like you said, like about feeling like an insider, but you know, all my friends were in the theater school.3 (47m 2s):I, I love theater people. I really enjoyed that experience. But, but part of my good college experience happened outside of it in many ways, just because I kind of took the reins and I was like, okay, I'm gonna, I'm gonna have some fun with this and get a good education and, and play. And I, I loved it. I loved school. I loved learning new things and try new things. I even, I even took like a leave of absence from the theater for theater school for one quarter. Cause I did a, an overseas, I went to Ireland for a quarter.3 (47m 43s):So, and to do that, I had to take a leave of absence from the theaters. Yeah. Does that seem familiar? Yeah, probably Kelly was crying because I was supposed to be her roommate, but I never got which Kelly Kelly and Mick Adams. I was when I came back from Ireland, we were supposed to be roommates, but I never called and she just got her own apartments. And then I was like, oh my God, I don't know where I'm going to live. But yeah. So I, you know, anyway, so back to my theater school experience, so was, was positive also for playwriting. I, I don't know. I mean, I, you know, Dean Corrin was great, you know, we took like dramatic criticism we had yeah.3 (48m 30s):You know, another, another theme that I have, you know, listening to your podcast and you guys talked about it a little bit is like self-sabotage or not taking advantage of the opportunities presented to you. I feel like, because I kind of had that chip and I wanted to be an actor. Like I didn't necessarily take advantage of the opportunities, like playwriting opportunities, which came easier of course, because cause that's the way it goes, because if you want something it's not going to be, you know, it's not going to be easy, but if you're kind of, sort of like, well maybe, maybe not then the opportunities roll in, but yeah, like we had a poetry or a playwriting workshop class with Sandy Shinar she worked at victory gardens at the time.3 (49m 18s):Yeah. And she was good friends with Dean and like he had her come in as like a guest teacher one day and we were going to work my play and he'd given it to her and she had read it and, and I was just, I don't know. I, I just was like, oh God, I hate that. I really don't want to work on it. Do we have to do this? Can we do something else? And like how we shoot ourselves in the foot, you know, like what an opportunity really? And because I was insecure and scared, I'm sure like whatever psychological, you know, thing you want to come up with that, that, that we, we do to why, why we do these things for ourselves.3 (50m 1s):So, you know, and I, I had other opportunities like that along the way that I didn't necessarily take advantage of. But1 (50m 8s):Did you pull your play or did you work3 (50m 10s):On it? We didn't work on it. No, because there was somebody else in the class who was much smarter than I was and was like, oh, well here's my play. We can do my play. We can work on mine today. Yeah. I know. That's really that's.1 (50m 26s):I mean, I totally relate. And I think it, it just speaks to many things, but like, you weren't ready for that and that's it. And I, I'm starting to look at things like ready versus not ready versus good and bad. So you just weren't ready to have that experience. And we can look back and, you know, I listened to Gina and I talk to people on and we're like, we blame ourselves for that, but you just simply didn't have the emotional resources to take in that experience. And that sucks. But,2 (51m 1s):And when you're not ready, it, people could say anything to you. That person could have said, we want you to be the new resident playwright, a victory gardens. You would've said, I don't think so.1 (51m 13s):I could've gotten the laryngitis again. Like it it's, we couldn't stop.3 (51m 19s):That's so interesting. I mean, I agree with you. I think you're, I think you're right. And that's, that's hearing it come from you. It, it, it's nice Rather than me saying it to myself or trying to figure out, like, why, why do I do these things to myself?1 (51m 37s):And it's interesting having done all these podcasts, Kate, we see it over and over again. So we have the data to tell you that people have, we've heard like so many people like with these ICTs being offered these things and being like, no, I'm not going to move to LA because you know, I have an apartment in Wrigleyville. Like I'm not going to be a movie star. And people are like, what's the D we all have that. I think that's part of growing up. And I also also think it's part of expecting young people to really handle a lot of things we cannot handle.3 (52m 11s):Yeah. They're one of the books that I, I teach my students is called outliers. Have you guys read it? It's Malcolm Gladwell. And he, you know, there's a section in where he talks about practical intelligence and you know, how some people, the people that are successful, you know, they grow up with a certain family life, or, you know, maybe it's about money. It's about education. It's about these things. But it's also just knowing how to handle yourself in certain situations and knowing how to take advantage of the opportunities that are presented to you. And I think if you aren't, if you don't have that, or you're not taught that it is hard sometimes to, you know?2 (52m 50s):Yeah. And what, I just heard you, I mean, when you said, it's good to hear that from us, that made me think, oh, you've been beating yourself up about this for 25 years to yourself. Why did I squander this opportunity? Which, I mean, whether or not you did it, it's completely human. That, that you might occasionally have that thought, but have you spent a lot of time in, in regret?3 (53m 18s):I mean, I don't think so. I think I don't spend a lot of time in regret. You know, I definitely had moments over the years. I, well, a few years back, I sort of had like a little bit of a, not a breakdown, but like, I think of my midlife crisis started and like my, you know, I have two kids and my daughter was, you know, eight and my son was four and it was just kind of like, you know, you know, when kids are babies, it's just baby, baby, baby, baby. You don't, you don't have time to think about yourself. So who cares? And then like when you start to get back to yourself a little bit, it's just like, okay, I'm, you know, I'm 42 or, you know, whatever, and what have I really done?3 (54m 8s):And you know, what am I doing? And you know, is this, this, this it, I mean, I, I was teaching yoga. So, I mean, that's also a part of my journey. I mean, like I, so when I got out of school, like I did acting for a while, like, I've done some very bad independent films. Do you guys know Sandra Delgado? Oh yeah. Yeah. She, I like, we did a really bad film together in the early two thousands. And, you know, like I did like a horror film and I was like, had some small parts as mother independent films.3 (54m 52s):And, you know, I, I was trying to act and auditioning and auditioning and auditioning and like I did a couple of plays, but it was just never, you know, I just could never get to a certain point. I really just, I would have done theater and crappy theater and whatever, but I just, I couldn't, you know, for whatever reason, you know, I have the, that decade that I called the, the bad boyfriend years, so which we can all relate to on some level, which I, you know, where we all waste a lot of energy on people who don't deserve it. Oh yeah. Yeah. And then, so, so then, yeah, like a few years back, so it was kind of not in a good place.3 (55m 39s):And I was like, okay, well, I guess it's now or never. And I, I finally finished the play, so I went back to writing. Yeah. That's huge. That's awesome. You know, I finally cause I, I was like, okay, I guess if I'm going to try, I guess I gotta try. And, you know, I, I really discovered a few things. I discovered that I like writing. I, I feel good when I'm doing it. You know, there's a lot of positives to it in that way. I finished the play. I, it got, it got into like the second round at the Austin film festival.3 (56m 19s):So that was, yeah, that was pretty cool. I guess, since it was just like my first foray out of doing anything in theater in quite some time, and I had a stage reading in Chicago and then it sort of, you know, petered out after that. I, I was sending it out, sending it out, but no, no, no hits after that. But so, you know, I'm kind of gearing up to write again. So, no, I don't, I don't have, I don't, I haven't been beating myself up about it. I think that, you know, life takes a course and you can only do what you are doing in the time that you're doing it.3 (57m 0s):You only have the information that you have. You only have the life skills that you have. You only have the resources that you have. And so I think regret, I don't waste a lot of time on regret. I have enjoyed listening to the podcast and sort of like you said, Jen, like everybody's story is the same, a little bit. And that, you know, a lot of people who, you know, I've looked up to and had a lot of respect for and were really good actors and good at what they did. It just didn't happen for them. And so that's, that's like, I, yeah.2 (57m 37s):So I'm still just trying to, I'm still trying to wrap my head around why I just remember you as being an acting student, maybe it had to do with that. You were friends with Kelly and maybe because of your friendship with Kelly.3 (57m 54s):Yeah, probably that was it. Yeah. I mean, I was, I was friends with all the apartment three crew. I, yeah.1 (58m 2s):So I mean, I like, I like that even like deeper in my brain, I was like, what if I was taking on your desire to be an actor? I saw you as an actor because it was so strong that you wanted to be an actor. Like, I literally have an image of you on stage, but I actually can't3 (58m 22s):Be somebody else. Yeah. I1 (58m 25s):It's your face. It's really weird. So, anyway,3 (58m 27s):I mean, I guess at one time, like I had a play that maybe I did a stage reading of with Darryl Dickerson at school and maybe some other actors, maybe Kelly was in it. I don't know. But that would have really been like in a classroom. Yeah, yeah, no, I not an actor or, I mean, I am an actor, but none of the theater school. Yeah.2 (58m 54s):So these days, I mean, when you're talking about the work of being an English teacher, it reminded me actually, ironically, just a few days ago, I ran across a notebook that I haven't opened since I was a teacher of social studies and drama. And I re remember that I used to take for social studies. I used to write my lesson like a monologue kind of, and sort of not memorize it exactly, but almost like repeatedly rehearse it because it was not information that I already knew. I was learning the lesson right before I taught it. And teaching is so performative that during that time I was doing theater at the time.2 (59m 35s):But even if I weren't, I think I would have felt fulfilled in a performance way. Do you have that feeling about being a teacher? That it feels like a performance?3 (59m 50s):I guess what I, I do like the exchange of energy, like, like you would get from say a live audience or something like that. I don't know that I necessarily look at it as a performance, but I do feel like, yeah, you, obviously you have to be ready. You have to know what you're going to say. You have to know the material. And like, even if it is you just learning it that day or getting, you know, I feel that exchange, like, I feel good after class, like after talking with the kids and being with the kids and talking at them and, and teaching them, it does feel that way, like a little bit like that exchange of energy that you get from an audience a little bit.3 (1h 0m 35s):Yeah.2 (1h 0m 37s):Do you otherwise feel a kind of a need to do, do you have a need for any other type of creative outlet or your guys you're doing it because you're kind of getting back into3 (1h 0m 48s):My goal is to, yeah. To start writing again, like, I, I don't know how, what your, how you guys write. Like, I don't know what if you're constantly writing all the time or for me it's, it's like, I tend to sort of get inspiration and then work on something, you know, in a, in, in a period of time. Or if I create the discipline, like when I finished this play, I was getting up at like four 30 every day. I was teaching yoga at the time and the kids were, you know, still pretty young. And so I knew that the only way it was ever going to work is if I was disciplined enough to, you know, set that time aside, this is my time, my time to write.3 (1h 1m 33s):And so now, you know, after, like you said, you know, that first year is so hard, so now I'm starting to get my legs again. And I'm hoping to, yeah. Maybe start working on something I have, I've like dabbled in screenwriting before a little bit. So I'm thinking about, maybe I'm getting too into that a little bit.1 (1h 1m 57s):I have a question for you when you took playwriting. So this is interesting because it was such a young program, right. Was there any actually teaching of writing at the theater school, Like how to write a play?3 (1h 2m 12s):You know, it's funny about that. It's funny because I mean, like, I, it feels like we would write and we give it the stuff to Dean and we had deadlines and things like that. And he would give us feedback on it. You know, it's the funny thing is, is like the only, I feel like the only piece of practical writing advice that I ever got, and I, this is nothing against Dean. It's just what I remember. So Dean was awesome. I loved him. Well, we had a visiting playwright from Nigeria all over TIMI. I don't know if you remember him being there. He was there for like one quarter and he basically just like, kind of taught me to, to write a bit, you know, he's like, he's like, you have this scene here.3 (1h 2m 57s):And the guy he's at the cafe and he wants his coffee, but the waitress isn't giving him his coffee. He has to keep asking for his coffee over and over again. And it was just like, oh, you mean, I have to create like a little bit of dramatic tension in the scene, what a revelation. Right?2 (1h 3m 16s):Like it just a Mo create3 (1h 3m 17s):A moment. I felt like, you know, he gave me some real practical advice. It was just like, okay, you just have to, you know, these two people are here and you have to kind of, he wants his coffee and she won't give him his coffee and that's where the comedy comes in. And so, yeah. I don't know. I, I don't know how much, you know, they taught me about writing. I feel like I could have used a little bit of more help, like in practical matters, you know, listening to Kate's thing when you guys all went out for your showcase and that kind of thing. Like if somebody had talked to me more about submitting my work, maybe that would have been helpful.3 (1h 3m 58s):I mean, it's so weird though, to think of it at that time. I mean, I was, we were sending out headshots through the mail. We were sending out work through the mail. I mean, you have to go ,1 (1h 4m 14s):You'd have to go to what was called Kinko's then print out your play and then, and then mail it in an envelope to theaters or drop it off in person.3 (1h 4m 24s):And there was like that, like one place where you could get your headshots downtown, like the one like photography place where you could go and get like your headshots in bulk and you'd have to go pick them up. And like the blue2 (1h 4m 35s):Box. I remember the blue box.3 (1h 4m 37s):Yes. I still box exactly. You know,1 (1h 4m 44s):I think, or2 (1h 4m 45s):Yeah, something like that. So. Okay. So then let's talk about the period between graduating and we're where you are now. So you, well, you said you were auditioning,3 (1h 4m 57s):So I graduated. Yeah. And then after that, I, I, you know, I would go in spurts of productivity, you know, where I would audition a lot. You know, I was always looking at performing, you know, once again, trying to, I took a lot of classes in Chicago. I, I took classes at the actor's center. They had a lot of Meisner there. I did Steven, Steven. I have a villages program. He had a studio in like Wicker park. And so he had like a, like a, I think it was like a nine month program or something. So you would, you know, go and you'd be with the same group.3 (1h 5m 40s):And I went through a program there. I took classes downtown at, I forget what it's called now, the audition studio, or, you know, and I remember taking like an on-camera class with Erica Daniels. And who was the other, who was the lady that she always worked with? The casting director. Do you remember she was blonde1 (1h 6m 8s):Phyllis at Steppenwolf?3 (1h 6m 9s):No. It was like a casting director. Her name began with an ass. I want to say it was like Sharon or Sally, or, I dunno, she was like a big casting director at the time. So I took like an on-camera class with them, you know, I, Yeah. I don't know. It's funny cause like you, you, there's these moments where you realize like you're trying to be funny and it just, isn't funny and it just ends up really awkward. And that was one of those moments with them, you know, you're trying to impress somebody and, and she, I was sort of like chubby in high school.3 (1h 6m 57s):And so I think that as with most women who have issues with body issues, like you, you have those body issues forever. It takes a long time to shake them off. And I remember they gave me the scene. It was, the character was played by Sarah rule. Yeah. So, you know, she was a little overweight at the time, you know, and I remember kind of making this off-color joke about how, oh, I guess I see you gave me the, the part of the fat girl or something like that. Like really like probably not appropriate, but I, I meant it to be self-deprecating, but I wasn't really fat at the time.3 (1h 7m 37s):So it was didn't come off as self-deprecating it was another one of those instances where it's just like, and the woman just like hated me after that, you know? And Erica was pretty cool. I think she kind of realized that I was just nervous and awkward. And with the other woman, I remember seeing her like outside after, and she crossed the street to like, not talk to me. And I was like, oh my God, I'm such an asshole. Like, why did I say that? I didn't mean it. You know? And so I'm even blushing now I think thinking about it,1 (1h 8m 10s):You said what probably a lot of people were thinking when they would get that.2 (1h 8m 15s):Honestly, you can rest assured that absolutely every person who was there was just in an internal monologue about their own body issues. I mean, that's, that's the thing that comes up over and over again, when we feel so much shame about something like that, it's like, those people would never remember it. A and if, even if they did, they'd say with the benefit of hindsight, they might say, oh yeah, well, that just brought up for me. You know, my feelings about myself. And3 (1h 8m 44s):I mean, you know, I think, yeah, it just, it, so I took classes all over the city. I auditioned a lot, like I said, I did some independent films and then, you know, like I was still auditioning kind of in spurts over time, I think. And then I discovered yoga. And so I started doing Bikram yoga. It's just the hot yoga. I hear you guys talking about cults and cult leaders a lot on here. He's, he's one of those guys. He's a, he's a cult leader, a guru now downfall on by sexual harassment.3 (1h 9m 26s):But I started doing the yoga and that was like 2007, I think. And, you know, I had a friend who really kind of pushed me to go do the training and I wasn't really sure, but I decided to go do it. And you know, it kind of, I think, I don't know if you guys have ever done yoga, but it is sort of, you know, it kind of, it gave me something that I had been missing in a way. I think, you know, it is that, that mind body connection, I think I had been very detached from my body for many reasons, you know, abuse and all that.3 (1h 10m 7s):Like not physical abuse, but other kinds of abuse. And, and so like, I think that people get detached from their bodies. And so I think I was really connected to it in a way, and I felt good, you know, in a way that I hadn't felt in a long time. And, you know, I think that's the hardest thing. Sometimes when it goes, when you go back to theater, it's like you put so much energy into it and so much time. And I took so many classes and, you know, I enjoyed the classes and, but I just, you know, I really wanted to get on stage and it was just like, I just couldn't get there. And I think like at a certain point, you're just kind of like, what positive am I getting from this thing that I'm giving all this time and energy and love to like, what's the positives that I'm getting out of this.3 (1h 10m 55s):And I'm not, I'm not really seeing it anymore. You know, you know, I, I would get calls from people. We loved your audition. It was lovely. Please come audition for us again. So, you know, there, there were positives, but it just could never, it just really came to fruition. And so then I started doing the yoga and I, I felt really connected to it and I felt really good and in a way that I hadn't felt. And so then I started teaching yoga and I did that for like 10 years while I was having babies and raising them. And then like, yeah.3 (1h 11m 36s):So then 27 16, I started writing again.2 (1h 11m 40s):I did, I did Bikram yoga for like two years and you're just making me re remember that part of what I liked about it. It was kind of like rehearsal. I mean, cause you just go and you do the same, whatever it is, 26 poses. And the set is the same and the smell the same. And it is kind of like, it's very rich of all the nuggets, like really ritualistic.3 (1h 12m 8s):It is very ritualistic and you know, I haven't been practicing here in Morocco. Sometimes I, you know, close all the doors to my kitchen and I turn on t

Richard Skipper Celebrates
Richard Skipper Celebrates Jordi Caballero (11/28/2021)

Richard Skipper Celebrates

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 73:00


For Video Edition, Please Click and Subscribe Here: https://youtu.be/MMK4BRpH_zc www.JordiCaballero.com Jordi Caballero is an actor, dancer-choreographer, musician and producer with a knack for crossing boundaries in the entertainment industry. As Jordi explains, "To me it doesn't matter what entertainment medium is used. My goal is to tell a story - be it through the eyes of a character, a movement, a beat or a show, to captivate the audience through the shared human experience. And figuring out the best route to get there is what fills me with inspiration". Jordi started training in the classical music arts at the age of 8.  Influenced by American Musicals such as "West Side Story" and an "American in Paris", icons like Fred Astaire and Gene Kelly, and TV shows like "Fame", Jordi headed to the New York City to pursue a career in acting and the performing arts earning a BFA degree from New York University, Tisch School of the Arts. Following graduation at NYU, Jordi caught the attention of celebrated film directors in a series of notable acting roles.   He has received two Nominations as Best Choreographer from the prestigious American Choreography Awards. Over the past several years Jordi has emerged as a filmmaker-producer of original entertainment content including TANGO SHALOM (Post Production), THE LAST ANALOGUE HIT: MACARENA: The last analog hit (In process), LA CARGA (2016), After the Rain (2016), DANCING FOR MY HAVANA (2015) and THE WORLD CHOREOGRAPHY AWARDS (2015, 2016 & 2017). http://www.imdb.me/jordicaballero  

Art World
Ep. 89 Caitlin Mary Margarett

Art World

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 51:50


Caitlin Mary Margarett is a Midwestern artist, born and raised between Minnesota and Iowa. CMM attends the University of Wisconsin-Madison, seeking an MFA in 4D (2024). She holds a BFA in performance art and a BA in art history from the University of Northern Iowa (2018). Rooted in a durational, performative practice, CMM's work shifts between seeking an esthetic, spiritual ambience and an immediate, frenetic urgency about our climate crisis. Her work is a multimedia exploration of place and the near past; utilizing video, photography, ceramics, antiques, and textiles to evoke both nostalgia and solastalgia. She has most recently been analyzing her local ecology and considering the Midwest landscape as an article of history in and of itself. The 100 Days project is a durational performance practice that began in 2020, illustrating the timeline of the Midwest's loss in biodiversity alongside her maternal family's immigration from Denmark to Iowa. The project is focused on generating a discussion surrounding our concept of time, ecological and cultural erosion, and grief. In 2021, her 100 Days V.ii documented the Iowa Derecho's damage and showed her multi-day pilgrimage across the state. In the final days of V.ii, CMM documented the homes, graves, and churches of her maternal line, and the Rompot prairie that was destroyed by Cargill and the City of Cedar Rapids. Through 100 Days V.i in 2020, CMM cataloged much of her surrounding landscape and domestic rituals at the onset of the pandemic. CMM's art practice is a means to make sense of her own feminist spirituality within systems of cultural / ecological flourishing and suffering. Her work poses questions about individual agency, and the experience of being locked in cycles of redemption and reemergence. These recurring threads, woven into narratives around site specificity and our connection to place, coalesce into new work that asks what our roles are as we brace for the impact of our climate emergency. Her work has been shown throughout the Midwest, at 2021's Miami Art Week as a part of the PERFORMANCE IS ALIVE / Satellite Show that runs concurrent with Art Basel Miami; at Louisiana State University for the 2019 Queeramics Symposium; in Ceramics Monthly; Emergency Index V. 8 and V. 9; and Aesthetica Magazine. She is currently preparing for her research trip to Denmark in 2022 and her solo show in Berlin, Germany, at LiTEHAUS GALERIE & PROJEKTRAUM, also slated for 2022. CMM's next upcoming solo show is scheduled at ARTIFACT Gallery, New York, NY, on January 11-29, 2023. https://www.caitlinmarymargarett.com/

Heilman & Haver
Heilman & Haver - Episode 53 (Guest Stewart Lyons - Part 2)

Heilman & Haver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 26:28


Welcome to Heilman & Haver - Episode 53.  We hope you enjoy the show! Please join the conversation - email us with thoughts and ideas and connect with the show on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram.   ANNOUNCEMENTS “A Classic Christmas" with Jeremy Arnold Saturday, December 18th, Jeremy Arnold will join us at the Roxy for a one-of-a-kind roundtable discussion before a “It's a Wonderful Life” hits the Roxy big screen.  Plan to come early for a matinee showing of “White Christmas” and stay for the holiday bites and wine before we hit the stage with Jeremy.  We'll also enjoy a special Christmas message from "Zuzu" herself, Karolyn Grimes.  Get more info and tickets at roxybremerton.org.  And tune in next week and keep an eye on our social media pages for your chance to WIN A PAIR OF TICKETS! Virtual "Coppelia" by Bainbridge Ballet to Stream Over Thanksgiving Keep an eye on the Bainbridge Ballet Facebook page next week for a special virtual production of comic ballet, "Coppelia", thanks to the skills of our friend, local filmmaker, Scott Breitbarth.   "A Match Made At Christmas" Special Event Mark your calendars for Thursday, December 9th, when BISA Vocal Studio, in partnership with Abundant House Films and Faraway Entertainment, will present the Bainbridge Island Premiere of a film made right here in the Pacific Northwest.  “A Match Made at Christmas” will play at 7pm at the Historic Lynwood Theatre at 7pm, followed by a Q&A with cast members Bainbridge Island resident Shannon Dowling, and Seattle actor Jared Hernandez.   IN THE SPOTLIGHT:  Stewart Lyons Stewart Lyons is a Co-Executive Producer, Line Producer, and Production Executive with extensive experience with most major studio, network, cable, and streaming television companies including Netflix, Sony Pictures Television, Warner Brothers, Amazon, HBO, Weinstein Productions, NBC, and CBS. He has worked on 33 television series, 27 pilots (20 ordered to series), and dozens of feature films and television movies.  He was recently Director, Original Series Production, for Netflix and prior to that assignment was Co-Executive Producer for the premiere season of “Better Call Saul”. He won 2 Emmys as Line Producer for “Breaking Bad”, the most critically acclaimed series in the history of television. He also received two Directors Guild Awards, two Producers Guild Awards, a Golden Globe, and two Peabody Awards for this series. He was also the only person, cast or crew, who was on set for every day of the production of "Breaking Bad".  In addition to his regular production positions, his work as a production consultant includes scheduling and/or budgeting over 160 pilots and television series for streaming, cable, and broadcast companies for projects throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, and Europe. In 2015, he was the first television line producer to be the subject of "An Evening With..." hosted by Senator Christopher Dodd at the MPAA in Washington, DC.  Stewart has lectured at the Directors Guild, the Producers Guild, Chapman University, USC's Peter Stark Program, UCLA, the University of Maryland, and in both England and Germany about set operations, scheduling, budgeting, and the development of "auteur" television. He received his BFA from NYU's Tisch School of the Arts and his MBA from NYU's Stern School of Business. He is a graduate of the DGA/Producers Training Program and currently works as adjunct Professor at DePaul University instructing in creative producing at their Los Angeles location for masters degree students.   He joined us from his home in Oxnard, CA.   COMING UP NEXT WEEK  Join us next week, Friday, December 26th, when we'll be joined by author Richard Barrios to talk about the history of the musical, the technology the films spawned, and some of his favorite must-see musicals throughout the years.

Sound & Vision
Alannah Farrell

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 83:56


Alannah Farrell (b.1988, Kingston, NY) is a queer transmasculine painter who lives and works in the East Village, New York, NY. They grew up in a rural hamlet in upstate NY, raised by two outside-the-system creative parents. They began undergraduate studies at The Cooper Union, New York, NY, receiving their BFA in 2011. Their work was previously exhibited at Anat Ebgi Gallery, Los Angeles, CA (solo), The Painting Center, New York, NY (solo); Thierry Goldberg Gallery, New York, NY; Harper's, East Hampton, NY, Harper's, Los Angeles, CA, Richard Heller Gallery, Los Angeles, CA, and UTA Artist Space, Los Angeles, CA. They have a forthcoming solo exhibition at Harper's new location in Chelsea at 512 West 22nd Street, New York, NY, 2022. They are represented by Harper's Gallery, New York, and Anat Ebgi Gallery, Los Angeles. Their work centers around a humanistic celebration of the individuals in their community, a predominantly queer creative community in NYC, by exposing the personal struggles, uncertainties, intimate moments, and triumphs they face.

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 138 Part 2: How Metalsmith Magazine Is Highlights New Voices in Jewelry with Editor, Adriane Dalton

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 22:39


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Metalsmith magazine, and why it maintains its name even as its scope has expanded beyond metals How SNAG has made efforts to diversify the voices in Metalsmith and open the organization to new members What type of content Adriane looks for as an editor, and how you can pitch ideas to her What changes need to be made in the jewelry industry to make it more equitable Why being a curator and being an editor aren't so different About Adriane Dalton Adriane Dalton is an artist, writer, and educator based in Philadelphia, PA. She is the editor of Metalsmith, the magazine published by the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG). She was formerly the Assistant Curator and Exhibitions Manager at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art (NEHMA) in Logan, Utah, where she co-curated “ARTsySTEM: The Changing Climate of the Arts and Sciences” and taught History of American Studio Craft, among many other curatorial and educational projects.  She holds an MA in the history of decorative arts and design from Parsons The New School for Design (2014), and a BFA in craft and material studies from the University of the Arts (2004). Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at Contemporary Craft (Pittsburgh, PA), The Wayne Art Center (Wayne, PA), Snyderman-Works Gallery (Philadelphia, PA), A CASA Museu de Object Brasileiro (Sao Paulo, Brazil), the Metal Museum (Memphis, TN), and Space 1026 (Philadelphia, PA). Additional Resources: SNAG Website Adriane's Instagram Photos: Recent Metal Smith Covers Transcript: Adriane Dalton took a meandering path to become editor of Metalsmith, the Society of North American Goldsmith's (SNAG) quarterly magazine, but her background as a maker, her work as a curator, and her education in the history of craft has only helped her hone her editorial skills. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the overlaps between making, curating and editing; what she looks for when selecting work for the magazine; and why it's important we not just talk about objects and the people who make them, but the conditions in which people make them. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: What kinds of changes do you think? I don't know, galleries representing more Black jewelers and jewelers of color? What kinds of changes do you mean? Talking about them in classes? Adriane: For that particular issue, that essay by Valena Robinson Glass and the essay by Leslie Boyd touch on some of the possibilities for how to address those things. I would encourage anyone who's listening who hasn't read that issue or isn't familiar with it to go pick it up off your bookshelf or go purchase it from SNAG. There are a lot of ways you can be reflective. Some of it is as simple as trying to understand if you have a space where there are no Black, indigenous, or people of color in that space, whether you're a galleries or an educator, what are the barriers to access for people, whether they're economic or graphic? There are a lot of different things. I don't know that I can say there are one-size-fits all solutions to these things, but I think it's a matter of being reflective. Sharon: I know you're the editor of the publication; you're not speaking for SNAG itself, but what do you see SNAG doing to lower barriers? Adriane: I think some of the things SNAG has done have been done to create, for example—for our virtual conference, there were needs-based scholarships for folks to attend the conference if they had an economic barrier, which is one way SNAG has dealt with that. Because of us having canceled our conference last year, there's been a lot of upheaval. We're trying to get through and recover from the financial burden of having to cancel an annual conference, as many organizations have this past year.  One of the other things that has been done—and this started pre-pandemic—is changing how we define what it means to be a student. In the past, that was implied to mean a student of a four-year jewelry program. As most folks have probably noticed, there are fewer and fewer jewelry and metals programs in higher education in the U.S. than ever. So many programs have closed, and there have been a lot of community programs which have popped up, such as the Baltimore Jewelry Center, Smith Shop in Detroit, Brooks Metalworks, plus others. Then, of course, there are places like We Wield the Hammer and the Crucible in San Francisco. We're trying to include anyone who's taking classes in a community setting in this definition of student, offering lower rates for registrations for students, lower rates for student memberships and things like that. SNAG's membership cost at this point is $99 annually, which I believe is less than it used to be. I feel like it used to be higher than that.  Sharon: I don't remember. I get my renewal notice and I know I want to remain a member. Will there be a regular conference this year or next spring, do you think? Although who knows with the Delta variant.  Adriane: Right. There are plans for an in-person conference to happen in the spring of 2022 as it would normally, around Labor Day. I'm not involved in the conference planning, so I don't know exactly what the plan is at this point, but I think there are some other things that SNAG has planned in the meantime. We have other virtual programming.  We're going to be having a symposium in the fall in October. I believe it's October 22-23. This is part of what will be an annual program that happens every fall in addition to the conference, and it will be virtual. I believe the title of that symposium program is “Tides and Waves.” Each year, we'll have a different geographical focus throughout the world. I believe that is the focus for this coming symposium, which is happening this fall. I think it will have been announced by the time this comes up. Sharon: This fall being 2021? Adriane: Yeah, this fall being 2021. I think the geographical focus for this symposium is Eastern Asia. Sharon: Oh, wow, that will be interesting. I'm not a maker, and when I go to the conferences, I'm more focused on what people are showing, what's different. I'm trying to remember the issues you're talking about. It doesn't seem like there have been many—maybe they haven't been of much interest to me, but I haven't heard these issues being discussed at the conferences as much as how you form a gold something, or whatever. I don't know.  Adriane: You mean as far as conference sessions? Sharon: Sessions, yeah. Adriane: The last conference I attended was in Chicago. No, that's not true; I attended our virtual conference, but when you're working and the conference is happening and you're trying to zip in and out of things and pay attention to everything, it's all kind of a blur for me at this point, honestly. I think the most recent virtual conference dealt a little bit more with some of the things I was mentioning. For example, there was a panel that dealt with people who were makers or involved in the field in some way, but who also have a caretaking role, whether that's mothering or something that. That also speaks to what I was mentioning before, thinking about not just what we make, but the conditions in which we make. That is a huge topic that hasn't fully been addressed. How can you go to a residency and take a month or longer to do that when you have a small child—or not even a small child, a teenager—and do all of these things when you have some other person you have to care for? And of course, that disproportionately affects women in the field. I think one of the things that is great about an in-person conference but is much more difficult to have happen organically in a virtual setting, even now when we are accustomed to attending events virtually—and I love it; it's great because I can be in San Francisco; I can be in New York; I can be in London, but I don't have to leave my house. I just have to be awake at whatever time zone the event is happening in. But something that doesn't happen at these things is the organic conversations you have in small groups at dinner or over drinks. For me as the editor, those are the conversations I'm really looking for. What are people talking about that we aren't talking about more broadly, and how can we make space for that and bring that in? Sharon: That's an interesting question. Yes, you do hear that as you're having coffee with somebody or with a group. What's on your plate that you've heard? Maybe it's harder to hear that virtually, but something that you thought, “Oh, I want to investigate that more,” or “We need to do something about that, an article.” Adriane: Yeah, one very straightforward example is that during last year's virtual New York City Jewelry Week, I spent the entire week, morning to night for seven days straight, glued to my computer. I was picking my laptop up and taking it into my kitchen when I made dinner. By the end of the week, I didn't want to look at a screen again, but of course I had to. One of the presentations during New York City Jewelry Week last year was by Sebastian Grant— Sharon: He is? Adriane: Sebastian is a jewelry historian and teaches at Parsons - Cooper Hewitt. His presentation, which I believe was in concert with The Jewelry Library, was on looking at the history of Black jewelry artists from mid-century forward and trying to identify these makers and talk about their work and their stories that hadn't been shared or acknowledged. In a lot of publications, there hasn't been comprehensive publishing around some of these artists. After seeing his presentation, I reached out to him and asked if he would be interested in taking some of that research and sharing it in Metalsmith in a series of articles. So far, we've published two articles by Sebastian. That's a very direct example of being engaged in the field in a virtual setting, hearing conversations that are going on—it was a presentation, but there was also a Q&A afterwards—and knowing this is something that needs to be given more space.  Sharon: It must be great to be in a position where you can say, “This needs to be addressed further” and do something about it, to literally create. I know you have people you consult with on that, but still, that's very interesting. What other areas do you have in mind that are churning right now? Adriane: It's hard to say. I can talk a little bit about the examples of things that have happened over the recent volume that fit these criteria. Looking forward, it's a little harder because I'm just finishing up Volume 41—or getting ready to finish it up—and then Volume 42 will be starting. There's a lot of planning, a lot of question marks and things that are penciled in that I'm hoping will be written in in pen shortly.  One of the examples that directly came out of attending the conference in Chicago, aside from that conversation I mentioned with Lauren Eckert which led to the New Voices Competition, was at—I forget what it was called—but basically, it was the exhibition room where everyone has their small pop-up exhibitions. There was an exhibition that was curated by Mary Raivel and Mary Fissell, who are both based in Baltimore and involved with the Baltimore Center. Their exhibition was called “Coming of Age,” and they were specifically interested in artists who had come to jewelry making or metalsmithing as a second career after having some other career first. I was really interested in that, because there's the idea of the emerging artist as being someone who's young and just out of school, just out of undergrad or just out of grad school. I think it's a limiting way to think about where people are at in their creative process. I invited them to write about that exhibition, turn it into an article and talk about the interviews they did with the artists who applied to the show. We ran that in Volume 40, so it was the second issue of Volume 40 of Metalsmith. Sharon: That's a really interesting subject. It's so true; there are so many people who have come to jewelry making, whether it's in metal or in plastic or whatever, after a career doing something else, when they said, “Hey, I'm done with this and I really want to do what I want do.” I know Art Jewelry Forum, when they started—I don't know exactly where it ended up, but I know there was discussion in terms of age. Originally some of the grants being submitted had to do with age, and that really doesn't tell you anything. Adriane: Right. That actually came up in that article. It's been a while since I read it, so it's not fresh in my mind, but I believe they interviewed someone from Art Jewelry Forum—maybe it was Yvonne—and they brought this up and talk about that. In the article, they talk about how people fall into this gap where they're an age on paper where it seems like they should be mid-career artists, but they truly are emerging artists; it just may not seem that way if you know their age. I think it's interesting, and the more we try to put—and this is true of all sorts of things—rigid parameters on something, I think we limit ourselves in whom we invite to participate in the field or be in these spaces with us. It leaves people out. Not everyone can graduate from high school and go straight into college and start a career as a bench jeweler or a production jeweler or conceptual artist. There are a lot of different factors that contribute to where a person is in their career and the work they're making. Sharon: Yeah, that as well. What's a student today? It's an avocation. It may become their vocation eventually, but if they take a class at a community—I took a class at a jewelry school, and that's all the metalsmithing I've done. I was thinking about how you, being a maker, how does that affect—do you think you could do your job as well if you weren't a maker? Adriane: I don't think I could do my job as well if I were not a maker who had a grounding in the processes and traditions of metalsmithing. As I was saying earlier, the field and the materiality of the field has shifted a lot. My undergraduate study in learning the basics of jewelry and metalsmithing is helpful for me as I'm looking at the way authors are writing about artists' work. Not everyone who writes for the magazine is a maker or a jeweler, so there are some times when a term might come up, or someone might interpret a component of an object in a certain way. I, as someone who is a maker, and our readers often could look at that and say, “Well, I don't think that's quite right.” I then have the knowledge to write a note or an edit and say, “Hey, I think you might have this wrong. I think it's vermeil and not actually gold.” I don't think I would have that ability if I didn't have a background as a maker. Sharon: That's interesting. How do you find the journalism aspect? To me, what you're doing—it's both the combination of being a maker or jeweler and having the crafts background, but the journalism, not everybody could do that. Adriane: I don't think about it in that way necessarily. Having a curatorial background, I think about the magazine more curatorially, I would say. Maybe there's some overlap with the way someone with a journalism background would think about it, but because that is not my background and not my training, I don't know. I think about what I'm doing as the editor as interpretative, in the way that if you are a curator and you've done research and you're presenting a selection of artworks to the public, you have to contextualize them in some way. You have to make sure that the way that you've put things together, people can come into that space, whether it's in a print publication or in a gallery space, and hopefully they can come away with the things that are apparent and the subtleties at the same time. That's what I try to capture when I write my letter from the editor for every issue, which, as you alluded to earlier, sounds like a difficult task and it certainly is. Even though I have done a lot of writing, I'm always fussing with it and fussing with it and fussing with it up to the last minute. I want to make sure that when people read it, they get something out of it that isn't just, “Here's what's in this issue.” Sharon: That's interesting. Being an editor has so many similarities with being a curator. You're culling through things and what goes with what and setting the context, which is what you definitely do in the note from the editor, and I'll be thinking about them a little differently as I read more. I already look at them and think, “Oh, it's so hard to express yourself.” You do a very good job, but they're very weighty things you're talking about. It's not just, “Oh, we have pretty pieces of jewelry in this issue.” Adriane: Right. If that were the case, that would probably be all I had to say about it.  Sharon: That's true; moving from here on to Vogue. Adriane: I don't know about that. Sharon: Adriane, thank you so much. I really appreciate it. You've given us a lot to think about. I didn't enter this conversation realizing it would be so thought-provoking. Thank you. It's greatly, greatly appreciated. Adriane: That's wonderful; thank you, and thank you for having me. This has been a fantastic conversation. Sharon: So glad to have you. We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.  

Future of Agriculture
FoA 286: Nutrient Density and the Future of Quality-Driven Food Systems with Dan Kittredge

Future of Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 33:05


Bionutrient Food Association: https://bionutrient.org/ Bionutrient Institute: https://www.bionutrientinstitute.org/  Bionutrient meter: https://bionutrient.org/bionutrientmeter  Over the past few years, the term “nutrient density” has been popping up more and more. There are a lot of claims being made about farming practices like regenerative agriculture producing more nutritious food or more nutrient dense food. But is this true? I mean, if you increase the amount of one nutrient are you really making it more nutrient dense or are you maybe just doing so at the expense of other nutrients? And if there are more of any given nutrient in a product, does that make it necessarily healthier?  The truth is we don't really know. There is no agreed upon standard for nutrient density. And many people and companies are not letting that stop them latching onto the term and running with it for their own marketing purposes. You've heard evidence of that right here on previous episodes of this show. Also, without collecting a large amount of data on the various compounds in agricultural products, we can't really even say if it matters.   Our guest today is making progress in defining nutrient density with data and has created an open-source consumer-priced handheld bionutrient meter that can provide a real time percentile of nutrient compound levels in eight different crops so far. He has a vision of someday using nutrient density as an important data point to optimize our food system in a variety of ways. But first we need the data to define what the nutrient profile should look like in each crop and the instrumentation to test this in every level of the food system, which he'll be the first to admit that we still have a long way to go toward that end.  We have on the show Dan Kittredge. Dan is the Founder and Executive Director of the Bionutrient Food Association. Dan was an organic farmer for more than 30 years and founded the Bionutrient Food Association or BFA with the mission of increasing quality in the food supply. Dan's perspective is healthier food comes from healthier plants which come from healthier environments. So, if we can develop a reliable and accessible measurement of healthy food, we can use that as a critical metric for a better food system.  Dan's vision is really interesting: once we have clear definitions and the instrumentation to give everyone access to the data, it creates a feedback loop that can optimize our food system for true quality. Dan believes this can nullify the need for a lot of labels about how a food is grown because what will matter is the data - both on quality and environmental impact. He's going to share the effects this could have on farming practices, genetics, health and consumer choice. Some of this may stretch your thinking here a little bit and you may find yourself wanting to see the evidence. That's ok - and the story here is what Dan and the BFA are doing to search for the data to inform this very interesting thesis. In order to make sure this was a pre-competitive effort, Dan and the team have made their device open source. Dan says it's a very early version of what we will need in the future, but it has allowed them to initially start collecting data with consumers at grocery stores and farmers markets and grow into working with 150 farmers as they did last year. Dan starts our conversation off with an overview of the Bionutrient Food Association. 

Bold Company
Sustaining Creativity with Mari Reisberg

Bold Company

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 48:35


In this episode, I'm speaking with Mari Reisberg: therapist, performer, creativity coach, and host of the Sustaining Creativity Podcast.    Mari and I talk about her journey as a very creative child, to the world of performing, and then onto her role supporting other creatives. We talk about rejection as a creative (something we all experience), creative self-care, and creating on your own terms.    Words you'll hear…   “Affirmations lead us to goals, they lead us to the changes we want to make in our life.”   “When we give our mind space to relax, answers show up.”   “Creativity is a present moment experience.”   “I think we forget how important mindfulness is to creativity.”   About Mari   Mari Reisberg, LPC is a therapist, performer, podcast host of the Sustaining Creativity Podcast and creativity coach. She holds a BFA in Acting from the University of Hartford's Hartt School and an MA in Somatic Counseling Psychology, Dance/Movement Therapy, from Naropa University. She currently splits time between the traditional 9-5 world as the director of utilization review and internship programming for a substance abuse treatment center, and her own Sustaining Creativity coaching business where she works 1:1 with performers and non-performers to spark, grow, sustain, share and transform creativity in their lives. She has shared her Sustaining Creativity work at conferences, Universities and in workshops across the country.   Mari believes we are all creative and life is way more fun when we can find creativity.   Links   Mari's Facebook: facebook.com/sustainingcreativity   Mari's Instagram: instagram.com/sustainingcreativity   Mari's Podcast: https://sustainingcreativity.buzzsprout.com/   Amy's episode of the Sustaining Creativity podcast: https://sustainingcreativity.buzzsprout.com/1028026/9485614-amy-eaton   Mari's LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/marika-reisberg-b1320151   Mari's 7 Day Creativity Challenge: https://courses.skillfulmeans.life/7-day-Awakening-Creativity   Mari's Free Creativity Guide: https://courses.skillfulmeans.life/Awakening-Creativity   Brioka: https://www.brioka.com   Brioka on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/createwithbrioka   Amy's website: https://www.amytakespictures.com/   Amy's Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amy.takes.pictures

Cerebral Women Art Talks Podcast
Lilian Garcia-Roig

Cerebral Women Art Talks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 25:18


Ep.83 features Lilian Garcia-Roig, a Cuba born, Texas raised artist living in Tallahassee, Florida whose works landscape-themed works have always explored the complex propositions of sense of place and belonging which so influence the construction of personal identity While she is most known for her perceptually-based, large-scale, “all-day” cumulative paintings that underscores the complex nature of trying to capture first-hand the multidimensional and ever-changing experience of being in that specific location. Recently she has embarked on a conceptual investigation of the idea of the Cuban landscape and how her American Bauhausian education has colored her relationship to place and space. These new works are part of the Hecho con Cuba and Hyphenated[1]Nature Series. She has shown at such places as the Chopo Museum in Mexico City, Americas Society Gallery in NYC, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Art Museum of the Americas and extensively in many museums throughout the southeast. In 2017 she had a large work included in “Relational Undercurrents: Contemporary Art of the Caribbean Archipelago” one of the Getty funded Pacific Standard Time LA/LA Initiative shows that opened at the Museum of Latin American Art and traveled to various museums across the US. In 2019 she was in the Florida Prize Exhibition at the Orlando Museum, the Florida Contemporary at the Baker Museum in Naples, FL and the 2020 Florida Biennial at the Hollywood Art Center in Miami. Most recently she had a large work acquired by Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM.) Her MFA is from the University of Pennsylvania (1990) and her BFA is from Southern Methodist University (1988). Major awards include a 2021 Guggenheim Fellowship, Joan Mitchell Foundation Award in Painting, Mid-America Arts Alliance/NEA Fellowship Award in Painting, State of Florida Individual Artist Fellowship Award in painting & a Kimbrough Award from the Dallas Museum of Art. Residencies include a Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture Fellowship, Vermont Studio Center Artist's Fellowship, Hambidge Arts Center, MacDowell Colony Milton & Sally Avery Fellowship, Joan Mitchell Center A-I-R and as a visiting artist at the Ludwig Foundation in Havana, Cuba. Photo credit: Alec Kercheval Artist website http://www.liliangarcia-roig.com/ Artist's Studio News https://liliangarciaroig.wordpress.com/2021/07/18/2021/ Guggenheim Foundation https://www.gf.org/fellows/all-fellows/lilian-garcia-roig/ Joan Mitchell Foundation https://www.joanmitchellfoundation.org/lilian-garcia-roig Valley House https://www.valleyhouse.com/bio.asp?artistid=70 Wikipedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lilian_Garcia-Roig Florida Contemporary http://www.liliangarcia-roig.com/florida-contemporary-2020/

New Books Network
Sara B. Fraser, "Just River" (Black Rose Writing, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 23:26


Today I talked to Sara B. Fraser about her new novel Just River (Black Rose Writing, 2021). The Otis River flows through the once bustling city of Wattsville, a few hours north of NYC, reminding the remaining residents of better days. Cross-dressing Sam is okay with his new, minimum-wage job, as long as he gets to sing Karaoke twice a month. His neighbor and best friend, Carol, is a cashier who spreads love through her baking. Garnet, Carol's daughter, is in prison after nearly killing her violent boyfriend, who visits her in prison. A couple of inmates learn that he's rich and threaten Garnet with violence unless he sneaks in drugs for them. Carol and Sam try to help Garnet, but then an innocent boy is kidnapped and a dog is poisoned. The river is the only thing that can save them all. Sara B. Fraser is the author of the novels Long Division and Just River. Her short fiction and essays have appeared in Carve, Jabberwock Review, the Forge, Wilderness House Literary Review, Salamander, Traveler's Tales, and more. Fraser completed her BFA in Creative Writing at Emerson College and two master's degrees, the first in Composition from the University of Massachusetts and the second in Education from Boston College. She is a high-school Spanish teacher, married to an Irishman, and mother of two boys. Her passions are surfing—she has trouble finding people willing to accompany her as she'll drop everything even in the dead of winter if there's swell (don't tell her boss)—and fermenting things in her kitchen. She cultivates funny smelling stuff like kimchi, sauerkraut, vinegar, kombucha, and sourdough bread starter. Some people think scoby (a product of fermentation) is weird looking, but she loves it. She spends summers in Galicia and plans on retiring there. A random fact that may or may not indicate something about who she is: as a teenager she used to darn her socks. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Literature
Sara B. Fraser, "Just River" (Black Rose Writing, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 23:26


Today I talked to Sara B. Fraser about her new novel Just River (Black Rose Writing, 2021). The Otis River flows through the once bustling city of Wattsville, a few hours north of NYC, reminding the remaining residents of better days. Cross-dressing Sam is okay with his new, minimum-wage job, as long as he gets to sing Karaoke twice a month. His neighbor and best friend, Carol, is a cashier who spreads love through her baking. Garnet, Carol's daughter, is in prison after nearly killing her violent boyfriend, who visits her in prison. A couple of inmates learn that he's rich and threaten Garnet with violence unless he sneaks in drugs for them. Carol and Sam try to help Garnet, but then an innocent boy is kidnapped and a dog is poisoned. The river is the only thing that can save them all. Sara B. Fraser is the author of the novels Long Division and Just River. Her short fiction and essays have appeared in Carve, Jabberwock Review, the Forge, Wilderness House Literary Review, Salamander, Traveler's Tales, and more. Fraser completed her BFA in Creative Writing at Emerson College and two master's degrees, the first in Composition from the University of Massachusetts and the second in Education from Boston College. She is a high-school Spanish teacher, married to an Irishman, and mother of two boys. Her passions are surfing—she has trouble finding people willing to accompany her as she'll drop everything even in the dead of winter if there's swell (don't tell her boss)—and fermenting things in her kitchen. She cultivates funny smelling stuff like kimchi, sauerkraut, vinegar, kombucha, and sourdough bread starter. Some people think scoby (a product of fermentation) is weird looking, but she loves it. She spends summers in Galicia and plans on retiring there. A random fact that may or may not indicate something about who she is: as a teenager she used to darn her socks. G.P. Gottlieb is the author of the Whipped and Sipped Mystery Series and a prolific baker of healthful breads and pastries. Please contact her through her website (GPGottlieb.com) if you wish to recommend an author (of a beautifully-written new novel) to interview, to listen to her previous podcast interviews, to read her mystery book reviews, or to check out some of her awesome recipes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

Jewelry Journey Podcast
Episode 138 Part 1: How Metalsmith Magazine Is Highlights New Voices in Jewelry with Editor, Adriane Dalton

Jewelry Journey Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 22:10


What you'll learn in this episode: The history of Metalsmith magazine, and why it maintains its name even as its scope has expanded beyond metals How SNAG has made efforts to diversify the voices in Metalsmith and open the organization to new members What type of content Adriane looks for as an editor, and how you can pitch ideas to her What changes need to be made in the jewelry industry to make it more equitable Why being a curator and being an editor aren't so different About Adriane Dalton Adriane Dalton is an artist, writer, and educator based in Philadelphia, PA. She is the editor of Metalsmith, the magazine published by the Society of North American Goldsmiths (SNAG). She was formerly the Assistant Curator and Exhibitions Manager at the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art (NEHMA) in Logan, Utah, where she co-curated “ARTsySTEM: The Changing Climate of the Arts and Sciences” and taught History of American Studio Craft, among many other curatorial and educational projects.  She holds an MA in the history of decorative arts and design from Parsons The New School for Design (2014), and a BFA in craft and material studies from the University of the Arts (2004). Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally at Contemporary Craft (Pittsburgh, PA), The Wayne Art Center (Wayne, PA), Snyderman-Works Gallery (Philadelphia, PA), A CASA Museu de Object Brasileiro (Sao Paulo, Brazil), the Metal Museum (Memphis, TN), and Space 1026 (Philadelphia, PA). Additional Resources: SNAG Website Adriane's Instagram Photos: Recent Metal Smith Covers Transcript: Adriane Dalton took a meandering path to become editor of Metalsmith, the Society of North American Goldsmith's (SNAG) quarterly magazine, but her background as a maker, her work as a curator, and her education in the history of craft has only helped her hone her editorial skills. She joined the Jewelry Journey Podcast to talk about the overlaps between making, curating and editing; what she looks for when selecting work for the magazine; and why it's important we not just talk about objects and the people who make them, but the conditions in which people make them. Read the episode transcript here.  Sharon: Hello, everyone. Welcome to the Jewelry Journey Podcast. Today, my guest is Adriane Dalton, editor of Metalsmith Magazine published by SNAG, the Society of North American Goldsmiths. The publication is designed to keep makers, jewelers and other artists in the field informed about important issues and people in their creative field. Adriane, welcome to the program. Adriane: Hi, it's wonderful to be here. Sharon: So glad to have you. I'm really looking forward to hearing all about this. I've been reading the magazine for so long. Tell us about your own jewelry journey. Were you a maker? How did you get into this? Did you come to it through journalism or the arts? Adriane: I came to it through the arts. I do not have a journalism background. I actually have a BFA in craft and material studies from the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, which is where I now live again after being in a lot of other places over the years. That craft and material studies program was my first introduction to jewelry making and to the contemporary jewelry field as we know it and as represented by SNAG and Metalsmith. Prior to that, I think my conception of jewelry was limited to the standard things you would see in the mall. That program was my gateway to the field. Sharon: Is that what you wanted to do when you came to study crafts and material arts? Did you think you'd be doing jewelry? Were you going to do fine art? Adriane: When I started undergrad, I had intended to be a photography major or potentially a glassblower. You have this first, foundational year of art school where you get to try different things out, and then you have to decide what your major is. I decided that in order to try to blow glass and work with my hands, I would need to be in the glass department. You couldn't major in glass at the time, so you had to pick a different focus area and then you could take classes in the glass department. So, I became a jewelry major sort of incidentally. I've always enjoyed working with my hands and making physical objects, so it ended up being a good fit for me. While I was there, I studied with Sharon Church, Rod McCormick and Lola Brooks, who were all teaching in the program at the time. That was my introduction to jewelry as an art form, not just as a piece of adornment. Sharon: So, you weren't third grade thinking, “I want to make jewelry.” Adriane: No. Sharon: When you graduated, were you making? How did it come about that you're now editing a publication? Adriane: It's been a meandering path, honestly. I graduated with my BFA with a focus in jewelry and metals. I was interested in enameling, and I did a lot of enamel work. When I finished undergrad, I had a studio and I worked on some small production lines. I worked on one-of-a-kind work, but I also needed to have a job to support myself beyond that, and I found out very quickly that I didn't like making production work. It wasn't what I wanted to do to support myself or express myself creatively. For about eight years, I worked in an office job and had a studio space. I was involved in some community arts organizations here in Philadelphia and maintained my own creative practice during that time.  It was almost 10 years after I had graduated from undergrad that I decided to go to grad school. I was interested in studying the field of craft more broadly, not just jewelry itself, so I enrolled in the joint program between Cooper Hewitt Museum in New York and Parsons. At the time, it was called History of Decorative Arts and Design. I believe the program is now History of Design and Curatorial Studies. I went into the program hoping to have a more formalized and research-based approach to thinking about craft. Sharon: Wow! That must have been exciting to be in New York and studying at such premier schools. Were you going to do research? Did you want to go into museums? What did you think you might want to do? Adriane: I was 30 at the time when I started grad school, and I had enough time after undergrad to figure out some of the things I didn't want to do. I considered going and receiving an MFA. I toyed with that idea a bit, and I decided I wanted to try to have a career that would allow me to use my creative mind in the work, but that would hopefully feed into my creative practice in some way while also supporting me. I had a curatorial focus when I was in grad school, and I had some fellowships in the Cooper Hewitt Product Design and Decorative Arts Department under Sarah Coffin when she was still curator there; I think she's since retired. I also was the jewelry intern under Alice Newman at the Museum of Arts and Design while I was in grad school. Those two experiences opened up possibilities for me to engage with the field in a way I hadn't prior to grad school. Sharon: Wow! Some really important people that were mentors or teachers. How did it come about that you're now at Metalsmith Magazine? Adriane: After grad school, I actually moved to Utah from New York, to a small town in northern Utah where I was the assistant curator of an art museum there, the Nora Eccles Harrison Museum of Art, which at the time had some exhibitions that were craft-centric. I came on to help with some of that. They have a fantastic ceramics collection. Ceramics is not my focus area, but having a broad generalization in craft, I can sort of move between materials. So, I was in Utah for a few years working as a curator. Then I moved back to the East Coast, to Richmond. I was working at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in their education department doing programming.  The way I came to be the editor of Metalsmith was a fluke in a lot of ways. I had applied for a different position at SNAG at the time that was educationally focused. I had a couple of interviews, got along really well with the executive director at the time, Gwynne Rukenbrod Smith. A few months later, she reached out to me and said, “Hey, our editor, Emily Zilber, is leaving, and I need someone to come in on an interim basis and keep things going until we figure out what we are going to do with the position and the magazine. Is this something you'd be interested in and capable of?” I said, “Yes, sure.” I came on thinking it would be potentially a six-month arrangement and then I would go on doing museum education, which is what I was doing. It ended up working out and I was invited to stay on, and so here I am. Sharon: Wow! Tell us about Metalsmith and what you want to do with it, what its purpose is, that sort of thing. Adriane: Sure. Metalsmith is one program area of SNAG. For folks who are listening who may not be familiar with SNAG, SNAG is the Society of North American Goldsmiths. It's a 50-year-old—well, I think it's 51 years old now—organization that's an international member-based organization. We are a 501(c)(3) nonprofit. Our member base is predominantly a variety of metalsmiths, jewelers, other folks who maybe don't consider themselves jewelers but use the body as a flight for expression, production studio jewelry artists, teachers, historians, curators, collectors, gallerists and writers. Our member focus is North America, but we do have members and subscribers all over the world. Metalsmith fits into SNAG in the sense that as a program area, it helps SNAG fulfill part of its mission statement, which is to advance the field of jewelry and metalsmithing and to inspire creativity, encourage education and foster community. Before it was Metalsmith, SNAG had three other publications. It started as a newsletter in the early days, and then it became Gold Dust. Then it was, I think, Goldsmith's Journal. Metalsmith was established in 1980. So, we are now in our 41st year of publication. Sharon: Did it become Metalsmith because—I'm a member of SNAG and I really like it, but I've only met maybe one goldsmith. Is that what happened there, going from Gold Dust to Metalsmith? Adriane: I think so. I'm not privy to all the early decisions of how the magazine was established and run, but I think choosing Metalsmith was to be more inclusive of the field at that time. Now, of course, one of the critiques I hear sometimes from members and other folks in the field is that Metalsmith doesn't always have that much metal in it. Sharon: That's true, yes. Adriane: That is true. That is, I think, indicative of the shifts in interdisciplinarity and shifts in thinking about materials that are appropriate for these forms that have happened over the past 20 or 30 years in the field. There have been times when people have said, “Well, they should change the name to something else,” but it still fits in a lot of ways. The word “smith” in and of itself points to the action that is involved. For me and how I think about the magazine and the work that's in the magazine, it doesn't necessarily matter what the material is; it's more about the approach and the context in which the maker is putting it out into the world. Sharon: How are you choosing the subjects? There are so many different areas now. I think of plastics; I think of wood; I think about all different kinds of crafts and jewelry. How do you choose the issues and writers you put in the publication? Adriane: I take pictures and proposals. Anyone listening to this podcast, anyone out there can send me an email or get in touch with me to propose any idea they have for an article or an artist they want to cover, things like that. It's a combination of taking proposals from people who reach out to me and me seeking people out who I'm interested in their work or interested in their writing, or me finding someone who I think would be good to write about a particular artist's work. It depends, and it's a mishmash of those things. A misconception I try to dispel any chance I get, and will do so now, is that I have a glut of proposals coming in. Really, a lot of the time I don't, particularly in the past 18 months. During the pandemic, people's focus has been in other directions, as it should be, but it's hard to keep things going if I have to do all the outreach and it's not going in both directions like it should. Sharon: I'm surprised; with everybody at home during lockdown, it seems like it would have been the perfect time for people to be writing or pitching or proposing or thinking about it at least. Adriane: Yeah, it is a combination of things. I do have people who reach out to me who I may or may not be familiar with. I'm really interested in having voices in the magazine that are new to the field or are in the process of establishing themselves as a thinker in the field. One of the ways we have done that in the past two years was through a writing competition that we hosted during our 40th volume, which was the previous volume to the one that's being published now. That was proposed to me by an artist and author, Lauren Eckert, who approached me at SNAG's conference in Chicago, the last in-person conference we held. She said, “What do you think about having a writing contest to get new voices into the magazine?” and I said, “Oh, I think that that's a great idea. Would you want to help me get that together?” She volunteered, and I invited Lauren to join the publication's advisory committee, which is a sounding board and feedback board for the magazine.  We ran the competition and had two awardees, and we published their writing in this most recent volume. In issue 41, we had Jessica Todd's article “Restrung: Contemporary North American Beadsmiths.” In issue 42, we had “Difficult Adornments: Recontextualizing Creative Adornment Through Display” which was by Rebecca Schena. Jessica was the New Voices award winner and Rebecca was the runner up, but we couldn't narrow it down to just one because there were so many great submissions. It was very hard to pick them.  Sharon: In terms of issues, what issues are really close to you, important to you? What issues do you see in the field? It's a few months old now, but I was looking at one of the publications about Black jewelers and inequality in the field, and I thought, “Well, that's not a namby-pamby issue; it's right out there and you're not afraid to discuss those kinds of things.” Adriane: Yeah, something that is important to me and has become extremely necessary as the world has shifted so much in the past 18 months is to not just create content in a vacuum, but to have the work and the voices in the magazine truly be representative of what is going on in the field. Some of that includes acknowledging ways the field of jewelry and metalsmithing replicates other systemic racist structures that exist in American society. To speak to the bigger picture for how I think about the content of the magazine—and this also predates the pandemic, but the pandemic has made me more firm in this—is that it's important to not just talk about objects and the people who make them, but to talk about the conditions in which people make them. That is especially relevant now that the world has been the way it has been for the past 18 months and we are all more acutely aware of a lot of things than perhaps previously. Sharon: That's a good point, in terms of picking up a publication or going online and saying, “What are the pretty pictures?” or “What are the creative objects?” You also mentioned in one of your notes from the editor—it must be a challenge to come with that every month, in terms of pithy subjects—you wrote that for some, the process of growth is discomfort. How does that manifest itself? Do you see it manifesting in SNAG's members, for example? Adriane: I don't know if I can speak to how it manifests for our members. I will say SNAG has a diverse membership. When I'm making the magazine, I'm making it not only for SNAG's membership, but we also have some people who subscribe but aren't SNAG members, and the magazine is on newsstands. So, I'm trying to think broadly whenever possible. As far as that particular letter from the editor, some of the content in that issue—which includes that essay by Rebecca Schena that I mentioned before—but it also includes the piece you alluded to, which is by Valena Robinson Grass, “Moving Beyond Acknowledgment: Systemic Barriers for Black American Metalsmiths.” There's another article in there by Leslie Boyd about how white educators can be more attentive to the ways their students are showing up in the structure of academia. As I'm talking, I'm getting further and further away from answering your question, but— Sharon: No, I don't get that impression. Adriane: I think that, much like a lot of other things that have happened in the past 18 months, there needs to be some amount of reflection and reckoning in parts of the jewelry field that have been predominantly white spaces and reflecting upon why that is, and thinking about how you can claim to value diversity and inclusivity and equity. You can say those things and you can mean them, but unless you're willing to do the reflection and make some changes, then it's meaningless; it's empty. We will have images posted on the website. You can find us wherever you download your podcasts, and please rate us. Please join us next time, when our guest will be another jewelry industry professional who will share their experience and expertise. Thank you so much for listening. Thank you again for listening. Please leave us a rating and review so we can help others start their own jewelry journey.

Being Home With Hunker
Being Home With Nina Freudenberger

Being Home With Hunker

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 39:22


Today on the show we have Nina Freudenberger, an interior designer, author, and founder of Freudenberger Design Studio.Nina is not a fixed interior designer—she loves all aspects of creativity and business. After graduating from Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA and a Bachelor's of Architecture, Nina “fell” into interior design. And it's a career that she feels she well suited for.In this conversation we talk about how her curiosity in the ways people create their own worlds at home led her to writing her design books, Surf Shack and Bibliostyle. She shares her method for writing her books; how her design style shifted after moving to California from New York; her rules around lighting in the home; the importance of authenticity in materials; and her experience designing two California hotels.Website: Freudenberger Design StudioInstagram: @ninafreudenbergerPinterest: @nfreudenbergerABOUT THIS PODCAST For more information about this episode, or other podcast episodes, visit Hunker.com/podcast.This podcast is produced by Laurie Gunning Grossman.Being Home With Hunker is recorded and mixed at Night Shift Audio.Theme music by Jonathan Grossman.Show art designed by Mory Men. ABOUT HUNKERHunker inspires and empowers you to create a space that expresses who you are, shows off your unique style, and makes your life happier and more productive.Visit us, follow us, learn more.Hunker: Hunker.comInstagram: @hunkerhomeSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Dancers Doing Stuff
202 | Finding a Holistic and Healthy Life With Allison Bollinger

Dancers Doing Stuff

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 53:06


Hello! Today I'm talking to Allison Bollinger while making paper cut out bats (spoooky vibes because our interview was in October lol) Alli Bollinger, born and raised in Syracuse New York, now resides in New York City! She graduated with a BFA in Dance in 2020, and Is passionately pursuing a professional dance career. Along with that, she also works as an Integrative Nutrition Health Coach. Alli is the creator of Wellness Without Obsession, a 1:1 health coaching program that helps women discover a better relationship with food and exercise, and gain a strong sense of confidence in their health. Overall Alli is very passionate about living a life doing what you love as your healthiest, happiest self! Follow Alli on instagram @your_spoonful and @alli_bollinger and get in touch if youhave any questions about holistic health! ________________________________ The Patreon is officially live! Check it out here https://www.patreon.com/essentiallyhaley Don't forget to create your profile on Arts Wrk using my special link (and then I might get a prize!) and definitly add me as a connection once you have your profile set up! https://artswrk.com/join/HaleyGrove

The Starting Zone: The World of Warcraft Podcast!
Episode #488: Talking 9.2 with Morgan Day! 

The Starting Zone: The World of Warcraft Podcast!

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 57:59


Welcome to The Starting Zone Podcast, The World of Warcraft Podcast for New and Experienced Players! On this special episode, Spencer Downey and Jason Lucas discuss the upcoming 9.2 content release with Morgan Day! Episode #488: Talking 9.2 with Morgan Day! is ready for Download! The foundation of the questions we asked Morgan New Zone: Zereth Mortis How did working through the pandemic affect the plan for Shadowlands and getting a new zone added to each patch? This seems like a natural place for Shadowlands' story to resolve, but what went into actually getting it there? What is the plan for Legendary crafting in 9.2? We know we get the new materials from Zereth Mortis. How do we get them and about how long after patch would you expect players to have their first top-rank Legendary?  Will we still need Rank 4 or Rank 6 base items to get started ?  Will we still need Soul Ash/Soul Cinders to craft a new Legendary from scratch? Will there be Conduit upgrade items via Zereth Mortis?  Are Conduits going up 2 more ranks, similar from S1 to S2?  What kind of catchup mechanics are being planned to get characters to baseline relevance with the Conduit system at the outset of 9.2? New Feature: Cypher of the First Ones What can players expect from the Cypher in regards to progression? Is it gated weekly, similar to Renown? Is there player choice in which upgrades unlock when? Are unlocks account-wide to any degree? How do we advance our progress at the Cypher? Are there specific tasks/quests, fill-the-bar style activities, lootable items similar to Archivist's Codex, or something else entirely? Are we “speccing out” the Cypher, so to speak, choosing certain upgrades/perks at the expense of others, or does every character eventually get the full slate of benefits? New Raid: Sepulcher of the First Ones Can you talk a bit about the factors that went into the decision to time-gate the initial release?  Can players expect a big shift in gameplay or the zone when they return the week after defeating the Anduin encounter? Are there plans for unlockable skips?  What about fast-travel points around the raid zone, like Hellfire Citadel had? With tier pieces being available from other sources, is there an intent to put uniquely powerful items in the new raid?  We saw probably not enough of that in Castle Nathria and maybe a bit too much in Sanctum of Domination. How is the team feeling about raid encounter length at the top end?  Should we expect more 12-15 minute marathons? Did the team feel basing boss phase transitions on health, like on KT, was effective? It resulted in many teams having unwanted “hold dps” phases, is that something we might see in this raid? Great vault loot restricted behind bosses killed? New Loot: Class Sets Return Will the set bonuses be per class or per spec?  Are there unique effects in Raid/M+/PvP or a set pair of bonuses per set? How many total pieces of each set are there? Is the goal with the class sets to shake up gameplay/rotations/priority or more to provide passive bonuses on top of what we're already doing? With set pieces dropping again, it would be nice to have tokens back. Has there been any thought about bringing Master Loot back? Shadowlands Season 3 Extrapolating high keystone versions of Tazavesh is a bit intimidating at the moment. Will we see changes to bring these dungeons in line with the rest of the pool? Operation: Mechagon was pretty on par with the rest of BFA, the additions to Legion were pretty big outliers. The Season 2 affix has been pretty fun, anything you can talk about regarding the plan for Season 3?  We haven't seen anything in SL that affected dungeon routes the way Awakened did for example in BFA, is that a concept that might be revisited? How is the team feeling about the way Mythic + Rating/Valor have worked out in Season 2?  Any notable updates coming in Season 3 or should we expect a similar path, just with 2 more dungeons in the pool? We know there are Torghast updates coming and new layers. Will Torghast still be a source for 9.2 Legendary mats or is that being 100% shifted to Zereth Mortis?  Any updates to the Box of Many Things? What kind of new stuff will there be for Torghast players to chase? How does the team feel about the Great Vault this expansion? Any thoughts on adding some kind of duplicate logic to the system or a streak-protection/currency type of option? Looking ahead, what were the lessons the team learned over the course of Shadowlands and how are they informing future design? Trying to reach the show? You can find us on Discord at The Starting Zone or email us at TheStartingZone@Gmail.com Have you heard about our Patreon? It's a great way to support the show and goes towards making more content for you! Check it out here: https://www.patreon.com/thestartingzone Looking for to grab some great TSZ merch? Look no further than here! We've got the shirts, hoodies, mugs, pillows even stickers you want!

Talking Out Your Glass podcast
Sonja Blomdahl: Queen of Symmetry

Talking Out Your Glass podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 59:18


Strong. Calm. Serene. So are the vessels of Sonja Blomdahl. In an industrial neighborhood near Seattle's Lake Union, the artist turned loose her vivid colors into the unsuspecting gray of her spacious cinderblock and cement studio. If a Scandinavian flavor is detected in the hue of her celestial orbs, it is by chance as she credits rainy Seattle as her primary inspiration. But Blomdahl is in fact of Swedish descent, leaving some collectors of her work to wonder if the Scandinavian sense of style and design is in her blood.  After graduating from Massachusetts College of Art with a BFA in ceramics, Blomdahl studied at Orrefors Glass School in Sweden for six months, providing her with a solid background in efficiently handling her material. Upon arrival at the glass factory in 1976, she had $300 in her pocket. When her apprenticeship was over and in need of cash, Blomdahl went to work as a cleaning woman in a Swedish hospital to finance trips to Italy and the British Isles. Back in Massachusetts, she blew glass in a New Hampshire studio for nine months until Dan Dailey, a former teacher at Mass Art, invited her to be his teaching assistant at Pilchuck.  Three weeks at Pilchuck in the summer of 1978 proved to be a pivotal time in Blomdahl's career, for it was there that she viewed the Italian master Checco Ongaro demonstrate the double bubble or incalmo technique. She honed this process over the next two years while working at the Glass Eye Studio in Seattle and teaching glassblowing at Pratt Fine Arts Center. After her first exhibition at Traver in 1981, Blomdahl stopped working at the Glass Eye, bought a three-month Euro Rail pass and traveled around Europe. There, she had the opportunity to produce new work in Ann Wolff's studio in Sweden – a wonderful experience that further entrenched Blomdahl's desire to establish her own hotshop. She shipped the work made there back to Seattle and had a second sell-out show at Traver, allowing her to build a studio in 1982, where she worked for the next 25 years. Currently on view in Venice and American Studio Glass, curated by Tina Oldknow and William Warmus, Blomdahl's work was the focus of solo exhibitions at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Art, Montgomery, Alabama; Martha's Vineyard Glassworks, West Tisbury, Massachusetts; and the William Traver Gallery, Tacoma, Washington. Permanent installations and collections include American Craft Museum, New York, New York; Clinton Presidential Library and Museum, Little Rock, Arkansas; Museum of Decorative Art, Prague, Czech Republic; Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, New York; and Kitazawa Contemporary Glass Museum, Kitazawa, Japan, to name a few. She has held teaching positions at Pratt Fine Arts Center, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine, and the Appalachian Center in Smithville, Tennessee.  Blomdahl's focus has been the vessel. She states: “In the vessel, I find the form to be of primary importance. It holds the space. In a sense, the vessel is a history of my breath: It contains the volume within. If I have done things correctly, the profile of the piece is a continuous curve; the shape is full, and the opening confident. Color is often the joy in making a piece. I want the colors to glow and react with each other. The clear band between the colors acts as an optic lens; it moves the color around and allows you to see into the piece. The relationship between form, color, proportion, and process intrigued me.”  

Heilman & Haver
Heilman & Haver - Episode 52 (Guest Stewart Lyons - Part 1)

Heilman & Haver

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 29:11


Welcome to Heilman & Haver - Episode 52.  We hope you enjoy the show! Please join the conversation - email us with thoughts and ideas and connect with the show on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram.   ANNOUNCEMENTS “A Classic Christmas" with Jeremy Arnold Saturday, December 18th, Jeremy Arnold will join us at the Roxy for a one-of-a-kind roundtable discussion before a “It's a Wonderful Life” hits the Roxy big screen.  Plan to come early for a matinee showing of “White Christmas” and stay for the holiday bites and wine before we hit the stage with Jeremy.  We'll also enjoy a special Christmas message from "Zuzu" herself, Karolyn Grimes.  Get more info and tickets at roxybremerton.org. Movies of the Decade - "La La Land" Playing tomorrow, Saturday, 11/20, for the 20-teens decade, it's “La La Land” starring Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone and written and directed by Damian Chazelle.  We'll get things started as usual at 6:30 and this month we'll enjoy a special video introduction by one of Jeremy Arnold's fellow TCM authors, Richard Barrios, author of A “Song in the Dark: The Birth of the Musical Film” and “Must See Musicals”.  Richard will also be our guest for Episode 54 on Friday, December 3rd, so make sure to tune in. WWCA Holiday Variety Show Opens 11/26/21 Opening November 26th at Western Washington Center for the Arts in Port Orchard, it's the “WWCA Holiday Variety Show” directed by our friend Rebecca Ewen.  Come and celebrate the season with some of your favorite WWCA performers.  The show will feature choral arrangements written by beloved Music Director, the late Bruce Ewen, dance numbers performed by Just for Kicks School of Dance, and much more.  Get your tickets now at wwca.us. Virtual "Coppelia" by Bainbridge Ballet to Stream Over Thanksgiving Keep an eye on the Bainbridge Ballet Facebook page next week for a special virtual production of comic ballet, "Coppelia", thanks to the skills of our friend, local filmmaker, Scott Breitbarth.     IN THE SPOTLIGHT:  Stewart Lyons Stewart Lyons is a Co-Executive Producer, Line Producer, and Production Executive with extensive experience with most major studio, network, cable, and streaming television companies including Netflix, Sony Pictures Television, Warner Brothers, Amazon, HBO, Weinstein Productions, NBC, and CBS. He has worked on 33 television series, 27 pilots (20 ordered to series), and dozens of feature films and television movies.  He was recently Director, Original Series Production, for Netflix and prior to that assignment was Co-Executive Producer for the premiere season of “Better Call Saul”. He won 2 Emmys as Line Producer for “Breaking Bad”, the most critically acclaimed series in the history of television. He also received two Directors Guild Awards, two Producers Guild Awards, a Golden Globe, and two Peabody Awards for this series. He was also the only person, cast or crew, who was on set for every day of the production of "Breaking Bad".  In addition to his regular production positions, his work as a production consultant includes scheduling and/or budgeting over 160 pilots and television series for streaming, cable, and broadcast companies for projects throughout the United States, Canada, Australia, and Europe. In 2015, he was the first television line producer to be the subject of "An Evening With..." hosted by Senator Christopher Dodd at the MPAA in Washington, DC.  Stewart has lectured at the Directors Guild, the Producers Guild, Chapman University, USC's Peter Stark Program, UCLA, the University of Maryland, and in both England and Germany about set operations, scheduling, budgeting, and the development of "auteur" television. He received his BFA from NYU's Tisch School of the Arts and his MBA from NYU's Stern School of Business. He is a graduate of the DGA/Producers Training Program and currently works as adjunct Professor at DePaul University instructing in creative producing at their Los Angeles location for masters degree students.   He joined us from his home in Oxnard, CA. COMING UP NEXT WEEK  Join us next week, Friday, November 26th, for the second half of our interview with Stewart and more about "Breaking Bad" and the craft of television production. 

SHOP TALK
SHOP TALK: Gretchen Kerr

SHOP TALK

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 70:55


Dramashop artistic director Zach Flock sits down with Gretchen Kerr to talk theatre in process. Gretchen made her Dramashop directorial debut with A PUBLIC READING OF AN UNPRODUCED SCREENPLAY ABOUT THE DEATH OF WALT DISNEY. She has portrayed Helen Bechdel in Dramashop's production of FUN HOME, Mother in NEVERMORE, has been seen in many productions at the Erie Playhouse, and holds a BFA in Theater and Music from Otterbein University. She is currently Administrator and Communications Coordinator at Saint George Church. And she sings. In the podcast.

Sound & Vision
Sara Greenberger Rafferty

Sound & Vision

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 96:54


Sara Greenberger Rafferty is a multi-disciplinary visual artist based in Brooklyn since 2000. She is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Photography at Pratt Institute. She is the Chair of the Artist Council of Powerhouse Arts, also in Brooklyn, which will bring art and craft fabrication facilities and education to the community in 2022. She received a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and an MFA from Columbia University School of the Arts.Current exhibitions include Forum 85: Sara Greenberger Rafferty at the Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh and Views from Somewhere at DOCUMENT, Chicago. Studio Visit, Rafferty's upcoming experimental monograph, will be published by Inventory Press in the Winter 2021-2022.

Crazy and The King Podcast
The CATK Interview: Baltimore Artist Kim Rice

Crazy and The King Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021 42:41


Join Torin and Julie in welcoming creator of Being White, Redlining, and The Inheritance on a must listen interview. Kim Rice creates large-scale works using common materials. Her installations are a meditation on institutional racism and the policies that continue to affect American society today. Kim earned her BFA in Sculpture and MFA in Printmaking from the University of Oklahoma. Her work has been shown throughout the country including the Alexandria Museum of Art, the Fred Jones Museum of Art, the Northern Illinois Art Museum, the Delaware Museum of Art, the Peale Museum, and Prospect.4 Satellite. She has received multiple awards, including the McNeese Grant for Socially Engaged Practice. Born in Kentucky, raised in California, educated in Oklahoma, loved in New Orleans and now home in Baltimore, Kim's work is influenced by her two children and the pile of books by her bed.

Better Me with BodyByBree
Fight the New Drug

Better Me with BodyByBree

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 47:10


This week Bree is talking with Natale McAneney. Natale McAneney is the Executive Director of Fight the New Drug—a global non-religious and non-legislative organization providing individuals the opportunity to make and informed decisions regarding pornography by raising awareness on its harmful effects using science, facts, and personal accounts. Natale is passionate about providing resources to help this generation of youth navigate growing up in the digital age. With a BFA from Westminster College and comprehensive leadership experience, she works closely with Fight the New Drug's team to curate educational programs and awareness campaigns that reach millions of engaged Fighters across the globe. Learn more at ftnd.org.Learn more about Bree and her programs at www.bodybybree.com or follow her on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/bodybybreefitness/

Here Wee Read
31 - A Friend Like You: Frank Murphy, Kayla Harren and Charnaie Gordon

Here Wee Read

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 59:00


Frank Murphy is a teacher who writes and a writer who teaches. He has taught a wide variety of grades at the elementary for more than 28 years. A history buff, former basketball coach & Sixers fan, and popular speaker, Frank is the author of many fun historical fiction/biography books for young readers.As a teacher and father, Frank is committed to creating children's books that expand readers' knowledge of history and help inspire discussions about kindness, leadership, citizenship, growing up, and more.Kayla Harren graduated from the School of Visual Arts (SVA) in New York City with a BFA in illustration.  Books she has illustrated include A BOY LIKE YOU (winner of the 2019 EUREKA Gold Award), A GIRL LIKE YOU, A TEACHER LIKE YOU, A FRIEND LIKE YOU, and THE BOY WHO GREW A FOREST (winner of the 2020 Crystal Kite Award.) Her work has been featured in the Society of Illustrators, American Illustration, Communication Arts, 3x3 Magazine, and she won the Highlights for Children Pewter Plate Award. Kayla loves animals, playing volleyball, hiking, and eating cookies with frosting. She currently lives in Minnesota with her husband, Peter Harren, and their adorable dogs. Purchase A Friend Like You.Visit Frank's website: https://www.frankmurphybooks.com/Visit Kayla's website: http://www.kaylaharren.com/Connect with Charnaie online in the following places:Blog: http://hereweeread.comPersonal Website: charnaiegordon.comPodcast Email Address: hereweereadpodcast@gmail.comFind Charnaie on the following social media platforms under the username @hereweeread: Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest.  Feel free to share this podcast on your social media platforms to help spread the word to others. Thanks for listening!

The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft
Finding Homes For Figurative Work | Kelsey Bowen | Episode 784

The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 62:49


Kelsey Bowan received her BFA in Ceramics from the California College of the Arts, going on to continue creating work as a Long-term artist in residence at the Red Lodge Clay Center in Montana. Kelsey is currently working as a professional artist and part-time educator in Montana.

Filmmaking Conversations Podcast with Damien Swaby
Ep 138: From Acting to Producing - Stephanie O'Neill

Filmmaking Conversations Podcast with Damien Swaby

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 50:34


Stephanie is an artist and producer originally from the Bay Area, CA. She received her BFA in Theatre from UC Santa Barbara before moving to Los Angeles. As a producer, Stephanie has worked on a variety of short films, music videos, features and live theatrical productions. The short films BOYS, (le) REBOUND, HAPA and MONOGAMISH have had successful runs in the festival circuit appearing in AspenShorts, Palm Springs International ShortsFest, LA Film Festival, Viennale, Outfest, and Hollyshorts to name a few. The feature THE LIVING WORST premiered at the Downtown LA Film Festival and was awarded Best Ensemble. To inquire about any of her projects or in regards to for-hire work:sann.oneill@gmail.comW: http://www.sannoneill.com/aboutAlso, you can check out my documentary The People of Brixton, on Kwelitv here: https://www.kweli.tv/programs/the-people-of-brixtonDamien Swaby Social Media Links:Instagram https://www.instagram.com/filmmaker_damien_swaby/Twitterhttps://twitter.com/DamienSwaby?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5EauthorWebsite http://filmmakingconversations.com/If you enjoy listening to Filmmaking Conversations with Damien Swaby, I would love a coffee. Podcasting is thirsty work https://ko-fi.com/damienswaby​

CAA Conversations
Jose DeJesus // Steve Rossi // Interdisciplinary Foundational Studio Art Pedagogy

CAA Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 41:45


In this podcast Steve Rossi and Jose DeJesus discuss aspects of interdisciplinary foundational studio art pedagogy in Parson's first year Space/Materiality course, benefits of limitations in lesson planning, being present for students, aspects of embodied learning, and design efficiency found in nature. Steve Rossi received his BFA from Pratt Institute in 2000 and his MFA from the State University of New York at New Paltz in 2006. His work has been exhibited at Dorsky Curatorial Projects, Eco Art Space, NURTUREart, the Open Engagement Conference at the Queens Museum, Bronx Art Space, the Wassaic Project, the John Michael Kohler Art Center, and the Jules Collins Smith Museum of Fine Arts among others. As a part-time faculty member, he has taught in the First Year Program at Parsons School of Design, the Sculpture Program and Art Education Program at the State University of New York at New Paltz, and in the Art Department at Westchester Community College. He is currently an Assistant Professor in the Sculpture Program at St. Joseph's University, in Philadelphia, PA. Formerly a personal assistant to Jeff Koons, Jose DeJesus Zamora is a sculptor whose practice and teaching methods are rooted in his studies of architecture, geometry, and a deep love for the studio methods and knowledge of the Italian Renaissance. Jose has presented in conferences and Symposia in London, Athens, Ecuador, Paris, Florence and Hong Kong. Jose presently teaches three dimensional courses in Space-Materiality and also Design Drawing at Parsons School of Design in New York City. He has been teaching at Parsons for more than twenty years. He brings the knowledge of his research into his teaching.

Healing Ground Movement
Exploring Embodiment Awareness to Release Repressed Trauma with Guest Licia Sky

Healing Ground Movement

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 52:13


Licia Sky, BFA, LMT, is a Boston-based artist, singer-songwriter, and bodyworker who works with traumatized individuals and trains mental health professionals to use mindful meditation in movement, theater exercises, writing, and voice as tools for attunement, healing and connection. In this episode, Licia explains why noise and noise expression can greatly help release trauma within the body and retrain the human brain how to feel, express, and be vulnerable in a safe way. Licia explains the kind of work she does and what it looks like to break free of childhood trauma through intentional body awareness.  Today's episode is sponsored by: Healinggroundmovement.com/resources Join the Movement! Healinggroundmovement.com Healing Ground Movement on Instagram Healing Ground Movement on Facebook Mentioned in This Episode: Liciasky.com Licia on LinkedIn https://www.besselvanderkolk.com/ Licia on Facebook www.traumaresearchfoundation.org Like what you learned? Buy me a coffee to show your appreciation!

8111
Jeff Light

8111

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 115:36


This week on 8111, Jeff Light! Jeff grew up in Lima, Ohio. His dad was an attorney and his mom kept Jeff and his three sisters mostly out of trouble. He loved theatre and movies as a kid and was inspired by 2001: A Space Odyssey which he saw the Summer before Jr. High. He bought a Yashika LD6 Super 8 movie camera and began playing with filmmaking and visual effects. He was pre-med at University of Cincinnati for his first year but it just didn't make his heart sing. He changed schools to Ohio State University where he earned his BFA and MA degrees in Photography & Cinema. He stuck around after his MA and taught animation to students. From there he worked at Cranston Surrey Productions doing motion graphics. Always curious and working to address needs on specific jobs, Jeff began learning programming and digital image processing. Lincoln Hu gave a presentation at SIGGRAPH and Jeff connected with him afterwards and was told to put his resume and materials together for an interview at ILM. He was first hired to work in the Scanning department on Terminator 2 in December of 1990. His background in film and programming were a perfect fit for the time when ILM was in transition from analog to digital. During his years at ILM Jeff taught Unix classes, composited on Hook and Death Becomes Her, technical direction on Jurassic Park, and was later tasked with helping develop and create the motion capture department.  He went on to work at Dreamworks for a number of years and later served as the Chair of Visual Effects at Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD). Today Jeff is back in California working on his own projects and keeping his finger on the pulse of the industry.Jeff is a true renaissance man. His innate curiosity, love of cinema, problem solving skills, and overall enthusiasm make him a great teacher, and a fascinating interview. It was so fun to talk with Jeff about his life and creative passions. http://jefflightmedia.com/

PROCESSING THE PROCESS - Auditioning for Musical Theatre College Programs, A Parent’s Perspective

Erin & Michael met in college as they were both MT students. They've journeyed together working in the industry…on ships & land. Today they are using their experiences as actors in interesting ways. I love hearing what life up the road could entail for BFA grads. Throughout this chat you'll also get a brief update on what my boys are up to. Please rate, comment or reach me at lisathams@aol.com or on instagram @processingtheprocessptp or @308lat. Would love to hear from you. Any input or feedback is a gift to me;) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/lisa-thams/message

Teaching Artist Podcast
#80: Isadora Stowe: Wearing All The Hats

Teaching Artist Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 67:42


Isadora Stowe shared her winding journey teaching in several settings before landing in community college where she embraces the student centered approach. She talked about learning on the job how to connect with students and truly listen to find their unmet needs. It was so helpful hearing about the mindset shift from thinking of behaviors as problematic to thinking of behaviors as expressing something that may be painful and is not being heard. I also loved hearing about Isadora's work and how she pursues her interest in physics through installation in collaboration with scientists. She talked about making a living and making a life as an artist - creating multiple income streams, but also building in time to recharge yourself. Isadora Stowe is a New Mexican based multi-media artist whose work focuses on the narrative of environment translated and coded into complex psychological landscapes. Stowe grew up in the southwest border region, living and working in New Mexico, Texas and Mexico. She credits these experiences for providing a heightened awareness of geographical and political boundaries, and a fascination with the exploration of identity of self and the construction of home in her work. Stowe earned her BFA in Painting with a double major in Cultural Anthropology, minor in Native American Studies and an MFA in Painting and Drawing. She exhibits her work widely and is represented in many private and public collections across the country and in Mexico. She has been the recipient of several grants, scholarships and awards for her work, including an Award for Excellence from the New Mexico Committee of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. She is also one of the Artists profiled in the Book, The Motherhood of Art, published in 2020. She is dedicated to making the world a better place for Artists from all points of origin and serves on many local and national committees and on the board of directors for the Texas Association of Schools of Art and Bordersenses, a non-profit which promotes arts in the binational region. She is also the co-creator of the professional art practice courses; Wearing all the hats without losing your head presented on the Artist Mother Network. Blog Post with links and images: https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/80-isadora-stowe/ isadorastowe.com @isadorastowe Wearing All The Hats . . . Follow: @teachingartistpodcast @pottsart @playinspiregallery Teaching Artists' Lounge meeting registration: http://arteducatorslounge.eventbrite.com/ Submit your work to be featured: https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/featuredartist/ Book an Art Critique Session with Rebecca: https://www.teachingartistpodcast.com/mentor/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/teachingartistpodcast/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/teachingartistpodcast/support

TECHnically Speaking
Breaking Down Disability in the Industry

TECHnically Speaking

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 43:13


We sat down with playwright, librettist, and host of the Break a Leg! Disability in the Arts Podcast Nicole Zimmerer and sound designer and podcast producer Scott MacDonald to break down the realities of living and working with a disability in the industry.Nicole is a playwright and librettist with a deep-seated hatred of stairs. She has been a recipient of The Kennedy Center's VSA Playwright Discovery Award and the Betty Z. Rose and Anne J. Exline Presidential Fellowship. She was a finalist for the Playwrights' Center Core Apprenticeship program. She has had multiple productions in Houston, New York City, Chicago, Pittsburgh, and Washington, DC. She holds a BFA in Playwriting and Dramaturgy from the University of Houston and an MFA in Dramatic Writing from Carnegie Mellon University.Scott is a sound designer and engineer based in New York City. After completing a BFA at the Carnegie Mellon University School of Drama, Scott was a Featured Designer representing the United States in the Emerging/Student Exhibition at the 2019 Prague Quadrennial. Scott is also an advocate for sustainable practices in the arts and beyond. www.sbmacdonald.comListen to the Break a Leg! Disability in the Arts Podcast with Nicole and Scott! breakalegpod.buzzsprout.comExplore the Break a Leg! Disability in the Arts Podcast Instagram. www.instagram.com/breakalegpod/TECHnically Speaking is a public service of USITT, which seeks to have a broad conversation on topics of interest to its members, but it is neither a legal interpretation nor a statement of Institute policy. The views expressed on this podcast by guests are their own and their appearance herein does not imply an endorsement of them or of any entity they may represent. Reference to any specific product or idea does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation. Views, opinions, recommendations or use cases expressed on this podcast do not necessarily reflect the views of USITT, its Board members or employees.

Focus on Women
Jillian Knox - San Francisco Food and Wardrobe Stylist

Focus on Women

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 46:57


Jillian Knox is an interdisciplinary creative polymath based in San Francisco, CaliforniaWith a BFA in Photography, concentrating in Fashion Photography from Savannah College of Art and Design, Jillian opened her online vintage store, Joules Jewels Vintage, in 2009 to hone her commercial photography, styling skills, and embrace her love for fashion. Shortly after, she opened community art gallery and multi-space, TBA Space 1039, in Chicago, IL which hosted many local and national artists in juried group shows. The space was closed coinciding with her move to San Francisco in 2011.She currently works as a food + fashion stylist and is the founder of The Astute Agency. The Astute Agency is a not-for-profit inclusive community that is founded and operated by BIPOC creatives. Not only that she runs an awesome little online shop called Casa Ojo.Season 8 is brought to you by some of our closest friends, our networking chair, Betsy Davison's baby, Space for Arts. They are a global marketplace for professional production spaces. Think of it as an AirBnB like platform dedicated exclusively to the demanding requirements of our creative community.Space for Arts presents a vetted inventory of production spaces with robust search tools optimized for the needs of production professionals.  Their patent pending Space for Arts booking system mirrors our industry's practice of using “holds” & “challenges.” And best of all there is no cost for production teams to book through Space for Arts.Space for Arts is AirBnB, meets Resy, meets CRM for our professional production community and has over 1,000 spaces listed in key US markets, London & Berlin and adds new listings daily.Find it  -  Plan it  -  Book it  -  Manage it

Pivot Arts Podcast
Reshaping the Climate Narrative

Pivot Arts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 55:45


At the heart of most performance practice is storytelling. How can the arts impact the climate narrative? What can individuals and institutions do to make a difference when it comes to climate change? We'll speak with a variety of artists, activists and experts about their work in shaping the story on climate and then close out with our featured artist, Nefertiti Abdulmalik, also known as SolAR Lightbeam. Be sure to visit our website pivotarts.org and click on "Get Updates" to stay  informed about Pivot Arts or follow us @PivotArts.EPISODE 1: RESHAPING THE CLIMATE NARRATIVE GUESTS:Annalisa Dias (she/her) is a Goan-American transdisciplinary artist, community organizer, and award-winning theatre maker working at the intersection of racial justice and care for the earth. She is Director of Artistic Partnerships & Innovation at Baltimore Center Stage and a Co-Founder of Groundwater Arts. Prior to joining BCS, Annalisa was a Producing Playwright and Acting Creative Producer with The Welders, a DC playwright's collective; and a Co-Founder of the DC Coalition for Theatre & Social Justice. For more information on the Green New Theatre Initiative visit: groundwaterarts.com/green-new-theatreHans Detweiler (he/him) Senior Director, Development at Jupiter Power LLC, has a demonstrated history in renewable energy project development. As vice president of development at Clean Line Energy, he directed development of long-distance overhead transmission line projects for wind power. He also oversaw development of a 1,000-MW wind farm in New Mexico, served as director of state policy for the American Wind Energy Association and was deputy director for energy and recycling at the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity.Kristin Idaszak (she/they) is a two-time Playwrights' Center Jerome Fellow and the former Shank Playwriting Fellow at the Goodman Theatre. Idaszak has received commissions from the Goodman, EST/the Sloan Foundation, Cleveland Play House, St. Louis Shakespeare Festival, and TimeLine Theatre. Her play SECOND SKIN received the Kennedy Center's Paula Vogel Playwriting Award and the Jean Kennedy Smith Playwriting Award, and her play ANOTHER JUNGLE was a Relentless Award Honorable Mention. She was the Kennedy Center Fellow at the Sundance Theatre Lab. She is a Resident Playwright at Chicago Dramatists and adjunct faculty at The Theatre School at DePaul University and Northwestern University. SolAR*, Nefertiti Abdulmalik (she/her) raised on Chicago's Northside, recently presented her video animation work Portal to New Earth as part of the 2021 Pivot Arts Festival. She has always been drawn towards the arts and nature. Her current focus is to create works that illustrate nature and how it is interconnected. Nefertiti holds a BFA in Animation from DePaul University and is now beginning her career as a performing artist, combining her love for music, dance, animation and storytelling. By blending together animated visuals, music and story, she shares messages of human empowerment, imagination and nature connection.Episode 1 was produced and edited by Julieanne Ehre with original music by Andrew Hansen and sound engineering by Hannah Foerschler.The Pivot Arts Podcast is made possible by FLATS, a Chicago based apartment community.Mentions in Episode Include:"All We Can Save: Truth, Courage, and Solutions for the Climate Crisis"  Edited by Ayana Elizabeth Johnson and Katharine K. Wilkinson"Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds" by Adrienne Maree BrownGroundwater ArtsIllinois' Stretch CodeHeat Pump Technology

Maker Mom Podcast
Episode 210 - Andrea de Leon

Maker Mom Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 61:44


Andrea is a Mexican-American artist based in Texas. She obtained her BFA in Studio Arts from the University of Texas and has received multiple awards, including residencies at Ox Bow School of Art and Penland School of Crafts. She has worked and exhibited internationally and currently teaches metalsmithing in several institutions in Texas. With metalsmithing she creates sculptural pieces as well as knives. She is also pursuing a passion in scientific glass blowing. You can follow along with Andrea on Instagram and her Website.

Meet Me At Mill Mountain: The Podcast
Awarding Young Artists With Ginger Morris

Meet Me At Mill Mountain: The Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 38:48


Our twenty-fourth official episode of Meet Me At Mill Mountain: The Podcast features Ginger Morris, from Austin, Texas. In this episode, learn how Ginger got her start in the industry after college and how she became a co-founder of Summer Stock Austin.Ginger Morris, having graduated from the University of Texas at Austin with a BFA in Theatre in 1998, is now a theatre producer, director, choreographer, and educator. For her first six years after college, Ginger worked as an Equity Stage Manager and the Academy Director for Austin Musical Theatre. She has directed and/or choreographed productions with various universities, professional, community, and youth theatres across central Texas. She is the co-founder of Summer Stock Austin, where she has directed and choreographed 13 musicals garnering the B. Iden Payne Award for Best Choreography. Ginger has directed and/or choreographed over 40 musicals and has worked on several original musicals from Austin to New York City. She is the Executive Director of a nonprofit theatre education company called Impact Arts, Producing Director for the Heller Awards for Young Artists with the Long Center for the Performing Arts, Artistic Director/Producer for Summer Stock Austin in partnership with Texas Performing Arts, and is also the program director of Texas Arts Project with St. Stephen's School. She is fiercely devoted to seeing young people come alive through the arts.

Crossroads & Cauldrons Podcast
Episode 53: Laura Tempest Zakroff

Crossroads & Cauldrons Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 47:38


Laura Tempest Zakroff is a professional artist, author, dancer, designer, and Modern Traditional Witch based in New England. She holds a BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and her artwork has received awards and honors worldwide. Her work embodies myth and the esoteric through her drawings and paintings, jewelry, talismans, and other designs. Laura is the author of the best-selling books Weave the Liminal: Living Modern Traditional Witchcraft and Sigil Witchery: A Witch's Guide to Crafting Magick Symbols, as well as the Liminal Spirits Oracle (artist/author) and Anatomy of a Witch. She blogs for Patheos as A Modern Traditional Witch, contributes to The Witches' Almanac, Ltd, and creates the Witchual Workout and other programming on her YouTube channel. www.LauraTempestZakroff.com www.instagram.com/owlkeyme.arts www.patreon.com/owlkeyme https://twitter.com/ltempestz --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/crossroadsncauldrons/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/crossroadsncauldrons/support

Rattlecast
ep. 117 - Clemonce Heard

Rattlecast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 129:09


Clemonce Heard was born and raised in New Orleans, Louisiana. He is the winner of the 2020 Anhinga Robert Dana Prize, selected by Major Jackson. His poetry collection, Tragic City, which investigates the events of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, is forthcoming from Anhinga Press in October 2021. Heard's work has appeared or is forthcoming from Obsidian, The Missouri Review, Cimarron Review, Iron Horse, World Literature Today, Poetry, Rattle, Ruminate, and elsewhere. He earned a BFA in graphic communications from Northwestern State University, and an MFA in creative writing from Oklahoma State University. Heard was a recipient of a 2018-2019 Tulsa Artist Fellowship and was the 2019-2020 Ronald Wallace Poetry Fellow at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He currently lives in San Antonio, Texas, and serves as the Sala Diaz artist-in-residence. Find the book and more at: https://www.clemonceheard.com/ As always, we'll also include live open lines for responses to our weekly prompt or any other poems you'd like to share. For details on how to participate, either via Skype or by phone, go to: https://www.rattle.com/rattlecast/ This Week's Prompt: This was a lot of fun last time, so let's do another random street view poem. Randomstreetview.com is a site that randomly generates photographs of streets all over the world. Find a photo that speaks to you and write a poem about it. Next Week's Prompt: Write an apology poem. The Rattlecast livestreams on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter, then becomes an audio podcast. Find it on iTunes, Spotify, or anywhere else you get your podcasts.

The Story Collider
Apprentices: Stories about mentors who shaped us

The Story Collider

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 29:59


In this week's stories, both of our storytellers are apprentices to mentors who have profound impacts on how they see the world, though in very different ways. Part 1: Fresh out of college, Stephanie Keep is hired to be the assistant to legendary evolutionary biologist Stephen Jay Gould. Part 2: At age fourteen, Fabrizzio Subia begins assisting a local dentist in treating undocumented patients. Stephanie Keep was trained as a paleobiologist at Wellesley College and Harvard University. Opting to leave research behind, she now resides comfortably in the center of a Venn diagram that includes science education, academia, and communication. She is a co-founder of a BiteScis, a spin-off organization of ComSciCon that brings together educators and researchers to develop misconception-focused lesson plans for high school students that are rooted in current research. Outside of BiteScis, Stephanie works on state-level science assessments and does work for nonprofit groups that produce free high-quality stuff for teachers. This year, she also finally crossed off the last item on her science education to-do list and started teaching science as part of the Science for Scientists program. Stephanie loves farm animals, hates olives, can't spell the word “resources,” and will do pretty much anything to get references to whales, cephalopods, and xenarthrans into the stuff she writes. Fabrizzio Subia is a Chicago based multidisciplinary artist. An Ecuadorian immigrant, his work touches on themes of migration, family, and identity through the mediums of storytelling, poetry, collaborative and individual performance, and visual art. He earned his BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 2020, and has exhibited work across Chicago, including 6018 North Gallery and SAIC's SITE Galleries. He is a member of Chicago's P.O. Box Collective, and co-founder of Tortas y Talento Open Mic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Plan A Konversations
Be Open to Hear The Call, Joey Lorraine, Dance Artist + Producer, Black Lives Rising

Plan A Konversations

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 38:38


Season 9, Episode 2 - Be Open to Hear The Call  - Joey Lorraine, Dance Artist + Producer, Black Lives Rising WELCOME TO SEASON 9! We're honored that you're here with us and very grateful to have you as a listener.About Joey LorraineJoey Lorraine is a NYC based dance artist who produces innovative dance media through video, photography, podcasts, and emerging technology such as NFT.  As a performer, she has danced as a soloist with the Morgan Scott Ballet, and showcased her own work at BAAD!, aka Bronx Academy of Arts and Dance, Balasole Dance, and The Culture Project's Women's Director's Series. Ms. Lorraine  has also served as a teaching artist for Creative Outlet Dance Theatre of Brooklyn as well as Dance Theatre of Harlem. Ms. Lorraine's professional dance training includes ballet, Horton, and Graham technique at Alvin Ailey's Professional Training Program. Ms. Lorraine has a BFA. in Film & Television Production from New York University's Tisch School of the Arts. Ms. Lorraine's most recent dance on camera project is Black Lives Rising, a cutting edge virtual dance film festival that explores the diversity of the Black experience in today's times. Black Lives Rising will be presented via discord/twitch virtual platform from December 16-18, 2021. Connect + learn more about Joey:Personal website: http://www.joeylorraine.com/Festival website: http://www.blrdancefilmfest.com/Seed&Spark: http://www.blacklivesrisingcampaign.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blrdancefilmfestTwitter: https://twitter.com/blrfilmfestivalInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/blrdancefilmfest/Klay's NoteWant more information on our custom meditations? Email: Assistant@PlanAwithKlay.com.If you're looking for a cool scripted podcast drama, check out Venice HERE by Marisa Bramwell.Thank you for listening to Season 8 of Plan A Konversations! Share your thoughts and follow Klay on your favorite social media: @PlanAwithKlay and use the hashtag #PlanA101​​​. Want more Plan A? Subscribe to Klay's website: KlaySWilliams.com.If you've been motivated, inspired and called to action by this podcast, please consider contributing with the link provided below. Support the show (https://paypal.me/PlanAEnterprises?locale.x=en_US)

NY NOW Podcast
Modern, Sustainable and Global Crafted Design with Incasa Décor

NY NOW Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 31:32


INCASA is an Astoria, NY-based contemporary home décor and accessories shop with a fresh design perspective, an eclectic mix of individual products and design services that blend seamlessly. Our collections incorporate style, quality, value, traditions, and community. Aiming to make home styling and quality design accessible to its clients, INCASA offers fine workmanship and innovative design products at affordable prices paired with a personal shopping experience.Guest Name: Eduardo Vázquez Silva   Title: Owner   Company: Incasa Décor  Bio: Eduardo Vázquez Silva is the owner of INCASA Décor, a small boutique located in Astoria, Queens that specializes in small batch, sustainable, home accessories and décor. Through INCASA, Eduardo aims to highlight small local and international brands that offer well-designed functional products. Originally from Mexico, Eduardo wants to use the store to bring to the forefront Mexico's craftsmanship and unique style, but his vision goes beyond Latin America - as he features products from Portugal, Turkey, and the Philippines, with plans to bring items from other parts of the world, while continuing to bring in a diverse range of makers from Queens and other boroughs of New York City. INCASA also has its in-house range of products and services, such as custom drapes and their accent pillow collection. A BFA in Interior Architecture and Design and his experience in furniture and textile design guides him through this ambitious project.    RESOURCES   Guest Websites:https://www.incasadecor.com/     | NY NOW: https://nynow.com     | NY NOW Podcast Page: https://nynow.com/podcast     | NY NOW Digital Market: https://nynowdigitalmarket.com    

Other Border Wall Podcast
Episode 16 - Gavin Benjamin in Conversation

Other Border Wall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 23:38


Continuing our theme with Season 2 that focuses on the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, we spoke with the artist Gavin Benjamin about his recent artist residency at the museum and his own practice. Tune in to a great conversation between Gavin, Leah, and Tereneh! Gavin Benjamin is a multifaceted artist who combines original analog photography and appropriated images with collage, paint, and varnish to create rich and luxurious works that call back to baroque traditions while incorporating elements of current culture to provoke, critique, and explore. Born in Guyana, South America and raised in Brooklyn, New York, Benjamin received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York City. During this time, he worked as an interned for the legendary portrait photographer, Arnold Newman. Benjamin also worked as black and white and color printer at LTI and Baboo color labs. From there, he went on to work at Edge Reps and Exposure NY, agencies representing commercial and advertising photographers, prop stylists, and hair and makeup artists. After Exposure NY, he worked as a freelance production coordinator/photo editor with stints at Kenneth Cole productions, Esquire Magazine, Hachette Filipacchi Media, and Good Housekeeping magazine. “I am very inspired by the work of artists during the 15th to 17th centuries, especially the Dutch and Italian masters. There is something very romantic, dark, mysterious, and brooding about these works. I find this period fascinating because of the deep, luxurious colors and intense light and dark shadows. I am drawn to the juxtaposition of objects and compositions that come together to tell a story” Benjamin investigates the intersection of culture, media, politics, fashion, and design, addressing questions that (continue to) confront a men of color in America today. “My work reflects everything that I'm thinking – it includes everything that I love and everything that I'm challenged by. It's honest and curious and bright and thoughtful. And sometimes a little dark. It's all of the things that made me want to be a professional artist in the first place.” His work has appeared at the Slick Paris, Sotheby's NY, Architectural Digest Home Design Show, Art Hampton, Affordable Art Fair, Scope Miami, Palm Beach Modern, Context Miami, Context NY, Art Silicon Valley, and the LA Art Fair. Links: Website: https://www.gavinbenjamin.com Mentions in episode: Penguin Court: https://www.brandywine.org/conservancy/preserves/penguin-court-thomas-road-farm Polaroids: https://mymodernmet.com/history-of-polaroid/ Haltson Netflix Series: https://www.netflix.com/title/80245103 Upcoming Exhibitions: Mattress Factory: https://mattress.org/upcoming-artists/ Contemporary Craft: https://contemporarycraft.org/exhibition/food-justice/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/otherborderwall/message

Film Addicts
James Fox *Multiple Award-Winning Screenwriter, Director, Producer and Author of Revolution (The Sol Saga Book 1)

Film Addicts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 29:59


James Fox, award-winning screenwriter, director, producer and now author of science fiction fantasy! Native American and Californian, James Fox is a natural storyteller. After graduating from the Academy of Art in San Francisco, with a BFA in Directing, he became the Founder of Dawnrunner Inc. and has championed the company through numerous award-winning projects over fifteen years. As a writer, Fox devotes his energies to the careful crafting of compelling characters and diverse worlds. thejamesfox.com Revolution (The Sol Saga Book 1) Thank you for listening & supporting the podcast :) https://www.buymeacoffee.com/sneakies https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/anonymouscontent Royal Girl Funds will go to sound and editing. Paypal (friends & family) petcarebuddies@gmail.com https://www.patreon.com/sneakies Instagram @marylinartist LinkedIn: Marylin Hebert Please Subscribe to our YouTube:) https://www.youtube.com/user/Fellinijr/videos @aabanks @marylinartist Marylin Hebert Zombie Diaries: https://youtu.be/tBmgi3k6r9A Our books :) Young Adult wizard book series: "Margaret Merlin's Journal" by A. A. Banks at Amazon! :) https://www.instagram.com/margaretmerlinsjournal/ MMJ Book I The Battle of the Black Witch https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Battle-Black-ebook/dp/B01634G3CK MMJ Book II Unleashing the Dark One Science fiction action adventure https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Unleashing-Dark-ebook/dp/B01J78YH6I MMJ Book III The Mask of the Parallel World An Adventure in Italy https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Parallel-World-ebook/dp/B01KUGIZ8W/ MMJ Book IV The Quest for the Golden Key https://www.amazon.com/Margaret-Merlins-Journal-Quest-Golden-ebook/dp/B076FTTDQN Top kids podcast: Enchanting Book Readings https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/enchanting-book-readings-reviews/id1498296670 Other awesome podcasts: Thrilling Stories, Enchanting Book Readings, Girl's Guide To Investing, Legitimately Mallie & The Haunting Dairies of Emily Jane. Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/girlmogul/support --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/filmaddicts/support

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors
Making Space in Painting, Virtual Reality & In a City: Arden Bendler Browning

I Like Your Work: Conversations with Artists, Curators & Collectors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 54:49


Philadelphia based artist Arden Bendler Browning makes large abstract paintings, small works on paper and panel, and virtual reality environments.   Her work contemplates perception of landscapes affected by digital imagery, the flow of time throughout many moments and distractions, and the contemporary desire to capture many possible perspectives and directions at once.   Intense, vibrant color, sweeping gestures, and areas of finer detail always show evidence of the artist's hand – even in the digital VR spaces. Her work is a direct response to her environments – whether it is her urban home base, weeks-long family road trips, documenting urban change, or seasonal changes during family hikes.  She takes cues from a wide range of artists, but with clear ties to Abstract Expressionists, time based work, Impressionist landscape, and many contemporary artists who engage with multifaceted and immersive spaces.     Her works are included in the West Collection, the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Philadelphia International Airport, Toyota collection,  Dream Hotel Nashville and more.   She is represented by Bridgette Mayer Gallery, Galleri Urbane, and Tinney Contemporary.  Exhibitions include the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Weatherspoon Art Museum, James A. Michener Museum, and Pennsylvania State University.  She holds a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University (1997), an MSA from Sydney College of the Arts (2000), and an MFA from Tyler School of Art (2003).  Upcoming shows in 2021 include a solo show at Tinney Contemporary in Nashville and a group show at the Delaware Contemporary and Katzen Art Center at American University in Washington, DC.     Arden is a mother to three daughters : 15 year old twins and a 6 year old.  Though her teens attend a small Montessori high school,  Arden has supervised a homeschool education for all three daughters since her teens were school age.  Their family follows a self-directed learning path.  Arden's husband Matt Browning is a creative tech programmer and assists the development of Arden's VR work.       LINKS:  www.instagram.com/arden2bees Ardenbendlerbrowning.com     I Like Your Work Links:   Exhibitions Studio Visit Artists I Like Your Work Podcast Instagram Submit Work Observations on Applying to Juried Shows Studio Planner  

Pointe To Rise
A conversation with Erin Pompa Pride

Pointe To Rise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 49:38


Erin is the CEO of Dance Boss LLC. She is also the host of the Dance Boss podcast. She is also a former choreographer, leader, and crew director. Erin helps dance specialists create 5k consistent months with a signature long term virtual group training program. She has been featured in dance magazines like Dance Business Weekly and Dance Media. She is a Jersey girl all the way. Graduated from Montclair State University with a BFA in dance and received her Master's in Dance Education from New York University. Erin is on a mission to help dance professionals build wealth financially, spiritually, and emotionally. In this episode, Erin shares her journey from experienced dancer, to dance teacher, to business coach. She talks about how professional dancers and artists struggle with fears and other challenges that keep them from growing and shares a few tips on how they can finally take action and develop themselves as individuals and their businesses. Other topics we chat about: Collaboration with other dance teachers Her experience with finding a coach Addressing fear as artists The relationship between growth and environment Taking action as an individual Business advice for dance studio owners Resources for Erin: Instagram Website Facebook Podcast Thank you for listening, So much ♥, Susanne Pointe To Rise links below:

Dream Freedom Beauty with Natalie Ross
Folk Medicine Practitioner Yaya Erin Rivera Merriman on the Role of the Dreamer and Visions for a Community [episode 61]

Dream Freedom Beauty with Natalie Ross

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 95:30


Yaya Erin Rivera Merriman shares about embodying your archetypes and creating the freedom to express and explore who you truly are. You'll also hear about: Visions of a community, inspired by a dream On relating and healthy intimacy Reconnecting with your intuitive self On finding healthy male role models ♥♥♥ Join The Earth Speak Collective Membership! Join like-hearted folks in a sacred container and community where you'll: Connect deeply to yourself, others, nature & spirit Learn to trust your intuition Activate your Earth magic Expand your healing & divination skills Put your intuition into practice in everyday life Stop feeling lonely on your spiritual path Embody & express your creative power & truths Experience safe space without agenda or judgment When you join the Collective, you get access to all of our past workshops, any live workshops happening while you're a member, live weekly energetic reset calls, monthly community rituals, all the secret episodes, member-run meetups to explore magical topics, and a lively members-only forum (that's not on FB!). ▶▶▶ Learn more and sign up for the Collective membership here: https://www.earthspeak.love/collective ***** Yaya Erin Rivera Merriman is a Taino-Irish-American folk medicine practitioner specializing in sacred plant medicines for communication and relationship. Raised on a 100 acre Christmas tree farm in rural Connecticut shared with 4 generations of family, she was taught from a young age the importance of community stewardship and living in harmony with the natural world.  Erin holds a BFA from Pratt Institute and has taught art to Brooklyn teens, volunteered as an Interfaith Chaplain in maximum security NYC prison, facilitated women's initiatory journeys and organized retreats with indigenous and emerging wisdom keepers since 2007. She currently resides at Rio Cosmico, a homestead, seasonal ceremonial micro village, and Library of Earth Magic located in Kumeyaay territory in Southern California where she provides multidimensional support to others on the green road to a responsible, creative, liberated embodiment. In this episode, we talk about: A dream that Yaya Erin had which inspired her to reconnect with Earth Speak Dreamwork and what can be revealed about ourselves How Yaya Erin was moved to join the Village On creating new structures of connection, outside mainstream social media  On creating empowered solutions Reconnecting with your intuitive self On the role of the dreamer Finding healthy male role models On embodying the masculine and being a goddess worshiper Embodying your archetypes On exploring and expressing the spectrum of who you are On healthy intimacy Love as karmic super-glue On autism and learning to fake being ‘normal' Uncoupling from a 10-year marriage On knowing when it's your time to talk and your time to listen Recognizing your triggers, traumas, and unhealthy patterns Creating connection in a disconnected and fragmented time On co-creating a safe container with your Spirit team The fractal nature of reality And so much more! Secret Episodes! Get access to past secret episodes at https://www.earthspeak.love/secret. Links: Join the Earth Speak Collective Membership at https://www.earthspeak.love/collective Learn more about Yaya Erin's offerings at www.activeculturefamily.com Connect with Yaya Erin on Instagram @Activeculturefamily // https://www.instagram.com/Activeculturefamily/ Connect with Yaya Erin on Patreon @activeculturefamily Explore Yaya Erin's other offerings at www.riocosmico.org Join the Earth Speak Village at https://www.earthspeak.love/village   Get the secret episodes at https://www.earthspeak.love/secret    References: Kristen Houser || episode 60 https://www.earthspeak.love/shows-1/kristen-houser-60 Blendily https://www.blendily.com   Native Land https://native-land.ca   Yaya Erin on Dream Freedom Beauty || episode 72 https://tinyurl.com/fp7sw3ed Genetic Haplogroup https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haplogroup Rio Cosmico www.riocosmico.org The Taino people https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ta%C3%ADno Greek key motif https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Meander_(art) Sex Education (TV series) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sex_Education_(TV_series) Werner Herzog https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Werner_Herzog Elon Musk https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elon_Musk Archetype https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Archetype Lady of the Lake https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_of_the_Lake The red road https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_red_road  Tantra https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tantra Saraswati https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saraswati  Kali https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kali Clairsentience  https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/clairsentience  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shiva Shakti https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shakti Pigment || Shop https://www.shoppigment.com/ Peyote https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peyote  Gaslighting https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaslighting Clairvoyant https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clairvoyance Dreaming With the Ancestors || Workshop  https://www.riocosmico.org/courses/dreaming-with-the-ancestors     ► Leave us a written review on iTunes, and get shouted out on the show! Theme music is “It's Easier” by Scarlet Crow http://www.scarletcrow.org/ and “Meeting Again” by Emily Sprague  https://mlesprg.info/ ► Join the Earth Speak Collective Membership at https://www.earthspeak.love/collective Follow Earth Speak on Instagram and tag us when you share @earthspeak https://www.instagram.com/earthspeak

riseyear
Ep. 93: Humanity and Theater with Kellee Stall

riseyear

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 49:39


Kellee Stall was born in Norfolk Virginia. She spent her childhood in Lilburn Georgia and her high school years in Mandeville Louisiana. At 18, Kellee moved to Crystal Lake Illinois where she earned her BFA in Acting and met her husband, Tim Stall, of 27 years. She founded and operated Inhabit Theater Company, an immersive, pop-up theater performing original stories throughout Northern Illinois. Kellee collaboratively wrote comedic plays with the actor's and musician's talent in mind then placed these plays in site-specific locations like coffee shops, bridal boutiques, and empty houses for sale. Kellee spent 23 years in the Midwest as an acting coach, talent scout, director, and playwright. In 2017 she moved to Charlotte North Carolina where she currently casts, produces, and acting coaches for local film companies. As an assemblage artist, she approaches her art as she would a theatrical piece. Kellee collects and casts found objects into a scene to provoke a humorous dialogue or a crucial conversation. She often collaborates with other artists in an attempt to advance the dialogue of her work. In July 2021, Kellee produced “Duets” an immersive art show which featured 10 local Charlotte artists and performers. This sold-out event allowed patrons the option to support artists by tipping their art. Kellee's art and set design was featured in Winston Salam The Breath and The Clay 2021 live & online conference. Kellee received a HUG grant from “Charlotte is Creative” for producing “Plastic Perspective” show in 2019. Her solo show “Identity Crises” featured 11 pieces shown at New City Gallery, Charlotte in the summer of 2018. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/riseyear/support

Leading Saints Podcast
Church Doctrine, Policy, & Leadership | An Interview with Anthony Sweat

Leading Saints Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 57:33


This is a rebroadcast. The episode originally ran in November 2018. Anthony Sweat is an Associate Professor of Church History and Doctrine at Brigham Young University, and previously taught Seminary and Institute for 13 years. With an early interest in art he obtained a BFA from BYU before pursuing religious education, earning an M.Ed in curriculum and instruction and a Ph.D in Religious Theory from Utah State University. His sustained interest and skill in art provides him an avenue of expression that he often blends into his teaching of religion, especially by painting previously-undepicted church history scenes. Dr. Sweat is the author of several books and a regular speaker at Latter-day Saint events and conferences. He and his wife Cindy are the parents of seven children. Highlights 07:20 Discussion of what constitutes official Church doctrine? Doctrine of Christ; other doctrines. 10:23 Culture or doctrine? 13:00 Where do we find doctrine? Church handbooks, standard works, official correlated Church publications; Family Proclamation. Multiple witness concept versus “outliers.” Unanimous (by the Brethren) declarations. Cohesive, cumulative statements from Church leaders acting as the Lord's agents. Reference to D&C 107:27. 19:00 Types of doctrines. 2011 official Church statement during the campaign season involving presidential candidate Mitt Romney. What about a single statement by a single leader on a single occasion—binding? Avoid pitting one general authority against another. Are some doctrines more important than others? Are core doctrines unchangeable? What are “supportive doctrines” according to the model (four rings) developed by Dr. Sweat and his colleagues? Can faithful members have differing views on supportive doctrines? Progressing in the next life? Discussion of policies or doctrines that are authoritative, timely and unique to a given time period. Are they “mere policies?” Can they be clarified/amplified? 30:13 Don't try to get ahead of or undercut prophets/revelators. Scriptures authenticate that God honors His prophets. Example of tribes of Israel that were required to wait to receive the priesthood. Orthodox today but heterodox tomorrow. Brigham Young said Section 76 was a “great trial” to him, but he did not reject it and later understood. 33:42 Fourth ring: “Esoteric doctrine” is obscured or ambiguous. Role of Mother in Heaven? Is Jesus married? Is there kingdom progression in the next life? What's in the sealed portion of the Book of Mormon? 34:33 Section 128:9 relates to receiving revelation and is “bold doctrine.” Prophets who hold sealing keys, acting truly and faithfully as the Lord's agents, have the authority to record on earth and bind in heaven. The role of “agents.” 39:51 Dealing with ambiguity in a church classroom setting. Clarity can come through the “wrestle.” Inviting discussion without straying from doctrine. Teaching what is declared and known without shutting off sincere comments about things that are not. “Managing opinions.” Listening without agreeing. 49:30 Leaders need to be dialed into core doctrines and official policies. 50:25 There are clearly things that have not yet been revealed. Embrace ambiguity. Just as artists don't always reveal precisely what they had in mind in their work of art, God seems to want us to grow by wrestling with some things where only hints are provided. He wants “seekers” who ask and knock. 53:35 Gratitude for Joseph's role as a called, inspired, and revelatory prophet who nonetheless had mortal weaknesses. Each of us, though weak, can be instruments in the Lord's hands. Links AnthonySweat.com Instagram @brotheranthonysweat The Holy Invitation: Understanding Your Sacred Temple Endowment Doctrine: Models to Evaluate Types and Sources of Latter-day Saint Teachings Approaching Mormon Doctrine Seekers Wanted | An Interview with Anthony Sweat Repicturing Leadership in the Restoration | An Interview with Anthony S...

Business Bros
How to Get Six figures in Freelancing with Kate Bagoy

Business Bros

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 31:12


835- A self-professed nerd with an MBA, Kate Bagoy is a UX Designer turned Forbes Councils business coach and founder of Six Figure Freelancers, where she helps new freelancers and consultants get started and get to cash, quick. After quitting a corporate dream job in 2008, Kate moved to Silicon Valley to work for a mobile startup, and she's been working with entrepreneurs ever since! She's worked with more than 50 startups as a designer, marketer, product manager, strategist, analyst, and advisor and has coached 1000's of consultants through starting a business and landing consulting clients. Kate is a graduate of the Portland Seed Fund, served as a mentor at the ATDC startup accelerator, and has led projects for Fortune 500 companies Nike, Ricoh, HP, and Microsoft. She holds a BFA in graphic design and an MBA in marketing and international business. Obsessed with travel since a flight to Oregon at six, Kate has been traveling as a digital nomad since 2017 – running her business entirely online from 25 countries – and helps other creatives find their freedom at sixfigurefreelancers.com. Kate's personal mission is to inspire and empower people to lead lives by design, not default. ________ Want your customers to talk about you to their friends and family? That's what we do! We get your customers to talk about you so that you get more referrals with video testimonials. Go to www.BusinessBros.biz to be a guest on the show or to find out more on how we can help you get more customers! --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/businessbrospod/support

The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft
Email Lists for Growth | Bri Lawson | Episode 778

The Potters Cast | Pottery | Ceramics | Art | Craft

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 47:44


As a BFA graduate from UW-River Falls, Bri Lawson creates functional pottery on the wheel with imagery and bright colors. Originally from MN, Bri relocated to RI in 2018 for a residency at The Steel Yard. Bri currently works in her studio at the Nicholson File Artist Community in Providence, RI.