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Representation of language in a textual medium

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Inside the ICE House
Episode 280: Snowflake CEO Frank Slootman Wrote the Playbook on How to Amp It Up

Inside the ICE House

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 55:09


Frank Slootman, Chairman and CEO of Snowflake (NYSE: SNOW), presided over the largest software IPO in the NYSE's history, but it wasn't his first rodeo. Snowflake is the third company Frank has taken public, and the lessons that shaped his career are part of his new book Amp It Up: Leading for Hypergrowth by Raising Expectations, Increasing Urgency, and Elevating Intensity. Frank shares the secrets of his success, the leadership principles that guide him, and what he's learned along the way.   Inside the ICE House: https://www.theice.com/insights/conversations/inside-the-ice-house  

The REALIFE Process®
161: Why I Wrote a Book (And Why YOU Should Too!)

The REALIFE Process®

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 18:04


Have you ever wondered if you should write a book? I considered writing one for years, and I finally completed my book at the end of 2021. In this episode, I'm sharing with you: Why everyone should consider writing a book How writing a book can be therapeutic and shape your character What I learned about myself through writing my story How to know if writing a book is right for you If you've ever wondered if you have a book in you, this episode will show you the power of writing down your message for other people. Whether you ever write a book or not, I hope this episode inspires you to share your story with others. Mentioned in this episode: Why Everyone Should Write a Book: article by Jeff Goins To follow along and hear more about my book before it comes out:Join our Facebook Group Sign up for our email list (and receive a free resource for signing up!)Email me at teresa@therealifeprocess.com Join us for a FREE Online Workshop!Join us for a FREE online workshop, “Living From Rest, Not Rush: 4 Essential Keys for Busy Entrepreneurs” on Wednesday, February 2 at 6pm CT on Zoom. Learn four essential keys that will help you create time for what uniquely matters to YOU in your life and business, and discover how you can use these practical tools with your clients. Sign up here.  REALIFE Resources:If you're ready to discover what matters to you, download our FREE Intro to REALIFE Needs and Values Assessment. You'll gain clarity on what you uniquely need to create a life and career you love. This is one sample of the content we provide for exclusive use by our REALIFE Process Facilitators™.  REALIFE Process Facilitator Network™The REALIFE Process Facilitator Network is open for applications! If you're looking to go deeper personally in your REALIFE and have the desire to serve others and multiply your impact, check out how to be certified as a REALIFE Process Facilitator™! Support the Podcast–Leave us a ReviewAre you growing as a result of listening to the podcast? The greatest compliment you can pay us is to share it with a friend and leave a review on iTunes. Click here and scroll down to Customer Reviews to leave a word on what you've found to be helpful as you're listening in! Connect further with the REALIFE Process®:Join the FREE REALIFE Process® Community - continue podcast topics discussions with Facebook LIVEs and guest interviews  Connect with your host, Teresa McCloy on:Facebook- The REALIFE Process® with Teresa McCloy Instagram- teresa.mccloy LinkedIn- teresamccloy  About Teresa McCloy:Teresa McCloy is the creator of the REALIFE Process®, an ACC Executive Coach, and an IEA Accredited Enneagram Professional who helps entrepreneurs, business owners, and leaders discover and live out their best REALIFE! She has worked with clients from all over the world to help them bring clarity to their REALIFE and joy to their REALWORK!

KERA's Think
Pharaohs wrote the playbook for today's dictators

KERA's Think

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 45:42


Perhaps the global slide into authoritarianism can be better understood by an examination of the ancient past. Kara Cooney, professor of Egyptian art and architecture at UCLA, joins guest host Courtney Collins to discuss her research into the Egyptian pharaohs and why their system of rule and religious beliefs can help us to understand power and privilege in our modern world. Her book is called “The Good Kings: Absolute Power in Ancient Egypt and the Modern World.”

My Camino - the podcast
Irish pilgrim Natasha Murtagh has walked the Camino six times with her father, Peter. They wrote a book about their journey, "Buen Camino"

My Camino - the podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 61:15


I'm taking two weeks off from hosting as I try to re-boot ahead of a very busy year. You are going to love Natasha's passion for the Camino and a similar passion for family. This is a story about love...pure and simple. You can find Natasha and Peter's book everywhere. It's called "Buen Camino". Enjoy dm

The Bledsoe Show
How We Are Building Eduction for the Future

The Bledsoe Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 83:21


00:00.00 mikebledsoe All right welcome to Monday morning with Mike and max Today we're gonna be talking about education and you know what this is a bit of a taboo subject because when I get in the conversations with the average. Person and I make certain comments about the education system a lot of people get very protective of it and they they get a little little scared around it and they want to reject things and and 1 of the things that I have to remember in those conversations is that. I am standing from a perspective that's very different than the perspective that they're holding and when that's the case we really need to stare step people into the conversation versus just saying well that's stupid so max and I are going to take a ah. 00:47.90 Max Shank KA. 00:54.75 mikebledsoe Stab at the conversation of Education. Hopefully we can help ah expand people's ideas about this and maybe change perspectives and maybe you're listening and you share the same perspective and we're able to help you put it into words more clearly so that you can share with others. As well and this was this conversation was inspired by the show we did last week where max was talking about how he would do things different with Education. So We decided to go deeper with it. Good to have you max. 01:32.76 Max Shank It's great to be here Mike I think what I'd like to start off by saying is that there is a monumental difference between school and education education is the process of learning. Which is essentially like cheating. That's how humans have been able to become so dominant because we've been able to ah compound our acquired knowledge intergenerationally over long term I think schooling. Especially public schooling and even university has been a colossal failure in almost every way does more harm than good and I think the reason that people get so triggered and defensive when you make a comment like that is because they don't want to feel. Silly for having wasted their time having gone through that system themselves and especially if they have kids that they have put through that system. They don't want to feel like they have abused their children which they probably have so those are the 2 main reasons that people get charged up. When you make a comment like school is probably 5% efficient use of time. There are a few things that are useful about school but most of it is done in such a destructive manner for both the body and mind of a child. So those are the reasons that people get triggered schooling itself is a colossal failure education is the most powerful tool you have to increase your leverage which is going to allow you to have a greater impact in life with lower effort or less work There's a great. Mark Twain quote that says I never let schooling interfere with my education and I think that describes perfectly what we're talking about so there's a big big distinction big difference between school and education. So. Ultimately, it is your responsibility to educate yourself. It is your responsibility to educate your kids and then it is their responsibility to educate themselves beyond that and I think tying into our concept of freedom and personal responsibility. That's. 1 of the biggest errors is when you outsource your education you are priming yourself for propaganda and brainwashing and just essentially you end up in obedience school is what it becomes rather than an actual education that allows you to be more. 04:19.91 Max Shank Self-reliant and contribute in a constructive way. 04:24.29 mikebledsoe Yeah, when I think about I mean there's a few other distinctions to make here. So the distinction between education schooling you've made well another one that um stands out to me is Dr Andy Galpin he he always says that. Know the difference between education and training and the what he witnesses is the average student walking through the door at cal state is expecting training from a college university whose job is to educate. 05:00.43 Max Shank A. 05:01.88 mikebledsoe And and the point of education especially like a liberal Arts education is to is this is this is the way it was set up is that the wealthy would send their kids here so they could broaden their horizons. They could broaden their their scope of knowledge into many different areas. And then after they attended University They then entered the workplace and they were able able to enter the workplace being more cultured having more total information but not necessarily going to school unless you're going to become a doctor or lawyer or or something like that. Ah. 05:37.18 Max Shank No. 05:39.13 mikebledsoe A lot of so a lot of people have basically ah in in regard to college. They've confused education with training and it's not training and so some of these expectations around. Oh I'm going to go to college and then I'm going to get a job that's paying me close to 6 figures. 05:46.42 Max Shank H. 05:58.46 mikebledsoe You have 0 training All you have is education and so it's ah the the learning is going to happen when you start training or when you start actually doing so I like to have that as a distinction. As well. The just because so many people think they should should have that job and yeah, you're gonna have to get your training after college and which also brings me to ah a. A phrase. That's really stuck with me for a long time which is learning is behavior change and there is ah there are so many the education system the way that people have been educated have been really rewarded for memorizing and regurgitating. And they've mislabeled that as learning. So What I notice is a lot of people. They'll you'll start talking to them. They go I know I know I know we know this because max and I are both Educators. We tell somebody and they go I know I was like why aren't you doing it if you know it. And it's because they read it and they know it and so they almost get they the problem with education system is it rewards you with good grades a pat on the back like you did something good by memorizing it and then you go Oh I should get a reward for memorization. 07:27.81 Max Shank Right. 07:29.45 mikebledsoe And so people are very confused about why they're not getting a reward in the real world for just knowing shit and you be if you really live your life which I've really taken this on for myself that learning is behavior change if your behavior didn't Change. You don't get to say that you learned it. 07:47.70 Max Shank Um, yeah I Really like that a lot I think the collapse distinction between training ah and education was that what you said between education and training. 08:01.19 mikebledsoe Education and training. Yeah. 08:05.32 Max Shank That's huge. That's huge um because you can go to welding school and you will learn a craft and you are now trained as a welder but the concept of broadening your horizons or as Charlie Munger calls it. The mental lattice work which I really like so you can borrow. Different ideas from a variety of topics and subjects and sources is really beneficial to your overall knowledge. But I also like the concept there of if the behavior doesn't change. You didn't really learn and it. Kind of makes me think of bf skinner classical conditioning right? If you if the behavior changes then learning has taken place. But if the behavior doesn't change then it has not ah that's. 08:55.64 mikebledsoe Right? And and going to your point in the beginning is the school has become Ah, it's ah it's obedient school because what's the primary thing that people are learning. And they're learning to follow directions. They're learning to be at a specific. Yeah, be here at this Time. Don't do all these things do all these other things. Ah yeah, there are like you. So. Also said there's 5% of it is useful information. 09:14.86 Max Shank Repeat What I say when I say it to you. 09:33.78 mikebledsoe And I think that people tend to focus on the 5% because they want to protect I mean their identity right? because if you come out and say hey you you got screwed over by this education system which you believe so strongly in. 09:41.13 Max Shank Exactly. 09:52.00 mikebledsoe Because it's the only thing you know? Ah yeah, it could be. It's It's a blow to the identity Ego does not like to have that conversation and I'm curious max. What was what was your education. What was ah what was your education experience like. 10:02.62 Max Shank Yeah, and. 10:11.12 mikebledsoe Growing up. 10:11.25 Max Shank Oh hellacious of of or pertaining to hell. Ah it. It was awful. Um, you know when you're a child the last thing in the world you want to do is sit in a desk and listen to someone who you don't like. Try to teach you something you don't care about for long long periods of time so it was horrible I almost got held back for bad bad handwriting ah made me think I was stupid and I mean once again I don't remember. 95% of the stuff I learned because that's not how that's not how memory works you know, even if you read a book and enjoy the book. You're not going to remember most of it unless you start using it and applying it in your everyday life and it is a tough pill to swallow. To recognize that you may be wasted 12 years of your life having your creativity and critical thinking skills essentially beaten out of you on some level but conversely. If. You don't accept that then you won't change your behavior so you have to sort of accept that before you can move on in a new and more constructive way. That's like that sunk cost fallacy. Oh well I did this for so long. Let me just do it a little bit more. So. Elementary school. Ah really traumatizing high school all the way up I did go to college before dropping out and it was it was really smart I didn't even have much left. To finish my spanish and economics degree. But I'm really glad I dropped out because it just proved ah how true that sunk cost fallacy is and it was almost better in terms of my actual learning and belief in that reality like. Am I going to spend another semester and a half to finish this degree when I have no intention of using it and I realized no so I went full hog into the career that I did enjoy that I was enthusiastic about and the gym that I had opened up. 12:28.50 mikebledsoe Beautiful. Oh we boat dropped out of college to run a gym and. 12:30.89 Max Shank Yeah, yeah, yeah, well and I I you know I I bought my house Thanks to book sales but I also failed English in high school. 12:46.90 mikebledsoe You know? yeah I think that um. 12:48.60 Max Shank So clearly I don't know how to write. 12:52.71 Max Shank And the incentives the incentives are backwards right? So we've established that it's obedient school but there's no incentive for the teacher to do anything other than get you to behave yourself while in class and repeat back through rote Memory. Wrote memorization what she taught you. There's no advantage.. There's no incentive there for her to teach you. How to think critically because of the way that we measure is kind of like ah yeah, whatever, whatever way that you measure is. Going to affect the tactics that you employ. So if you're measuring Memorization. You're not really going to be incentivized to build critical thinking skills or expansive questioning. Um same as the incentive for college. You know there's no incentive for them to ensure that you get a good paying job and actually the only incentive there is to continue to increase the price of college because student loans for college are one of the only things you can. Get a person that young with that bad of credit to engage into a contract in I mean they're essentially like raping kids of their future by getting them to take out huge student loans that they can never default on due to bankruptcy So The incentive structures are. Um, completely backwards through the entire schooling process. 14:31.67 mikebledsoe Yeah, by the way if if it sounds like we're just doing a lot of bashing we we do have solutions for each one of these things that we're gonna discuss we want to. We want to get all the problems out there first and one of the things that struck me is you know. The the rope memorization regurgitation is a really strong focus on what to think and as you were saying you know critical thinking skills. That's more about how to think and how to work your way through problems and we have an entire society that. Is easy to control because they're just told what to think if you if you log into Google Apple Facebook watch television listen to radio. They're repeating to you what to think about, but they're. Not telling you how to think about it. It's usually ah telling you what to think and then why you should worry about it and why you should be afraid of it and so this is it's a very fear drivenve experience in our culture right now and recognize this with. 15:34.92 Max Shank 11 15:47.32 mikebledsoe My girlfriend especially she. She's got a master's in psychology and she's a certified you know, Psychotherapist and she did all the education racked up the student loan debt and she's very good at what she does like there. There's there's a lot of benefit out of it. But she's also since since her and I met and she's been swimming around the world of coaches who may not necessarily have finished their degrees which I know some coaches that were psychology majors but then just decide not to you know, go all the way or whatever it is and so. 16:14.74 Max Shank And. 16:25.44 mikebledsoe Um, now we get into this realm where people don't have you know certifications that fall under a board of ethics run by a bunch of academics and there was so much she I've heard this from her and many other people who have ah. Ah, ah, not certifications. But they have these credentials that could be taken away by a board. You know like a medical board or this or that and so what she shared with me is being in college. There was so much emphasis on. 16:52.30 Max Shank Right? well. 17:02.73 mikebledsoe You could lose your license for this. It's license not certification. You could lose your license for this lose your license for that like all the she said there was just so much fear and there was like if you don't follow these very specific rules then you're gonna lose your license and then you won't be able to work ever again and then she starts meeting everybody who. 17:04.23 Max Shank Small cut. 17:20.96 mikebledsoe Nobody has a license and they make good money and they get great results for their clients and she experienced ah ah quite a bit of frustration around that and ah, you know and there's so many things that she has because she went through. Like it was the perfect way for her to go she needed to go through that for many reasons part of it is you know, no one in her family had gone to college and her finishing at College made a big impact on the family you know and and there's there's all these. There's all these. 17:42.67 Max Shank No. 18:00.30 mikebledsoe Cultural narratives that really drive that but what I'd like for her to get to and I think she's getting there which is being really appreciative for the education she received but also recognizing it that its limitations and and going beyond. Ah. 18:09.42 Max Shank And. 18:17.97 mikebledsoe Where those limitations were at which which I've witnessed her due and I I hope that most people can do that? Um, yeah. 18:24.12 Max Shank That's a tricky thing is changing resentment into gratitude when you know, full well with the benefit of hindsight that there was a much better way. But if you're not feeling that way your whole life. You're probably not paying attention. Like if you can never think back and go like there was a better way I could have done that than I want whatever you're having this can you imagine. 18:46.70 mikebledsoe Yeah. Yeah, yeah, and one of the things that I also see missing in school that that really occurred to me after I got out of college was I remember taking a counting class in my first semester back to school after I was in the Navy and. I got a quarter away of the way through and the and the drop date was approaching and and I dropped the accounting clause because I was gonna get like a d in it or something and I had never gotten such a poor grade on anything and then um I go and i. 19:16.44 Max Shank Ah. 19:25.56 mikebledsoe Go on to physics you know a couple semesters later and do just fine which if you talk to most people accounting is way easier than physics for for most people. What I recognize when I look back? Ah what I really enjoyed about physics was the there was so much Context. This is why we're doing this. This is the practical application of this This is why we're learning this and when I sat down in the accounting class I was like all right. These are credits and these were debits. There was no and this this this teacher was so this accounting teacher was so. 19:55.71 Max Shank Context. 20:02.48 mikebledsoe Ah, popular for having it being a difficult class or you he was like pride prided himself on weeding people out of business school and I look back I was like it's just a bad teacher like come on you So proud of you Idiot like. 20:11.72 Max Shank What an asshole. 20:20.93 mikebledsoe A good teacher would be educating their students really well and giving them the tools to succeed but this is I think this is one of the dangers of you know I met a lot of ah I'm not saying that they're all like this but I met a lot of people who were. In the education department so they went to school specifically to become a teacher so we have to remember that the education system. It's not one of those things where we could just introduce new curriculum into the system and it would solve it because part of the problem is the teachers grew up in a. Memorize and regurgitate environment. They don't have the critical thinking skills in order to pass them down and I think that's at the core is really the problem. Um, you know there's a lot of problems but like. You can't expect the teacher that doesn't have critical thinking to be able to teach critical thinking. 21:20.83 Max Shank Right? And unfortunately because the system is so entrenched and there's 10 year and there's um teachers who do really well actually become ostracized by the rest of the teachers. And I think the core problem with schooling the absolute core problem is the lack of incentive because if we talk about what the purpose of education is which is what the purpose of schooling should be It should be that you are. Self-reliant able to contribute understand value and values and because there's no connection. There. There's no incentive for the teacher to be able to do that. There's no incentive for the college to. Do a good job. Once they've gotten your tuition money. That's the biggest problem is there's ah, no incentive or sometimes there's actually a backwards incentive so you need to allow competition to happen with education. And there was actually a really good um thing that John Stossel did about education with regard to letting the free market help elevate the best teachers to the chop and I guess there's this. I want to say he's like a south korean guy. Um, who is a multi multi-millionaire I think like tens of millions of dollars because his lectures are so well attended both in person and online and actual learning is happening and. So that's part of it. But also if there was some correlation to how well the students do afterward. Um, just like if you offer coaching I'm sure you've offered coaching with a guarantee before hey I guarantee and yeah I mean that like like ah right. 23:20.33 mikebledsoe Oh yeah, yeah, it's a conditional guarantee so you have to show us the work you did that we prescribed. Otherwise you're not getting your money back. 23:28.54 Max Shank Yeah, right? But imagine though like that is that's an insanely good deal like if you pay me five k for coaching I guarantee that if you do what we say that you will get 10 k back like whoa. Are you kidding me. You have all the incentive to do a great job. They're bought in so they have all the incentive to do a great job I mean talk about a win-win and so that's my core point is the incentives are backwards and people respond to incentives more than anything else and that's why I like the. The ancient ah Roman ah bridge builder having to stand underneath the bridge when the first guys drive over it and they're like ah carriages I think that's that's essentially. 24:16.42 mikebledsoe Seeing him. 24:22.94 Max Shank How everything should be done. Is there needs to be an incentive for the people who are doing the work and the reward needs to also go to those who are incentivized to do so that's the core problem across the board. 24:34.20 mikebledsoe Yeah, on your point 1 more out which is cost and the cost is soared and the quality has diminished over time I think it's at least in the the college university experience. The the government came in and basically subsidized through grants and they ah they stood behind loans. They guaranteed loans so that these banks would start lending money to people that have poor credit scores or have no credit. 25:10.34 Max Shank Their children their children. 25:10.60 mikebledsoe Or just too young to even know what they're getting themselves into yeah and so the education loans are predatory in nature for one they predatory loans I everyone I know that's got over $ $100000 in debt when I talk to them about. Experience of going into the financial aid office. It's always the same They're just always trying to max them out and the people in the financial aid office. They don't know any fucking better either. They're just doing what they're told they're not thinking they didn't they weren't taught to critically think they don't understand what's going on. They think they're doing a good thing. 25:41.83 Max Shank It was just following orders. 25:46.66 mikebledsoe Um, and and the the ah the cost as skyrocketed because these are guaranteed by the government. You can't be Bankrupt. You can't bankrupt your way out of these. So It has incentivized the schools to raise their rates because more people can get loans so simultaneously. Yeah, so the schools have raised their rates without actually making improvements to the education at all I Imagine it's just made the administrative. 26:12.73 Max Shank Guaranteed. 26:22.73 mikebledsoe Portion of the school much fluffier. Um, there's tenured professors that are in ah in a fluffy environment and in some way due to these things. So The football teams are probably getting you know, really great stadiums built who the fuck knows but um. Yeah, the the cost is to me is really disgusting in how much people are spending on education with what they get out of it and that is just long term debt. So it's. Pretty sickening. 27:00.87 Max Shank Predatory is the correct word I think use the word predatory I think that's exactly what it is I think the guy Mike Roe who hosted dirty jobs and now has a foundation called micro works. Really has done a good job in illuminating the destructive cultural expectation that says oh going to university means you're good and if you're a welder and electrician that makes you bad and I'm falling back to the same examples. But. You know plumber there's nothing wrong with being a tradesman shoot I knew a guy who became a truck driver when he was 18 by the time he was 27 he owned like 3 or 5 semi trucks and he was basically retired you know so this whole idea that you need to be part of the intelligentsia is. Such a fallacy and it's very destructive because of course children they just want to be loved they want they want to get positive attention. So um, kids will do whatever gets them positive attention I mean the more interviews you listen to the the great people. In their fields. It's usually that they got positive attention for whatever it is they were doing. 28:19.63 mikebledsoe Yeah, and another part of um, you know the the grants and the guaranting of the loans has basically made it possible for people who would not normally go to college to go to college and. With that has been the lowering of standards for accepting people to schools and so college education hasn't become special and it used to be special and now because everybody's going and the standards are lower. It's just kind of. It lowers the overall experience of what colleges it no longer stands out like the batch but the Bachelorsard's degree is what the high school diploma used to be.. It's It's not. It's not anything that's gonna make you stand apart and so we end up with just people that are in school into their mid 20 s or. Early 30 s just putting off actually getting their life started. 29:19.15 Max Shank And with the exception of a few careers. It's totally worthless. It's for most careers, you'd be better off working and earning money when you're like 1412 1416 you know you can you can become an apprentice. For something when you're in your teens and by the time you're 18 have lots of money saved up and have a valuable skill and if you have a good mentor a valuable skill that you know how to sell and there's no better security than that. Ah, valuable skill that you know how to sell. 29:59.30 mikebledsoe Yeah,, let's let's get into that So What are the now. What I want to do is I Want to talk about the important things that are that we should be learning So What should exist and. Education and then after we talk about the different things that are important. We can roll into how we would design an education system that included these things and excluded all the bullshit. So. What do you got Max. What are the important things for us to learn. 30:30.96 Max Shank First off I just want to reiterate why? what? What were you trying to learn. Why is it important we have self reliance and contribution. We have value and values and we have physical and mental health. I think that pretty much covers what you would hope to learn right? Is there anything else. You can think of I think that's basically it. 30:56.42 mikebledsoe Um I like that as ah as a context I started thinking about the things that like specifically when I think about what's commonly thought of being created in school is reading writing arithmetic. Ah. 31:10.90 Max Shank O. 31:14.38 mikebledsoe If you can if you can read and write you can you're going to be able to and if you can comprehend what you read at a high level you become more literate so that the more you can comprehend the better. You can comprehend the more literate you become which allows you to grasp information at much faster speed. But also be able to produce it and share it. So um, the reading and writing are super important there if you can I Really think I mean this this trumps math if you can read, you can learn anything. You can go anywhere if you can read really? well. Um, that's. 31:46.49 Max Shank Agreed agreed. 31:52.67 mikebledsoe To me is the primary thing I'm a little biased I'm sure because like I I have ah a super high reading comprehension but I look at my life and I see how beneficial that has been It's probably because I was homeschooled. And basically around seventh or eighth grade I was learning everything on my own so it was was kind of like forced into reading comprehension. Um. 32:15.72 Max Shank Whole words usually make or break your life your ability to communicate with other people and cooperate with other people is totally dependent on your ability to express and interpret both. Ah. 32:20.81 mikebledsoe You know. 32:35.49 Max Shank Actual language and body language. So it it is the ultimate skill and we are the ultimate social emotional creature. So there's no question that word is important I have it split up into word number and movement basically and. 32:49.63 mikebledsoe E. 32:54.10 Max Shank That will give you the mental and physical health that will also allow you to understand the concept of value and if you understand the concept of value. You know that value is relative to the individual like you know, bottled water at Coachella. Is very valuable but bottled water on you know, an iceberg is is next to a ah pure stream is not that valuable at all. In fact, it might even be detrimental. You'd pay nothing for it. So that's really the the crux of it. So. With number I have it split up into economics engineering and music is how I would teach numbers econ so you can learn about risk reward cost and benefit. There's some accounting in there of course and then engineering. Would be where like physics and geometry and structures would come into play. So I think that covers most of the practical uses for numbers and I'm sure that our listeners would have other ideas of how that work I think music is. Ah, really good thing to ah teach people because it's actually pretty easy and the amount of effort required versus the benefit you get both ah psychologically and physically is very high so that would be number and then for words. You would want logic and rhetoric history to know what worked and what should be done differently Ww and Dd and then ah learning about programming. Learning about how humans are programmed learning how to program yourself using language learning about the power of stories and storytelling and maybe most importantly, learning how to craft an offer and sell that offer. And I think that really covers a lot of the word skills that a person might need. And lastly we have under movement I have meditation under movement because it's sort of the um I think stillness is actually a pretty useful. Exercise and then we have wrestling striking gymnastics and Ballgames and I think that would cover like 95% 35:41.39 Max Shank Of what you need in order to be able to deliver value which allows you to be self-reliant and contribute and it would also enhance your mental and physical health and still leave lots of time left over for. Recreation and leisure and rest and play which I think are also non-negotiables. 36:06.61 mikebledsoe Yeah, one thing I would add to that be law I think there's yeah, no manmade laws. The um, those. 36:13.36 Max Shank Law like physical laws or so so crime crime and punishment. 36:25.30 mikebledsoe Yeah, really I mean people people be don't understand how law works They don't understand I mean going back to because that falls under the the word category for you because law is just an opinion. 36:38.94 Max Shank Yeah. 36:44.32 mikebledsoe By a certain group of people that they then Hire Policy. You know they create a policy Hire Policy enforcers to make sure that everybody complies. Um. And most people are very confused about the law so it leaves it leaves law in the hands of very few people people people get involved politically in ways that they don't understand. 37:11.36 Max Shank O. 37:18.77 mikebledsoe Don't understand the implications of what's going On. Ah and they don't know how to make a change. They don't know how to how to change the law or take advantage of the law or to interpret the law and I think this is something I started learning some of that when I was in high school. I was I was blessed enough to have been exposed to constitutional law and take that high school and I was homeschooled so I got to study a bunch of shit that other people never I talked to anyone who went to public school. No one talked about constitutional law. Even though that's the entire basis of our culture So culture is made up of language in the most concrete version of culture is the laws that are written down and people are going around enforcing those laws I mean it doesn't get more concrete than that outside of. 38:12.54 Max Shank Or else That's a strong incentive. 38:15.79 mikebledsoe Yeah, or else. So I think that I think that law is is really powerful to to learn and another thing is most of the things that people avoid in this world that keeps them from being wealthy I had this conversation with one of my friends this weekend. Is people are scared to learn anything administrative in nature people due to avoiding administrative load ah remain poor They they don't engage with what's happening financially with and with their taxes. They don't know how to. 38:49.31 Max Shank So. 38:52.36 mikebledsoe They're afraid of it and they just you know whatever the accountant says I don't really know how to how to engage in that administratively and a lot of people confuse law with Administrative. There's a lot of administrative stuff going on if you just do these things that you're not going to be subject to certain laws because you went through these. Certain administrative Processes. So this happens with real estate this happens with what what we're seeing in the the crypto markets right now there's a lot of there's a lot of really complex and sophisticated administrative things that are built in a society right now that. 39:11.40 Max Shank Ah. 39:28.85 mikebledsoe The only people who really get the benefit of it are the people who are willing to engage in that administrative load and are willing to learn the complexity of it and so I see the administration falls under government and governance and law. Whether it's coming from a government or the governance is coming from a smaller institution. These things are all important to know about if you want to participate in society and make a difference in it. 39:50.27 Max Shank The. 39:58.98 Max Shank It's like how you want to? It's like how to manage your life. Basically right? because you know don't hate the player hate the game better yet. Just ah, don't hate anything just ah play the cards you're dealt. But you're right I mean law is so deliberately complex to obscure the truth accounting rules are so deliberately complex to obscure the truth tax rules, etc. But you can complain about how it's unfair. Which it is or you can learn the language of those pursuits and I think the fact that we don't teach kids about accounting and taxes and law in high school is a frigging crime. 40:50.69 mikebledsoe Yeah, well be too many people learn it. They might get they they might start thinking for themselves. That's a problem so we won't go. 40:59.71 Max Shank Well, they might realize how bad everyone's being screwed I mean that's why we also that's why we also don't get ah a transparent pie chart with a list of how tax dollars are being spent because we would all go like are you fricking kidding me. Like you couldn't you couldn't imagine a more egregious misappropriation of funds. But once again that is taboo because people are under the fantasy. That it's being spent well if their tax dollars are going to a good cause and so in order to come to the realization that they're being catastrophically mismanaged wasted or maybe even ah used for ah sinister acts. 41:51.57 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 41:53.53 Max Shank Right is horrifying. 42:00.63 mikebledsoe So horrifying. Alright, so we know we know what we want to learn so I don't have children yet. But I'm planning on it. Um I was homeschooled I feel very blessed for that I think. 1 of the things that people are mostly concerned about and it comes homeschooling is you know the social interaction piece and I said this last week is you know the 3 big things we want to learn that the reason we want to learn things is so we can benefit our health our wealth and our relationships. And ah, you know a lot of times people think about you know, homeschoolers being isolated and and I had plenty of opportunity I my parents hired tutors along with some other parents. So I would go to a latin teacher with 3 other guys once a week we would study latin. Um I had an algebra tutor I had a spanish tutor and I was getting little social engagement in these small groups throughout the week so I wasn't without a social structure. It was just different and I think I actually developed very well because of that because I actually spent more time. Amongst adults that I did with kids who are my own age who probably weren't as mature and had I been in that environment I would have behaved less maturely as well. So I had ah I was able to mature pretty quickly due to that. Um. And I know one thing that's really emerged. That's really exciting is this past couple of years. The kids weren't allowed to go to school and they all had to sit at home and and ah, they're basically being homeschooled. 43:46.12 Max Shank Right. 43:54.49 mikebledsoe By parents who may not even be interested in it or they're having to work a job and can't give them the attention and it just created this this whiplash in a way and you know they they started letting kids go back to school here in Texas and Florida you know the kids. Everything's pretty much back to normal when it comes to going to school sometimes I have mass sometimes they don't depends on the school here in in Texas and ah, but my friends in California who have children what they've done because California laws are so insane. Ah. Is ah a lot of these teachers have left these these really great teachers have left these amazing schools because they're tired of all the mandates as well and these parents have gotten together and they go oh there's 6 families. Getting together. We're all going to contribute $20000 to this teacher for the year the teacher gets paid more the kids get more attention that the ratio of parent a teacher is just right? The parents are in a constant conversation with the teachers. And there's not just one teacher to 1 group of kids. There's multiple teachers that have specialties and different things and so these kids are are and it's and it's very it's become very communal and what we're gonna what we're gonna be witnessing over the years is there's a ah decentralization of. Everything everything's being decentralized and so a lot of people are not going to like that because it's so different than the way it's been but education is becoming decentralized and it's gonna be very community oriented and when things decentralized things tend to become tribal and what I mean by that is. There are small cultures. There's these subcultures that start forming these bubbles I'm part of a subculture where I live we all have you know we we all share the same beliefs and all that kind of stuff and when you know we have kids and bring them up through that culture that's going to be that way. And we need to be good with other people having their own bubbles and their own beliefs and their own cultures. That's perfectly fine. That's what makes this world such a beautiful place. Um, but what I I see in the future is the reason this teacher can get paid much more. You know it could be making 6 figures and. Not working for the school. So the teacher makes more money it costs the parents less money to send their kids to school because're not paying for all this administrative bullshit and the administrative bullshit basically gets in the way of having a direct relationship with the teacher and it gets in the way of community because it's sets a centralized humane and control. 46:35.28 Max Shank Right. 46:42.61 Max Shank And no direct incentive either yet, you need to have um, correlated incentives. Otherwise you're always going to get a worse result. You're always going to get corruption. You're always going to get. Ah. 46:47.34 mikebledsoe And the incentives are yeah are broken. 47:02.44 Max Shank Like lobbying. For example, we're we're going to. We're going to convince the rule breakers to give us better rules I mean that's just that's just crazy. 47:05.19 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 47:13.45 mikebledsoe so so I started throwing out a solution. that's that's 1 big broad solution. We didn't talk about how kids should be school choice. 47:19.84 Max Shank School choice. Yeah school choice is the ultimate solution because if you want to send your kid to public school and you have what you consider a good public school and you're well-informed then hey you know more power to you but you have to have that choice. Which allows for competition so that the let's just say like the destructive schools don't have a monopoly on the hearts and minds of kids. It's ridiculous. 47:49.98 mikebledsoe Um, yeah, how would you handle the 8 hours of sitting in 1 spot as a child. 47:57.10 Max Shank You you don't I mean what could possibly be worse than sitting in a chair that is horizontal with a desk that is horizontal. It's catastrophically bad. You're looking straight down all the time. Or you're looking at the teacher talk. Ah I think for the body. It's awful. You know you could you could do you could do 100% of schooling outside if the weather was good. You could do most schooling outside depending on the weather just with like a. A notebook or a tablet of some kind I mean it doesn't have to be a fancy ipad or anything like that. You know we forget that you pay a premium for a luxury brand like that. But you could go to Walmart today and for like eighty bucks get a tablet that can connect to the internet. And write notes and has a little pen on there. So. 48:55.83 mikebledsoe For all my friends kids were the school gave them Macbooks once covid hit like all the kids got macbooks I know well you're welcome kid. 49:05.43 Max Shank Wow you and I paid for those. Ah, yeah, and obviously someone won big on securing that contract too. So that that's that sort of ah backwards incentive is par for the course and a lot of it has to do with transparency. 49:18.51 mikebledsoe Oh yeah, for sure. 49:29.19 Max Shank I think that's the main attraction of cryptocurrency. For example, especially like blockchain technology is that it's so transparent. Ah there isn't anyway, we don't want to get on that topic too much but when it's transparent and you know where everything's going. It's really difficult for there to be those. Dirty dealings behind the scenes and those backwards incentive structures. So I think that sitting in a desk, especially ah a single desk most of the day is. 1 of the worst things you could do to a kit to their posture to their eyesight to their skin to their body I mean it's horrible. You know if you don't see it as child if you don't see it as child abuse then you like don't understand physiology. 50:12.84 mikebledsoe Well, the other thing is is. 50:21.37 mikebledsoe Yeah, and the other thing that I've done a lot of work in the emotional realm and one of the things that I recognize is the emotional body and the physical body are so intertwined These are not different these are and. 50:21.90 Max Shank At all. 50:41.36 mikebledsoe And if you put kids in an environment where they cannot move and they're experiencing anything emotional that they're not allowed to express because you're not allowed to express yourself emotionally in class you gotta be quiet. You can't you know if you're crying. We're gonna. 50:53.91 Max Shank And right? yeah. 50:59.33 mikebledsoe You You know, get rid of you somehow or get you to settle down if you're if you want to be happy and Laughing. You can't do that either. So Not only is there this retardation of physical movement but ah of being in touch with the emotional body. So What I see. Problem with the desk is it's yeah, it's the the emotional body also gets stunted in this so you get the the physical body and the emotional body are suffering by being in this and while the physical body and the emotional body are being minimized. 51:17.99 Max Shank Eq goes down. 51:35.57 mikebledsoe We are then putting most of our attention on the memorization and regurgitation and so we end up in honoring and really I guess holding on a pedestal. The. The intellectual part of being human as being the most valuable so we've got 20 years of education telling us that what's in our mind is what's truly important and that our body and our emotional body are not as important you won't be valued in Society. If you have that So what we have is a bunch of people who have very poor development physically poor development Emotionally who have an overdeveloped psyche in a lot of ways that is that they identify as who they are and that that. Creates a very controllable population. It's a very,. It's very easy to create sheep in that in that case. 52:41.60 Max Shank All being taught by an obedience teacher who has no skin in the game for how well they do in life. 52:51.11 mikebledsoe Um, yeah. 52:52.80 Max Shank Even even with the best of intentions I've I've met teachers who are amazing I've also met teachers who couldn't be worse and even if you have really good intentions. It doesn't mean that the action is good I Think that's. 52:57.84 mikebledsoe I. 53:11.00 Max Shank Something that I've really come to think about a lot as I study history as I Observe what's going on in our culture Good intentions doesn't doesn't make the action good if your intentions are good. It doesn't mean what you're doing is good. So Even with the best of intentions you can like horribly abuse a lot of people. 53:29.65 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah. 53:35.33 mikebledsoe The the truth is in the results I talk to people about this which is somebody wants to start getting defensive of you know I speak frequently about the the medical system being fucked up and you know what people refer to as the health care system. Being fucked up and they're like well you know and they want to defend it I'm like all we have to do is look at the results I don't want to hear about why you think this is a good idea or not or people want to defend very specific actions when I go look I don't I'm not look. That action. You know was a good theory and it was put in place and all that but it didn't work out the way we wanted to work out. You know the american healthcare system is failing. How do we know? record breaking diabetes cancer mental health the heart disease people. That ah number one killer in the United States right now. Fentanyl overdose. So ah, prescription drugs. 54:37.86 Max Shank Number 1 even above and beyond like heart disease that would surprise me. 54:44.30 mikebledsoe I I Saw a new thing I think it became number one definitely beats Covid but um. 54:50.44 Max Shank Maybe number one? No well, there's ah, there's a lot of iffy numbers around testing and things like that and the amount of deaths and cases there but we don't want to get ourselves censored. 55:01.35 mikebledsoe Everything? Ah yeah, all arms. Ah yeah, if you're getting censored. 55:09.50 Max Shank That's always a good sign by the way if ah if someone's trying to censor certain topics. They're probably doing it with good intentions. 55:16.98 mikebledsoe Ah, yeah, so so we really got to look at the results and so anyone who still is hesitant to agree with us. Ah just look at the results you know or the results of the education system. What kind of what kind of people are going out into the world. Seems pretty chaotic to me at this point. Um, what I mean I too many too many kids to one teacher these classrooms with 30 kids 1 teacher. What? What's the number you'd like to see. 55:46.28 Max Shank I well here's the thing I think if the structure were different that would be fine that'd be fine if if kids worked with each other in groups and they were learning things that were useful. Things that were important and interesting to them. Um, then you wouldn't need to have that teacher giving one thirtieth of her attention to everyone all the time it could be done in more of like a ah circuit style. 56:20.70 mikebledsoe Um. 56:22.54 Max Shank So I think the number of students to the teacher is relevant but it can work a lot of different ways. Ah no question, no question if you have ah a 1 on 1 relationship you're you're gonna get more. 56:29.36 mikebledsoe You. 56:41.19 Max Shank Information transmitted there you're going to get more direct and immediate feedback which can be very beneficial. Um, ah so I think 1 to 30 is not necessarily a problem but it is a problem especially with the structure that we have it in. You know everybody in an individual desk. We got 95% fluff. The rest of it is not really um, taught in a way that is principles based It's more rote memorization based so um, yeah, part of the reason that's no good is. Because of the structure we have in place ah school school choice though is the solution and unfortunately the worse we like dumb down the. 57:20.81 mikebledsoe Got it? yeah. 57:38.17 Max Shank School system the more ah like pork belt barreling the more like fluff we throw in there due to lobbying and teachers unions and stuff like that and the less incentive at play you just create are ah wider wider and wider chasm between the haves and the have-nots because if then. You know going to public school is actually worse and worse and worse for a child that makes the gap between that and a private school or a free choice school bigger and bigger. 58:09.43 mikebledsoe yeah yeah I think about how I teach and we break you know Um I'm teaching adults so they learn the information on their own. They they try to apply it. Um, but then they also meet with a pod I put people in groups of a pod of 6 and that pod of 6 is led by 1 of my coaches and you know they're usually got more than no more than 25 or 30 people they're managing at a time but only 6 at a time. 58:32.57 Max Shank This. 58:48.20 mikebledsoe Is what they're managing and so I really like that that group of 6 I I grew up learning in in groups of 6 or or less I see a lot of value in that I do like what you were saying you know one teacher could be handling 30 kids if there was a certain rotation going on. But I think most teachers are managing like 150 kids and 30 at a time. So I think that and and the other thing we have to also think about is you know the age if you're if you're 3 4 5 6 7 eight years old you probably need that constant supervision. There needs to be a teacher all the time present or most of the time present you know I think it's really silly for thirteen fourteen Fifteen year olds to be under constant supervision of a teacher for 8 hours a day. It's I'm a big believer in. 59:31.71 Max Shank A. 59:45.69 Max Shank But. 59:46.61 mikebledsoe Like let's sit down for 60 to 90 minutes to focus on a topic as a group and then go go fuck off for an hour. You know, go go ah go to recess. Go move your body go play. Do something you enjoy. If you want to study more if you want to learn more about it and continue to have the conversation. Great. But I'd like to see an environment where like as kids get older that they get more autonomy over their time and how they spend it and. Giving them the space to research and learn about things that they're curious about instead of having this need to cram all this useless information in your head so that you know the teacher can meet their quota the way to pause it real quick. 01:00:31.50 Max Shank Um, yeah, sure. Yeah, so what we need is interest and incentive. Basically. 01:00:40.12 mikebledsoe Hear the door knocking go. 01:00:49.19 Max Shank Like if if you're interested in something and you're incentivized. You'll do it. That's that's what I've noticed with coaching adults as well is if you're interested and incentivized. There's no limit to the energy and enthusiasm that you'll have and if you. Reinforce that sense of ah contribution that good feeling you get when you share with others. It allows you to have this abundance of psychic energy which I think you and I agree you and I would agree is 1 of the main roadblocks. For adults in success in their business. It's not because they don't know how to do arithmetic. It's because there are personal blocks. Ah psychologically and emotionally right. 01:01:42.64 mikebledsoe Yeah, absolutely absolutely. Um, how how do you approach teaching children to we. We talked a lot about memorizing and regurgitating as as not learning, but just as it is what it is. 01:01:54.65 Max Shank Right. 01:02:00.54 Max Shank Right. 01:02:02.19 mikebledsoe How do we teach like what would be your idea of how to teach kids. How to think for themselves. 01:02:07.31 Max Shank So I have ah I have a very controversial method. What I do is I have a pocket full of marshmallows and then I carry a long stick and if they do something I like then they get a marshmallow and if they do something I don't like then I hit them with the stick and I'll. I'll trick them. Ah, into just blindly believing what I say and if they do blindly believe what I say then I hit him with the stick and if they ask for context then they get a marshmallow I'm a little bit old school. Ah no I mean I. 01:02:45.13 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, yeah. 01:02:49.75 Max Shank I Think ah, encouraging curiosity and question asking is very valuable. Um I think relating everything back to how you're going to be able to liberate yourself and contribute. Is very important there needs to be context with the content. You can't have just content. You want to reinforce how learning to read will allow you to learn anything Else. You have to reinforce how ah economics and accounting are. Going to help you become wealthy so you don't have to worry about living paycheck to Paycheck. So I think having context with content and encouraging curiosity are probably the most important things when it comes to teaching kids. Um. The other thing is trying to have something physical in the world rather than just ah, verbal or visual something that they can hold in their hands I think is really valuable and making it a little bit more kinesthetic. 01:03:58.40 mikebledsoe Yeah, there's ah ah well the the interesting there is um I read I read this book last year called Metaphors that we live by and it Yeah, do you. 01:04:11.60 Max Shank I have that book. Yeah. 01:04:15.61 mikebledsoe And it does a really good job of mapping out how the the mind works in Metaphor. So ah, the when we when we talk about if we talk about inflation the way that it's structured in a sentence. Makes it out to where we're creating inflation as a person you know inflation is bad and it's gonna come get you and all these types of things just as an example and so we tend to take Concepts and we we say the mind is a. Is an engine or a machine.. It's like that's not actually True. You know we we could think about it as a process but most people don't That's too conceptual So Most Concepts are made that we make sense of those concepts by ah, assigning Them. Ah. 01:04:58.40 Max Shank Right. 01:05:13.25 mikebledsoe It's a metaphor to something we can physically see and touch and and feel and all that kind of stuff and so to your point if there is a lack of of 3 D experience if there's a lack of what's going on then. I Think these when you when you're learning Concepts and you don't have the metaphors locked in well enough you you are going to you. You run the risk of just living in the conceptual world which I call the fifth dimension and. 01:05:49.10 Max Shank Yes. 01:05:51.19 mikebledsoe World of concepts the fourth dimension being our 3 dimensions that we exist in in this particular moment and then add time and for the fourth dimension fit dimension being concepts and so what we end up with is a bunch of people who are lost in their heads. 01:06:10.34 Max Shank And. 01:06:10.71 mikebledsoe And just doing you know mental masturbation that never know how to to practically apply these things and I have suffered from that a bit myself. So I I get it. But that's something that I think you're spot on I think the solution to that is a lot of hands On. Learning like I learned geometry and trigonometry in my high school years but the real application which was way simpler than what I was learning in the books by the way was going on the job site with my dad and renovating houses and having to cut pieces of wood that were going to fit. 01:06:45.50 Max Shank Okay. 01:06:49.79 mikebledsoe This angle over here and this angle over there and we were doing the math it Trigg made so much sense to me being on the job site. You get me in a book and all of a sudden. It's stop it. It doesn't it doesn't mean as much but again because I have the I have the carpentry background. 01:07:05.69 Max Shank It's not rich. 01:07:09.11 mikebledsoe I do understand trick really well I was able to get into physics really well because I I so I can take the conception when I and I've had practice making it practical. 01:07:19.84 Max Shank Well and you know you bring up a really good point like pract I'm one of the most practical people I've ever met because I tend to think that if something is superfluous. You can do it for fun but otherwise it should be. Cut out like there's no reason for any of that unless you're specifically like trying to just have fun. So when I have the 3 categories of you know, word move and number there's a lot. You actually still have a lot of time left over so you could have part of schooling be woodworking and plumbing and learning a little bit about electric circuits and having these very practical schools like how about cooking and once again, we don't want to. Rely 100% on the state to teach your kid because they will ah do the worst job possible because there's no incentive for them to do a good job so having practical skills acquired that are not only. Ah. Applied in that moment but also applied for the rest of your life is hugely valuable. So I think um, that idea of no content without context would be. Like 1 of the most important things because you need someone to emotionally and intellectually buy in and apply that knowledge once they've realized that it's valuable. 01:08:59.99 mikebledsoe Yeah, that also solves the problem of the fluff. The the useless information that is made important when you have context I think about history and how much history is taught and it's like. 01:09:10.34 Max Shank A. So much fluff. 01:09:17.62 mikebledsoe This battle happened at this point and whatever and you know on the test you got to make sure that you got the right battle in the right year and all that kind of shit and it just makes no sense and um. 01:09:24.18 Max Shank Right? It's ridiculous. It's ridiculous. It's rote memorization with no idea for like why are we learning this. It's so we don't repeat the mistakes of history and history is all about how human beings clump together and cooperate or. 01:09:35.26 mikebledsoe Right. 01:09:43.56 Max Shank Or don't cooperate how they resolve their differences How you know that that kind of thing I agree. 01:09:47.79 mikebledsoe Yeah, and so we could study the the purpose of studying history. The the grand context there which isn't taught school is yeah, don't repeat the mistakes and what's made us better. How do we do more of that and how does this. Why are we learning what we're learning today. How does that apply to today's environment and where we're going and what what are the pitfalls and and I I would you know when I have kids that conversation is gonna it's gonna be a conversation. You know what do you think about how that applies to what's going on in our world right now. 01:10:10.44 Max Shank Right. 01:10:23.52 Max Shank Hello text. 01:10:24.85 mikebledsoe This and that and and talk it through. 01:10:29.89 mikebledsoe Um, how would you incentivize creativity. What do you? What are you laughing about. 01:10:42.50 Max Shank I'm just thinking about ah the the teachers who hear this who are going to hate my fucking guts and yours too probably, but but they'll hate me more after I say this next thing is it doesn't seem hard. It actually doesn't seem difficult at all. Once you add context to every piece of content and once you cut away all the fluff. There's not that much. You need to know to understand value and values and when I say value and values I Basically just mean understanding that value is relative understanding that you have to deliver value. To be able to exist within this societal framework and values to me essentially means like volunteerism like non-coercion Morality like we talked about before like if you if you don't like someone that's fine but don't punch them in the face. 01:11:28.89 mikebledsoe Oh. 01:11:39.20 Max Shank Ah, however, if they attack you then ah go ahead and make sure you win that battle in some way, don't steal. Don't lie like it's very simple stuff. But. 01:11:46.10 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:11:53.29 Max Shank It's not a lot of stuff. It's more important to reinforce those things with practical application and context. That's what I was laughing about. 01:11:58.12 mikebledsoe Yeah I on that I want to make sure that we have ah some type of solution for each thing we we named as a problem we we're talking about ah the the school system is stifling creativity. So. 01:12:06.54 Max Shank Yeah, can you repeat it I I was off in my own little world. There. Those are the. 01:12:17.28 mikebledsoe What? Ah how would you enhance? what would you do to help enhance creativity in children you were teaching. 01:12:22.66 Max Shank I Suppose asking leading questions to how you could apply something. You know that seems unrelated to something that we're learning right now would be a good way to do it. 01:12:38.70 mikebledsoe Yeah. 01:12:42.10 Max Shank Um, asking what other ways could you try to solve this problem. Um I think music and art would be Useful. Creativity is a tricky thing because. If we try to nail down a definition. What does creativity really mean um, like an unexpected solution like if you say in sport someone came up with a really creative play. It would be something that you haven't really seen before it would be. Something that maybe you've seen elsewhere applied in a new way right? So I I think encouraging knowing what that means and then encouraging that behavior and recognizing that's what innovation is would be useful. 01:13:24.90 mikebledsoe Yeah, one one of the ways I like her. 01:13:35.59 mikebledsoe Yeah, yeah, I like the idea of well you know I train entrepreneurs I train people to be entrepreneurs basically and an entrepreneur is just a problem solver at the end of the day is. 01:13:44.50 Max Shank Right. Yeah. 01:13:53.49 mikebledsoe A problem in the world and you're gonna create a solution. So I really like the idea like creating an environment where creativity is enhanced by putting problems in front of them without the without saying solve it inside of this context but obviously. 01:14:10.74 Max Shank 2 01:14:13.24 mikebledsoe This problem solving this problem it. The problem itself creates its own boundaries and so if I'm solving a very specific problem then I have to take all this creative energy that might be going in random directions and then focus it down into this one solution and I think that. 01:14:25.85 Max Shank The. 01:14:32.62 mikebledsoe Being able to approach different types of problems and then apply all this other knowledge that that exists in other Contexts and then see the the principles overlap and the relationship of those principles into this New. Ah. New context if you can do that then you're you're gonna be really well Off. So It's I think putting a I think putting problems in front of kids and letting them work it out in their own way and just see what happens also allowing them to be. 01:14:57.69 Max Shank Ah. 01:15:08.12 Max Shank That's that's a great point. 01:15:10.69 mikebledsoe Kids just allowing kids to be curious and study what they want I mean ah the way I've thought about approaching is like you know what? I'm gonna make sure that my kids do math for like twenty thirty minutes a day I'm gonna make sure they read and write for twenty thirty minutes a day. It's like reading writing arithmetic. 01:15:12.84

Highest Self Podcast
413: How this mom launched a podcast and wrote a book through joining Rose Gold Goddesses with Tara Webb

Highest Self Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 35:32


Feel like you're too busy to write a book, launch a podcast and connect with aligned community? This week, I sit down with Tara who joined Rose Gold Goddesses two years ago.. and since then met her business partner, wrote a book and became our community manager! Did I mention she has FOUR young children and her husband was deployed while doing this?! Tara is a beautiful example of what is possible when you open yourself up for the possibilities and support available for you in RGG, my divine feminine mystery school (which doors are open to this week only!) Doors open this week only. Check out our curriculum and join now rosegoldgoddesses.com Intro + Outro Music: Silent Ganges by Maneesh de Moor Connect with me for daily Ayurvedic and modern spiritual wisdom at: Instagram.com/iamsahararose Facebook.com/iamsahararose Twitter.com/iamsahararose Order My Books: www.iamsahararose.com/books By accessing this Podcast, I acknowledge that the entire contents are the property of Sahara Rose, or used by Sahara Rose with permission, and are protected under U.S. and international copyright and trademark laws. Except as otherwise provided herein, users of this Podcast may save and use information contained in the Podcast only for personal or other non-commercial, educational purposes. No other use, including, without limitation, reproduction, retransmission or editing, of this Podcast may be made without the prior written permission of the Sahara Rose, which may be requested by contacting pr@iamsahararose.com. This podcast is for educational purposes only. The host claims no responsibility to any person or entity for any liability, loss, or damage caused or alleged to be caused directly or indirectly as a result of the use, application, or interpretation of the information presented herein.

I Almost Died With BENOFTHEWEEK
I Wrote an Entire Book - Read-through Part 2

I Almost Died With BENOFTHEWEEK

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 71:48


In the thrilling conclusion of Ben's book, Ben writes about a fictional YouTube employee with the same 14-year-old bitterness from the first half, as well as a bonus mildly more uplifting bonus chapter at the end. Plus, yes, Ben is STILL snowed in! Read along with the FREE book here: https://www.wattpad.com/story/297026441-yet-another-vlogger%27s-book Tweet your crazy near-death experiences to @benoftheweek using #IAlmostDiedPodcast! Watch the podcast on YouTube: https://bit.ly/IAlmostDiedYT Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: http://bit.ly/IAlmostDiedPodcast If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be helpful! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: http://bit.ly/IAlmostDiedPodcast Follow Ben on YouTube Follow Ben on Instagram  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Rebellion
Ep388 Our Supreme Court Has Become The "People Of The Lie" That M. Scott Peck Wrote About

The Rebellion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 27:48


Today's episode looks at statements made by several of the Supreme Court Justices last week as just another example of what M. Scott Peck coined as “the people of the lie”and even the Prophet Isaiah warned about this very thing. Ready to join The Rebellion? Become a patreon member and enjoy some great extras while supporting our efforts to speak the Truth into our culture. Learn more at patreon.com/dreverettpiper. Find more resources and info at dreverettpiper.com

Respark Your Life
Ep.141: How I Wrote My First Book

Respark Your Life

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 6:19


This is the unusual story of how 21 year old Raymond became a published author. It's a story of how courage leads to opportunity. With courage, determination and an open mind, you will see opportunities that others don't see, and people will give you opportunities they wouldn't give to just anyone else.   In this episode: How to think outside the box. Inspiration to believe in yourself. How determination and sacrifice leads to results.   Raymond Aaron has shared his vision and wisdom on radio and television programs for over 40 years. He is the author of over 100 books, including Branding Small Business For Dummies, Double Your Income Doing What You Love, Canadian best-seller Chicken Soup for the Canadian Soul, and he co-authored the New York Times best-seller Chicken Soup for the Parent's Soul.  www.Aaron.com

Swiftish: A Taylor Swift Podcast
"Oh My God, She's Insane, She Wrote a Song About Me" (I Bet You Think About Me)

Swiftish: A Taylor Swift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 66:12


Shelby and Ashley start the year off right with a deep dive into this searing, snarky takedown of a man who some think has already been through enough. Thye talk about Taylor's Version (From the Vault) and all the mv easter eggs that didn't end up being clues before walking through the lyrics of this twangy bonus track.

The Goal Digger Podcast
528: SURPRISE! I Wrote a Book!

The Goal Digger Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 37:05


The truth is, I've had this folder in my Gmail titled: “If I Write a Book” for the last five years. Becoming an author would naturally come up in conversations here and there, and while the idea was certainly flattering, it never truly inspired me into action. It was always one of those “Maybe someday” ideas where I wasn't totally convinced that someday would actually arrive. But then, a massage and a mouse changed everything. This is my big official announcement: I WROTE A BOOK. Hard to believe I'm saying those words after so many years of resisting the idea. This episode is the behind the scenes of my book writing journey, the moment that changed my thinking, and what you can expect from the first ever JK book.  GOAL DIGGER FB COMMUNITY: https://www.facebook.com/groups/goaldiggerpodcast/ GOAL DIGGER INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/goaldiggerpodcast/ GOAL DIGGER SHOWNOTES: jennakutcherblog.com/book

I Almost Died With BENOFTHEWEEK
I Wrote an Entire Book - Read-through Part 1

I Almost Died With BENOFTHEWEEK

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 54:15


You read that correctly, Ben wrote a book when he was 14 years old. If you want to hear the dark mindset of a teenage benoftheweek, you'll want to listen as Ben reads through the first half of his self-published satirical self-help book. This is a hybrid audiobook and commentary episode, where Ben talks about his online life before turning 15, much of which he doesn't remember writing. Stay tuned next week for the second half of the book! Download the book for free here: https://www.wattpad.com/story/297026441-yet-another-vlogger%27s-book Go right now - Truebill.com/ALMOSTDIED - it could save you THOUSANDS a year! Tweet your crazy near-death experiences to @benoftheweek using #IAlmostDiedPodcast! Watch the podcast on YouTube: https://bit.ly/IAlmostDiedYT Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast for free wherever you're listening or by using this link: http://bit.ly/IAlmostDiedPodcast If you like the show, telling a friend about it would be helpful! You can text, email, Tweet, or send this link to a friend: http://bit.ly/IAlmostDiedPodcast Follow Ben on YouTube Follow Ben on Instagram  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Kevin McCullough Radio
20220104 - KMC's Final Thought - The Guardian Person Of The Year Wrote A Book

Kevin McCullough Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 3:49


20220104 - KMC's Final Thought - The Guardian Person Of The Year Wrote A Book by Kevin McCullough Radio

Nitwits Anonymous
We Basically Wrote the Bible (Like, the Christian One) — Nitwits Anonymous #31

Nitwits Anonymous

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 47:48


ATTENTION NITWITS: In this episode, you'll learn that both Tim and Leah are featured in the Holy Bible.  You'll also learn some tips for committing crimes, the dangers of a biased media, and how important it is to be physically attractive. Tune in for some game-changing advice, and once your life has been successfully changed, consider living a rave review on Spotify or Apple Podcasts.

All Current Classes From Dean Bible Ministries
07 - Who Wrote the Pentateuch?-Has God Spoken? (2021)

All Current Classes From Dean Bible Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 76:19


Why is it important to believe that Moses wrote the first five books of the Bible? Listen to this message to learn a number of reasons why believing in Moses' authorship is necessary for an understanding of God's revelation to mankind in the Bible. Find out what the false assumptions are that liberal scholars start with that make them skeptical and hear seven facts that support Moses' authorship, many of which have been validated by archeological findings.

The Aubrey Masango Show
Continuing with the importance of indigenous languages in South African University with the First ever PhD in IsiXhosa Dr Kunju who wrote his 4 year-long thesis in isiXhosa.

The Aubrey Masango Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 24:57


Guest: Dr Hleze Kunju | Head of Creative Writing at Rhodes University See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Ken's Think Tank
the Ghost of Molly Pickett Wrote this Book

Ken's Think Tank

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 1:14


https://kensthinktank.com/the-ghost-of-molly-pickett-wrote-this-book-s04e04/Michael Kent on Ken's Think Tank Season 4, Episode 4“This girl from the mid-1800s spoke to me.”“She told me her name in a dream.  Her name was Molly Pickett.  She spoke to me in the same voice that I write “The Haunting of Molly Pickett” in.”“I wrote a book, and it started with this girl's story.  She told me her name at night.  The next day, I was looking up at the hills in San Bernardino – the San Bernardino Mountains – and she told me her story.  She was left by her parents, turned to prostitution, and she ended up selling her soul to something in a haunted gold mine.  Something.  She ended up having an offspring.  You gotta read the rest of the book to find out what happened to her and the offspring.”“Molly Pickett wrote the prologue.  I just listened and scribbled it down and typed it up.”​Support the show (http://kensthinktank.com/)

Economist Radio
All she wrote: our obituaries editor reflects on 2021

Economist Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 25:00


From Prince Philip to Desmond Tutu, from an anti-racism campaigner and member of the Auschwitz Girls' Orchestra to a war surgeon focused on civilians to an impoverished Ethiopian whose school for the poor educated 120,000 students: our obituaries editor reflects on the famed and the lesser-known figures who died in 2021. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Intelligence
All she wrote: our obituaries editor reflects on 2021

The Intelligence

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 25:00


From Prince Philip to Desmond Tutu, from an anti-racism campaigner and member of the Auschwitz Girls' Orchestra to a war surgeon focused on civilians to an impoverished Ethiopian whose school for the poor educated 120,000 students: our obituaries editor reflects on the famed and the lesser-known figures who died in 2021. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sacrilegious Discourse - Bible Study for Atheists
Who Wrote the Pentateuch? (Bonus)

Sacrilegious Discourse - Bible Study for Atheists

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 30:44


Husband and Wife answer questions about the author of the first five books of the Bible. We discuss the likelihood that Aaron was merely an imaginary friend, and then Husband urges everyone to harass Wife on Twitter. Thank you for stopping by Sacrilegious Discourse - Bible Study for Atheists! Check out these links for more information about our podcast and merchandise: Our Homepage: https://sacrilegiousdiscourse.com/ Help support our podcast by purchasing some of our atheist and science themed merchandise here: https://sacrilegious-discourse.myshopify.com/ Links to find Sacrilegious Discourse - Bible Study for Atheists wherever you listen to podcasts: https://sacrilegiousdiscourse.com/subscribe-today/ Subscribe to receive updates on our episodes and great deals on our atheist merchandise via email: https://sacrilegiousdiscourse.com/subscribe-to-receive-email-updates/ Help support us by subscribing on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/sacrilegiousdiscourse Check to see if we're currently running a giveaway here and stop by to win some awesome atheist gear: https://sacrilegiousdiscourse.com/giveaway/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/sacrilegious-discourse/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/sacrilegious-discourse/support

Always Evolving with Coach Mike Bayer
Why I wrote One Decision and how you can use it to change your life

Always Evolving with Coach Mike Bayer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 36:37


In this episode of Always Evolving, I'm celebrating the release of the paperback version of my best-selling book One Decision. Did you know that we make approximately 35,000 decisions each and every day? What is your decision-making strategy? How do you get unstuck when you don't know the “right” decision? In this episode, I'll share with you my three most authentic decisions, and exactly how they set my life on its current path. But how do you know you're being authentic when you're making choices, or when you're making them to please someone else? I'll talk about that, and I will also reveal what inspired me to create the tools within this book and how I believe they can serve you and give you the internal freedom to live your best life.  https://www.facebook.com/coachmikebayer/ https://www.instagram.com/coachmikebayer/ https://twitter.com/coachmikebayer tiktok.com/@coachmikebayer https://www.instagram.com/stage29podcasts https://twitter.com/stage29podcasts https://www.facebook.com/Stage29Podcasts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Into the Woods with Holly Worton
440 Emma Carmichael ~ Road Trip Adventures in the Balkans

Into the Woods with Holly Worton

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 52:18


I'm excited to introduce this week's guest, Emma Carmichael. I first met Emma in the London Indie Authors Meetup Group (https://www.meetup.com/London-Indie-Authors/), where I found out about her adventures, particularly the one we discuss today. In 2009, Emma quit her job and bought a classic Serbian car, which she drove in a huge circle around the Balkans.   This adventure is unlike anything else we've discussed on this show. It's also unlike any trip I've ever been on. I hope Emma's journey inspires you to come up with your own wild adventures.   About Emma Carmichael Born in Edinburgh. Lived in Edinburgh, London, Sydney, Strasbourg, Pristina, Sarajevo and now back in London for now. Traveller, podcaster, writer - not particularly in that order! Worked as a Conservation Building Surveyor for Historic Royal Palaces from 1995-2004 Worked for the Council of Europe, involved with post-conflict conservation and cultural heritage from 2004-2009 Travelled the Balkans in a vintage Zastava 750 from August-October 2009 Wrote the first draft of Driving Tito in 2010 while living in Strasbourg, France Moved to Sarajevo in Bosnia & Herzegovina worked on a cultural heritage programme for the town of Vares. 2011-2012 Returned to the UK in 2012 and opened my bookshop Travelling Through in 2014-2019. Published Driving Tito in June 2019 Began podcasting in 2020 to present day Travelled solo, in groups, with my partner, with my sister, my family, my brother and/or with a friend. Each experience is different. Each notable in its own way. Each can be enjoyable or a nightmare - it's a mindset thing. It's about compromise even when travelling alone!   WALKED: a section of the St Jacques de Compostella from Le Puy en Velay to Conques; the Mozarabe Camino, Portuguese Camino, the Coast to Coast (UK), Hadrian's Wall Walk TRAVELLED to: Round the world ticket when 22yrs old for 20 months. Partly with a friend / and solo. Separate trips to: Russia/Mongolia - Vietnam - Argentina/Chile - Brazil - Colombia - many parts of Europe. RUNNING: love 5km runs; ran half-marathon in Stockholm, Sweden (never again!) CYCLING: still have my bicyle from when I was 14yrs old - who needs more than five gears? Cycled many of the Scottish isles. Cycling cities of Strasbourg and Amsterdam.   Travelling Through is a concept, whether it be a place, a community, or life. It's how we respond instinctively to this constant state of movement that's important to our well-being.   Website Podcast Instagram Facebook Twitter   Listen To This Episode        What You'll Learn What inspired Emma to quit her job and drive around the Balkans in a Serbian Zastava 750 car What it was like to drive a classic car around the Balkans How Emma traveled around tiny villages without speaking the local languages How Emma remembered all the details from the adventure so she could write her book Emma's top tips for a Balkan adventure   Things We Discussed Zastava 750 car  Vellum for publishing    Related Episodes 438 Jenny Mowbray ~ Solo Travel + Adventure When You're in a Relationship 433 Robert Twigger ~ How Adventure Satisfies Our Need for Childlike Play (now with downloadable transcript!) 383 Anne Malambo ~ How Solo Travel Can Change Our Lives (now with downloadable transcript!) 374 Holly Worton ~ How Outdoors Adventures + Travel Help With Digital Detox (now with downloadable transcript!) 367 Holly Worton ~ Finding Yourself Through Solo Travel and Outdoor Adventures (now with downloadable transcript!)   Connect With Holly Website Facebook Instagram Twitter Pinterest Google+ LinkedIn   How to Subscribe Click here to subscribe via iTunes Click here to subscribe via RSS Click here to subscribe via Stitcher   Help Spread the Word If you enjoyed this episode, please head on over to iTunes and kindly leave us a rating and a review! You can also subscribe, so you'll never miss an episode.

#impact Podcast
End of Year Special | #impact host Regina Larko shares her end of year thoughts (and a song that she wrote and sang)

#impact Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 25:45


This episode is unlike anything we have done here on the channel, and we have done a lot. Produced in Hong Kong. Recorded across the globe. We recorded on rooftops, in elevators, in front of sold out theatres and in teeny tiny boiling hot meeting rooms, We recorded across timezones with our talented co hosts... The post #impact host Regina Larko shares her end of year thoughts. (And a song, that she wrote and sang). appeared first on .

TIME's The Brief
Joan Didion Wrote About Grief Like No One Else Could... and More Stories

TIME's The Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 30:24


Included in this episode: 1. Joan Didion Wrote About Grief Like No One Else Could 2. Kim Potter Found Guilty of Manslaughter in Shooting Death of Daunte Wright 3. What Low-Wage Workers Understand About the True Meaning of Christmas 4. The Grim History of Christmas for Enslaved People in the Deep South 5. LAPD Officers Accidentally Kill 14-Year-Old Girl While Shooting at Suspect .

Markets Daily Crypto Roundup
Most Influential 2021: The Developers Who Wrote Bitcoin's Taproot Upgrade

Markets Daily Crypto Roundup

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 12:14


On today's show, CoinDesk's Managing Editor of Technology, Christie Harkin, sheds light on the developers who wrote one of Crypto's biggest upgrades of the year for CoinDesk's Most Influential 2021. Read the story here.This episode is sponsored by Kava, Nexo.io and Market Intel by Chainalysis.This episode was edited & produced by Adrian Blust with additional production support by Jonas Huck. -Kava lets you mint stablecoins, lend, borrow, earn and swap safely across the world's biggest crypto assets. Connect to the world's largest cryptocurrencies, ecosystems and financial applications on DeFi's most trusted, scalable and secure earning platform with kava.io.-Nexo is a powerful, all-in-one crypto platform where you can securely store your assets. Invest, borrow, exchange and earn up to 12% APR on Bitcoin and 20+ other top coins. Insured for $375M and audited in real-time by Armanino, Nexo is rated excellent on Trustpilot. Get started today at nexo.io.-Market Intel by Chainalysis—the Blockchain Data Platform—arms your team with the most complete on-chain dataset to make informed crypto investments, deliver original research, and identify and confidently fund emerging players in the market. See Chainalysis Market Intel in action now.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

19 Nocturne Boulevard
19 Nocturne Boulevard - A TRILOGY FOR XMAS - Reissue

19 Nocturne Boulevard

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 46:22


Nothing is ever normal at 19 Nocturne Boulevard.  So when Olivia, our sultry announcer, decides to read the listeners a few of her favorite Xmas tales, things get a bit out of hand. Adapted by Julie Hoverson from stories by Arnold Bennett, Rudyard Kipling, and Joseph Conrad, appearing in A Christmas Garland edited by Max Beerbohm, published in 1912 Cast List Olivia - Julie Hoverson Emily Wrackgarth - Beverly Poole Jos Wrackgarth - Russell Gold Albert Grapp - Gareth Bowley Kipling/narrator - Rick Lewis Judlip - Cole Hornaday Mr. Williams - Michael Coleman [from Tales of the Extradordinary] Mahamo - Pat McNally Music:  Kevin MacLeod (Incompetech.com) Editing and Sound:   Julie Hoverson Cover Photo:  Sanja Gjenero (courtesy of Stock Xchange.com)   "Puh-leeze!  Do I sound like the type to offend with yet another rendition of A Christmas Carol?"   **************************************************** A TRILOGY FOR CHRISTMAS Cast: Olivia SCRUTS Emily Wrackgarth Jos Wrackgarth Albert Grapp   PC X36 Kipling Judlip Father Christmas   THE FEAST Williams Mahamo ANNOUNCER    The stories for tonight's show have been abridged and dramatized by Julie Hoverson     OLIVIA     Did you have any trouble finding it?  Well sit right down.  I want to read you my favorite Christmas stories.  No, don't go!  [disgusted] Oh, puh-lease!  Do I seem the type to offend with yet another rendition of A Christmas Carol, or The night Before Christmas?  Even the Velveteen Rabbit, which is a truly disturbing tale to any small child, is far too common for this house.  MUSIC CREEPS IN OLIVIA    Indulge me, won't you?  I promise I won't disappoint.  I have selected three of my most favorite Christmas tales to share with you, and even if one is a bit romantic and sentimental, well, you have to let me be girly sometimes, right?  So - I'll get sentiment out of the way and move right into the more... meaty stories.  The first story, then, is Scruts by Arnold Bennett MUSIC CHANGES OLIVIA     Emily Wrackgarth stirred the Christmas pudding till her right arm began to ache. But she did not cease for that. SOUND    KITCHEN, STIRRING OLIVIA    She stirred on till her right arm grew so numb that it might have been the right arm of some girl at the other end of Bursley. And yet something deep down in her whispered EMILY    [muttered] It is your right arm! And you can do what you like with it! OLIVIA    She did what she liked with it. Relentlessly she kept it moving till it reasserted itself as the arm of Emily Wrackgarth, prickling and tingling as with red-hot needles in every tendon from wrist to elbow. And still Emily Wrackgarth hardened her heart. EMILY    Mine.  You are mine. OLIVIA    Presently she saw the spoon no longer revolving, but wavering aimlessly in the midst of the basin. EMILY    Ridiculous! This must be seen to! OLIVIA    In the down of dark hairs that connected her eyebrows there was a marked deepening of that vertical cleft which, visible at all times, warned you that here was a young woman not to be trifled with. Her brain despatched to her hand a peremptory message—which miscarried. The spoon wabbled as though held by a baby. EMILY    [exasperated noise] OLIVIA    Emily knew that she herself as a baby had been carried into this very kitchen to stir the Christmas pudding. Year after year, as she grew up, she had been allowed to stir it "for luck." And those, she reflected, were the only cookery lessons she ever got. EMILY    How like Mother! OLIVIA    Mrs. Wrackgarth had died in the past year, of a complication of ailments.  Emily still wore on her left shoulder that small tag of crape which is as far as the Five Towns go in the way of mourning. Her father had died in the year previous to that, of a still more curious and enthralling complication of ailments.  Jos, his son, carried on the Wrackgarth Works, EMILY    [interrupting] and I kept house for Jos. I with my own hand made this pudding. But for me, this pudding would not have been. Fantastic! Utterly incredible! OLIVIA    [slightly miffed] And yet so it was. She was grown-up. She was mistress of the house. She could make or unmake puddings at will. And yet she was Emily Wrackgarth. Which was absurd. EMILY    It is doubtful whether the people of southern England have even yet realised how much introspection there is going on all the time in the Five Towns. OLIVIA    [ahem!]  Emily was now stirring the pudding with her left hand. The ingredients had already been mingled indistinguishably in that rich, undulating mass of tawniness which proclaims perfection. But Emily was determined to give her left hand, not less than her right, what she called EMILY    "a doing." OLIVIA    Emily was like that.  At mid-day, when her brother came home from the Works, she was still at it. EMILY    Brought those scruts with you? JOS    That's a fact. OLIVIA    And he dipped his hand into the sagging pocket of his coat.  It is perhaps necessary to explain what scruts are. In the daily output of every potbank there are a certain proportion of flawed vessels. These are cast aside by the foreman, EMILY    with a lordly gesture, OLIVIA    and in due course are hammered into fragments. These fragments, which are put to various uses, are called scruts; and one of the uses they are put to is a sentimental one. EMILY    The dainty and luxurious Southerner looks to find in his Christmas pudding a wedding-ring, a gold thimble, a threepenny-bit, or the like. To such fal-lals the Five Towns would say fie. OLIVIA     A Christmas pudding in the Five Towns contains nothing but suet, flour, lemon-peel, cinnamon, brandy, almonds, raisins—and two or three scruts. There is a world of poetry, beauty, romance, in scruts—though you have to have been brought up on them to appreciate it. Scruts have passed into the proverbial philosophy of the district. EMILY    "Him's a pudden with more scruts than raisins to 'm" OLIVIA    is a criticism not infrequently heard. It implies respect, even admiration. Of Emily Wrackgarth herself people often said, in reference to her likeness to her father, JOS    "Her's a scrut o' th' owd basin."  [realizing he cut in] Oh, Hmm.  Pardon. OLIVIA    Jos had emptied out from his pocket on to the table a good three dozen of scruts. EMILY     I laid aside my spoon, rubbed the palms of my hands on the bib of my apron, and proceeded to finger these scruts with the air of a connoisseur, rejecting one after another. OLIVIA    The pudding was a small one, designed merely for herself and Jos, with remainder to "the girl"; so that it could hardly accommodate more than two or three scruts. EMILY     I knew well that one scrut is as good as another. Yet I did not want my brother to feel that anything selected by him would necessarily pass muster. OLIVIA     For his benefit she ostentatiously wrinkled her nose. JOS    By the by, you remember Albert Grapp? I've asked him to step over from Hanbridge and help eat our snack on Christmas Day. EMILY    [incensed] You've asked that Mr. Grapp? JOS    No objection, I hope? He's not a bad sort. And he's considered a bit of a ladies' man, you know. EMILY    [incensed noise] SOUND    CLATTER OF SCRUTS INTO BOWL OLIVIA    Emily gathered up all the scruts and let them fall in a rattling shower on the exiguous pudding. Two or three fell wide of the basin. EMILY    [vengefully]  I made sure they all fit, too. JOS    [alarmed] Steady on!  What's that for? EMILY    That's for your guest.  And if you think you're going to palm me off on to him, or on to any other young fellow, you're a fool, Jos Wrackgarth! JOS    I - I would never-- EMILY    Don't think I don't know what you've been after, just of late. Cracking up one young sawny and then another on the chance of me marrying him! I never heard of such goings on. But here I am, and here I'll stay, as sure as my name's Emily Wrackgarth, Jos Wrackgarth! OLIVIA    It is difficult to write calmly about Emily at this point. For her, in another age, ships would have been launched and cities besieged. But brothers are a race apart, and blind. It is a fact that Jos would have been glad to see his sister "settled" JOS    [muttered] —preferably in one of the other four Towns. OLIVIA    [chuckle] She took up the spoon and stirred vigorously. The scruts grated and squeaked together around the basin, while the pudding feebly wormed its way up among them. MUSIC CHANGES ALBERT    [whispered] Is it me?  Oh!  [up]  Albert Grapp, ladies' man though he was, was humble of heart. Nobody knew this but himself. OLIVIA    Not one of his fellow clerks in Clither's Bank knew it. The general theory in Hanbridge was "Him's got a stiff opinion o' hisself." ALBERT    But this arose from what was really a sign of humility in him. He made the most of himself. OLIVIA    He had, for instance, a way of his own in the matter of dressing. He always wore a voluminous frock-coat, with a pair of neatly-striped vicuna trousers-- ALBERT    --which he placed every night under his mattress, thus preserving in perfection the crease down the centre of each. OLIVIA     He had two caps, one of blue serge, the other of shepherd's plaid. These he wore on alternate days. He wore them in a way of his own—well back from his forehead, so as not to hide his hair.  OLIVIA    On wet days he wore a mackintosh. This, as he did not yet possess a great-coat, he wore also, but with less glory, on cold days. ALBERT    He had hoped there might be rain on Christmas morning. But there was no rain. [sigh, resigned] Like my luck. OLIVIA    [whispered, urgent] Stop referring to yourself in the third person, no one else does.  [back up] Since Jos Wrackgarth had introduced Albert to his sister at the Hanbridge Oddfellows' Biennial Hop, ALBERT    when he -I- danced two quadrilles with her, OLIVIA    --he had seen her but once. He had nodded to her, Five Towns fashion, and she had nodded back at him, but with a look that seemed to say-- EMILY    You needn't nod next time you see me. I can get along well enough without your nods. ALBERT    A frightening girl! And yet her brother had since told ...me... she seemed "a bit gone, like" on me!  Impossible! He, Albert Grapp, make an impression on the brilliant Miss Wrackgarth! Yet she had sent him a verbal invite to spend Christmas in her own home. OLIVIA    You're doing it again. ALBERT    [oblivious, enchanted] And the time had come. He was on his way. Incredible that he should arrive! The tram must surely overturn, or be struck by lightning. And yet no! He arrived safely. OLIVIA    [sigh] The small servant who opened the door gave him another verbal message from Miss Wrackgarth. [disapproving] Wipe your feet well on the mat.  [narrating again] In obeying this order he experienced a thrill of satisfaction he could not account for. He must have stood shuffling his boots vigorously for a full minute. ALBERT    This, he told himself, was life. He, Albert Grapp, was alive. And the world was full of other men, all alive; and yet, because they were not doing Miss Wrackgarth's bidding, none of them really lived. OLIVIA    In the parlour he found Jos awaiting him. The table was laid for three. JOS    So you're here, are you? OLIVIA    Said the host, using the Five Towns formula. JOS    Emily's in the kitchen.  Happen she'll be here directly. ALBERT    I hope she's tol-lol-ish? JOS    She is.  But don't you go saying that to her. She doesn't care about society airs and graces. You'll make no headway if you aren't blunt. ALBERT    Oh, right you are. OLIVIA    A moment later Emily joined them, still wearing her kitchen apron. EMILY    So you're here, are you? OLIVIA    She said, but did not shake hands. The servant had followed her in with the tray, and the next few seconds were occupied in the disposal of the beef and trimmings.  The meal began, Emily carving. JOS    [sigh] The main thought of a man less infatuated than Albert Grapp would have been "This girl can't cook. And she'll never learn to." The beef, instead of being red and brown, was pink and white. Uneatable beef! ALBERT    [rapturizing] And yet he relished it more than anything he had ever tasted. This beef was her own handiwork. Thus it was because she had made it so....  [up]  Happen I could do with a bit more, like. OLIVIA    Emily hacked off the bit more and jerked it on to the plate he had held out to her. ALBERT    Thanks! OLIVIA    Only when the second course came on did he suspect that the meal was a calculated protest. This a Christmas pudding? The litter of fractured earthenware was hardly held together by the suet and raisins. ALBERT    All his pride of manhood—and there was plenty of pride mixed up with Albert Grapp's humility—dictated a refusal to touch that pudding. Yet he soon found himself touching it, though gingerly, with spoon and fork. OLIVIA    In the matter of dealing with scruts there are two schools—the old and the new. The old school pushes its head well over its plate and drops the scrut straight from its mouth. The new school emits the scrut into the fingers of its left hand and therewith deposits it on the rim of the plate. ALBERT    Albert noticed that Emily was of the new school. OLIVIA    Oh, I give up. ALBERT    But might she not despise as affectation in him what came natural to herself? On the other hand, if he showed himself as a prop of the old school, might she not set her face the more stringently against him? OLIVIA    The chances were that whichever course he took would be the wrong one. ALBERT    It was then that he had an inspiration—an idea of the sort that comes to a man once in his life and finds him, likely as not, unable to put it into practice. OLIVIA    Albert was not sure he could consummate this idea of his. He had indisputably fine teeth— JOS    "a proper mouthful of grinders" OLIVIA    in local phrase. But would they stand the strain he was going to impose on them? He could but try them. OLIVIA    [con't] Without a sign of nervousness he raised his spoon, with one scrut in it, to his mouth. This scrut he put between two of his left-side molars, bit hard on it, and—eternity of that moment!—felt it and heard it snap in two. SOUND    GRINDING, CRUNCHING ALBERT    He was conscious that at sound of the percussion Emily started forward and stared at him. But he did not look at her. EMILY    [amazed] That was none so dusty. [similar to "not too shabby"] OLIVIA    Calmly, systematically, with gradually diminishing crackles, he reduced that scrut to powder, and washed the powder down with a sip of beer. SOUND    DRINK OLIVIA    While he dealt with the second scrut, he talked to Jos about the Borough Council's proposal to erect an electric power-station on the site of the old gas-works down Hillport way. ALBERT    He was aware of a slight abrasion inside his left cheek. No matter. He must be more careful. OLIVIA    There were six scruts still to be negotiated. ALBERT    He knew that what he was doing was a thing grandiose, unique, epical; a history-making thing; a thing that would outlive marble and the gilded monuments of princes. Yet he kept his head. OLIVIA    He did not hurry, nor did he dawdle. Scrut by scrut, he ground slowly but he ground exceeding small. ALBERT    And while he did so he talked wisely and well. OLIVIA    He passed from the power-station to a first edition he had picked up for sixpence in Liverpool, and thence to the Midland's proposal to drive a tunnel under the Knype Canal so as to link up the main-line with the Critchworth and Suddleford loop-line. JOS    I was too amazed to put in a word, but sat merely gaping—a gape that merged by imperceptible degrees into a grin. Presently I ceased to watch our guest. I sat watching my sister. OLIVIA    Not once did Albert himself glance in her direction. She was just a dim silhouette on the outskirts of his vision. ALBERT    But there she was, unmoving, and he could feel the fixture of her unseen eyes. The time was at hand when he would have to meet those eyes. Would he flinch? Was he master of himself? GRINDING STOPS OLIVIA    The last scrut was powder. No temporising! He jerked his glass to his mouth. ALBERT    A moment later, holding out his plate to her, he looked Emily full in the eyes. They were Emily's eyes, but not hers alone. They were collective eyes—that was it! They were the eyes of stark, staring womanhood. OLIVIA    Her face had been dead white, but now suddenly up from her throat, over her cheeks, through the down between her eyebrows, went a rush of colour, up over her temples, through the very parting of her hair. ALBERT    [casual] Happen, I'll have a bit more, like. OLIVIA    Emily flung her arms forward on the table and buried her face in them. EMILY    [breaking into sobs] OLIVIA    It was a gesture wild and meek. It was the gesture foreseen and yet incredible. It was recondite, inexplicable, and yet obvious. EMILY    [aside, not teary] It was the only thing to be done—and yet, by gum, I had done it. [back to sobbing] OLIVIA    Her brother had risen from his seat and was now at the door. JOS    [pleased with himself] Think I'll step round to the Works, and see if they banked up that furnace aright. OLIVIA    NOTE.—The author has in preparation a series of volumes dealing with the life of Albert and Emily Grapp. MUSIC BACK TO NEUTRAL OLIVIA    Sweet romance, eh?  Well, I've indulged my sentimental side, now how about some gritty policework?  EMILY    Hold up.  You really think I'll get hitched over some fellow who sups pottery? OLIVIA    That's how the story ends.  And he's a good looking chap. EMILY    And your accent is wretched. OLIVIA    Go back to your story. EMILY    Won't. OLIVIA    Your story is over.  Shut up.  EMILY    Can't make me - you're no better'n me - have ten toes and ten fingers just the same. OLIVIA    I'll close the book, and then you'll be gone until someone else reads you - and you're far enough out of print, THAT won't happen any time soon. EMILY    [annoyed, seething]  Right.  I'll sit here, then shall I? OLIVIA    Don't care.  Just keep quiet.  [deep breath] My next tale is PC X-36, by Rudyard Kipling. JUDLIP    Then it's collar 'im tight, In the name o' the Lawd! 'Ustle 'im, shake 'im till 'e's sick! Wot, 'e would, would 'e? Well, Then yer've got ter give 'im 'Ell, An' it's trunch, trunch, truncheon does the trick OLIVIA    From police station ditties. EMILY    Sounds like a donkey. OLIVIA    Shh! KIPLING    I had spent Christmas Eve at the Club, listening to a grand pow-wow between certain of the choicer sons of Adam. OLIVIA    Hold on!  I'm the one reading this story! KIPLING    But I'm the narrator. EMILY    Hear Hear. OLIVIA    I'm the reader.  You need to keep quiet. KIPLING    You might have thought first before taking on a first person narrative, mightn't you? OLIVIA    Well, I'll endeavor to sound like you.  Now!  Wait for your cue.  [clears throat] Then Slushby had cut in. Slushby is one who writes to newspapers and is theirs obediently "HUMANITARIAN." When Slushby cuts in, men remember they have to be up early next morning.  KIPLING    Sharp round a corner on the way home, I collided with something firmer than the regulation pillar-box. OLIVIA    [gritted teeth] I righted myself after the recoil and saw some stars that were very pretty indeed. Then I perceived the nature of the obstruction. KIPLING    "Evening, Judlip," [quickly spitting out his descriptives] I said sweetly, when I had collected my hat from the gutter. "Have I broken the law, Judlip? If so, I'll go quiet." JUDLIP    [Gruff] Time yer was in bed.  Yer Ma'll be lookin' out for yer. KIPLING    This from the friend -- OLIVIA    Ahem!  --of my bosom! It hurt. Many were the night-beats I had been privileged to walk with Judlip, imbibing curious lore that made glad the civilian heart of me. Seven whole 8x5 inch note-books had I pitmanised to the brim with Judlip. EMILY    And now to be repulsed as one of the uninitiated! It hurt horrid.  OLIVIA    Don't you start in again! EMILY    Hah! OLIVIA    Don't!  [back to the story] There is a thing called Dignity. Small boys sometimes stand on it. Then they have to be kicked. Then they get down, weeping. I don't stand on Dignity. KIPLING     "What's wrong, Judlip?" I asked, more sweetly than ever. "Drawn a blank to-night?" JUDLIP     Yuss. Drawn a blank blank blank. 'Avent 'ad so much as a kick at a lorst dorg. Christmas Eve ain't wot it was. KIPLING    I felt for my note-book. JUDLIP    Lawd! I remembers the time when the drunks and disorderlies down this street was as thick as flies on a fly-paper. One just picked 'em orf with one's finger and thumb. A bloomin' buffet, that's wot it wos. KIPLING    "The night's yet young, Judlip," [quickly] I insinuated, with a jerk of my thumb at the flaring windows of the "Rat and Blood Hound." At that moment-- OLIVIA    [Catching up] --the saloon-door swung open, emitting a man and woman who walked with linked arms and exceeding great care. EMILY    [sarcastic]  How sweet. OLIVIA    Judlip eyed them longingly as they tacked up the street. Then he sighed. Now, when Judlip sighs the sound is like unto that which issues from the vent of a Crosby boiler when the cog-gauges are at 260 degrees. KIPLING    "Come, Judlip!" I said. "Possess your soul in patience. You'll soon find someone to make an example of. Meanwhile"—I threw back my head and smacked my lips [he does] —"the usual, Judlip?" OLIVIA    In another minute I emerged through the swing-door, bearing a furtive glass of that same "usual," and nipped down the mews where my friend was wont to await these little tokens of esteem. KIPLING    "To the Majesty of the Law, Judlip!" OLIVIA    When he had honoured the toast, I scooted back with the glass, leaving him wiping the beads off his beard-bristles. He was in his philosophic mood when I rejoined him at the corner. JUDLIP    "Wot am I?  [pronouncing] A bloomin' cypher. Wot's the sarjint? 'E's got the Inspector over 'im. Over above the Inspector there's the Sooprintendent. Over above 'im's the old red-tape-masticatin' Yard. Over above that there's the 'Ome Sec. Wot's 'e? A cypher, like me. Why? KIPLING    Judlip looked up at the stars. JUDLIP    Over above 'im's We Dunno Wot. Somethin' wot issues its horders an' regulations an' divisional injunctions, inscrootable like, but p'remptory; an' we 'as ter see as 'ow they're carried out, not arskin' no questions, but each man goin' about 'is dooty.' KIPLING    "''Is dooty,'" said I, looking up from my note-book. "Yes, I've got that." JUDLIP    Life ain't a bean-feast. It's a 'arsh reality. An' them as makes it a bean-feast 'as got to be 'arshly dealt with accordin'. That's wot the Force is put 'ere for from Above. Not as 'ow we ain't fallible. We makes our mistakes. An' when we makes 'em we sticks to 'em. For the honour o' the Force. Which same is the jool Britannia wears on 'er bosom as a charm against hanarchy. That's wot the brarsted old Beaks don't understand. Yer remember Smithers of our Div? KIPLING    [takes breath, but is interupted] OLIVIA    I remembered Smithers - well. As fine, upstanding, square-toed-- [hand over mouth] EMILY    [Picking up quickly, but struggling slightly] bullet-headed, clean-living - go on! - son of a gun-- KIPLING    Ta! --as ever perjured himself in the box. There was nothing of the softy about Smithers. I took off my billicock to Smithers' memory. JUDLIP    Sacrificed to public opinion? Yuss, KIPLING    Judlip paused at a front door, flashing his light down the slot of a two-grade Yale. JUDLIP    Sacrificed to a parcel of screamin' old women wot ort ter 'ave gorn down on their knees an' thanked Gawd for such a protector. 'E'll be out in another 'alf year. JUDLIP     Wot'll 'e do then, pore devil? Go a bust on 'is conduc' money an' throw in 'is lot with them same hexperts wot 'ad a 'oly terror of 'im. EMILY    Then Judlip swore gently. KIPLING     What should you do, O Great One, if ever it were your duty to apprehend him? JUDLIP    Do? Why, yer blessed innocent, yer don't think I'd shirk a fair clean cop? Same time, I don't say as 'ow I wouldn't 'andle 'im tender like, for sake o' wot 'e wos. Likewise cos 'e'd be a stiff customer to tackle. Likewise 'cos— OLIVIA    [muffled struggle] KIPLING    He had broken off, and was peering fixedly upwards across the moonlit street. JUDLIP    [drawn-out, hoarse whisper] Ullo! SOUND    STRUGGLE OLIVIA    [muffled, then deep breath]  Back off! EMILY    Hmph.  [shrug] I made a good go. OLIVIA    Striking an average between the direction of his eyes—for Judlip, when on the job, has a soul-stirring squint—I perceived someone in the act of emerging from a chimney-pot.  Judlip's voice clove the silence. JUDLIP    Wot are yer doin' hup there? OLIVIA    The person addressed came to the edge of the parapet. KIPLING    I saw then that he had a hoary white beard, a red ulster with the hood up, and what looked like a sack over his shoulder. OLIVIA    He said something or other in a voice like a concertina that has been left out in the rain. EMILY    [muttered] Not so very hard to pass it round, is it? JUDLIP    I dessay.  Just you come down, an' we'll see about that. OLIVIA    The old man nodded and smiled. Then—as I hope to be saved—he came floating gently down through the moonlight, with the sack over his shoulder and a young fir-tree clasped to his chest. He alighted in a friendly manner on the curb beside us. EMILY    Come along - let us have a go! KIPLING    Judlip was the first to recover himself. Out went his right arm-- EMILY    --and the airman was slung round by the scruff of the neck, spilling his sack in the road. KIPLING    I made a bee-line for his shoulder-blades. Burglar or no burglar, he was the best airman out, and I was muchly desirous to know the precise nature of the apparatus under his ulster. OLIVIA    Fine.  Let's just keep it moving - A back-hander from Judlip's left caused me to hop quickly aside. The prisoner was squealing and whimpering. He didn't like the feel of Judlip's knuckles at his cervical vertebræ. JUDLIP    Wot wos yer doin' hup there? EMILY    asked Judlip, tightening the grip. SANTA CLAUS     I'm S-Santa Claus, Sir. P-please, Sir, let me g-go.. KIPLING    "Hold him," I shouted. "He's a German." JUDLIP    It's my dooty ter caution yer that wotever yer say now may be used in hevidence against yer, yer old sinner. Pick up that there sack, an' come along o' me. EMILY    The captive snivelled something about peace on earth, good will toward men. JUDLIP    Yuss.  That's in the Noo Testament, ain't it? The Noo Testament contains some uncommon nice readin' for old gents an' young ladies. But it ain't included in the librery o' the Force. We confine ourselves to the Old Testament — O-T, 'ot. An' 'ot you'll get it. Hup with that sack, an' quick march! OLIVIA    I have seen worse attempts at a neck-wrench, but it was just not slippery enough for Judlip. EMILY    And the kick that Judlip then let fly was a thing of beauty and a joy for ever. KIPLING    "Frog's-march him!" I shrieked, dancing. "For the love of heaven, frog's-march him!" OLIVIA    Trotting by Judlip's side to the Station, I reckoned it out that if Slushby had not been at the Club I should not have been here to see. ALL    Which shows that even Slushbys are put into this world for a purpose. MUSIC CHANGES OLIVIA    Oh, this is just getting silly. EMILY    Only just?  I should have said it's been a laugh for several miles. KIPLING    D'you have some problem with a bit of a laugh? OLIVIA    The third story I want to read is very serious.  If this goes on, I won't be able to do it justice. EMILY    What is it then? OLIVIA    The Feast.  By Joseph Conrad. KIPLING    Conrad?  He wrote a Christmas story? EMILY    Who is this Conrad fellow? KIPLING    Wrote something called heart of Darkness. OLIVIA    Yes, yes, yes!  Look, it's ruined now.  I'm just going to give up and read The Night before Christmas. EMILY    [disgusted noise] KIPLING    That sentimental pap? OLIVIA    [huffy] The mood is gone. EMILY AND KIPLING    [whisper in the background] EMILY    We might-- KIPLING    Let me! EMILY    I don't think so!  [annoyed grunt] Look you! - um - I think we've not been introduced? OLIVIA    [sulky] Olivia. EMILY    Right.  Olivia.  Why not let us help read the story.  We can do that well enough, can't we? KIPLING    Certainly. OLIVIA    And keep the comments to a minimum? KIPLING    Well... EMILY    I'll box his ears for you if he steps across the line. OLIVIA    It's worth a try. MUSIC TURNS TROPICAL OLIVIA    The hut in which slept the white man was on a clearing between the forest and the river. EMILY    Silence, the silence murmurous and unquiet of a tropical night, brooded over the hut that, baked through by the sun, sweated a vapour beneath the cynical light of the stars. KIPLING    Mahamo lay rigid and watchful at the hut's mouth. In his upturned eyes, and along the polished surface of his lean body black and immobile, the stars were reflected, creating an illusion of themselves who are illusions. OLIVIA    The roofs of the congested trees, writhing in some kind of agony private and eternal, made tenebrous and shifty silhouettes against the sky, like shapes cut out of black paper by a maniac who pushes them with his thumb this way and that, irritably, on a concave surface of blue steel. EMILY    Resin oozed unseen from the upper branches to the trunks swathed in creepers that clutched and interlocked with tendrils venomous, frantic and faint. KIPLING     Down below, by force of habit, the lush herbage went through the farce of growth—that farce old and screaming, whose trite end is decomposition.  [aside] Optimist, eh?  Ouch! OLIVIA    Ssh.  Within the hut the form of the white man, corpulent and pale, was covered with a mosquito-net that was itself illusory like everything else, only more so. Flying squadrons of mosquitoes inside its meshes flickered and darted over him, working hard, but keeping silence so as not to excite him from sleep. EMILY    [with distaste] Cohorts of yellow ants disputed him against cohorts of purple ants, the two kinds slaying one another in thousands. KIPLING    [avid] The battle was undecided when suddenly, with no such warning as it gives in some parts of the world, the sun blazed up over the horizon, turning night into day, and the insects vanished back into their camps. OLIVIA    The white man ground his knuckles into the corners of his eyes, emitting that snore final and querulous of a middle-aged man awakened rudely. With a gesture brusque but flaccid he plucked aside the net and peered around. EMILY    The bales of cotton cloth, the beads, the brass wire, the bottles of rum, had not been spirited away in the night. So far so good. KIPLING    The faithful servant of his employers was now at liberty to care for his own interests. He regarded himself, passing his hands over his skin. WILLIAMS    [shouted] Hi! Mahamo! I've been eaten up. OLIVIA    The islander, with one sinuous motion, sprang from the ground, through the mouth of the hut. Then, after a glance, he threw high his hands in thanks to such good and evil spirits as had charge of his concerns. In a tone half of reproach, half of apology, he murmured— MAHAMO    You white men sometimes say strange things that deceive the heart. WILLIAMS    Reach me that ammonia bottle, d'you hear?  This is a pretty place you've brought me to!  Christmas Day, too! Of all the —— But I suppose it seems all right to you, you heathen, to be here on Christmas Day? MAHAMO    We are here on the day appointed, Mr. Williams. It is a feast-day of your people? OLIVIA    Mr. Williams had lain back, with closed eyes, on his mat. Nostalgia was doing duty to him for imagination. EMILY    He was wafted to a bedroom in Marylebone, where in honour of the Day he lay late dozing, with great contentment; outside, a slush of snow in the street, the sound of church-bells; from below a savour of especial cookery. [chuckles a bit] WILLIAMS    Yes, it's a feast-day of my people. MAHAMO    Of mine also. WILLIAMS    [disinterested] Is it though? But they'll do business first? MAHAMO    They must first do that. WILLIAMS    And they'll bring their ivory with them? MAHAMO    Every man will bring ivory. OLIVIA    The islander answered with a smile gleaming and wide. WILLIAMS    How soon'll they be here? MAHAMO    Has not the sun risen? They are on their way. WILLIAMS    Well, I hope they'll hurry. The sooner we're off this cursed island of yours the better. Take all those things out-- OLIVIA    Mr. Williams added, pointing to the merchandise. WILLIAMS    --and arrange them.  Neatly, mind you! KIPLING    In certain circumstances it is right that a man be humoured in trifles. Mahamo, having borne out the merchandise, arranged it very neatly. OLIVIA    While Mr. Williams made his toilette, the sun and the forest, careless of the doings of white and black men alike, waged their warfare implacable and daily. The forest from its inmost depths sent forth perpetually its legions of shadows that fell dead in the instant of exposure to the enemy whose rays heroic and absurd its outposts annihilated. EMILY    What's all this to do with Christmas? KIPLING    Want me to cuff her one? OLIVIA    It takes place on Christmas day - they already said that. EMILY    But this is all jungle creepers and spooky shadows - and vermins.  If there's one thing that doesn't come to my mind when I think of Christmas, it's ants and mosquitoes and such.  KIPLING    You should see some of the places I've been. OLIVIA    Why don't we just finish the story? KIPLING    There came from those inilluminable depths the equable rumour of myriads of winged things and crawling things newly roused to the task of killing and being killed. Thence detached itself, little by little, an insidious sound of a drum beaten. This sound drew more near.  [aside]  A-ha, I see where this is going.  Drums in the distance are never a good sign. EMILY    [huffy] Maybe I haven't traveled all over the great wide world, fellow, but even I can probably guess at that. DRUMS SNEAK IN OLIVIA    Mr. Williams, issuing from the hut, heard it, and stood gaping towards it. WILLIAMS    Is that them? MAHAMO    That is they. OLIVIA    The islander murmured, moving away towards the edge of the forest.  EMILY    Does he not notice?  What sort of a dullard is he?  [calling to williams] Do you have a gun? OLIVIA    [exasperated sigh] KIPLING    Calm down, it's just a story. EMILY    Don't go telling me when to calm down!  I just hate stories where stupid people do very stupid things - what possessed this fool to sail half round the world anyway? OLIVIA    [resigned, trying to get it back on track] Sounds of chanting were a now audible accompaniment to the drum. WILLIAMS    What's that they're singing? MAHAMO    [off a bit] They sing of their business. WILLIAMS    [shocked] Oh!  I'd have thought they'd be singing of their feast. MAHAMO    It is of their feast they sing. OLIVIA    It has been stated that Mr. Williams was not imaginative. WILLIAMS    Oh, I say--! OLIVIA    Oh, no!  You stay put! KIPLING    [very knowingly] But a few years of life in climates alien and intemperate had disordered his nerves. There was that in the rhythms of the hymn which made bristle his flesh.  EMILY    Suddenly, when they were very near, the voices ceased, leaving a legacy of silence more sinister than themselves. And now the black spaces between the trees were relieved by bits of white that were the eyeballs and teeth of Mahamo's brethren. MAHAMO    It was of their feast, it was of you, they sang. EMILY    I knew it! KIPLING    It was obvious. WILLIAMS    Look here--! OLIVIA    Cried Mr. Williams in his voice of a man not to be trifled with. WILLIAMS    --Look here, if you've— SOUND    JAVELIN HIT OLIVIA    He was silenced by sight of what seemed to be a young sapling sprung up from the ground within a yard of him—a young sapling tremulous, with a root of steel. KIPLING    Then a thread-like shadow skimmed the air, and another spear came impinging the ground within an inch of his feet. EMILY    As he turned in his flight he saw the goods so neatly arranged at his orders, and there flashed through him, even in the thick of the spears, the thought that he would be a grave loss to his employers. OLIVIA     This—for Mr. Williams was, not less than the goods, of a kind easily replaced—was an illusion. It was the last of Mr. Williams illusions. MOMENT OF SILENCE EMILY    So what shall we do now? SOUND    LARGE BOOK SHUTS DECISIVELY, CUTTING HER OFF OLIVIA    Happy Holidays, all - wherever and whatever they may be. CLOSER OLIVIA    Now that you know how to find us, you'll have to come back.  Maybe next week?  Don't be a stranger - we have enough of those already... The stories dramatized in tonight's episode appeared in a collection titled "A Christmas Garland", first published in October of 1912, collected by Max Beerbohm.  Scruts was written by Arnold Bennett, PC X-36 was written by Rudyard Kipling, and The Feast was written by Joseph Conrad.  These stories have been edited slightly to fit the program.          

The Substack Podcast
Dear Writer: Advice on recognizing what you've accomplished

The Substack Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 4:56


As the year draws to a close, we asked Anna Codrea-Rado to share a piece of writer-to-writer advice about taking stock of one’s creative accomplishments. Anna writes Lance, a publication all about building a freelance career without burning out. Read on for her advice, or listen to her read it aloud above.Dear writer,How do you stop to recognize what you've accomplished? And how do you refocus and refresh when starting a new chapter?Dear writer,On the eve of a breakup, a past boyfriend said to me that I’d never be happy because I’m always looking for something else.Over a decade later and the memory of that remark still stings. Not because I regret dumping him, but because he’d touched on something that I was (and still am) prone to doing: ambitiously going after something but not stopping to appreciate its fruits. I share this relic from my relationship graveyard to confess that I too struggle to recognize my accomplishments. And before I can attempt to answer what you can do about that, first I want to ask: why can’t you recognize what you’ve accomplished? Earlier this year, I wrote my first book and while I knew it was a huge milestone, I couldn’t feel it. So much so, that I felt uncomfortable whenever other people told me how proud I must be of myself. I started calling this inability to see my own success "productivity dysmorphia.” The pursuit of productivity spurs us to do more while at the same time robbing us of the ability to savor any success we might encounter along the way. As for why it happens, personally, I think the biggest culprit is our toxic work culture which not only moves the goal posts, but then tells us that if we miss, that’s our personal failing. The pursuit of productivity spurs us to do more while at the same time robbing us of the ability to savor any success we might encounter along the way.There’s a badly wrapped gift to be had here: This stuff isn’t your fault! This partly explains why I’ve only ever had mixed results in my attempts to do something about it. Because believe me, I’ve tried all the hacks for recognizing my achievements. The big one is writing down your wins at the end of each day. Seems like a no-brainer for a writer, right? Make yourself feel better about your writing by writing about it? And indeed, scribbling “Wrote 1,000 words today” in my bullet journal does make me feel smug. When I’m fretting about my newsletter, a game I like to play is zooming in and out of the graph in the “Subscriber” tab. There, I can see my growth over the last 30 days, 90 days, and all time. My 30-day chart looks like a rollercoaster; a rickety track of dizzying climbs preceded by stomach-flipping descents. Then I toggle to the 90-day view and things look a little gentler. At the “all-time” setting, all the bumps are smoothed out into a healthy line that clearly points upwards. At that distance, I have an uninterrupted view of how much further along I am now from my starting position. These tactics (or maybe it’s better to call them reflections) have definitely helped me better appreciate my achievements, but only ever after the fact. It’s a bit like how I experience the benefits of exercise, not so much in the moment of doing it, but only after a period of inactivity when I feel terrible for its absence. As the French political theorist, Germaine de Staël wrote, “The human mind always makes progress, but it is a progress in spirals”. And so, I don’t think the move is to throw out these acts of reflection, but rather to accept their limitations. “The human mind always makes progress, but it is a progress in spirals” ~ Germaine de StaëlThen the question becomes, how can we recognize our accomplishments in the moment? For me, the answer lies in getting back to why I write in the first place. I believe that the writing subjects we’re drawn to aren’t random. Richard Bach, the American writer said, “We teach best what we most need to learn.” And I think the same is true for writing—I write best about the things I need to work out for myself. I find this to be particularly important to remember at the close of one chapter and the beginning of another. And if you too are at a similar crossroads right now and struggling with which direction to take next, try asking yourself the following question: Even if no one read me, what would I write about? It’s easy to lose sight of why you’re even writing in the first place, so recentring can be a powerful way to help you get unstuck. Asking yourself this simple question will help you reconnect with your writing and remind you why you’re even doing it in the first place. You’ll be surprised how clearly the answer will come to you. And remember, the sheer act of even asking these kinds of questions is a celebration of how just far you’ve come.Sincerely,AnnaThis is the second in a recurring series of longform writer-to-writer advice, following Mason Currey’s advice column on creative growth. Could you use some advice or inspiration from a fellow writer about creativity, motivation, and the writing life? Submit your question for consideration for a future advice column by leaving it in the comments below, or entering it (with the option to remain anonymous) using this form. Subscribe at on.substack.com

The Quest with Justin Kan
How @Eric Glyman Re-Wrote the Credit Card Playbook

The Quest with Justin Kan

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 50:56


Welcome to The Quest Pod Season 1: Episode 34 with Eric Glyman: a two-time fintech founder shares his advice for innovating in a crowded market. Eric Glyman is the co-founder and CEO of Ramp, the only corporate card that helps companies spend less. He also previously founded Paribus to help consumers get money back on their online purchases. Eric's success reflects the power of customer-centric design: focus on building something that serves and created value for your market, instead of trying to extract as much money from your customers as possible. In this conversation, we talk about leaving a stable job to found a start-up, leading big teams and unlocking innovation. Check out Eric's LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/in/eglyman/If you liked  this episode, check out our YouTube channel and follow us on Twitter!A thank to our sponsors Universe and CashApp for making this podcast possible.  THE QUEST MEDIA | CONTENT MEETS SILICON VALLEY |

Stay At Home Mom? Yeah Right!
She Didn't See A Book That Represented Her Child So She Wrote It: A Chat With Iolani Bullock

Stay At Home Mom? Yeah Right!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 22:22


Iolani Bullock is a wife, mom of two, a DEI Specialist and the author of the book "Lenox Takes Flight"On the podcast we chatted about:-Why she wrote the book "Lenox Takes Flight"- What she hopes children will get out of her book-The importance of travel even if you think your kids are too young to remember-Her favorite places she's traveled to -What's on her travel bucket list------Follow me: www.instagram.com/stayathomemomyeahrightwww.facebook.com/stayathomemomyeahright

The Opperman Report
The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote Scum (and Shot Andy Warhol)

The Opperman Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 60:05


The authoritative biography of the 60s countercultural icon who wrote SCUM Manifesto, shot Andy Warhol, and made an unforgettable mark on feminist history. Valerie Solanas is one of the most polarizing figures of 1960s counterculture. A cult hero to some and vehemently denounced by others, she has been dismissed but never forgotten. Known for shooting Andy Warhol in 1968 and for writing the infamous SCUM Manifesto, Solanas became one of the most famous women of her era. But she was also diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and spent much of her life homeless or in mental hospitals. Solanas's SCUM Manifesto, a sui generis vision of radical gender dystopia, predicted ATMs, test-tube babies, the Internet, and artificial insemination long before they existed. It has sold more copies and been translated into more languages than nearly all other feminist texts of its time. And yet, shockingly little work has investigated the life of its author. This book is the first biography about Solanas, including original interviews with family, friends (and enemies), and numerous living Warhol associates. It reveals surprising details about Solanas's life: the children nearly no one knew she had, her drive for control over her own writing, and her elusive personal and professional relationships. Valerie Solanas reveals the tragic, remarkable life of an iconic figure. It is “not only a remarkable biographical feat but also a delicate navigation of an unwieldy, demanding, and complex life story” (BOMB Magazine).

The Opperman Report'
The Defiant Life of the Woman Who Wrote Scum (and Shot Andy Warhol)

The Opperman Report'

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 60:05


The authoritative biography of the 60s countercultural icon who wrote SCUM Manifesto, shot Andy Warhol, and made an unforgettable mark on feminist history. Valerie Solanas is one of the most polarizing figures of 1960s counterculture. A cult hero to some and vehemently denounced by others, she has been dismissed but never forgotten. Known for shooting Andy Warhol in 1968 and for writing the infamous SCUM Manifesto, Solanas became one of the most famous women of her era. But she was also diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia and spent much of her life homeless or in mental hospitals. Solanas's SCUM Manifesto, a sui generis vision of radical gender dystopia, predicted ATMs, test-tube babies, the Internet, and artificial insemination long before they existed. It has sold more copies and been translated into more languages than nearly all other feminist texts of its time. And yet, shockingly little work has investigated the life of its author. This book is the first biography about Solanas, including original interviews with family, friends (and enemies), and numerous living Warhol associates. It reveals surprising details about Solanas's life: the children nearly no one knew she had, her drive for control over her own writing, and her elusive personal and professional relationships. Valerie Solanas reveals the tragic, remarkable life of an iconic figure. It is “not only a remarkable biographical feat but also a delicate navigation of an unwieldy, demanding, and complex life story” (BOMB Magazine).

The Ella Ringrose Podcast
#70 Everything I Wrote Down Came True! My Scripting Story

The Ella Ringrose Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 26:55


Enrol in MANIFESTING BREAKTHROUGHS IN 2022

The Tony Talks Podcast
85: The Tony Talks Podcast Episode #85 "Wrote a letter to you and threw it away"

The Tony Talks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 63:48


On this episode Tony and G talk stand up, philosophical mindsets, and more....ENJOY!!! Follow Everyone: @tonytalksopc (IG & Twitter) @elementgmedia (IG) @Tony_mcbadluck (IG) @gera.dejesus (IG)

ignoranthinkerspodcast
The Side Jawn - The Writer's Bloc with Philly DMC

ignoranthinkerspodcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 123:37


Writers Bloc 12/18/21 - Demichael Cole Where did you go to school? When did you come out? What was your major? What's the best Article you ever Wrote? What was ur favorite interview??? How is that ur not a grizzles fan or a titans fan?? in ur time in philly what was some of your favorite spots to go to??? How is it working for the Philadelphia Inquirer? What are you doing now in Memphis? Sharon As a journalist, how do you keep stories fresh? In other words, when reporting on games, rather than just giving the score, who performed well and what the next game is, how do you come up with ideas to keep the content fresh? Why Memphis? What was it like interning? When you have a media pass, what advantages do you get? Where do you plan to be in 5 years? 10 years? Words of wisdom to up and coming writers Sharon: 5 Star Shout Out 1. Jordan or LeBron 2. Drums or flats 3. Phone or text 4. Vacationing: mountains or beach 5. Rihanna or Beyonce Back to Dennis. Wrap up the show: Thank you all for watching. Be sure to join the Side Jawn Facebook group, follow the ignoranthinkerspodcast on FB, IG, YouTube, listen to the audio podcast on Spotify, Apple, Google or wherever you get your podcast. Damichael how can people follow him. Ask for his final thoughts. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/dennis-holmes/support

The Mind Of George Show
Natasha Wilch Wrote A 7-Figure Business Plan While Breastfeeding.

The Mind Of George Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 67:03


This episode is loaded with amazing information as I talk to my dear friend and brain injury expert Natasha WilchHow to learn from every mistake that we makeHow you can't run five races at the same time and expect to win any of themNatasha's four secrets to succeeding in all business and life.Are you utilizing the hidden team that's in front of your business right now?The secret to your business succeeding is actually unplugging from your business. she wrote a business plan while breastfeeding to get a business loan, to heal people's brains.

God's Whole Story
Hebrews 1- Who Wrote This?

God's Whole Story

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 17:38


Grammar Girl Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing
How Lori Rader-Day Wrote a Historical Novel About War Evacuees in Agatha Christie's Vacation Home

Grammar Girl Quick and Dirty Tips for Better Writing

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 28:30


Accomplished mystery writer Lori Rader-Day was drawn to the story of children who were evacuated to Agatha Christie's vacation home during WWII, but having never written a historical novel before, she faced challenges. We talk about what she learned along the way while working on "Death at Greenway." |  Subscribe to the newsletter for regular updates. http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/subscribe | Watch my LinkedIn Learning writing course. https://j.mp/3oooKmK | Peeve Wars card game. http://www.thegamecrafter.com/games/grammar-girl-s-peeve-wars | Grammar Girl books. bit.ly/GrammarPopBooks | HOST: Mignon Fogarty | VOICEMAIL: 833-214-GIRL (833-214-4475) | Grammar Girl is part of the Quick and Dirty Tips podcast network. | Theme music by Catherine Rannus at beautifulmusic.co.uk. | Links:  https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/ https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/podcasts https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/subscribe https://www.tiktok.com/@therealgrammargirl http://twitter.com/grammargirl http://facebook.com/grammargirl http://pinterest.com/realgrammargirl http://instagram.com/thegrammargirl https://www.linkedin.com/company/grammar-girl

Everybody's Best Friend!
"WHAT About That Sentence Makes You Think She Wrote 'Pass Over?!'"

Everybody's Best Friend!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 71:08


Nothing says "Happy Holidays" like Kendall having to quarantine due to two genuine COVID exposures! Miss Omi really tried that with our girl! So, this week on EBF, Tat and Bendy take to Zoom to deliver our best friends some podcast goodness. After our break last week, we have lots of content to catch up on, so we are #MentioningItAll, Mary! We are talking Single All the Way starring Jennifer Coolidge, the hullabaloo surrounding the Jeremy Strong profile in the New Yorker, the Golden Globe noms, Annie LIVE!, Britney coming for Diane Sawyer on IG, and we finally get to the bottom, once and for all, of WHO actually wrote the Broadway play PASS OVER. Aboard the HME this week, we got some drunk co-eds crying and making microwave nachos!! All fun and drinking games until campus police shows up...

Deweerdo Podcast
39. I WROTE A BOOK

Deweerdo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 12:50


I WROTE A BOOK.

Angelo Cataldi And The Morning Team
"People wrote us off!"

Angelo Cataldi And The Morning Team

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 45:18


The third hour of today's show. Doug Pederson joins the program. We have a potential buyer for the Flyers. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The One Where...
We Wrote A Lot (with Ashley Gorman)

The One Where...

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 63:04


Kyle chats to comedian, writer and director Ashley Gorman (@imashleygorman) about growing up mixed race and how he wrote and directed his comedy-drama pilot 'Diamante'. PRODUCED BY: Vittorio Angelone (@thatvittorio) and Vauxhall Creative Network  

My Dad Wrote A Porno
My Dad Wrote A Christmas Porno 6 - Part Two

My Dad Wrote A Porno

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 52:42


Ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, it's time for the world premiere of the Steele's Pots and Pans Christmas Panto - 'Cinderella The Intern'. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Bobbycast
#327 - Keith Urban (Part 1) - How He Discovered Country Music in Australia and Learning to Play Guitar + His Relationship with his Father and Seeing Johnny Cash As a Kid + Breaking Down How He Wrote “Somebody Like You”

Bobbycast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 43:09


Bobby sat down with Keith Urban. In Part 1 of the interview, Bobby and Keith dive into where his love of music started and how he discovered country music in Australia. Keith explains how his dad got him into country music and how their relationship led to him wanting to pursue it as a career. Keith talks about his early days starting out, his biggest inspiration as an artist, why he strives to make his live show so BIG and he also breaks down the day he wrote “Somebody Like You”.  Be sure to subscribe to hear Part 2 of the conversation next week! Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Nitty Gritty of Ditties with Brooke
"I Have a Little Dreidel" is the Worst Song of the Season, So I Wrote a Better One

Nitty Gritty of Ditties with Brooke

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 24:39


I love Christmas music, I love winter music, and I love Hanukkah music. I released a few podcast episodes last year about my favorite Hanukkah and Christmas songs. But, as long as I can remember, I've hated "I Have a Little Dreidel", the most famous Hanukkah song. In this episode, I dig into the musical reasons why this song misses the mark so badly, and I was so irate, that I wrote my own dreidel song to prove how easy it can be. As a holiday gift to the listeners, listen to the end to hear my original song for the season! Find Merch Here with new designs: https://nitty-gritty-of-ditties.myspreadshop.com/ --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/nittygrittyofditties/support

Typology
Why I Wrote My New Book (The Story of You) [S05-019]

Typology

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 41:00


In this special episode, Anthony and I drop by the studio to talk about my new book, The Story of You, and what motivated me to write it.  We all craft a story about who we are and how the world works as little people. Then, as we grow older, we think of our lives as a movie we're in that's unfolding in real-time. But the narrative we crafted as children no longer works for us as adults. But how do we change that story? The Enneagram teaches that there are nine archetypal stories that people tend to inhabit. However, the true gift of the Enneagram is its ability to help us challenge those self-limiting stories and move into a new narrative.   In this episode, I identify the self-limiting story of each type and explain the 4 stage process for transformation so you can become your authentic self.

RAD Radio
12.08.21 RAD 09 Stalking Brandon & Kyle's Dad Emails RAD - Grandma Wrote Adult Literature

RAD Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 9:58


Stalking Brandon & Kyle's Dad Emails RAD - Grandma Wrote Adult LiteratureSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Windows & Mirrors
Day 404 (Psalm 136-139) If the Migos wrote a Psalm

Windows & Mirrors

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 9:20


Recap of Psalm 136-139 From the archives! Join our Patreon: patreon.com/windowsandmirrors.org

My Dad Wrote A Porno
My Dad Wrote A Christmas Porno 6 - Part One

My Dad Wrote A Porno

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 49:09


Jamie, Alice and James record part one of Rocky's annual festive special at London's iconic Abbey Road Studios to celebrate their 90th birthday. Belinda begins preparations for Steele's Pots and Pans pantomime. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda
Holland Taylor: The Role of a Lifetime She Wrote Herself

Clear+Vivid with Alan Alda

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 41:20


Emmy and Tony nominee Holland Taylor wrote and performed a one-woman show called Ann, bringing to life on the stage the woman she most admired, former Texas governor Ann Richards. And she came up with a smash hit.  Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/clearandvivid See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.