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  • 1,088PODCASTS
  • 1,515EPISODES
  • 47mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Oct 22, 2021LATEST
Bazaar

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Best podcasts about Bazaar

Latest podcast episodes about Bazaar

I AM Healthy & Fit
A Whole Body Approach To Weight Loss with Esther Blum

I AM Healthy & Fit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 48:19


Esther Blum is an Integrative Dietitian and High Performance Coach. She currently maintains a virtual practise where she helps people permanently lose weight, balance hormones, heal the gut, and reverse chronic health struggles. Esther believes that diet and supplements are the foundation to healing, but treating the whole person is paramount.Esther is the bestselling author of 4 books: Cavewomen Don't Get Fat, Eat, Drink and Be Gorgeous, Secrets of Gorgeous, and The Eat, Drink, and Be Gorgeous Project. Widely respected as an industry expert, Esther was voted Best Nutritionist by Manhattan Magazine. She has appeared on Dr. Oz, the Today Show, A Healthy You with Carol Alt, the ISAAC show, ABC-TV, FOX- 5's Good Day NY, and Fox News Live. Esther is an in-demand authority frequently quoted in E! Online, In Touch, Time Magazine, The New York Post, The Los Angeles Times, In Style, Bazaar, Self, Fitness, Marie Claire, and Cosmo.Esther received a Bachelor of Science in Clinical Nutrition from Simmons College in Boston and is a graduate of New York University, where she received her Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition. Esther is credentialed as a registered dietitian, a certified dietitian-nutritionist and a Certified Nutrition Specialist (CNS), the certification from the Board for Certification of Nutrition Specialists (BCNS). She is also a member of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians in Functional Medicine, Nutritionists in Complementary Care, and the Connecticut Dietetic Association.Esther lives in CT with her family where she can be seen cooking up a storm, going for long hikes, and blasting 80's music by the fire pit.GIFT TO YOUThis application is to learn more about you to see if or how I can help you. I will review each application personally. If selected, we'll schedule you for a 30-minute complimentary Strategy Session to give you 3 actionable steps to move you towards your goal. estherblum.com/callSOCIAL LINKSEstherBlum.comInstagram @gorgeousestherYouTube: Esther Blum

RNZ: Nine To Noon
Elizabeth Day: why things going wrong can be so right

RNZ: Nine To Noon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 26:24


Best-selling author and award-winning writer Elizabeth Day speaks with Kathryn Ryan about her latest novel Magpie, a psychological thriller about motherhood. Elizabeth has been praised for "revolutionising the way we see failure". Her How To Fail podcast has topped iTunes charts, and her live tours have sold-out venues such as London's National Theatre. Elizabeth writes for The Times, the Guardian, the Observer, Harper's Bazaar and Elle, and is a presenter on BBC Radio.

The Quarantine Tapes
The Quarantine Tapes: 210 Derecka Purnell

The Quarantine Tapes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 31:11


Derecka Purnell is a lawyer, writer, organizer, and author of forthcoming Becoming Abolitionists: Police, Protests, and the Pursuit of Freedom. She works to end police and prison violence by providing legal assistance, research, and trainings in community based organizations through an abolitionist framework.  As a Skadden Fellow, she helped to build the Justice Project at Advancement Project's National Office which focused on consent decrees, police and prosecutor accountability, and jail closures, providing community training, political education and legal representation to organizers. Her advocacy efforts led to the dismissal of over 3,000 cases based on unconstitutional policing practices. Additionally, she supports several campaigns and grassroots organizations around the criminal legal system, electoral justice, and community investment, including Action St. Louis, Dream Defenders, Communities Against Police Crimes and Repression, the Ferguson Collaborative, and the Movement for Black Lives. Derecka also organized the founding steering committee for Law for Black Lives, a growing network of 5,000 law students, lawyers, and legal workers to support social movements.  In the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, Derecka co-created the COVID19 Policing Project at the Community Resource Hub for Safety Accountability. The project tracks police arrests, harassment, citations and other enforcement through public health orders related to the pandemic. Derecka received her JD from Harvard Law School, her BA from the University of Missouri- Kansas City, and studied public policy and economics at the University of California- Berkeley as a Public Policy and International Affairs Law Fellow. Her writing has been published in The New York Times, The Atlantic, The Guardian, Cosmopolitan, Harper's Bazaar, Teen Vogue, The Appeal, Truthout, Slate, Boston Review, Huffington Post, Vox, and In These Times. She's been  on NPR, Democracy Now!, Slate's What Next, and MSNBC, and is the former Editor-in-Chief of the Harvard Journal of African American Public Policy. Derecka has lectured, studied, and strategized around social movements across the United States, The Netherlands, Belgium, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and Australia. She is from St. Louis and lives in D.C.

Active Allyship...it's more than a #hashtag!
EP# 67: Becoming Abolitionists with Derecka Purnell

Active Allyship...it's more than a #hashtag!"

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 14:50


Lisa is solo and is joined by Derecka Purnell.  Derecka received her JD from Harvard Law School and works to end police and prison violence by providing legal assistance, research, and training to community-based organizations through an abolitionist framework. Her work and writing has been featured in the New York Times, NPR, The Atlantic, the Boston Globe, Harper's Bazaar, Cosmopolitan, The Appeal, Truthout, Slate, and many other publications. Book description:For more than a century, activists in the United States have tried to reform the police. From community policing initiatives to increasing diversity, none of it has stopped the police from killing about three people a day. Millions of people continue to protest police violence because these "solutions" do not match the problem: the police cannot be reformed. In Becoming Abolitionists, Purnell draws from her experiences as a lawyer, writer, and organizer initially skeptical about police abolition. She saw too much sexual violence and buried too many friends to consider getting rid of police in her hometown of St. Louis, let alone the nation. But the police were a placebo. Calling them felt like something, and something feels like everything when the other option seems like nothing.Purnell details how multi-racial social movements rooted in rebellion, risk-taking, and revolutionary love pushed her and a generation of activists toward abolition. The book travels across geography and time, and offers lessons that activists have learned from Ferguson to South Africa, from Reconstruction to contemporary protests against police shootings. Here, Purnell argues that police can not be reformed and invites readers to envision new systems that work to address the root causes of violence. Becoming Abolitionists shows that abolition is not solely about getting rid of police, but a commitment to create and support different answers to the problem of harm in society, and, most excitingly, an opportunity to reduce and eliminate harm in the first place. 

The Bazaar Cast
89 | The Bazaar In The Keep

The Bazaar Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 84:33


Welcome to Episode 89! Today's interview with Ty Brannan; Ty is the brain child of In The Keep an independent outfit of gaming enthusiasts compelled by the Drowned God Cthalha to frag and gib for all eternity. Ty is also a trained meteorologist with the US Air Force and working currently for 3D Realms; a renowned game developer. We discuss podcasting and interviewing techniques, our brief life stories and what brings us all together and lots more. We hope you enjoy this simulcast. Please rate, review & most importantly share! Become a Patron and support the show using link below: Patreon - The Bazaar Cast Find Ty and his projects below: Website: inthekeep.com Upcoming Game: Call of Saregnar Wider Studio: 3D Realms Bonus Haiku: Ty on The Bazaar, Simulcast for our people, Follow In The Keep. ***** Intro Music: Robert Christopher - Rekindle The Memory Support Robert below, click the links: Bandcamp: Robert ChristopherYoutube: Rob Christopher Music ***** All inquiries to TheBazaarCast@gmail.comTwitter @TheBazaarCast using #TheBazaarCast Join The Bazaar Cast Discord --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thebazaarcast/message

The Dom Giordano Program
Audacy Engineer Dave Skalish Remembers DelCo's ‘Bazaar of All Nations'

The Dom Giordano Program

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 8:55


Throughout today's Dom Giordano Program, Dom asked listeners for the businesses or brands that they loved, that have since gone defunct. Early in the show, a caller reminisced about ‘The Bazaar of All Nations,' a shopping destination that served Delaware County until 1993. Dave Skalish, longtime engineer of beloved Philadelphia radio stations such as WPHT, WIP, and KYW, joins the Dom Giordano Program to reminisce about the place the he too spent much of his childhood. (Photo by Getty Images) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Earth Ancients
Destiny: Daniel Pinchbeck, 2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl

Earth Ancients

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 76:46


Cross James Merrill, H. P. Lovecraft, and Carlos Castaneda -each imbued with a twenty-first-century aptitude for quantum theory and existential psychology-and you get the voice of Daniel Pinchbeck. And yet, nothing quite prepares us for the lucidity, rationale, and informed audacity of this seeker, skeptic, and cartographer of hidden realms.Throughout the 1990s, Pinchbeck had been a member of New York's literary select. He wrote for publications such as The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, and Harper's Bazaar. His first book, Breaking Open the Head, was heralded as the most significant on psychedelic experimentation since the work of Terence McKenna.But slowly something happened: Rather than writing from a journalistic remove, Pinchbeck-his literary powers at their peak-began to participate in the shamanic and metaphysical belief systems he was encountering. As his psyche and body opened to new experience, disparate threads and occurrences made sense like never before: Humanity, every sign pointed, is precariously balanced between greater self-potential and environmental disaster. The Mayan calendar's "end date" of 2012 seems to define our present age: It heralds the end of one way of existence and the return of another, in which the serpent god Quetzalcoatl reigns anew, bringing with him an unimaginably ancient-yet, to us, wholly new-way of living.A result not just of study but also of participation, 2012 tells the tale of a single man in whose trials we ultimately recognize our own hopes and anxieties about modern life.Pinchbeck, journalist and author of the drug-riddled psychonaut investigation Breaking Open the Head, has set out to create an "extravagant thought experiment" centering around the Mayan prophecy that 2012 will bring about the end of the world as we know it, "the conclusion of a vast evolutionary cycle, and the potential gateway to a higher level of manifestation." More specifically, Pinchbeck's claim is that we are in the final stages of a fundamental global shift from a society based on materiality to one based on spirituality. Intermittently fascinating, especially in his autobiographical interludes, Pinchbeck tackles Stonehenge and the Burning Man festival, crop circles and globalization, modern hallucinogens and the ancient prophesy of the Plumed Serpent featured in his subtitle.

Corbett Report Videos
REKO Rings, Farm Shares and Farmer Bazaar - #SolutionsWatch

Corbett Report Videos

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 25:12


Talk Healthy Today
How to Fix the Root Cause of Your Health Issues Using a Whole Body Healing Approach with Author, Integrative Dietitian, & High Performance Coach Esther Blum,

Talk Healthy Today

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 41:00


Lisa is joined by Esther Blum is an Integrative Dietitian and High Performance Coach to talk about how to fix the root cause of your health issues using a whole body healing approach. Esther currently maintains a virtual practice where she helps people permanently lose weight, balance hormones, heal the gut, and reverse chronic health struggles. Esther believes that diet and supplements are the foundation to healing, but treating the whole person is paramount. Esther is the bestselling author of 4 books: Cavewomen Don't Get Fat, Eat, Drink and Be Gorgeous, Secrets of Gorgeous, and The Eat, Drink, and Be Gorgeous Project.  Widely respected as an industry expert, Esther was voted Best Nutritionist by Manhattan Magazine. She has appeared on Dr. Oz, the Today Show, A Healthy You with Carol Alt, the ISAAC show, ABC-TV, FOX- 5's Good Day NY, and Fox News Live. Esther is an in-demand authority frequently quoted in E!Online, In Touch, Time Magazine, The New York Post, The Los Angeles Times, In Style, Bazaar, Self, Fitness, Marie Claire, and Cosmo. Esther received a Bachelor of Science in Clinical Nutrition from Simmons College in Boston and is a graduate of New York University, where she received her Master of Science in Clinical Nutrition. Esther is credentialed as a registered dietitian, a certified dietitian-nutritionist and a Certified Nutrition Specialist (CNS), the certification from the Board for Certification of Nutrition Specialists (BCNS). She is also a member of the American Dietetic Association, Dietitians in Functional Medicine, Nutritionists in Complementary Care, and the Connecticut Dietetic Association. Esther lives in CT with her family where she can be seen cooking up a storm, going for long hikes, and blasting 80's music by the fire pit. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Better Call Daddy
167. Body Positivity Model and Podgasm Host. Bonjour Clem: Clémentine Desseaux

Better Call Daddy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 51:43


Special birthday episode with Bonjour Clem who rocks her birthday suit on Instagram in a body positivity kind of way.  She thinks about food, sex, and dog videos, and home stuff.  She's daring, powerful, out of the box, and now loves her body.  Is the fashion industry changing?  Have you had your own body acceptance struggles or shame to deal with?  Better Call Daddy: The Safe Space For Controversy! Clémentine Desseaux is the founder of The All Womxn Project that established a platform for womxn to support body positivity, representation, empowerment, and self-acceptance. Her entrepreneurial spirit enabled her to create adjacent careers by creating a lifestyle blog reflecting her brand titled, BonjourClem.com.  Harper's Bazaar has recognized her as a “face-to-watch” and Vogue as “top ten plus size models to follow.” She has starred in campaigns for Levi's, H&M, Macy's, Nordstrom, Express, Nike, Anthropology, and spoke at her first TEDTalk in April 2019 in Edinburgh, Scotland. This globetrotting activist, entrepreneur, and model continues to combine her French roots, brave heart, and unique style to build her empire. Connect with Clem: https://www.instagram.com/bonjourclem/ Connect with Reena: www.podchaser.com/bettercalldaddy www.linkedin.com/in/reenafriedmanwatts www.instagram.com/reenafriedmanwatts www.instagram.com/bettercalldaddypodcast   Me and My daddy would love to hear from you! ratethispodcast.com/bettercalldaddy

LADY'S After Hours
Episode 27 ft. Shirley Lord

LADY'S After Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 62:53


Shirley Lord is a journalist, beauty editor and expert, and novelist, who rose from working-class Cockney lass to one of the most influential people in the beauty industry through grit, good humor, and a passion for journalism. A features editor for a British women's magazine by age 24, three years later she married the carpet tycoon Cyril Lord. Weaving easily between high-class entertaining and a high-powered career, Shirley worked for British Harper's Bazaar and the Evening Standard in London before leaving her marriage in the early 1970s to move to New York. After a stint as beauty director of Harper's Bazaar, she became beauty editor of Vogue—a job that she would have in some capacity for most of the next 40 years, only leaving briefly to be vice president of Helena Rubinstein. In the 1980s she married Abe Rosenthal, the legendary editor of the New York Times—they were together until his death in 2011. Shirley Lord has written two beauty books as well as several novels drawing on her deep knowledge of the glamorous fashion and beauty industries. Truly a woman who self-created her life, she joins host Laura McLaws Helms to discuss her journalism career, her five marriages, and all things beauty. For full show notes, episode resources and a slideshow of photographs, head to https://sighswhispers.com/episode-26-shirley-lord Produced and hosted by Laura McLaws Helms 
 Featured Guest Shirley Lord

BlackBeltBeauty Radio
150. BELLS UP W/LACEE LAZOFF + MELISSA PARIS: How to feel, look + age with more strength + resilience.

BlackBeltBeauty Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 93:46


Today on the show I have the powerhouse duo, Lacee Lazoff + Melissa Paris, founders of Bells Up, an empowering digital strength training platform for women.  Lacee specializes in hard-style kettlebell, barbell, and bodyweight training. As a NASM certified personal trainer and former StongFirst Kettlebell Level 2 + Bodyweight Instructor, Lacee is passionate about educating women on the benefits of using strength training progressions to optimize their body composition  + fortify their mindsets strength + capabilities. Her work of empowering women through her strength training programs has earned her features in multiple publications including Self, GQ, Harper's Bazaar, Runner's World, Shape + Women's Health. Melissa has an impressive 15 years of fitness and nutrition experience under her belt, holding a degree in dietetics. Melissa's highly effective training takes her clients from a mindset of “fitness/working out, to an EMPOWERED MINDSET that has them training for LIFE performance. After the birth of her two sons, she became passionate about guiding women through safe and effective pre/postnatal strength training workouts with her specialty program, FitFourth.  FitFourth incorporates strong First Kettlebell principles, tools from Ground Force Method, and Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization.  Together, Lacee and Melissa are a creative force in the fitness world for women as they model true ownership of SELF, internal + external shape as well as being in the “best shape of their lives” at the age of 35+ while empowering other women to discover + connect with their own power + strength- at ANY AGE.  In this episode, we dive into… Maintaining longevity, youth, and endurance through weight training. Overcoming the stigma of weights being for men, and cardio for women. Why cardio, HITT + other faster-paced training sessions must not replace resistance training. Trading the mentality of working out for FITNESS, for the mentality + programing that has you Training for LIFE. The correlation of holistic lifestyle habits pertaining to fitness routines including better sleep, elevated mood, balanced hormones, consistent energy levels, etc. The stress hormone, cortisol, and its role in stunting fitness results + what to do about it. And so much more! This episode is super empowering and will give you strong motivation + ideas that will drive you to train consistently and create sustainable habits that fortify your wellbeing, no matter your age. Definitely check out Lacee and Melissa's site at: https://bells-up.com and follow on Instagram at @bellsuptv Let us know how this episode impacted you via @ROXYLOOK + @BLACKBELTBEAUTY in the comments, DMs + story shares-- we LOVE connecting with you.  ❤️ Are you loving BlackBeltBeauty Radio? We would LOVE your support! Subscribe, share + give our podcast a 5 Star rating and review HERE We APPRECIATE YOU!! STAY CONNECTED INSTAGRAM: @laceelazoff @melissaparisfitness @bellsuptv WEBSITE: www.bells-up.com YOUTUBE: www.youtube.com/c/BellsUp/videos

The Artist Business Plan
Black Creatives Matter with Ashley Chew

The Artist Business Plan

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 31:24


In this episode of The Artist Business Plan, we sit down with model, activist, artist, and writer Ashley Chew. She leads an amazing masterclass on creating as much as possible as an artist because that is how people will find you. We discuss diversity in the creative world, and posting everything! "No one will know if you're just waiting for work to come to you. Create as much as possible because people will know that you're working." - Ashley Chew Guest: Ashley Chew is an Artist, Model, Diversity Activist and Writer based in New York, NY. Chew's paintings focus on the resilience, rest, regality and visibility of marginalized groups. Chew has also written for Vogue, Cosmopolitan & Harper's Bazaar. Currently, Chew is a #StillStanding Artist-In-Residence at Stonehenge NYC located in New York, NY. https://ashleybchew.com/ (https://ashleybchew.com/) For more information on applying to Superfine Art Fair as well as recordings of this and all of our past podcasts, just visit http://www.superfine.world/ (www.superfine.world ) IG: https://www.instagram.com/superfineartfair/?hl=en (@superfineartfair) IG: https://www.instagram.com/ash_chew/?hl=en (@ash_chew) If you want to submit a listener question you can email it to kelsey@superfine.world for a chance of it being answered by Alex, James, and our guest! Hosted and Executive Produced by James Miille and Alexander Mitow Executive Producer/Producer : Kelsey Susino Written by: Kelsey Susino, Alexander Mitow, and James Miille Audio Edited by: Federico Solar Fernandez

Uplifting Impact
Breaking the Mold: Social Conditioning and Its Effect on Leadership

Uplifting Impact

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 20:45


Hira Ali is a leadership trainer, career coach, and Founder of Advancing Your Potential. She is passionate about empowering women and ethnic minorities, closing the gender gap, and advocating diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Her work has been featured in Forbes, Telegraph, BBC, Harper's Bazaar, and Huff Post, and in 2019 she released her first book, Her Way To The Top: A Guide to Smashing the Glass Ceiling. Just recently she released her second companion book, Her Allies: A Practical Toolkit to Help Men Lead Through Advocacy. In this episode, Hira and Justin talk about the role of men as allies in gender equality, particularly in the work place, and specific ways in which men can be helpful. They discuss the qualities of a successful workshop and ways to leave a lasting impact as a speaker or workshop leader. Hira also details her background, how she started doing diversity, equity, and inclusion work, and her passion for coaching. To connect with Hira, find her on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hira-ali-5972b91b/ Topics In This Episode The importance of speaking and leading with authenticity Finding your passion Commonalities among women and minorities The social conditioning of men and women, and its effect on leadership Internal and external challenges facing women and minorities Good male ally-ship Connect LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/hira-ali-5972b91b/ Website: https://advancingyourpotential.com/about Social Media: @advancingyou Other Conversations We've Enjoyed Celebrate Diversity: How to Rethink Society So It's Inclusive Of All Be Impatient in your Fight Against Social Injustices Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Book Dreams
Ep. 74 - When It's Exceptional to Be Unexceptional, with Kaitlyn Greenidge

Book Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 36:35


Even when history has been overlooked, ignored, or suppressed, that doesn't mean it's hidden. Researching and writing her novels, Kaitlyn Greenidge--author of Libertie and We Love You, Charlie Freeman--“approach[es] Black history from a place of abundance, from the idea that Black people have always been multifaceted, have always been fighting for freedom, and have always been coming up with ingenious ways to combat the world around us.” This week on Book Dreams, Kaitlyn discusses with Eve and Julie how society has emphasized exceptionalism in Black history to the detriment of Black people. She searches in unexpected places for evidence of the inner lives of the unexceptional, like Black spirituals. She also examines the difference between Black artists being forgotten and choosing not to be found. Kaitlyn Greenidge is the recipient of fellowships from The Whiting Foundation, The National Endowment for the Arts, The Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies, The Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University, and The Guggenheim Foundation. She's currently the Features Director at Harper's Bazaar as well as a contributing writer for The New York Times. Her writing has also appeared in Vogue, Glamour, The Wall Street Journal, Elle, Buzzfeed and The Believer, among many other places. Her debut novel, We Love You, Charlie Freeman, was one of The New York Times critic's “top 10 books of 2016.” Libertie, her second novel, was named “one of the most anticipated books of 2021” by O the Oprah Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Time, The Rumpus, Book Page, Harper's Bizarre, News Magazine, and more. Find us on Twitter (@bookdreamspod) and Instagram (@bookdreamspodcast), or email us at contact@bookdreamspodcast.com. We encourage you to visit our website and sign up for our newsletter for information about our episodes, guests, and more. Book Dreams is a part of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy. Since you're listening to Book Dreams, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about literature, writing, and storytelling like Storybound and The History of Literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Gravel Ride.  A cycling podcast
In the Dirt 24: Part One - Questions and Answers

The Gravel Ride. A cycling podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 38:11


This week we tackle our first Q & A episode from The Ridership Community. Randall and Craig tackle your questions in part 1 of 2 fun filled episodes. The Ridership Support the Podcast Book your free Thesis Bike Consult Automated transcription (Please excuses the errors): Episode 24 [00:00:00] Craig Dalton: Hello and welcome to in the dirt from the gravel. The ride podcast. I'm your host, Craig Dalton. And i'll be joined shortly by my co-host rental jacobs In this week's episode, we're tackling our first Q and a episode.  [00:00:14] We've mentioned the ridership community on a number of occasions on this podcast. It's a community that's full of vibrant questions all the time. So we thought we'd put out an ask to say, what are the things you want to learn about what should Randall an IB discussing? And we were overwhelmed by. By the number of questions we received.  [00:00:34] So much. So in fact that we're going to break this episode down into two parts. So today we'll focus on part one. And in the coming weeks we're released part two. [00:00:44] Before we jump into this week's episode, I'd like to thank this week. Sponsor Thesis bikes. As you know, Randall Jacob's my co-host in these, in the dirt episodes is the founder of Thesis bikes. Which you might not know is it's the bicycle I've been riding for the last let's say year and a half.  [00:01:01] Over the course of this podcast, I've had the opportunity to ride many bicycles and I keep coming back to my Thesis. As my number one bike in the garage, it really does deliver on the promise of a bike that can do anything. As many of, you know, I operate with two wheel sets in the garage. So I've got a 700 C wheel set with road tires on, and my go-to six 50 B wheel set for all my off-road adventures.  [00:01:26] In the many, many hours of conversation I've had with Randall, I've really come to appreciate how thoughtful he was in designing this bike and everything that goes in the Thesis community. Randall and the team are available for personal consults, which I highly recommend you take advantage of. If you're interested in learning more about the brand and figuring out how to get the right fit for your Thesis bicycle.  [00:01:49] In a shocking statement. I can actually express that Thesis has bikes in stock. It's something we haven't been able to say about a lot of bike brands these days during the pandemic. It's October as we're releasing this episode and they have bikes available for November delivery with the SRAM access builds. They also have frame sets available.  [00:02:10] So I encourage you to head on over to Thesis.bike, to check out more about the brand, the story. Cory and the product and book one of those free consultations with a member of the Thesis team. With that said, let's dive right into this. Week's. Q and a episode [00:02:25] Craig: Randall, how are you today? [00:02:26] Randall: I am doing well, Craig, how are you my friend?  [00:02:30] Craig: I am doing good. I'm particularly excited for this episode because it essentially came entirely from the Ridership community. We're doing our first ever Q&A episode.  [00:02:42] Randall: Yeah, people have a lot of trust in us, maybe too much in terms of our knowledge here. So we'll try not to get over our heads in terms of uh what we claim to know, but a lot of good questions here and hopefully we can answer most of them.  [00:02:54] Craig: Yeah, I think that's been one of the cool things about the ridership is I see these questions going on all the time and I quite regularly. See them answered by people Smarter than you and I in a specific area of the sport. They have particular knowledge about a specific region. So it's really cool to see those happening in real time, every day for the members of that community. [00:03:17] Randall: Yeah, everything from fit related questions where we have some experts in there. Professional fitters like Patrick Carey, who I just did the episode with just before this one, I was in there answering questions, but then also if you've got a question about tires, nobody's going to have ridden all of them, but somehow every one has been written by someone in the forum there. And it's one of our most popular topics.  [00:03:38] Craig: Yeah. And I've seen some really detailed, help transpire between members as well, just like random disc bait break problems or compatibility problems. And I'm always shocked when someone raises their hand digitally and start to answering a question saying, no, I experienced that exact same weird problem in combination of things. [00:03:57] Randall: Yeah, it really fits into the spirit of The Ridership in which embodied in that word was this idea of fellowship, like writers, helping writers. So it's been super cool to see that community develop organically. And so thank you all members who are listening, and to those who aren't in there yet, we hope you'll join us.  [00:04:15] Craig: Yeah. just head over to www.theridership.com and you can get right in and start interacting as much, or as little as you want. I think the uniqueness of the platform is it is designed inherently to be asynchronous. So you can put a question in there give it a little time to marinate and a couple of days later Get lots of answers. [00:04:35] This is pretty cool.  [00:04:36] Randall: And in addition to that, there's also rides being coordinated. So myself and another writer here in the new England area or leading a ride. And we have about 10 or 15 people who chimed in wanting to join. And we've seen quite a bit of that in the bay area as well. So that's another use case for this in addition to sharing routes and general bicycle nerdery.  [00:04:54] Craig: Yeah, it's super cool. [00:04:55] So this episode, we're clearly going to jump around a bunch. We've tried to organize the questions, so there's, there's some pairing around them, but these are questions that all came in from subset of individuals. So They are what they are and we wanted to jump on them. So with that, let's let's dive right in. Okay.  [00:05:12] Randall: All right, let's do it.  [00:05:14] Craig: Cool. So the first question comes from Keith P E. And he says, every time I go out for a gravel ride, I think why is this roadie where I'm like Rhonda trails when there's no podium to win or anybody watching. What is this obsession with wearing skin tight clothing in a sport that resides in the dirt.  [00:05:31] Randall: I don't know about you, but I'm just showing off.  [00:05:34] Craig: Your physique.  [00:05:35] Randall: My, my Adonis like physique, sure. It's just more comfortable for me. And I like to go pretty hard and I'm sweating a lot. And if I had baggier gear on, I would tend to have, potential issues with chafing and the like so for intensity I definitely find that the Lycra is a lot more comfortable.  [00:05:54] Craig: Yeah, I'm sorta with you. Like I do I desire to be that guy in baggy shorts and a t-shirt, but every time it comes down to it, I'm grabbing the Lycra. I think for me, there's a couple of performance things, definitely on the lower body. I appreciate the Lycra just cause I don't get any binding and less potential for chafing. So I'm like, I'm all about a big short for riding, unless it's a super, super casual outing for me.  [00:06:21] And then up top. I think it comes down to, I do having the pockets in the Jersey. So that sort of makes me tend towards wearing a Jersey, even if it's just solely to carry my phone in my pocket.  [00:06:34] Randall: And if you really want to be pro show up to an elite race and like a led Zeppelin t-shirt and some cutoff jorts, and hairy legs and just rip everyone's legs off that would be super impressive. But for the rest of us,  [00:06:45] If you ha, if you have those sorts of legs,  [00:06:47] Yeah, it would be very impressed. Send pictures in to the ridership. If you actually do that .  [00:06:50] Craig: Yeah. So you'll see me. You'll see me. Rock a t-shirt you. As a performance t-shirt instead of a cycling Jersey on occasion. And I just jam stuff into bags, but yeah, nine times out of 10, unfortunately I'm that Lycra. Reclad. Gravel cyclists. [00:07:06] Randall: MAMIL, I think right.  [00:07:08] Middle aged man in Lycra.  [00:07:11] I'm right behind in the age category.  [00:07:13] Craig: Second question comes from Tom Schiele. And forgive me if I mispronounced your last name, he'd love to get our insights into winter riding, especially tips for those of us in new England who go out on cold dark mornings.  [00:07:29] I'm going to, I'm going to go out on a limb here and Randall and say, it's probably not the guy. [00:07:32] from California that should be offering this advice.  [00:07:34] Randall: Let's have you go first for that reason.  [00:07:38] Craig: Look. I mean you, new Englanders will throw hay bales at me and make fun of me, but I do find it cold here. And it's all about layers.  [00:07:48] Randall: Okay. [00:07:48] Carry  [00:07:48] Craig: all about layers.  [00:07:49] Actually, in fact, I just got some great gear from gore and I was Scratching my head because it's really designed for way cooler Temperatures. [00:07:58] than I have available to me. So a fleece lined tight is something that's just outside of the weather that I'm going to experience as much as I'll complain about it being cold. But I do appreciate a thermal Jersey for the Dawn patrol rides and things like that.  [00:08:12] But for me, it's always come down to layering. And as someone who's Been around. [00:08:16] the sport for a while, what I really do like about my wardrobe today is I think I have a really good understanding about what to layer on for what temperature And having been in the sport long enough. I've just acquired a lot of clothing along the way. So I even go down to having.  [00:08:32] Like a thicker vest. Than just a standard thin, vast, and they're very nuanced and it's only because of, I had decades worth of clothing kicking around that I've really started to understand and embrace how each garment is for a particular degree temperature. And the layers will get me to a certain point.  [00:08:51] Randall: Yeah. I'm a hundred percent with you on layers. I like to go like Jersey and then maybe a base layer or older Jersey underneath add to that thermal sleeves a vest that has a wind breaking layer on the front. A balaklava. Is also a great thing to have when the weather gets a bit colder, one to keep your head warm and your ears warm, and to keep the wind off your face, but then also you can breathe through it. So you're preheating the air and when it gets bitingly cold, which I don't know, you may not have experienced this, but I've definitely written around the Boston area and five degree temperatures and you got, ice crystals forming on the front of it, but at least you're getting a little bit of that preheating first.  [00:09:29] Definitely wants some wind breaking booties. Wind breaking layers on the front of the body. Generally when it gets really cold. If you must, you could do like heat packs on the backs of your hands. So over your arteries, delivering blood. If you're in real extreme conditions,  [00:09:44] Let's see, Tom also mentioned riding cold dark mornings, which means low pressures for grip. And then also lots of lots of lights, lots of reflectivity. You definitely don't want to be caught out and that's a good general rule, but especially riding in dark conditions when people might be tired.  [00:10:00] And then what else?  [00:10:02] Craig: Going to add the other big thing that I really enjoy is a thermal cap with the little flaps over the years, I find that really just, keeps the heat in there.  [00:10:11] Randall: Yeah, that's a nice intermediate solution before it's too cold to expose your face.  [00:10:16] Going that route. Other things pit stops with hand dryers. So I knew where all the Dunkin donuts were along my routes. I could just go in there on a really cool day and just dry off and heat up. People around here sometimes like in embrocation, gives you like a Burnie tingling sensation on the skin.  [00:10:30] Vaseline. It's actually a big one. It helps with insulation on exposed skin and helps it from getting dried and raw and so on. So I'll put Vaseline on my face and that actually makes a big difference in keeping me warm. And I don't find that it has any negative effects on my skin, my pores and things like that.  [00:10:48] I'm trying to think. Did we miss anything? Oh, tape the vent holes on your shoes. That's a big one. 'cause even with booties sometimes the holes will still, oftentimes the holes will still be exposed. And so close that up. Otherwise you just going to get air flow into the shoe and you'll know exactly where it's coming from. Once you get on the road.  [00:11:08] Craig: Yeah. And I remember. When all hell broke loose. I would even stick my foot in a plastic bag and then put it in the shoe.  [00:11:16] To get a little extra warmth. I don't necessarily recommend that. And I do know and aware em, aware that, you can get like Russ socks now in different kind of obviously wool is a great material to have underneath your shoe. It, yeah. [00:11:28] Randall: I love wool and I'll take like old wool sweaters and stuff and cut the sleeves and then put it in the dryer to shrink. So it's tight against the body and that'll be a base layer. Cause it's just great for loft and for wicking. So if you're trying to be cheap, that can be a way to go about it.  [00:11:43] Craig: I'm Now like off in my head, imagining sleeveless Randall in a tight fitting wool sweater. And it's more reading burning man then cycling performance.  [00:11:54] Randall: with the jorts, I might show up at a race near you.  [00:11:56] Craig: Our next couple of questions are from Alan Collins and the first one's around everyday carry. What do you always carry with you on every ride tools, parts, spares, pumps, hydration, snacks, gels, et cetera. Are you traveling light or packing an RV?  [00:12:14] Randall: So I'm now back in new England, so I'm often relatively near civilization, so I'm not as comprehensive as I would be say, like riding in Marine where I might be a good five, six mile walk over some mountains to get to anywhere. But critical things. I bring plugs like tire plugs. In my case, dynaplugs bacon strips, same deal.  [00:12:36] Spare tube. A tool that has all the critical things I need. If you're one of our riders, make sure you got a six mil on your tool because that's what you need for your through axles. What else? If there's any risk whatsoever. Me getting caught out in the dark. I'll have lights front and rear might as well.  [00:12:54] I'm trying to think of anything else that I always bring along. That's the key stuff. How about you?  [00:12:59] Craig: Yeah, I'm a mid-weight packer. Like I've really embraced that quarter frame bag. So I just tend to be ready for most eventualities that I expect. And obviously I gear up depending on the amount of hours I plan on being out. I tend to bring one nutritional item per hour that I'm going to be out. Obviously if I'm going out for an hour, I tend to be forgetful about hydration and nutrition. I don't really think too much about it.  [00:13:26] But I do think about it in terms of the number of hours I'm going to be out and then building Certainly my nutrition and hydration on top of that.  [00:13:33] my basic everyday carry same with you. I just want to make sure I can handle. [00:13:37] the most likely kind of repair scenarios out there on the trail. And I don't go overboard with it. There's probably many more things I would bring on a bike packing trip than I do on a five-hour ride.  [00:13:50] Randall: Yeah.  [00:13:51] And one thing I forgot to mention.  [00:13:53] Yeah, we did the everyday carry in the dirt episode nine. So listen there. That's where we go. Deep nerd on all the things. If you want a comprehensive list of what you might bring. The other thing, I don't know if I mentioned a pump. Duh. So I forgot that one there.  [00:14:06] Craig: Pump and CO2 for sure. [00:14:07] Randall: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:14:08] But otherwise it really depends on the ride. These days, I'm doing mostly like hour and a half, two hour higher intensity rides actually oftentimes even shorter, lower intensity rides. So I don't need to bring as much. But I'll where you are, you have micro-climates all over the place on Mount Tam.  [00:14:23] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. So. I'm always rocking like a full spare jacket in there, unless I'm going out mid day, which is rare these days. I just figure if I'm going downhill, I might as well be warm and it just makes it more pleasant. So that's why, again, like I have that quarter frame bag and I just jam it full of stuff.  [00:14:40] After our everyday carry episode, I did get a magic link. Cause it's it's nothing like this. Obviously no weight. And I just threw it in there. [00:14:48] Fortunately, I haven't had to use it, but it's there. If I ever did need it. [00:14:51] Randall: Oh, you don't have the technique for breaking the chain and being able to piece it back together without the magic link.  [00:14:57] Craig: I'm fairly skilled at that, But I don't have a chain breaker that I bring with me.  [00:15:01] Randall: Got it. Okay.  [00:15:02] Craig: Yeah.  [00:15:04] Alan's next question was, do you have any tips for prepping a gravel bike for competition in road, gravel mix or cyclocross?  [00:15:11] Randall: Don't do it the night before.  [00:15:14] Craig: Yeah. I I think there's a couple of different ways to go with this question, right? Obviously if you're a cross specialist, there's going to be lots of things you're going to do. For me, if I got the courage to raise cross again, I would just show up with what I got and I wouldn't really mess with it too much.  [00:15:29] Randall: Yeah, I would do basic checks. A couple of weeks out, I would just be making sure that I don't have anything that's about to fail because especially now parts are a challenge to find in many cases, even brake pads. And in fact, if you don't already have a set, get some extra brake pads, just have them around just in case.  [00:15:47] But otherwise checking chain lengthen and the lubrication making sure the sealant and the tires. I'm having all my gear and kit and nutritional stuff laid out, making sure the brake pads have have enough life in them. This sort of thing would be the basics. And I would do this several days in advance and I would make sure to get a ride in before I actually did the race, just to make sure that I didn't mess up anything that's going to bite me later. Like the worst thing you can do is be working on your bike the night before, or the morning of, and then, potentially miss something or break something or have to replace something.  [00:16:18] Craig: Yeah, I forget who I was listening to. It might've even been kate Courtney or perhaps a professional female gravel rider who was saying they arrived at actually the Sarah Sturm. Sorry. She arrived at the start line of an event and realized that her brake pads were totally thrashed. And her mechanic slash partner said. [00:16:39] I'm going to change them right now. And that would stress me the heck out.  [00:16:43] But he did add new successful. She's Thank God. because I never would have been able to stop on the way downhill. I was swapping bikes from one, the one I had written the other day and just didn't think about it.  [00:16:54] Randall: All right, everyone you've been warned.  [00:16:57] What have we got  [00:16:58] Craig: reminds me, I need to get an order in for some brake pads, because I'm definitely reaching the end of the life of the current ones.  [00:17:06] All right. So the next couple of questions are from Ivo Hackman, and he's asking thoughts on red bull entering gravel with a race in Texas. I don't know if you caught this Randall, but it was calling strict Lynn and pacing pace and McKell then. I have bonded together and are doing a race out of Marfa, Texas that red bull is sponsoring, which is, I a natural because both of those athletes are red bull sponsored.  [00:17:31] Randall: So I'm assuming like extreme gravel jumps, flips things like this. It's just the evolution of the sport.  [00:17:38] Craig: Exactly. I think, both those two guys are so grounded in the culture of gravel racing And in my opinion have been good stewards of conversation as we bring these mass star gravel events forward. I think it's great. I think the bigger question probably within this question is about is red bull coming in as an, as a quote unquote, an Advertiser and sponsor of the event. Is that somehow changing the Experience, is it becoming more corporate? Is it something other than the community wants to see? Again, with those two people involved. I think it's a positive thing.  [00:18:12] Randall: Yeah, I don't see it as a problem, even if it's not not any, my personal thing, for me, I love the really local. Really community oriented events that are much more like mullet rides and yeah, this is a little bit of a competition going on upfront, but it's not a huge deal.  [00:18:27] And, we definitely do see more of a professionalization of gravel. There's a space for everyone and there's a space for different types of events. So I don't see them displacing the events that are even more kind of grassrootsy. So yeah, I don't have a problem with it, especially if they end up doing flips.  [00:18:45] Red bull.  [00:18:47] Craig: The next question from Ivo is how to transition from weekend warrior to competitive rider.  [00:18:54] I feel like I'm better suited to answer the reverse question, to move from a competitive rider to weekend warrior. That one is easy.  [00:19:02] Randall: Yeah. Let's see. Step one. Have a kid.  [00:19:06] Craig: Yeah.  [00:19:07] Randall: That'll That'll take care of that in a hurry.  [00:19:09] Craig: Yeah. For me, this trend, it's all about structure.  [00:19:13] Like I, and I don't have any or much in My writing anymore, but I recognize in listening to coaches and Talking to them, it really is all about structure. And Even if that structure just means. You have one specific interval training session a week, and then your long endurance rides on the weekend to me, by my likes, I think you'll see a lot of progression. And as you progress, I think then you start to see the potential for coaching, more multi-day structured program in your week, If you're willing to go down that route. But to me, from what I've seen first stop is intervals.  [00:19:50] Randall: Yeah. Structure. Intervals is. Is one. And then within the context of a period iodized training program, Which is to say you do different types of training at different times during the season, based on the amount of training time you have available and the events that you're preparing for, because there's no sense in doing a lot of intensity several months out from a race and then, be firing on all cylinders, say, three months out and then just be totally kicked by the time your van comes around, you have that build, you do base training, and then you're doing more tempo. And then towards the events, your hours are going down and your intensity is going up and you're really trying to peak for that specific event.  [00:20:33] The book that was one of the Bibles when I was racing some time ago was Joe Freels I think it was called like the training and racing Bible or the mountain bikers, Bible or something. A book like that would be a good starting point. And then if you have the budget working with the coach, especially early on to really just accelerate your learning and to get someone to bounce ideas off of, and to use them as a way of learning your body. And that last part I would add at the very least heart rate monitor, learn how your body responds to stress, but then a power meter as well It's just a tremendously helpful tool and they're cheap. Now you need a four I power meter bonded onto a lot of cranks for 300 bucks. So there's really no reason not to make that investment if you're spending all this time to train and to, go to events, 300 bucks is pretty low lying fruit.  [00:21:25] Craig: Yeah, it is a great source of truth. Having a power meter. [00:21:29] For sure.  [00:21:29] Randall: yeah. One last thing would be a bike fit, actually if you haven't done it already, I think everyone should invest in a bike fit if you're doing any reasonable amount of riding, but if you're gonna be racing and training and trying to squeeze out every last bit and not get injured go get yourself a bike fit.  [00:21:44] Craig: Next question, moving on to what we've deemed at components category. JC Levesque probably pronounced that wrong. Sorry jC, appreciate the question he's asking. What about handlebars? There's a move towards wider flared bars and gravel and a few odd ones out there. There's the kitchen sink candle bar from our friends at red shift. The coefficient bar. From our friend, Rick Sutton. Obviously he's mentioned the canyon hover bar, although that isn't an add on it's integrated into that bike.  [00:22:14] But he asked him maybe worth going over the different expectations are for drop bar bikes that is tackling. Gravel versus pavement versus term.  [00:22:22] Randall: Sure you want to. Take a stab at this first.  [00:22:26] Craig: So for me, I think we're going to continue to see more and more riders explore Wider and flared bars. Like when I jumped on that trend and went out to a 48 millimeter with a 20 degree flare, I immediately felt more comfortable. My orientation as a gravel cyclist is towards rougher terrain, More like pure off roady kind of stuff. So I really appreciate. Appreciated that with.  [00:22:52] It is a pretty easy component to you forget about when you get a bike, right? So many things are going through your mind when you're buying a bike. The handlebars just the handlebar it comes with. If you're working with a good shop from a good direct manufacturer, they're going to ask you appropriate questions about what width you should get. But I do think there's going to be this continued trend towards exploring these different types of bars as the gravel market continues to see people ride these bikes in different ways.  [00:23:21] Randall: Yeah, I generally agree. And I think it's a good thing. I'm not sold on the extremes of flare. I just don't see it as necessary. There's not so much torque being delivered through the steering column when I'm riding, even on technical terrain that I'm finding myself needing more control. With a dropper post of course that's the big caveat, right? Cause that's lightening up the front wheel taking, mass off of that front wheel, putting it on the back, allowing the body to access suspension more. So that helps a lot in reducing the need for leverage. We do a 10 degree flare and I find that for me, that's the max I can do with a traditional flare and I was still having my hands in a comfortable position. And I actually find that flair is helpful in terms of my risk comfort in hand comfort.  [00:24:06] And you see this as a trend, actually on road bars to, four to six degrees of flare on road bars starting to happen. You also see a trend towards leavers coming standard with a bit of kick out a bit of flair at the lever itself which goes along with these trends. The thing that I'm actually really interested in is bars like the 3T Aero Ghiaia. I think that's how it's pronounced.  [00:24:26] This bar has a pretty compound bend. So it's relatively standard on the hoods, but then flares out below the hoods and gives you that extra leverage while at the same time giving you more of a roadie position on top. And I really like. Sticking with this one bike trend and making, keeping these bikes as versatile as possible, just because they can be. And in the case of that bar, it's also that arrow profile, I don't think is super important. Frankly, people overblow the value of arrow and we can talk about that. But, it's certainly not a problem. And that arrow profile probably gives it some more vertical flex.  [00:25:02] And I think that's actually a great way to get some additional compliance on gravel bikes is to have some flare in the wings of the bar.  [00:25:10] Craig: Yeah, I think you're right. I think people are going to continue to explore that. It's a market that I think is tricky for manufacturers to play in because people are so entrenched with what they know and have, and exploring some of these new trends can often be costly. It might be $100 to $300 to get a handlebar and try it out. [00:25:31] Randall: Yeah. For. $400 plus in some cases you can spend a lot of money on a carbon bar.  [00:25:36] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. A related question comes from east bay grants. Just question on Aero bars and gravel.  [00:25:42] Randall: Yeah. Pretty trivial gains. All in all. If you're going to be spending money on, even just on arrow, get an Aero helmet. I think that would be a bigger impact. Then arrow, handlebars. These are just very marginal gains and I wouldn't at all compromise ergonomics or control in order to go arrow. So if you're already getting a new bar and there's an arrow version and a non arrow version that you like. And there aren't any other compromises sure. Go with the arrow version, but I don't think that this is where your low lying fruit is.  [00:26:17] Craig: Yeah. I was reading it as arrow bar extensions on the handlebar and my perspective is it just depends on what you're doing at the end of the day. If you're hauling across the Plains for 200 miles, I understand having a variety of hand and body positions is required and useful, and I'm all for it. If you're ripping around Marin I think you're going to find that you never.  [00:26:39] You never set your arms in a gravel bar if you're actually in the dirt, but that's just where I live.  [00:26:44] Randall: Without, now that you've reframed the question. Yeah, they definitely has their place. And in addition to offering another hand position that's particularly useful if you're just bombing down a really straight road and into a headwind it can be a real aerodynamic advantage there. It also gives you another place to secure gear too. So if you're doing extended bike packing tour. It has that added benefit. There's a place for it, for sure.  [00:27:08] Craig: Yeah. Next question comes from our friend, Tom boss from Marine county bike coalition. He was out riding and he mentioned that he was thinking about how things get named in the cycling world. And how his gravel bike. If he thinks of as an adventure bike effectively, the way he rides it. And then he had a funny note is just about why clipless pedals are called clipless when there's actually no clip.  [00:27:32] Randall: Yeah.  [00:27:33] Craig: Actually. Yeah. So anyway. I think this is something you've been on about the naming convention in cycling, just about these bikes being adventure, bikes, more than anything else. [00:27:42] Randall: Yeah, it's really like adventure is what we're doing with it. Gravel is one type of surface that we're riding. And I like the idea, granted not only a subset of bikes fall into this category, but we call our bike a onebike. And I think bikes like the the allied echo, the servo, a Sparrow, and a few others fall into this category of being, an endurance road or even in the case of the echo,  [00:28:07] borderline, crit type geometry that you can achieve. While at the same time being very capable for adventure riding. And for that type of bike, you could call it a one bike, but then otherwise, what is being called a gravel bike on the more off-road technical end of the spectrum. I think it's an adventure bike.  [00:28:23] And in fact even if it doesn't has have bosses and other accommodations for bags and bike packing. A lot of these bags and so on, or you can strap on or mountain other ways. So you could go and do some adventuring with it.  [00:28:36] Craig: Yeah, I think they, these names. Of category starts to take hold at the grassroots level and then manufacturers just get behind them. And certainly in the early days of the quote unquote gravel market, It was just easy to call it gravel as opposed to road or mountain.  [00:28:54] Presently, obviously we can acknowledge there's so many, there's so many nuances there and there's this spectrum of what gravel means. So yeah, they are adventure, bikes, plain and simple. But I guess I understand where gravel came from.  [00:29:06] Randall: What's good though, is we have another category, right? So we can get you to buy an adventure bike and a gravel bike and endurance road bike, and a crit bike and a cyclocross bike. And even if all these bikes could be the same bikes. Let's not tell anyone because that gets them to buy more bikes. I think that's the marketing perspective on some of the naming conventions.  [00:29:26] Craig: Next up comes a series of questions from Kim ponders. And we should give a shout out to Kim because she's the one who really set this off. She actually recommended and suggested in the ridership forum that, Hey, why don't you guys do a Q and a episode? And I immediately thought that great idea, Kim, I'm all about it. [00:29:44] Randall: Yeah. Thanks, Kim.  [00:29:46] Craig: So our first question is what should I do not do to avoid damaging a carbon frame?  [00:29:52] Randall: So I'll jump in on this one. Carbon is strong intention, but not in compression, so never clamp it in a stand or sit on the top tube, use a torque wrench, always. And avoid extreme heat sources like car exhausts, which generally isn't a problem with frames because they don't end up in the main stream of the exhaust, but is definitely a problem with carbon rims.  [00:30:13] We've seen a number of molten rims. And it's usually they fail at the spoke holes first. Cause there's just so much tension on those spokes that as soon as the resin starts to transition. Into more of a liquid glass it immediately starts to crack at the rims that'd be my main guidance for carbon generally.  [00:30:32] Craig: And as we've talked about it a little bit before on the podcast, I think as a frame designer, You're layering in carbon, in greater, greater levels of material in more sensitive areas.  [00:30:44] But you are. Yeah. [00:30:45] So like your, your down tube and by your bottom bracket. They can take a ding from a rock and they're going to survive. [00:30:52] Randall: Generally. Yes. So if you're kicking up a lot of rocks, adding a layer of thicker film is definitely a good idea. We put a very thin film on ours. It's mostly to protect the paint. And then film on the insides of the fork plates seat stays and chain stays where the tire passes through.  [00:31:08] I can save you a lot of grief. If you end up with mud caked on your tires. Cause that'll just grind right through the paint and potentially to layers of carbon. So we do that stock for that reason. And it's a good idea. If you don't already have it, get yourself some 3m protective film.  [00:31:22] Craig: Yeah, and for me, I actually run it's essentially a sort of protective sticker layer from a company called the all mountain style and they just, in my opinion, do great visual designs. And check them out because personally, I love when you look underneath my, down to that, you see this. Digital cammo kind of thing on my nice pink bike.  [00:31:43] Randall: Yeah, it's rad. It's definitely a way to pretty things up.  [00:31:47] Craig: Next question from Kim is their basic regular maintenance checklists that I should be aware of. You things I should check every ride every month, every season, every year.  [00:31:57] Randall: Yeah. When you got.  [00:31:59] Craig: I think there's a lot there, obviously, we've talked about the importance of making sure your chain is lubed your tire pressure. Those are the things I check every single ride. Be aware of how your brakes are changing and performance. So keep an mental eye on.  [00:32:14] Your brake pads and how they're wearing, I'm not going around tightening bolts at all. Unless I've removed something, I'm not really messing with Any of that. I do find my Thesis to be pretty much ready to go. As long as I'm paying attention to the tire and the chain lube. [00:32:31] Randall: Yeah. Yeah, that's that's about right. I would add to that, check the chain length every so often. And there's a question in here about how to do that. Get one of these go-no-go gauges. I've got the the park tools, CC three.  [00:32:44] There's a bunch of good ones out there. And if it has multiple settings to check, go with the most conservative one. Swap your chains early and often, because it will save you a lot of money on your expensive cogs and cassettes.  [00:32:58] And it'll just make everything perform better. And then every so often, if you feel any looseness in your headset, that's a common thing that will come up over time, potentially just, just check that every so often. If you feel any looseness, you want to tighten it up early. So it doesn't start to wear down the cups or things like that.  [00:33:14] Craig: Yeah. And if you can afford it and you don't have the skills in your own garage, definitely bring it in for an annual tune-up. I think the bikes are going to come back working great and you've got some professionalize on them. [00:33:26] Randall: Yeah.  [00:33:26] Craig: Next question. Kim asked was what's the best way to pack a bike for air travel.  [00:33:31] Randall: So if you try to be. The cheapest option for the packaging. Cardboard box. And if you're not doing it frequently, that's a good way to go.  [00:33:41] Craig: Yeah, agreed. There's a reason why every bike manufacturer in The world is shipping with a cardboard box. As long as you protect the bike. Inside the box with some bubble wrap or some additional cardboard, they generally arrive where they need to go intact and safe. And I've had multiple occasions where I've used the cardboard box on an outbound trip and the box is Perfectly intact for the return trip. [00:34:05] Randall: And we should say specifically. Carbo box that a bike would have come in. Cause generally this'll be a five layer corrugated box. It'll be a thicker material. And if you need to reinforce it with some tape, At the corners and so on. And if you get, if it gets a hole in it, patch up the hole, but you can go pretty far with the cardboard box.  [00:34:24] I have a post carry transfer case, which I love, it's a bit more involved. I got to pull the fork and it takes me usually about 15 minutes or so. 20 minutes to pack it up, and to squeeze some gear in between the wheels and the frame and things like that.  [00:34:38] But I generally get past any sort of oversize baggage fees and I have the bigger of the two bags too. So oftentimes I don't even get asked what it is and if I get asked, it's oh yeah, it's a sports gear. Massage table. Yeah, whatever.  [00:34:50] Craig: That's the key for me that post carry bag or or, okay. This is another company that makes one of these bags where as you said, you've got to do a little bit more disassembly, whereas typically it might've been take the handle Bazaar off the pedals and your wheels, and you can get into a cardboard box. Would these particular smaller bags, you do need to pull the fork, which seems incredibly intimidating. When you first talk about it, but in practice, it's actually not. [00:35:15] Randall: It's not too bad. Probably the biggest issue is if you have a bike with integrated cabling, Then it can be a real nightmare. And in fact I might even go as far as to say, if you don't know what you're doing, don't mess with it. A bike with external cabling, or at least partially external, like our bike, you just have to be careful not to kink the hoses. That's the big, probably the biggest city issue, kinking the hoses, or bending the housings and cables in a way that affects the breaking or the shifting.  [00:35:44] Craig: Yeah. Yeah. If you've, if your cables are particularly tight, It then becomes a problem. I think my routing is just on the edge. I do feel like I'm putting a little bit of stress. On the cables when I'm disassembling in that bag, but so far so good. [00:35:58] Randall: Yeah. Yeah.  [00:35:59] And then of course you have the full sized bags where if you don't care about paying the airline fees, then get one of these was it Evoque I think makes a really nice one that has good protection there's a bunch of companies that make good ones where you just  [00:36:11] Craig: Yeah, I've.  [00:36:12] Randall: the front wheel and throw it in.  [00:36:14] Craig: I've got a Tulay one that is like bomber. It's got like a through axle slots, but one it's hard as hell to move it around. And two, I got dinged on both weight and access size on my trip to Africa. It's out. I was pretty ticked. [00:36:31] Randall: Yeah. And then the other thing is on the other end can you get it into the trunk of a cab. And so that's actually another advantage of bags like the post transfer case in the oral case ones is you can. I think I know the post one has backpack straps, and then you can fit it in the boot of pretty much any vehicle.  [00:36:49] Craig: Yeah, totally under emphasized attribute and benefit of those types of bags. Totally agree. [00:36:54] Like you can get into a sedan. With a, a Prius, Uber Lyft driver and make it in. No problem. [00:37:00] Randall: Oh, yeah.  [00:37:01]  [00:37:01] Craig Dalton: Pardon the segue that's going to do it for part one of our Q and a episode. I thought that was a great time to break and we'll jump into another half hour of questions and answers in our next episode of, in the dirt, which we'll release in the coming weeks. As always, if you're interested in communicating with myself or Randall,  [00:37:20] Please join the ridership www.theridership.com. If you're able to support the podcast, your contributions are greatly appreciated. You can visit, www.buymeacoffee.com/thegravelride to contribute in any way you can to support the financial wellbeing of the podcast. If you're unable to support in that way, ratings and reviews are hugely appreciated.  [00:37:46] On any of your favorite podcast platforms. Until next time. Here's to finding some dirt under your wheels. 

The Talent Economy Podcast
Piloting a Program for Radical Flexibility

The Talent Economy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 30:13


The last year and a half has caused massive changes in all of our lives, both personal and professional. What if a company decided not only to embrace those changes, but also to use them as a catalyst for large-scale evolution in the way we work and in the way we think about work? In this episode, we speak with Leena Nair, the first female, the first Asian individual, and the youngest ever Chief Human Resources Officer of Unilever, about what the company is doing to create a radically flexible work model—and the benefits that approach can hold for everyone involved. Nair heads a pioneering agenda for Unilever's 149,000-strong workforce. Under her direction, the London-based company has achieved a 50/50 gender balance across global leadership and now offers a living wage across its supply chain. Her expertise has driven business growth to €50 billion. Nair began her Unilever career at Hindustan Unilever, where she became the first woman on the management committee in 90 years, heading HR. She was also appointed the first woman on the Unilever South Asia leadership team and was responsible for Unilever's growth in five markets with a business size of around €6 billion. Nair has continued to redefine how big business can contribute to the environment and society; she has a reputation for putting the people at the heart of the business, driving growth, and taking risks to create a better business and a better society.Nair speaks about the unprecedented flexibility that Unilever is currently piloting with its workforce, how the company encourages its employees to be lifelong learners, and her push to continue valuing all the lessons learned over the last 18 months. She also shares with us the lesson Unilever learned about treating every country's workforce according to the country's own culture, and why it's so important that the company continue to support its employees in every way possible, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.Some Questions Asked:What can you tell us about the program that's allowing people to get an education while maintaining job security?What more can you tell us about how Unilever is imagining what will happen next?Unilever wants all its employees to have a future-fit skill set by 2025. What is a future-fit skill set? And how are you ensuring that goal is met?In This Episode, You Will Learn:How COVID-19 has forced employers and employees alike to slow down and take stock of the way we work. The ways Unilever strives to support its employees' well-being—mentally, physically, and emotionally. How other companies can learn from Unilever's gender balance and what they can do to achieve the same. Links:Leena Nair - at Unilever Leena Nair - LinkedIn Leena Nair - in Time magazineLeena Nair - in Harper's Bazaar magazine See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Fast Keto with Ketogenic Girl
PROTEIN SERIES: Optimize Yourself with Protein: Dr. Gabrielle Lyon

Fast Keto with Ketogenic Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 62:18


Dr. Gabrielle Lyon is a functional medicine physician specializing in the concept of muscle-centric medicine, which focuses on the largest organ in the body, skeletal muscle, as the key to health and longevity. Her individualized wellness plans include interventions using high-quality protein diets, supplements and resistance training to improve health, reduce chronic disease risk and boost overall energy and wellness by focusing on building and maintaining healthy body composition and lean muscle. In her private practice, Dr. Lyon leverages evidence-based medicine with emerging cutting-edge science to restore metabolism, balance hormones and optimize body composition with the goal of lifelong vitality. She treats patients of all walks of life – from sarcopenic individuals that want to improve muscle to age independently to overweight and pre-diabetic adults who need to manage weight and improve lean body mass for better health. Her patients also include elite military operators such as Navy SEALS, Green Berets, Army Rangers and Canadian Assaulters, who benefit from her whole-body, whole-person approach, including advanced nutrition interventions, metabolic and genetic testing and personalized behavioral action plans. She received her doctorate in osteopathic medicine from the Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine and is board-certified in family medicine. She earned her undergraduate degree in Human Nutrition from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign where she studied vitamin and mineral metabolism, chronic disease prevention and management and the physiological effects of diet composition. She also completed a research/clinical fellowship in Nutritional Science and Geriatrics at Washington University in St. Louis. A nationally recognized speaker and media contributor, Dr. Lyon has been a recent guest on The Doctors and has written for Muscle and Fitness, Women's Health, Men's Health, and Harper's Bazaar. Her subject matter expertise ranges from brain and thyroid health to lean body mass support and longevity. Try the Higher Protein Keto Meal Plans & Coaching: https://www.ketogenicgirl.com Special thank you to Fast Keto sponsors: This episode is brought to you by ButcherBox™ ! They make sure their members are taken care of! Thanks to them I have a special offer for our listeners! ButcherBox™ is giving new members free ground beef FOR LIFE! Sign up at ButcherBox.com/ FASTKETO and get 2 lbs of ground beef free in every order for the life of your membership. Log on to ButcherBox.com/ FASTKETO to claim this deal! - Try AG1 by Athletic Greens! ONE tasty scoop contains 75 vitamins, minerals and whole food-sourced ingredients, including a multivitamin, multimineral, probiotic, greens superfood blend and more, that all work together to fill the nutritional gaps in your diet, increase energy and focus, aid with digestion and supports a healthy immune system, all without the need to take multiple products or pills. To make it easy, Athletic Greens is going to give you an immune supporting FREE 1 year supply of Vitamin D AND 5 free travel packs with your first purchase if you visit athleticgreens.com/ketogenicgirl today. - Prior to beginning a ketogenic diet you should undergo a health screening with your physician to confirm that a ketogenic diet is suitable for you and to rule out any conditions and contraindications that may pose risks or are incompatible with a ketogenic diet, including by way of example: conditions affecting the kidneys, liver or pancreas; muscular dystrophy; pregnancy; breast-feeding; being underweight; eating disorders; any health condition that requires a special diet [other conditions or contraindications]; hypoglycemia; or type 1 diabetes. A ketogenic diet may or may not be appropriate if you have type 2 diabetes, so you must consult with your physician if you have this condition. Anyone under the age of 18 should consult with their physician and their parents or legal guardian before beginning such a diet]. Use of Ketogenic Girl videos are subject to the Ketogenicgirl.com Terms of Use and Medical Disclaimer. All rights reserved. If you do not agree with these terms, do not listen to, or view any Ketogenic Girl podcasts or videos.  

THE CITY CONFESSIONS
Ep 118: Harry Josh- Celebrity Stylist and Americas Ambassador, Goldwell & KMS- Staying Persistent in NYC - Importance of Education in the Beauty Industry- Power of Mindset, Meditation and Energy

THE CITY CONFESSIONS

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 45:30


Today's guest is Harry Josh, one of the most sought-after editorial stylists in the world. Before his freelance career took off, Harry was doing double duty as a celebrity hairdresser and casting director for Marc Jacobs and Louis Vuitton. Now, Harry's days are filled doing editorial work for Harper's Bazaar, British Vogue, GQ, Allure, and other leading fashion magazines. In 2013, he launched his namesake hair tool line: Harry Josh® Pro Tools. His much-lauded Pro Dryer 2000 is a favorite of celebrities, stylists and real men and women alike. Today, Harry Josh® Pro Tools consists of two hair dryers, two curling irons, a flat iron, a diffuser, and an array of brushes, combs and clips. Harry has touched the heads of Rose Byrne, Olivia Wilde, Taylor Schilling, Kate Bosworth, Hillary Swank, Ellen Pompeo, Christy Turlington, Helena Christensen, Cindy Crawford, Kaia Gerber, Karlie Kloss and Gisele. In this episode we talk about a variety of topics including Harry's persistence working in the industry for 12 years before getting his big break. Harry recalls how his job as a casting director helped him forge relationships with models and how those friendships essentially placed himself in front of Amy Astley, the former beauty editor of Vogue at that time. We also dive deeper into the power of mindset and how he's cultivated an abundant one throughout his career. He notes that his struggles taught him how to focus on the present and to always remain true to his passion for education and empowering others through his work. Harry reiterates that happiness is a choice and not based on circumstances. We also discuss the benefits of meditation and the mind, how to stay present in a digital world, and how he's taking all his lessons from his extensive and impressive career to make an impact in the beauty industry today. You can connect with Harry on Instagram and check out his tools on his website https://www.harryjosh.com/. If you have any questions, comments or feedback, feel free to email thecityconfessions@gmail.com.  --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/thecityconfessions/support

Kopec Explains Software
#68 Open Source Business Models

Kopec Explains Software

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 18:19


Open source does not mean non-commercial. We start this episode by dispelling the common myths amongst the general public about the relationship between the business world and open source software. We then get into the many different business models that open source software companies use to make money. We cover six different business models, ranging from selling services to using your open source product as a so-called "loss leader." After we tour the major business models, we discuss some of the less well-known business models, like selling documentation. Show Notes Episode 12: Open Source Software Episode 65: What is a Device Driver? Episode 64: What is a Content Management System? The Cathedral and the Bazaar by Eric Raymond Follow us on Twitter @KopecExplains. Theme “Place on Fire” Copyright 2019 Creo, CC BY 4.0 Find out more at http://kopec.live

The Nathan Barry Show
049: Jessica DeFino - Using Musicality and Rhythm To Dramatically Improve Your Writing

The Nathan Barry Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 55:34


Jessica DeFino is a freelance beauty journalist living in Los Angeles, California. For the past seven years Jessica has been writing, researching, editing, and publishing about the beauty and wellness industry. Her work has appeared in Vogue, The Cut, Fashionista.com, Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire, Business Insider, SELF, HelloGiggles, Harper's Bazaar, and more.Before starting her career as a freelance journalist, Jessica worked as a beauty writer for The Zoe Report. She was Director of Communications at Fame and Partners, and worked as a ghostwriter for Khloé Kardashian and Kendall Jenner.Jessica earned her bachelor's degree in Music/Business Songwriting from the Berklee College of Music. Jessica's music degree brings a unique perspective to her writing. It infuses each piece with lyrical qualities of storytelling, flow, and connection to her audience.Jessica also publishes a bi-monthly beauty newsletter called The Unpublishable, where she shares “What the beauty industry won't tell you — from a reporter on a mission to reform it.”In this episode, you'll learn about: Making lasting connections with your audience Why understanding music and rhythm makes your writing better Capturing and keeping your readers' attention right from the outset The dangers of cross-posting your content across social media Links & Resources Vogue Magazine Allure Harper's Bazaar Ursula K. Le Guin RhymeZone Ali Abdaal Jessica DeFino's Links Follow Jessica on Twitter The Unpublishable Jessica's Instagram Episode Transcript[00:00:00] Jessica:I started writing as a songwriter. The musicality of something is very important to me. So I'll read my own stuff out loud sometimes. I feel when people can read something and there's a clear flow and rhythm to it, and the words melt into each other sound nice next to each other, it locks them into the content early on. You want to keep reading because if you stop reading it's like you're breaking this rhythm that you've started.[00:00:34] Nathan:In this episode I talk to Jessica DeFino. She's a journalist covering the beauty industry, but she tends to take an approach that's not as popular with sponsors and publishers, because she's anti a lot of their products and a lot of the nonsense that is put into the products and the marketing behind it.She's taking a critical angle and she's well loved by her readers because of it, but maybe not so loved by the big brands. We talk about how that came about. We talk about her writing style, her approach of using her background in song writing and going to school for songwriting to have a better, more interesting writing style.She gives some tips along that angle, talking about how she launched a newsletter last year and growing that to 9,000 subscribers. How that is a backbone for the rest of her work she does in journalism.It's a great conversation. So, let's dive in.Jessica, welcome to the show.[00:01:28] Jessica:Thank you so much for having me.[00:01:29] Nathan:We'll jump around a whole bunch, but I want to start on the launching of your newsletter. What was the moment when you started to think, okay, I want to actually run a newsletter and start to control my own audience?[00:01:44] Jessica:I had been toying with the idea for a while, and then I think it was, April, 2020, right after the pandemic, where I had gotten into a situation where—I'm a freelance reporter—I had four freelance stories out when March happened, and Coronavirus lockdowns happened and everything was up in the air.The company severed ties with all of their freelancers and basically gave these four unpublished stories back to me, and gave me a kill fee. So it was like I had reported out these whole stories. I had spent months on them, and now I had nowhere to put them, and I gave it about a month of pitching it out to other alums.There weren't any takers because media was in such a precarious position at the time. Finally I was like, maybe this is the opportunity I've been waiting for to launch a newsletter. and I decided to call it The Unpublishable because I couldn't get anyone to publish this. And yeah, it's been going, almost like every other week.[00:02:50] Nathan:Nice. Yeah. It's interesting how these unfortunate moments result in something that's like, okay, this is actually either a good thing now, or hopefully going to be a good thing soon, but it starts with difficult times.[00:03:05] Jessica:Yeah, exactly. I wanted these pieces to be big. They were stories that I thought were important to tell, and I really wanted them to be in a major outlet. Sometimes with media, you can't sit on things for very long. It was like, I maybe have two more weeks before they stopped becoming relevant.[00:03:23] Nathan:Yeah. So for context, for anyone listening, what were some of those stories as an example?[00:03:27] Jessica:The first story I published with a piece called “Where are All the Brown Hands?” It was a look into the overwhelming whiteness of the top nailcare companies in beauty. If you would look at their Instagrams or if you would look at their websites, everything was modeled on white hands.As a beauty reporter, when I have to source images for the stories, I don't want to just be showing white hands. If I'm writing about nail trends or whatever, and it would take me hours every week to comb through places and try to find the trend I was speaking to on a person of color. At one point, I was like, why is this happening and how come it's so hard?This should not be hard. So, I wanted to do an investigation into it, and just like that the whole process had already taken six months. I was like, you don't know what's going to happen in this story. It might be scooped. It might be written by somebody else. It might be irrelevant in another month or so.So, I really wanted to get that out there, and that started it.[00:04:31] Nathan:When you publish a story like that, and you're used to publishing for a major beauty publication, but you're publishing it for yourself. What did that look like? What was the process of saying, I have this story that I've worked on for a long time, and I have a brand new newsletter and all at once.How did you bring that to life and pull the audience together?[00:04:52] Jessica:Well, luckily at that point I had a mask, a little bit of a social media following just from my work on work, like major publications. Like I had been writing for Vogue and allure. Harper's bizarre. And I had been pretty diligent about building up a social media audience. So I had a pretty sizable, amount of readers just from Instagram.And a couple of years prior, I had like tried starting my own beauty content platform, but I never really had the time to dedicate to it. But I had a small email list from that, from when I was still doing it. So I kind of like funneled all of that together under this new umbrella of this is going to be like my personal reporting newsletter and I kind of got the word out on Instagram.So it ended up reaching like a surprisingly large audience for something that was like a first-time newsletter.[00:05:44] Nathan:Yeah. So if you don't mind sharing how many subscribers were like to that first article?[00:05:49] Jessica:I think that first article probably went out to like 1500 subscribers[00:05:53] Nathan:Okay. Yeah, but that's you're right. That, that is a surprisingly of like, here's the first thing that we're doing.And I guess it goes to show from right. Spending a whole career being known and, and building it in this space. And then, you know, you're not starting from scratch when you funnel entity.[00:06:10] Jessica:Yeah, it, it had always been important to me to, not as important, but it was something I thought about to collect email addresses and to get social media followers, because my goal had always been to write a book. And I know that when publishers are looking at whether to buy a book from you, it matters what kind of audience you have and how many people you have on an email list.So even though I wasn't sending things out prior to finally launching the newsletter, Collecting emails here and there. Just, just to have for the, for the book pitch one day.[00:06:42] Nathan:Yes. That's something that I've always heard is, you know, from agents and friends who are authors and all of that, as they talked about the, the email as being the thing that the publisher is looking for, they're like, Yeah, that sounds good. First question.[00:06:57] Jessica:Yeah.[00:06:57] Nathan:I mean, they use it as a proxy for how many copies can you sell?[00:07:01] Jessica:Exactly. Yeah. When I was pitching out my book, it was all about, Instagram. I, this was probably like two years ago now. and I couldn't get an agent to talk to me until I had 10,000 Instagram followers. So that's like, all I cared about for maybe a year, I was like, I don't care. I'm not going to put effort into anything else.I just need these Instagram followers.[00:07:23] Nathan:Yeah. So you have 35,000 followers on Instagram now. what were the things that worked for you as far as growing that, that audience on it?[00:07:32] Jessica:Honestly, in the beginning, when I was like, I need to get to 10,000 followers, I was a little scammy about it. I did a lot of the like follow unfollow. So I followed a ton of people who were following accounts that were similar to mine.And kind of, and what you do with that is like, they see that you followed them, they check out your page.Hopefully they follow you back. If they don't follow you back, you can like unfollow that person to keep your ratio looking good.[00:08:00] Nathan:So is that like going through and following like 50 people a day kind of thing or hundreds[00:08:05] Jessica:Yeah. I mean probably 50 to 200 people. Like I would spend probably an hour or two hours a day just doing. Stupid stuff like that, but I didn't really care about, but I was like, I'll do anything to get a book deal. If it's following 200 people a day, that doesn't bother me. And if at the end of the day, they're looking at my profile and saying, Hey, this is somebody whose content I care about.I'm going to follow them. It doesn't feel like bad or wrong to me. So I just did a lot of that[00:08:34] Nathan:Yeah, it's a very small way, like small and non-intrusive way to be like, Hey. Do you want to pay? Like, you're just sort of raising your hand and people either go like no, or they go, oh yeah, I'll look at that for a second.What's interesting is I think that a lot of creators started in that way, but probably now when they tell their story, they're like, yeah. You know, I just, I just put out good content and then the content itself. And before you know it, I was, you know, internet famous, you know,[00:09:01] Jessica:I think that worked, it worked like 10 years ago, maybe even five years ago, but right now there's just so much content out there on every platform. And I don't think it's fair to say that if you have great content, you will be successful on that alone. Like, I think you need more than that today.[00:09:18] Nathan:Yeah. So, so the following, people in the space, which we'd recommend, you know, regardless, what are some of the other things, on that quest to 10, that will.[00:09:27] Jessica:Yeah, I was falling up a storm.I was liking a ton of stuff cause that's kind of the same strategy. Like sometimes Instagram too will phrase your account. If you like too many things or you. follow too many people. So I was getting into that. I did a ton of hashtagging at the time. luckily the, the area that I write to to beauty has like a very big and dedicated community on Instagram.So there are a ton of like beauty community hashtags out there that I was following and getting involved in and commenting and just really making my presence known in this community while at the same time posting my own content. That I thought had a very different point of view that would be intriguing to people.So once they saw that I was engaged, they were like, who is this person? And there was, you know, a lot of content there for them to, to delve into.[00:10:18] Nathan:Yeah, that's good. In the last, episode of this show, I had a YouTuber on his name's Ali doll and he's got, you know, he's built up to 2 million subscribers on YouTube, but he talked about that like back catalog that you have of when someone comes across your work for the first time, like seeing the back catalog and seeing it have a unique point of view.And I feel like. That would be the experience, you know, when you pop up in some little way. Okay. Another, you know, beauty, Instagram account, and then you come in like, oh, this is actually different. Has a unique point of view. So, I'd love for you to share. I don't know what the, the short version of like the different perspective that you're bringing to the beauty industry and what someone would notice when they come to your Instagram or your, newsletter.And they're like, this is different. This is a, you know,[00:11:08] Jessica:Yeah.[00:11:09] Nathan:Challenging.[00:11:10] Jessica:I think the easiest way to put it that most beauty content out there is very fluffy. and very positive and very product heavy. and my stance is very beauty industry critical. and I, I say that I'm pro skin anti product. So I'm much more interested in how beauty applies to like your actual skin and your actual body and like the human itself, rather than this external product, you can apply some very focused on the science of how human beings work rather than the science of like a skincare and.[00:11:44] Nathan:Right. Okay. Is there an example that comes to mind of something where you're like, do this? Not that.[00:11:50] Jessica:Yeah. I mean, probably the biggest example is just, I mostly tell people to stop using skincare, you know, period. End of story. Just, you don't have to, our skin does all of that for us. You know, humans have survived millennia without pre bottled products, and there's no reason why. In the past 30 years, our skin has suddenly evolved to need a 10 step routine.It doesn't so, yeah, I just tell people, stop using it. And they're shocked at the results all the time.[00:12:20] Nathan:I like that. I could see a conflict in. Message and business model in the industry. and your interaction in this. there's a lot of money in the industry of obviously selling, I mean, any product, but especially a product that you need to buy every month or every three months or something like that.Like that's a very good business. So have you had any, any conflict of publications not wanting to pick up your stories or any of those things as the publication is. You tell your people to not buy our sponsor's products, you know, or something like that.[00:12:55] Jessica:Oh yeah. I mean, there's been a ton of pushback and depending on what platform I'm writing for, I. See my work being edited in a certain way or softened in a certain way or a brand name being taken out. I've had articles be published and then the platform takes them down almost immediately because an advertiser has complained.I've had legal action threatened against me while I'm reporting for a story just for asking questions. yeah. Yeah. It's that kind of stuff happens all the time because in beauty journalism, there is a huge. Conflict between what you're supposed to be writing about and who's footing the bill for that content, which is products and advertisers.And I think in the beauty industry in particular, there's this extreme lack of objectivity where, you know, editors and journalists and influencers are all gifted product or taken on press trips. And. And given money to review products in a way that in any other industry, you wouldn't be able to call that journalism.You know, there's always gotta be some sort of separation there. Like a typical journalist is not allowed to accept gifts in the beauty industry. It's the complete opposite. It's like, well, how can you write about our product if we don't gift it to you? So it's, it's a very weird space that is very reliant on gifts and money and advertising.[00:14:18] Nathan:So how has that changed as well as you've launched your own newsletter? I imagine you're still doing plenty of freelance writing. Is that.[00:14:27] Jessica:Yeah. Yeah. I'm still, my, my thing is, is I try if I have a story I want to tell, I obviously want to tell it to the biggest platform possible. And then if I can't get the story placed somewhere else, I will, I will tackle it for the news.[00:14:43] Nathan:Okay. So yeah. How has like, has the news that are helped? Like, for example, you're trying to get us started placed and they're like, sure, we'll place it. But could we do this version of it instead? And, and you know, maybe you're saying that like, no that's okay. Whereas before the paycheck might've mattered more or how's That. relationship?[00:15:01] Jessica:Yeah, that's pretty much spot on. I, I didn't really push back too much before, but now that I have. platform that like actually brings in, okay. Money for me. It's not like if I say no, I don't want that story published this way. It's really not like I'm losing out on a paycheck anymore because I will make that up from my own subscribers.So, I think since I've launched the newsletter, there have been two instances of that where I've written a story for a platform have been uncomfortable with the edits and actually. And was like, no, I don't, I don't want to publish it this way. And that feels really good to have a little bit more control over, over what I want to say and the information I want to put out there.[00:15:45] Nathan:Yeah. I mean, you have even more, I mean, you, you always had agency, right. But now it's like, you have an alternative instead of like, I'll keep pitching it to someone else who might have the same objections or, or that kind of thing. On the business side what's well, actually, maybe if we dive into the newsletter today, right?So that we talked about where I was at a year ago when we launched to, I just said, we, when you launched, I had nothing to do with my launch. There's no Royal we in that are taking credit later. when you launched, you know, a year and a half ago, there was at 1500 subscribers. where's it at today,[00:16:24] Jessica:I'm at 9,000 subscribers now.[00:16:26] Nathan:Right?[00:16:28] Jessica:But, I mean, I have a model where some of it is free and some of it is paid, so there are like different cohorts within the subscriber-based too. But like, I'm, I'm pretty happy with how it's grown on the free side so far.[00:16:41] Nathan:Yeah. And so on the paid side, you're charging $7 a month, or 77 a year. What was the thinking on the pricing there? Was that something that you like agonized over a lot or was that a, like, we'll just go with something and see how it works.[00:16:54] Jessica:Yeah, I didn't agonize over it too much. I started out at $5 a month and, after I got maybe my first hundred or 200 paid subscribers and I felt really good about like, wow, that feels like a lot. That's like a good chunk of change I didn't have before. And then when I was looking into the fees that were taken from like Stripe processing, from sub staff, I was taking home like closer to $3 per subscriber.And I was like for the time and attention that I want to give this project, I'm just not going to be making it. At $5 a month until I hit a certain number of paid subscribers. so I decided to bump it up to seven, just to sort of motivate myself to put the time and attention into it that I wanted to give it because if I wasn't going to be bringing in like, actually $5 to me, it didn't feel worth it.So by pricing it at seven, I get more like $5, which felt like a, okay, I'm happy with that number. now that I do have more paid subscribers, I am toying with the idea of, of lowering it because I feel like I feel like from, at least from my perspective, when I am subscribing to a newsletter,I subscribe to a ton of them.I'm much more interested to click. I'm much more likely to click pay and subscribe if it's $5.And if it's like six or seven or eight,[00:18:21] Nathan:You think about[00:18:22] Jessica:Eh, that's kind of a lot. Do I care enough about this content to pay that much? But personally for me, $5 is like a whatever I'll I'll subscribe kind of thing. So I, I think I'm getting closer to the point where I feel like I have enough of a base that I can do that and hopefully reach more people.[00:18:42] Nathan:Right. Okay. I have so many questions here, but diving into the psychology side of when you're deciding to subscribe to something, right? Cause everyone listening is Ryan newsletter and asking these same questions. Like, should it be $5? Should it be $20? Should it be free? Shouldn't be $2. You know, like any of these things.And then they're analyzing their own buying habits. And they're like, but what if it's a business versus a fitness versus, you know, any of these, like what category I'm in and what are those other things that you notice beyond price? When you as a newsletter consumer, I go to like instant subscribe versus like, well, think about this.How many articles have I enjoyed from the recent layer? Like that, tips it over to the other side.[00:19:25] Jessica:Right. Oh, I don't know that there are that, like my personal revelations will be. relevant to people. I personally, just because I run a newsletter, I love to support. So if it's anything that I'm like vaguely interested in and it's like $5 a month or less, I don't know why $5 is my cutoff, but also subscribe.And I'll just see what it's like for a couple of months. And if I don't like it, Whatever I can always unsubscribe, but I just really love the idea of putting that abundance out there into the universe and just being like, I'm a little bit interested in this and I want to support this creator because I know what a, like a hustle it is.I'm sure the average, like newsletter consumer doesn't really doesn't really think that way. but for me, I don't know. I love a good headline if it's like a good quippy, funny headline, like I want to be reading. fun, critical content. There's a lot of like heavy, critical content out there. and I love something that's like fun and critical, so that'll get my[00:20:27] Nathan:Yeah. There are things wrong with the world and we could get depressed about them, but that doesn't[00:20:32] Jessica:Yeah,[00:20:34] Nathan:About fixing the things that are wrong with the world,[00:20:36] Jessica:yeah, exactly. Like turn it into a little bit of a, like the state of the world I feel is so bizarre.[00:20:43] Nathan:Right.[00:20:44] Jessica:Just so wild that we have set up the world the way we've set it up. Like everything that, that exists is just something that like some guy made up one day and we were like, okay, we're going to go along with it.And I feel like there is a lot of humor in that. so yeah, I, I love looking at the depressing state of the world for like a bit of a jokey lens. So if I find anything like that, I'm like immediate.[00:21:09] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. And I think that's where for anyone writing their content, like having that voice really matters. So it's not just, you know, this is what you're teaching or this is, the educational side. Or present the entertaining side. It's like, okay. But how can you, how are you gonna make me feel as I read and consume this.[00:21:29] Jessica:That's a great way to think about it. I think the difference, when I'm consuming like a newsletter versus the news is I don't really know. I don't concern myself with like tone or voice when I'm reading an article from like the New York times or the Washington post. but a newsletter is so much more personal.It's like you're getting into people's personal inbox, it's more of a one-on-one relationship. and I think it's a great opportunity to play with your voice in a way that you really sometimes can not when you're writing for a media plan.[00:22:04] Nathan:Yeah. So what are the things that you've done to practice that obviously you've had a whole career as a writer. And so, you know, as you've found your voice and the things that you play with, are there yeah. Little exercises or things that you play with or try on, or anything like that? Any, any tips for someone who's also looking to like craft their own way?[00:22:26] Jessica:It's as much of a tip, but I started writing as a songwriter. I went to school for songwriting. So I feel like a lot of my writing takes that into account. Like that's the musicality of something is very important to me. So I'll like read my own stuff out loud. Sometimes like flow of a sentence is very important to me, the rhythm of a sentence, the like intonation, the, Continence and assonance and all of that alliteration, I, I feel like when people can read something and there's a clear flow and rhythm to it, and the words like melt into each other sound nice next to each other.I personally feel like it locks them into the content early on. Like you want to keep reading because if you stop reading, it's like you're breaking this rhythm that you've started. So, yeah, I would say rhythm is very important to me and reading things out loud helps me make sure that what I've written is what I'd like envisioned and felt[00:23:35] Nathan:Yeah.[00:23:36] Jessica:Mind and my heart when I was conceptualizing the thing.[00:23:39] Nathan:Yeah, reading out loud is a really good tip because there's so many things where I'll find myself starting to read what I wrote and then like finishing it in a much more like in my head in a much more conversational way, and then realizing the sentences or the following sentences that I had. We're not conversational.They were like stilted. The version that I wanted to auto finish in my head is like, oh, that's better. Let's let's say that instead.[00:24:05] Jessica:I love that. And I think, I think newsletter subscribers are like ready for more. Conversational writing. Like I don't, I think you can be like professional and say something that has weight and has merit and has value and still be kind of, you know, casual about it.[00:24:23] Nathan:Yeah.[00:24:23] Jessica:As a strategy to connect with people.[00:24:26] Nathan:Is there a poster or a piece that you've written that you felt like. Maybe you struggled to find that balance of like, it was a, maybe a weighty piece or something like that. And you're like, oh, maybe this one I shouldn't be playful with or, you know, finding[00:24:41] Jessica:Yeah, there are definitely times when I take a break from the jokey conversationality I think the last big piece that I wrote, was about, anti-Asian racism when like all the news came out that like anti-Asian hate crimes were at an all time high. there's a lot of the beauty industry tends to take a lot of its concepts from Eastern culture, from Asian cultures.So, there was a lot to say there about racism within the beauty industry that, you know, happens in ways that you may not even realize. So for a piece like that, I think there were some moments of, of humor within it, like a dark humor within it, but for the most part, for, for things like that, I take that very seriously.I think my readers take that very seriously and I. It's less conversational then, because it's like, no, I have something that's like very important and clear that I want to get through to you. And I don't want it to be muddled with any sort of, uh jokingness.[00:25:46] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense. So let's say you were a writing coach, coaching someone,Ryan newsletter, that sort of thing. You don't have to become a writing coach after this. Just.[00:25:59] Jessica:Thank God.[00:26:00] Nathan:But like, you know, you have a friend, maybe they're writing the newsletter, they've got a couple of thousand subscribers they're getting going in.And they're saying like, you know, they, they hear what you're talking about of the, the musicality and the, the flow of, of writing. And they're like, okay. Short of going to songwriting school, like, what's the, what, you know, is there, a book or another thing that you would recommend of where to start to, to sort of dive into the flow of what you write?[00:26:29] Jessica:There is a great essay, by Ursula K Le, is that how you say her last name?[00:26:37] Nathan:I'm not sure.[00:26:37] Jessica:Read it and I've never said it out loud before.[00:26:41] Nathan:Yep. I have so many things like that in my life where I'm like, I don't know how to pronounce this word.[00:26:46] Jessica:It's so embarrassing writing about skincare, because there are these huge, like long skincare ingredients that I write all the time. I can spell them for you off the top of my head, but then I tried to like say them out loud on a podcast, for example. And I'm like, I don't know how to say this at all. I'm looking for this, this essay it's from her book.No, no time to spare[00:27:10] Nathan:Okay.[00:27:10] Jessica:And there's this. And she writes a lot about right. but she has this beautiful essay about rhythm, and how it's different in poetry and how it's different in pros and how to kind of like sort out the rhythm of your piece. and I would say that was hugely helpful to me when I, when I first read it.So I would recommend doing that and. Yeah, I don't know. I use things like, I mean, I, I use it the sores all the time, but I use rhyme zone a lot for like fun phrasing and plays on words. It's just rhyme zone.com and you type in the word that you're you're playing with. And it'll kind of like, you know,[00:27:50] Nathan:Oh, interesting. Yeah.That's exactly the kind of, kind of that's good. Yeah. A lot of people, you know, they come to newsletters from kind of two different sides, either from the journalist, professional writer side or the, you know, hobbyist, maybe even, I never thought I'd be a writer, but I have this skill or something to teach or behind the scenes in this industry.And like writing maybe as a slog or a chore. And so it was always interesting when these two worlds meet and either, you know, one group might be really good at marketing because they knew they came from that world and another group.[00:28:27] Jessica:Yeah.[00:28:27] Nathan:Really good at writing and they each hate the other's job, but[00:28:31] Jessica:Yeah,[00:28:31] Nathan:Like they pick the job.That's the intersection of both of those worlds.[00:28:35] Jessica:Yeah, no, you're so right. I think there is this like sort of misconception in the journalism and reporting space that any reporter who is on sub stack has decided to go in all in on the newsletter. Because there have been some very high profile journalists who are no longer writing for like the times or the posts and they're just doing their newsletter.But I think for the large majority of, of reporters and journalists who have, who have started newsletters as well, it's like a both and kind of thing.[00:29:06] Nathan:Yeah.[00:29:06] Jessica:Sill freelancing and we have this, this sort of personal platform.[00:29:11] Nathan:Yeah. So how do you think about your career developing over the next couple of years? Is it, is there a specific milestone in mind, where you're trying to grow the newsletter to, to do that full-time or is it always trying to place a piece to the biggest possible audience?What's that like?[00:29:29] Jessica:Yeah, I would say my goal, like I very much, this is kind of earnest and nerdy, but like, I very much want to change the beauty industry. I see so much that is wrong with it and I see how it like emotionally impacts people. in terms of anxiety, depression, mental disorders, eating disorders, like there's a lot of heavy stuff that comes out of the beauty industry.And I like, I'm very passionate about actually measurably changing it. So for me, the number one thing is always, I want to reach the largest audience possible with an unadulterated message. So if I can do that in a place like the New York times, of course, I'd rather place it there than my own news. if I can do that through a book, of course, I'd rather write it in a book then in my own newsletter.So the newsletter has been sort of like a nice foundation for me to have and a nice fallback for me to have. And I, I truly love fostering it as its own little separate entity, but I would, I would say I almost try harder to place things elsewhere because I wantAs many people as possible to be able to, to read the things that I'm writing. the newsletter I'm I am writing my first book right now, and it's definitely been hard to juggle book writing with like reporting for other platforms and deadlines. So I will say like juggling a book and my own personal newsletter has been much easier than trying to juggle a book and reporting. So I think, I think there will be times in my writing career while I'll lean a little bit more heavily on the newsletter.And times where I'll lighten up on the newsletter. I'm always seeing it as sort of like a supplemental tool to my like greater mission.[00:31:13] Nathan:I think, I don't know what publication they were writing for. but someone was telling me about, was that in each of these publications, they're watching the view counts, you know, for every story. And they had gotten the newsletter. I think they were maybe at 20, 25,000 subscribers. And they would, when they placed a piece with a fairly major publication, they would email it out.And they, it was enough direct traffic to that individual piece that they could get it to move on. Some of these internally watched leaderboards and stuff like that. And so editors were paying attention to that of like, they didn't necessarily know like making things up that, you know, Jessica was the one who drove a bunch of traffic to this, but they're just like, wow, Jessica's stories are consistently resonating.And so they were wanting to pick up more pieces in that. and so I was always wondering about that, of how you can, it's not gaming an algorithm or anything like that.[00:32:08] Jessica:Hmm.[00:32:08] Nathan:Just saying like, look, here's my story. And I bring an audiences.[00:32:12] Jessica:Oh, I love that. I might try to do that. I always do. Like I do these little roundups every other week for my paid subscribers.And if I have something that comes out, I'll always put, drop the link in there, but I've never done like a strategized push like[00:32:28] Nathan:Right.[00:32:29] Jessica:Be interesting to experiment for sure.[00:32:31] Nathan:Well, cause it's like, if someone is following you that they're following you for. Your content and your ideas and your perspective. And they probably don't really care if it's, you know, in your sub stack, you know, on your Instagram or, you know,[00:32:48] Jessica:Right.[00:32:48] Nathan:Major publication, there's like, look, I want to read your, your content.And you're like, oh, today's article is[00:32:54] Jessica:Yeah.[00:32:55] Nathan:Here on Vogue. Or, you know,[00:32:57] Jessica:Kind of nice to hear, because I think that's something that I do worry about pretty often with my newsletter is I feel like a ton of my newsletter readership has come from social media. And so I'm like very conscious of cross posting. Like I don't, I don't want someone to get my newsletter and say, I already saw this on your Instagram, so I don't need to subscribe.I don't need another email in my inbox because I'm seeing it on Insta, you know? And I don't know if that's like a legitimate concern or how much people see when they subscribe to you on different platforms. but that has been. You know, something that I'm very mindful of, where if it's like a meme that I'm posting on social media, or just like a one-off Instagram post, I'm probably not going to repeat that content, even if I think it's good or important on the newsletter. Just because I don't know, I'm aware of like how precious it is to allow someone into your email inbox, because at least for me, like email is very annoying. The worst part of my day is trying to like go through my inbox and file it away into folders. And I never want my newsletter to be like, oh, I've seen this already. I've seen something very similar from her already.[00:34:09] Nathan:Right. Yeah. I don't know that I have a perspective on that. I'm just thinking about it. I don't have the same concern. but I don't know that. You know whether I should or not. I think probably my approach would be that if you've already seen something, let's say there's five or six things in the newsletter and I've already seen one of them on Instagram, but I just skipped past that one.[00:34:30] Jessica:Yeah.[00:34:31] Nathan:And so my focus would be on making sure that everything is high quality, more than making sure that everything is, completely a unique[00:34:40] Jessica:Yeah. That's I mean, that's encouraging to hear, and I think that that might, change how I approach my like every other week[00:34:49] Nathan:Yeah,[00:34:49] Jessica:Maybe I'll experiment and I'll see, I'll see if people are like, Hey,I saw that.[00:34:54] Nathan:The other thing that I would do is I would ask, one of my favorite things to do is to ask for replies to my newsletter, which has a downside of that you get a whole bunch of emails, but they can often be really fun cause they're, No, the people who are reading every day and like they're following your stuff.And, and so they're usually not pitching you things. They're just saying, like, here's the thing that I, and so in that case, just say, Hey, you know, if I share something on Instagram, would you also like it here? Or do you feel like, keep those worlds more separate? Like don't I want everything to be unique.And then I would just like, say hit reply and let me know.[00:35:34] Jessica:Yeah.[00:35:34] Nathan:And it's. Yeah, but you know, out of 9,000 subscribers, I'd bet you'd get at least, I dunno, 20, 30, 40 replies or something.[00:35:42] Jessica:Yeah, that's a good point. Okay. Oh, you're inspiring me. I have so many ideas now.[00:35:48] Nathan:Perfect. I love it. okay. One thing that I want to know more about is growing that. That newsletter from the pieces that you're, I assume subscribers are coming from Instagram. And then also from the pieces that you're publishing,[00:36:04] Jessica:Yeah.[00:36:04] Nathan:Seen like spikes? when it came from an Instagram post that did really well or some other promotion to drive subscribers,[00:36:13] Jessica:I mean, I definitely get new subscribers every time I post about it on Instagram or Instagram stories. So I would say that's been like a main driver for me, but my two biggest, like surges of subscribers came from, All of the newsletter press that's been happening lately. Cause you know, like the newsletter revolution is here.So, I got a little write up in New York magazine and then one in the UK Sunday style magazine and both of those were amazing and totally unexpected. I had no idea they were coming. so now I'm like, damn, how do I, how do I facilitate some more press for myself? Because this is where that.[00:36:55] Nathan:Like what would a spike like that look like? Cause that a couple of hundred subscribers, 500 a thousand from one of those[00:37:01] Jessica:I would say from New York magazine, it was probably close to a thousand. And then from the UK, Sunday times was probably between like 500, 600.[00:37:11] Nathan:Yeah. That that's substantial.[00:37:14] Jessica:Yeah. It was, it was really exciting. and it definitely goes to show like the power that these publications have. It's interesting to see that power as applied to like inherently, anti large publication platform, like a personal newsletter, you know?[00:37:35] Nathan:Yeah. So how do you, how do you think about it when it's like. More press would be nice. You're like, Hey, this, this is a big boost, you know? I'd 10% lift in total subscribers or something from a single thing. And then knowing what you know about journalism and being in the space, like, is that something that you craft a strategy around and say, okay, I'm going to intentionally pursue, placements in these publication.[00:38:02] Jessica:No, in terms of just the newsletter, I, I don't think I'll ever like strategize and try to do that. I think, I mean, the, the reason that I got those two placements is just because I. In the beauty space, my newsletter does offer something that's really different that you're not getting anywhere else. and so it becomes inherently interesting to write about or call out because this is the only place you can get that kind of thing if that's what you're looking for.So I think it's just more of like striving to figure out, like, how can I create more, very original content that actually. Gives value to the reader in a way that's going to create that kind of buzz. I don't want to like manufacture the buzz so much as I want. Like my condoms would be good enough for people to actually talk about it.But that being said, when my book comes out eventually like, hell yes, I plan to like strategize and try to get the shit written about me everywhere, which will hopefully we get to the newsletter as well. But yeah, I feel like I'm going to save all of that, like smarmy, you know, networking for book launch.[00:39:14] Nathan:Yeah, that makes sense to me. I want to push back on it a little bit, because so much of the success of the book is going to be dependent on a lot on a lot of things, but a big factor is going to be the size of your platform. When that book comes out.[00:39:29] Jessica:Yeah.[00:39:29] Nathan:And so if you wait to be self promotional until the book comes out, then like, that'll get this far, but let's say you were self promotional in a tasteful way.We're going to be tasteful about all of this. you know, but along the way, and that 9,000 subscribers turned into 25,000.Right. And it's that much bigger of a platform to launch from. So I'll say that with the caveat that I think the same thing.[00:39:51] Jessica:Yeah.[00:39:52] Nathan:We have, I've lots of friends who have big platforms and I'm like, oh, I could guest post on them.You know, with them, or like ask, Hey, can I come on your podcast or something like that? And I'm like 90% sure that they would say yes, but then I think, oh, I should save that for when my book comes out. Right.Cause you know, you have that, maybe that, just that one ask.So I think it's something that a lot of creators struggle with of like when to promote.And so intellectually I'm like promote early enough.[00:40:21] Jessica:Yeah.[00:40:22] Nathan:And then emotionally, what I'm actually doing is I think exactly what you're doing, but I'll save that for when I really need it.[00:40:28] Jessica:Yeah, I think for me, there's also this, this sort of inherent struggle with what I write about and getting press, because I am pretty critical of beauty media coverage. and I'm aware that I have made some enemies in the beauty media space. Like I'm not the most well-liked person, in some of these circles.So I do feel like I only have like a certain amount of rope that I can, use up like a certain amount of leeway in these spaces. and then also I, yeah, I don't know. I think it's something I have not sat down to really work out my feelings about. But there is some sort of ethical dilemma there where if I'm critiquing the way a certain platform has covered this beauty trend or whatever it is, I'm critiquing.And then I'm sort of like asking for press at the same time, like ethically, what does that say about me and my participation in these systems?You[00:41:30] Nathan:Right.[00:41:31] Jessica:Which is a big question and not one that I'm going to be able to answer here.[00:41:36] Nathan:Yeah. Are there publications outside of the beauty space that would have less of the, maybe sponsored ties or other, you know, issues[00:41:47] Jessica:Yeah,[00:41:48] Nathan:The main publications might have, but that would find your story.[00:41:52] Jessica:I think so. I think the path that I am trying to follow in beauty coverage right now. the path of sustainable fashion coverage, like I feel like fashion and beauty have been so intertwined in their coverage and they're, they're both sort of seen as these like less serious pursuits. They're both seen as like inherently female interests.And they've struggled to be taken seriously, I think. but with like the push towards sustainability content and, you know, the inevitability of climate change, I think. Sustainability and fashion is getting a ton of like serious quality coverage all over the place, even from platforms that wouldn't normally touch fashion.And I see beauty as being very behind that. Like there are still these huge global issues in the beauty industry and beauty production and just the way that we consume and beauty, that hasn't been touched. But I see it starting to be touched by these larger, serious. News organizations. And I feel like there's such an opportunity there.And that those are topics that I'm super passionate about and super interested in. So I'm, I'm trying to carve out a space for myself there to say, look, we're taking fashion seriously for the impact that it has culturally societaly environmentally. Like we have to start taking beauty justice seriously because it's just as big of a person.[00:43:17] Nathan:I like, I like that angle on that. That makes a lot of sense. And just seeing trends in a neighboring industry. I think you're right. I hope that I hope that you're right in, that plays out in there.[00:43:28] Jessica:Me too.[00:43:29] Nathan:One of the things that I'm curious about is kind of the rise of newsletters in the journalism space.I don't come from that world. I very much come from the newsletter world. And so seeing, you know, so many people either make the switch full-time, or get to the point where they're like, Hey, I've been writing these pieces everywhere. And like, my byline has just directed people back to Twitter or Instagram or.And now it's directing people back to my own audience. What are you seeing in like in your friends and colleagues and all of that is, are a lot of people starting newsletters or is there this overwhelming trend of some are starting it, and maybe it's getting hyped more than is actually happening.[00:44:12] Jessica:Yeah, I think that's what I've noticed. I don't think as many people within my like, sort of direct. Community of journalists and reporters are starting newsletters. And I think it's gotten so hyped. Like we're in such a moment of coverage right now that it almost like, seems like a little lame to start a newsletter now.Cause like everyone's doing.But the reality of the situation is that everyone is not doing it. And I think there's still a lot of opportunity and a lot of room to grow and to move into and to create your own kind of thing. like I mentioned, I think there is a big misconception that if you're starting your newsletter, that means you're done with journalism and you're just doing this now.It's like, no, you can very much do both. And you can do your newsletter once a month. You can do it, you know, once a week you can do it. However, often you have time for it. Like you said you could use it as a tool just to send out your journalism, pursuits to a wider audience. but yeah, I think sort of the hype around newsletters has sort of, created this little, Ooh, I don't know if I want to do a newsletter too.Cause I might get to see them. Like, I'm just doing what everybody else is doing.[00:45:23] Nathan:Right. Yeah. The, the newsletter hipster trend is sort of passed and it's gone mainstream. I can't do it[00:45:31] Jessica:Exactly. I mean, for the record, I don't believe that that's true, I think that's how people are perceiving.[00:45:38] Nathan:Well, it's so funny to me because, I've been doing E you know, email and email newsletters and that kind of thing since I guess, 2013. and you know, very excited. They got into all of that. And I was telling people like, email is amazing and friends that have me, who've been doing it since like 2001 were like, yeah, like good job, discovering it.Do you want to go and start? Like what a pat on the back, what are you hoping for here? And watching is, you know, these trends as they come, if you had a friend who, you know, is in the space who comes to you and says like, oh, I'm going to start a new. You know, what are the things, I don't know, the three or four things that you would tell them right away of here's what they should watch out for is strategies that they should employ any of those things.[00:46:25] Jessica:I mean, my number one piece of advice that seems really obvious. Isn't always is just to find your niche. Like I would say hone in on something as specific as you possibly can, within your space so that people have a reason to subscribe. I would say to have, like, especially if you're doing sub stack or a place where you can view past newsletters, like have a healthy backlog before you actually start soliciting people to sign up so that they can see what your content is like.And then this is a big thing that I think is missing from a lot of the journalism to newsletter side, because like he said, there are people who are coming from marketing and people who have never done marketing in their life. something that I do is that when I'm sending something out to my paid subscribers, I send a shorter version out of it to my free subscribers.Click to continue. And then it brings them to the paid subscriber thing. And I convert between 30 and 50 people every time.And when I sign up for free newsletters, which I sign up for a ton of them, I have never once got in that. I've never once gotten an email. That's like the intro of the article. And then it, you know, sort of leads me into that paid funnel.And I used to work in marketing. I used to work in fashion marketing. That was just like a no, duh of course I would do that sort of thing. but I've never seen any other like journalists to newsletter convert, use that very easy tool. so I would say, take advantage of that for sure.[00:48:07] Nathan:Yeah, that's interesting of the things that in one industry, like you're right in the marketing industry, everyone's like, obviously, you know, of course you would do that. And then you get into another space and it is this exciting, new thing. I started in, in design and, like user experience and interface design.And so I brought a lot of design ideas to marketing and then a lot of like direct response marketing ideas into the design world. And it needs to circle. Everyone was like, whoa, this is amazing and new.[00:48:35] Jessica:Yeah,[00:48:36] Nathan:You did it in the original circle, people are just like, obviously there's nothing novel about it.[00:48:41] Jessica:Exactly. I think people really, underestimate. The skills they learn on the way to get to where they've, they've gotten to. Like, I never would have thought the job that I hated in fashion marketing would have served me in, in, any way. Cause I sort of wanted to get away from all of that. Like marketing bullshit, lack of a better word, because at least at the company that I was at, it mostly felt like lying and just like squeezing money out of people.I think you can use those tools for good as well, which is what I'm trying to do.[00:49:15] Nathan:Yeah. So a lot of creators struggle with that transition where they feel like either from a past experience or something that they've seen where they're like, oh, I can never ask for money for this or charge for it or, that kind of thing. Or they're very, very hesitant to sell in any, anything. what would you say to them?Or what's your journey been like in saying like, no, this is what it costs. This is why you should subscribe.[00:49:40] Jessica:Yeah. I mean, I think it's important to have, to have a reason, you know, make it very clear that it's reader funded or user funded. for me, all of my content is very clear that I blame the media advertisement model for so much of the misinformation and bullshit that's out there in beauty. So me saying that my newsletter and this content is completely user funded, so that I'm loyal to you.The reader rather than an advertiser, is very like, you know, quote unquote on brand for me. And I think people who are interested in my content are more than happy to pay for it. It's solving a problem that I am pointing out in my reporting, you know? and then I would just say also like allow yourself to be surprised at how much people want to support you.I have been so pleasantly surprised by people who are just, they just liked my content and they're happy to pay for it. And I think one of the, the biggest, the biggest ways that I've seen that happen is that, on substance. They let you do like the page, so you can do monthly or a yearly rate, or you can do something called a founding member, which is just somebody who pays a little bit more to support and they don't really get any extra benefits at all.And I am shocked at the amount of people who give me 50 more dollars than they need to, just to support, And that's like, every time I get that email, that's like someone signed up for the founding member level. It's heartwarming because it's like, there are a lot of people out there who want to support great creator, led content.[00:51:23] Nathan:Do you have a percentage or numbers on that? Like I'm curious, every time I see that I'm like how many people select that[00:51:29] Jessica:Yeah.[00:51:29] Nathan:Know from doing multiple prices or packages, that it's one of the best ways to increase revenue is to just have a higher price option available.[00:51:38] Jessica:Yeah.[00:51:38] Nathan:confirming that, but I want to know any[00:51:40] Jessica:Yeah. I have not like crunched the numbers on anything, but just from, so I sent out a paid newsletter, on Thursday. So between Thursday and today from like my conversions of free[00:51:55] Nathan:Yep.[00:51:56] Jessica:Sign up, I've gotten, I think 56, new signups. I would say maybe 10 of them were the yearly membership and maybe five of them were the founding member.[00:52:08] Nathan:Okay. Wow. So half of the year, the ones being the like yeah. I'll pay you $50 more just to support your work. Even[00:52:17] Jessica:Yeah,[00:52:18] Nathan:Because the yearly membership is supporting your work, but even just[00:52:21] Jessica:Yeah,[00:52:21] Nathan:Above and beyond.[00:52:23] Jessica:Yeah, exactly. I mean, that's just what, roughly, from what I remember from the email. I'm not like super concerned with, with stats and strategizing right now. I'm just like ecstatic. Every time I get the ding on my phone that says somebody new signed up.[00:52:39] Nathan:Yeah. That's super fun. So, what are the things that you're thinking about next for the newsletter? Is it slow, steady, growth, and maintaining that while working on the book? Is there a big milestone that you're working towards any of those things?[00:52:52] Jessica:There is not a huge milestone, but I think when I first started it, and this is, I think maybe just a personal hangup, but I was very conscious of not bothering people too much, like not being in their inbox constantly. So, it was like one big story a month, and then every other week for paid. Now I'm toying with the idea of doing more, short form content and where weekly content.I'm going to be launching a new feature for paid subscribers that's gonna be, like an advice column, but more like, how do I navigate the industry? How do I divest from these marketing tactics? How do I like stay smart and know what's alive and what's not?So, I'm going to be launching that within the next month.Then, for everybody, I'm going to be launching weekly or even twice a week, just like little, like a little tip newsletter. Because what I do in my newsletter a lot is critique the beauty, and point out what's wrong with it.People are always like, okay, sure, but how do I apply that to my own life? Like how do I get over the fact that I know it's marketing, that I don't need to have big lips to be beautiful, but how do I stop feeling that way?So, it's going to be more practical tips for, I guess, sort of healing from all of the beauty industry shit that they put us through, but it's going to be very short, quick hits, like, you know, five sentences, a paragraph tops. So, I'm going to experiment with a couple of different, forms of writing and a couple of different frequencies and see, see what people.[00:54:38] Nathan:Yeah, that sounds good. Well, if anyone wants to go subscribe to that and follow you on Instagram and other things around the web, where should they go?[00:54:46] Jessica:My sub stack is JessicaDefino.substack.com, and you can sign up for The Unpublishable there. And then on Instagram, I'm @JessicaDeFino_.[00:54:56] Nathan:Sounds good. Well, thanks so much for coming on. This has been fun to[00:54:59] Jessica:Yeah.[00:54:59] Nathan:learn about a whole side of the newsletter industry that I'm less familiar with, and just hear your story, and your writing tips, and everything else.[00:55:08] Jessica:Yeah, thank you so much. I feel inspired. I'm going to go send more newsletters.[00:55:13] Nathan:Sounds good.

Blue Peg, Pink Peg
Episode 204-Ankh:Gods of Egypt

Blue Peg, Pink Peg

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021


Reviews of Azul;Queens Garden, Islands in the Mist, and a Harper's Bazaar. Featured review: Ankh-Gods of Egypt by CMON; Reroll Ecos-First Continent by AEG. Board game discussion starts at 41:55. https://bluepegpinkpeg.com/ep204.Thank you to our sponsors: Queen Games, Grand Gamers Guild, and AEG. Timestamps:41:55 - Azul-Queens Garden; 48:12- Islands in the Mist; 53:41 - Marrakesh; 1:00:18-Harper's Bazaar.

It's A Thing
How Bazaar - It's a Thing 181

It's A Thing

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 25, 2021 27:35


Tom is leaving a meh review for a body of water and Molly is getting in the holiday sampling spirit. Then Tom finds an iconic Zoom meeting, while Molly risks a deluge of emails by drifting into a car thing.LINKS:Atlantic OceanViral New ZealandAdvent CalendarsDrift CarsInitial D  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

What You're Craving
Mia Kang on The Miracle of Connecting with Her Body and the Journey of Escaping Her Eating Disorder

What You're Craving

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 40:48


In this episode, I get to have an incredibly insightful and authentic conversation (my favorite kind) with Mia Kang. Mia is a Hong Kong–born international model and author of the amazing book, KNOCKOUT. She discusses her story of struggling with her own eating disorder and addiction while working in the modeling industry, and how she unexpectedly found her solution in Indonesia at a Muay Thai gym, starting her on the path of true healing. We get to all the goods: how Mia is developing a new loving relationship with herself and her body (and how you can too!), why we should pay attention to our own internal wisdom, and how coming out of the shadows and into recovery is very, very possible.    Mia has graced the pages of Vogue, Harper's Bazaar, and Sports Illustrated, among many others, and has worked with many international brands. She is currently the host of Bravo's Spy Games. She lives in New York City, when she is not in Thailand practicing Muay Thai. Beneath her success is the story of a woman who once lived and died by her weight. In her first book, KNOCKOUT she opens up about her struggles with bullying, anorexia, bulimia, body dysmorphia, drug addiction, anxiety, and even suicidal thoughts, and how, in a true life-saving moment, she eschewed normative body standards and, with the help of martial arts, learned to redefine her sense of self-worth.   If you want to know more about Mia, you can find her on Instagram, and you can listen to her amazing TED Talk here.  I'm also obsessed with knowing all about you, so please follow (and DM!)  me on Instagram, Facebook and my website. We're in this together and the journey is going to be so awesome. Produced by Dear Media

UNbiased Label
Starring American Celebrity Hairdresser: Ted Gibson

UNbiased Label

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 54:58


This episode is a conversation with Icon American celebrity hairdresser Ted Gibson who is known for his couture hair both on the runways and in magazines including Vanity Fair, Elle, Harper's Bazaar, In Style, Vogue, WWD, and Allure.  Ted's long list of Hollywood clients includes Angelina Jolie, Lupita Nyong'o, Anne Hathaway, Priyanka Chopra and Jessica Chastain, to name a few.  Ted along with his husband and colorist Jason Backe opened the World's First Smart Salon in Los Angeles named Starring by Ted Gibson designed by architect Francisco Gonzalez Pulido. In 2020, Ted and Jason launched The Worth Up Alliance Foundation which is a coalition of change agents, dream makers and emerging beauty entrepreneurs supporting the industry with education, coaching, mentoring, networking, and start-up capital grants. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/zara-korutz/message

Outspoken Beauty
Newby Hands - My Beauty Habits

Outspoken Beauty

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 47:06


In this episode I get to know a hugely knowledgable and influential woman who has been in the beauty industry for more than 30 years. Newby Hands has an incredibly impressive CV including being Style and Beauty Editor at the Daily Mail, Beauty Director at large at Harper's Bazaar, editorial director at Feelunique.com and her current role, Beauty Director at Net-A-Porter.As I interviewed Newby I got really excited. I just found her insights, views and recommendations so spot on and I was blown away by her knowledge of beauty but also of what we, real women want and need. This episode is for anyone who is obsessed with the beauty industry and where it's heading and is also brimming with great advice and product recommendations from a woman who really knows her stuff.

Colleen & Bradley
9/21 Tues Hr 2: D-BAGS: AJ McLean's Duluth Experience

Colleen & Bradley

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 36:33


PLUS: Harper's Bazaar article about Nicole Kidman talking about her marriage with Tom Cruise. AND ANTI-D-BAG: Steven Cojo Cojocaru, his Twitter response to Holly's nephew/ Team CoBra's red carpet correspondent Jasper for his Emmy fashion review.

Beef And Dairy Network
Episode 75 - Live At The Great British Cattle Bazaar

Beef And Dairy Network

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 43:11


Highlights from our recent live show at the Great British Cattle Bazaar featuring Mike Wozniak, Henry Paker, Nadia Kamil, Sammy Graham and Dave Cribb.Tickets to watch the recording of the show are available until 3rd October 2021 here: https://www.kingsplace.co.uk/whats-on/comedy/beef-and-dairy-network-podcast-11-9/

On and Off Your Mat Yoga Podcast
Clean Mind, Clean Body with Tara Stiles

On and Off Your Mat Yoga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 50:09


Are you someone that is busy, looking to get it all done, but you want to feel better in the process? If that's you, today's episode is for you.I sat down with Tara Stiles. Tara is a wellness expert, bestselling author, and the founder of Strala Yoga which is a combination of yoga, tai chi, and Traditional Chinese and Japanese Medicine. Tara's bestselling books have been featured in The New York Times, Vogue, Elle, Harper's Bazaar, InStyle, Esquire, and Shape. Tara's work has been used in a case study by Harvard University, she is a sought-after speaker on topics of entrepreneurship, health, and wellbeing, and she has lectured at venues that include Harvard and New York University. Tara works with The Alliance for a Healthier Generation, an initiative with the American Heart Association and the Clinton Foundation that combats childhood obesity. Today, we sat down to talk Her newest book, Clean Mind, Clean Body: A 28 Day Plan for Physical, Mental and Spiritual Self-Care.MY 5 BIGGEST TAKEAWAYS FROM THIS EPISODETake a screenshot of you listening to the episode and share your takeaway with me and our community on Instagram. Tag @onandoffyourmatpodcast and #onandoffyourmatpodcast in your story of post. I can't wait to read and share them.1. Tai Chi principles can inspire the way you move in yoga. It teaches you softness. Softness is the quality that makes anything possible. You can do move if you're not rigid. Let the breath begins, the body follows.2. physical mobility links to the emotional connection; it allows you to see how everything is in conversation with everything else.3. Spiritual self-care is any practice that helps you reinforce positive beliefs about yourself and continue to grow into a better person.4. Focus on feeling-based goals instead of achievement-based goals. Notice how you feel and make changes based on how you want to feel.5. When you listen to yourself and get sensitized to your signals, you learn to connect what feels good to what is truly supportive for you. Get to know how good it feels to be good to yourself.SUBSCRIBE, RATE & REVIEW! BECOME A PREMIUM MEMBER TODAYIf you haven't already done so, please subscribe, rate and review this podcast anywhere you listen. Find out how here.We recently transitioned our Premium Membership to this new platform: www.withribbon.com/u/erikabelanger. As a member, you can get a ton of exclusive audio and video content. We added a new library of almost 200 recorded full-length yoga classes in a Netflix-Style Membership. Finally, you can sign up for any live-stream class I offer! Everything yoga-class-related is now in the same place! If you're new to With Ribbon, here's a walkthrough video I recorded to help you find your way around.Know that as you become a Premium Member, your contribution ripples to thousands of people every week, allowing me to offer accessible quality free content to a wide community of yogis. This podcast is one of the away I contribute to the community, and this membership is a way you can too. It allows you to share everything yoga offers with the world by supporting me in the creation and production of this podcast while I choose to keep it ad-free. RETREAT / GO FUND MEI'll be leading an Eco-Luxury Yoga Retreat in Mexico, in November 2021. I heard you, you've been craving to immerse yourself in yoga, nature, and community again so you can feel renewed and re-enliven. Many of us are suffering from zoom fatigue. So I'm offering you to hit the beach and the reset button so you can let go of this last year. You'll find all the info for that retreat at erikabelanger.com/yoga-retreat-mexico.In parallel, I have launched a Go-Fund-Me campaign. I know yoga retreats are an investment and I know how hard the last year has been. Yoga retreats were in my personal growth, so I wanted to give back. I'm raising money while investing alongside the community to make the experience of a yoga retreat available to students who wouldn't be able to participate otherwise. If you're able to donate anything you could transform someone's life. And if you're in need you can apply for the scholarship. And either way, I'd love for you to share it with the people you love and on social media. That's a simple way you can directly impact others' lives in a positive way. Find the Go-Fund-Me Campaign here.QUESTIONS SHE ANSWERED DURING THIS EPISODE:Why did you write a detox / self-care book? Did something in your own life prompted you to write this book or did you see a need around you?how did you choose the practices in the book?Can you explain the qualities of tai chi that we could bring in any movement practice we do and in our lives in general?Why did you consciously start with the mind and spirit before addressing the body?What does it mean to clean our minds?Can you give examples of practices to clean our minds or keep them clean?How do we move from a clean mind to spiritual self-care?How do we take care of our bodies with food while staying truly connected to what we need?What is the role of mindset in exercise and movement? How could we approach yoga differently?MORE ABOUT OUR GUESTTara Stiles is a wellness expert, bestselling author, and the founder of Strala Yoga. The Strala approach combines yoga, tai chi, and Traditional Chinese and Japanese Medicine to help people release stress, heal, let go of negative habits, and move more easily through everyday challenges. Tara's bestselling books, which have been translated and published in multiple languages, include Strala Yoga, Make Your Own Rules Diet, Yoga Cures, and Slim Calm Sexy Yoga, and she has been featured in The New York Times, Vogue, Elle, Harper's Bazaar, InStyle, Esquire, and Shape. Tara's work has been used in a case study by Harvard University, she is a sought-after speaker on topics of entrepreneurship, health, and wellbeing, and she has lectured at venues that include Harvard and New York University. Tara works with The Alliance for a Healthier Generation, an initiative with the American Heart Association and the Clinton Foundation that combats childhood obesity, in order to bring Strala classes to more than 30,000 schools around the United States. She also supports the BOKS program, which delivers Strala classes and wellbeing resources to educators across North America. Her newest book, Clean Mind, Clean Body: A 28 Day Plan for Physical, Mental and Spiritual Self-Care(Dey Street Books), was released December 2020. Strala Home: https://stralahome.com/Link to her book: https://www.tarastiles.com/booSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/5a5fdec3a4d96aa520f89227. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sip With Me
Wedding Planner & Designer, Jove Meyer

Sip With Me

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 40:23


In episode 32, we get some help walking down the aisle from Wedding Planner Jove Meyer. Founder of Jove Meyer Events, Jove started his business after planning his best friend's wedding (how cute)! He is all about making your wedding personalized, reflecting each couple's unique personality. This was all Ioanna and I heard before we knew we needed to chat with him! Featured many times on our fave “The Rachael Ray Show” and in all the biggest wedding publications, Jove's talents have been recognized by Harper's Bazaar, Martha Stewart, US Weekly, Brides & more! Jove has also been recognized not only for his design but his work supporting marriage equality and inclusion, creating the viral “Totes Getting Married” tote bag to raise funds to support this cause! We chat with Jove about his inspirations and how he works one-on-one with his couples. Then we dive into some of the post-quarantine wedding trends that are here to stay and ask him about Ioanna's wedding! Last, we play a round of wedding rapid fire and discuss his famous colorful home!

MagaMama with Kimberly Ann Johnson: Sex, Birth and Motherhood
EP 138: Cultish - The Language of Fanaticism with Amanda Montell

MagaMama with Kimberly Ann Johnson: Sex, Birth and Motherhood

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2021 47:09


In this episode, Kimberly and Amanda discuss language, cultism, and community. Amanda explains aspects of her book “Cultish” to describe how religious principles still permeate much of our secular culture, how groups such as fitness brands and start-ups use language similar to cults, and how we can give ourselves and each other more flexibility in how we use language, identify with groups, and hold disagreements. Ultimately, they discuss how language is based on context, evolves over time, and requires a genuine understanding as we use it to communicate with each other.   Bio Amanda Montell is a writer, language scholar, and podcast host from Baltimore. She is the author of two critically acclaimed books: Cultish: The Language of Fanaticism, an indie bestseller about the language of "cults" from Scientology to SoulCycle and Wordslut: A Feminist Guide to Taking Back the English Language. Amanda's books have earned praise from The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Atlantic, Time Magazine, Harper's Bazaar, and Kirkus Reviews, among others, and Amanda is currently developing Wordslut for television with FX Studios, serving as creator, writer, and executive producer. Amanda is also the creator and co-host of the comedy-cult podcast, Sounds Like A Cult. As a reporter and essayist, Amanda's writing has been featured in Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan, Teen Vogue, Refinery29, DAME Magazine, The Rumpus, and Who What Wear, where she formerly served as the Features & Beauty Editor. She holds a degree in linguistics from NYU and lives in Los Angeles with her partner, plants, and pets.   What She Shares: --How religious principles still exist in secular culture --Aspects of cults that can be harmless and harmful --How social media is cultish --Finding space in the grey areas    What You'll Hea:r --American protestant principles infiltrates culture through finding meaning, community, transformation --Fitness brands like SoulCycle and CrossFit act as religions in a secular society --Cult definitions vary despite sensationalized media portrayals --Most cults have not been linked to criminal activity --Everyone is susceptible to cultish influence --Language clues us to cultish groups or communities --Protestant ethic deeply embedded in ideas of meritocracy and cleansing self of badness found in culture --Many cults of 60s and 70s use Evangelical concepts appropriated with Eastern religious language --Obsession with word art is similar to Protestant shift from images to text  --Buzz words from psychology, feminist politics, etc. used as codes in various communities --”Thought terminating cliches” as expressions that are easily remembered and shut down any questioning --Semantic stop-signs in conspiritualist circles --Intuition vs. facts --Admitting when we're wrong and overwhelmed by information --No spaces culturally exist for grey areas of life --Evolving language and incredibly challenging time of reckoning what language feels inclusive and accurate --Cults aren't always necessarily as extreme as Jonestown but can be exploitative, abusive, and trauma-inducing --Mainstream groups that function as certain dangers and exploitation --”Cult” definition is varied and nuanced --Language is dependent on context --Social media cultivating cultism in ourselves, our interests, our beliefs, etc. --Being able to recognize our full humanity outside of groups and communities   Resources Website: http://amandamontell.com/ IG: @amanda_montell

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein
Award-winning New York-based contemporary art advisor, author, and curator Maria Brito

Long Shot Leaders with Michael Stein

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 63:00


Award-winning New York-based contemporary art advisor, author, and curator Maria Brito María Gabriela Brito is a Venezuelan-born curator, art advisor, and author based in New York City. Her published works include Out There: Design, Art, Travel Shopping, published by Pointed Leaf Press in 2013, and Greek Gotham, published in 2016. A Harvard graduate, originally from Venezuela, her first monograph “Out There” published by Pointed Leaf Press in 2013, was the recipient of the Best Book Awards in both the Art and Design Categories. In 2015 Brito was selected by Complex Magazine as one of the 20 Power Players in the Art World and in 2020 she was named by ARTNEWS as one of the visionaries who gets to shape the art world.       She has written for publications such as Entrepreneur, Huffington Post, Elle, Forbes, Artnet, Cultured Magazine, Departures, and the Gulf Coast Journal of Literature and Fine Arts from the University of Houston, Texas. For several years, Maria has taught her creativity course in companies and, in 2019, she launched “Jumpstart”, an online program on creativity for entrepreneurs based on years of research and observation in both the areas of business and art.       She has worked on product collaborations with artists such as Kenny Scharf, Erik Parker, Katherine Bernhardt, Assume Vivid Astro Focus, Nir Hod and many more. In 2016, Maria curated “Greek Gotham” presented at Dio Horia, Mykonos with the participation of sixteen New York-based artists including KAWS, Austin Lee, Nina Chanel Abney and Raul de Nieves. A full-color catalogue with an introduction by Jeffrey Deitch was written and designed by Maria to commemorate this exhibition. In 2019 she created and hosted "The "C" Files with Maria Brito", a TV and streaming series for PBS's new station "ALL ARTS". The same year she also curated two exhibitions: “The Thousand and One Nights,” the inaugural show of Artual Gallery in Beirut, Lebanon with seven American artists including Holly Coulis, Allison Zuckerman and Rosson Crow and "MUSE", Shona McAndrew's first New York City exhibition at CHART Gallery in Tribeca.       Maria and her projects have been featured extensively in national and international publications including The New York Times Style Section, T: The New York Times Magazine, The Wall Street Journal, The Huffington Post, W Magazine, ELLE Magazine, Harper's Bazaar, Time Magazine, New York Magazine, The New York Observer, The Daily Beast, The Economist, Interview Magazine, VOGUE Italia, VOGUE Mexico, VOGUE Latin America, VOGUE Brazil, VOGUE China, VOGUE.com, ELLE Décor Spain, Departures, Forbes, Blouin ArtINFO, Hamptons Magazine, Condé Nast Traveler, Architectural Digest, Modern Luxury, Refinery29, goop, Billboard, Marie Claire Australia, Marie Claire Spain, Allure, The Coveteur, House Magazine, House Beautiful, Buro 24/7, Latina, Modern Magazine, and more.

The Zero Waste Countdown Podcast
138. Aura7 Activewear

The Zero Waste Countdown Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 29:38


    Aura 7 Activewear is made with recycled fibers from ghost fishing nets and other ocean waste. Their mission is to clean more seas and plant more trees by donating 1% of all revenues to Healthy Seas and with every purchase, a tree is planted with One Tree Planted. The Southern California brand became a celebrity favorite worn by Kristen Bell, Gabrielle Union, Jessica Alba, Lucy Hale, and Keke Palmer to name a few. Aura7 has been featured in VOGUE, Harper's Bazaar, ELLE, US Weekly, and The Zoe Report for revolutionizing the activewear industry by bringing in some much needed changes in sustainability.     Francisksa Bray-Mezey, Aura7 Founder  Francisksa Bray-Mezey is a yoga instructor, mother, and founder of Aura7 Activewear. She joins the Zero Waste Countdown to discuss her brand and the sustainability behind it.     Host Laura Nash wearing Aura7

Friends in Beauty Podcast
[REWIND] Ep. 77: Part 1 - Merrell Hollis - From Sneaking Onto Video Shoot Sets To Successfully Navigating The Beauty Industry For Over 20+ Years

Friends in Beauty Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 43:35


Today in the Friend's in Beauty guest chair we welcome Merrell Hollis, Celebrity Makeup Artist, Beauty Director, and Skincare Expert. With over 20 years of experience in the beauty industry we had so much to chat about that we had to split the interview into 2 parts.   Merrell Hollis' beauty career exploded when he became the grooming consultant and makeup artist for the entire roster at Sean Combs' Bad Boy Entertainment where he was responsible for decades of iconic and aspirational looks we still find inspiration from today. His work  appears in music videos for Sean ‘P.Diddy' Combs, Mary J Blige, Usher, Nelly, Faith Evans, Ludacris and many more.   He's also responsible for the faces of so many beloved celebrities including but not limited to Yara Shahidi, Naomi Campbell, Diane Von Furstenberg, Regina King, Jennifer Hudson, Hannah Brofman, Cassie, Adina Porter, Neicy Nash, Kim Cattrall, and Wendy Williams. This list and many more innovators have allowed their faces to be canvassed by this visionary who delivers them to the public with elegance and sincerity. ​ His cosmetic expertise has been prominently featured by Access Hollywood, Entertainment Tonight and the CBS Early Show among many others. Editorially, his artistry can be found in the pages of Vogue, Harper's, Bazaar, InStyle, Vanity Fair, Essence, GQ, Details, Interview, Rolling Stone, People, Men's Health, V Magazine and so many more.  ​ In this episode, Merrell drops so many gems on everything from the importance of networking to gain experience and grow your business, set etiquette when working with celebrities, to why male glam squads are more common than all female glam squads. Merrell also shares how he's managed to continuously stay booked for 20+ years and gives us some tips. We dive into We even got to talk about how he partnered with the doctors at LUVANYA Beauty to launch a vegan skincare line that is a product of decades of knowledge and passion for healthy and flawless skincare, and so much more.   Enjoy This Episode!   Listen to Part 2 Next…   Leave us a 5 star review and share this episode with a friend or 2 or 3.   Resources Mentioned In This Episode:   Crowd Management Ken Barboza The Power of NOW by Eckhart Tolle The Wisdom of Florence Scovel Shinn by Florence Scovel Shinn   Announcements:   Join our Facebook community If  you're looking for a community of like minded, ambitious, and supportive #FriendsinBeauty all working to leave our mark on the beauty industry, join us here: https://www.facebook.com/groups/friendsinbeauty   Social Media Info:   Merrell Hollis (Instagram) - @merrellhollis (DM Merrell for Luvanya discount code) Luvanya Beauty (Instagram) - @luvanyabeauty Luvanya Beauty (Website) -  www.luvanya.com Friends in Beauty (Instagram,Facebook, Twitter) - @friendsinbeauty Friends in Beauty (YouTube) - Friends in Beauty  Akua Robinson (Instagram,Twitter) - @akuarobinson AkuaRobinson (Facebook) - Akua Robinson MUA Akua Robinson (Website) - www.akuarobinson.com   #FriendsinBeauty #FIBPodcast

Book Vs Movie Podcast
Book Vs Movie "AI: Artificial Intelligence" (2001) Haley Joel Osment & Jude Law

Book Vs Movie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 62:14


Book Vs. Movie: AI: Artificial Intelligence Brian Aldiss's Supertoys Last All Summer Long Vs. the 2001 Steven Spielberg Film Twenty years ago, Steven Spielberg released a longtime project with his friend Stanley Kubrick--AI: Artificial Intelligence. Kubrick bought the rights to the 1969 short story from author Brian Aldiss (which appeared as Supertoys Last All Summer Long in the August 1969 issue of the UK edition of Harper's Bazaar. The story is about a robot child being jettisoned by his parents when permitted to have a baby and a dystopian future where overpopulation has caused the management of families.  Kubrick liked the idea of a story about a neglectful parent but thought there weren't any child actors who could accurately play the part. After he died in 1999, Spielberg took over the project and divided to flesh out the story with Mechas (humanoid robots) and hired actor Haley Joel Osment to lead David. A young Mecha is programmed to love his mother. When she decides to abandon him after he has behavioral issues, the story turns into a tale of David, his “Teddy” bear friend, and Jude Law (a hustler Mecha) to now underwater NYC to find the “Blue Fairy” to make him a real boy.  The film divided the critics and the audience, with some praising the vision and others finding the “Kubrick Vs. Spielberg” styles making a messy picture. Now that 20 years have gone by, there are now think pieces about its brilliance.  So, between the short story and the movie--which did we prefer?  In this ep the Margos discuss: The original short story by Brian Aldiss The history of the adaptation from Kubrick to Spielberg. The special effects are used on the actors and onset.   Starring: Haley Joel Osment (David,) Jude Law (Gigolo Joe,) Frances O'Connor (Monica Swinton,) Sam Robards (Henry Swinton,) William Hurt (Professor Allen Hobby,) Brenden Gleeson (Lord Johnson-Johnson,) Jack Angel (Teddy,) Robin Williams (Dr. Know,) Ben Kingsley (Specialist,) Meryl Streep (Blue Fairy,) and Chris Rock in a creepy cameo! Clips used: David meets an advanced Specialist AI trailer David is driven away  Gigolo Joe talks about David's mother  David at the Flesh Fair Music by John Williams Book Vs. Movie is part of the Frolic Podcast Network. Find more podcasts you will love Frolic.Media/podcasts Join our Patreon page to help support the show! https://www.patreon.com/bookversusmovie  Book Vs. Movie podcast https://www.facebook.com/bookversusmovie/ Twitter @bookversusmovie www.bookversusmovie.com Email us at bookversusmoviepodcast@gmail.com Brought to you by Audible.com, You can sign up for a FREE 30-day trial here http://www.audible.com/?source_code=PDTGBPD060314004R   Margo D. @BrooklynFitChik www.brooklynfitchick.com brooklynfitchick@gmail.com Margo P. @ShesNachoMama https://coloniabook.weebly.com/    Our logo was designed by Madeleine Gainey/Studio 39 Marketing Follow on Instagram @Studio39Marketing & @musicalmadeleine 

The Bazaar Cast
88 | John Romero: The Icon of Sin

The Bazaar Cast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 55:29


Welcome to Episode 88! Today's interview with John Romero; John is an American video game designer, programmer, and developer. The godfather of the FPS genre having worked on games such as Wolfenstein 3D, DOOM, and Quake and is by all accounts an industry veteran and legend. With over 40 years making games, John now resides in Galway, Ireland running Romero Games Ltd with his wife Brenda (another industry behemoth); their latest release Empire of Sin is certainly worth checking out. We touched on working with family, Sandy's wellness, Shambler furriness, food trucks, biggest regrets and sins and much more in this jam packed episode. Please rate, review & most importantly share! Become a Patron and support the show using link below: Patreon - The Bazaar Cast Find John and his projects below: Wikipedia: John Romero Website: Romero Games Twitter: @romero Bonus Haiku: John on The Bazaar, Forty years making us games, The Icon of Sin. ***** Intro Music: Robert Christopher - Rekindle The Memory Support Robert below, click the links: Bandcamp: Robert Christopher Youtube: Rob Christopher Music ***** All inquiries to TheBazaarCast@gmail.com Twitter @TheBazaarCast using #TheBazaarCast Join The Bazaar Cast Discord --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/thebazaarcast/message

Talk Tull to Me
Broadford Bazaar

Talk Tull to Me

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 58:54


Swearwords in GaelicGreen Shield Stamps - Golden Harvest of GiftsAlbum 11 - Heavy HorsesGet your Talk Tull To Me merch here!Talk Tull To Me Patreon & schedule.Talk Tull to Me is a proud part of the Feckless Momes Audio Network.Art credit: Burton SilvermanMusic credits: “Bourée” - Jethro Tull”Mother Goose” - Jethro Tull”Acres Wild” - Jethro Tull”Who Will Buy” - Oliver (1968)”Rising Sea” - Irony & Omen Sade”Horse-Hoeing Husbandry” - Jethro Tull”Waldorf Salad” - Fawlty Towers (1979)“Skye Cuillin” - Kevin MacLeod (license)

FASTer Way Podcast
Dr. Gabrielle Lyon on the Secrets to Longevity

FASTer Way Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 26:34


Dr. Gabrielle Lyon is a functional medicine physician and the founder of the Institute of Muscle-Centric Medicine, a health care practice that provides solutions for weight loss and longevity. Trained in nutritional science and geriatrics and board-certified in family medicine, she services leaders, innovators, and executives in their respective fields and has a private practice where she services patients worldwide. Her articles on various health topics have been featured in Muscle and Fitness, Women's Health, Men's Health, and Harper's Bazaar.   https://www.instagram.com/drgabriellelyon https://drgabriellelyon.com/ Please check out our website at fasterwaytofatloss.com and take advantage of our free quiz where you'll learn what intermittent fasting protocol is right for you - in addition to receiving a free sample meal plan!

Money Making Conversations
Author, Zakiyah Dalila Harris, talks inspiration behind her New York Time's Best Seller & Hulu Deal

Money Making Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 5, 2021 30:47


Rushion McDonald talks to Zakiya Dalila Harris, Writer, and Author of the New York Times Best Selling Book, The Other Black Girl. The psychological thriller incorporates social commentary about diversity in the workplace and the challenges Black women often have to navigate. Named a Most Anticipated Book of 2021 by TIME, The Washington Post, Harper's Bazaar, Entertainment Weekly, Bustle, BuzzFeed, Parade, Goodreads, Fortune, and BBC.https://www.moneymakingconversations.comhttps://www.youtube.com/MoneyMakingConversationshttps://www.facebook.com/MoneyMakingConversations/https://twitter.com/moneymakingconvhttps://www.instagram.com/moneymakingconversations/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Book Dreams
Ep. 69 - The Truth About the Gospel of Jesus's Wife, with Ariel Sabar

Book Dreams

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 44:57


What happens when a Harvard professor puts the weight of her reputation behind an alleged ancient gospel with monumental implications for the Roman Catholic Church, and the gospel turns out to be a fake? In 2012, Karen King, the Hollis Professor of Divinity at Harvard's Divinity School, announced the discovery of a gospel in which Jesus refers to “my wife.” Investigative reporter Ariel Sabar, author of Veritas: A Harvard Professor, a Con Man, and the Gospel of Jesus's Wife, was present at the announcement and helped uncover the actuality of the gospel's forgery. This week on Book Dreams, Ariel talks with Eve and Julie about what it was like to be in the room, across the street from the Vatican itself, when Karen King unveiled the alleged gospel. He describes the steps taken to establish that the document was forged, and his own, successful efforts to identify the man who is almost certainly the mastermind behind the forgery. And he discusses what this saga illustrates about the nature of truth and the significance of authenticity, with a consideration of the influence of Karen King's postmodernist thinking. Ariel Sabar is an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times, The Atlantic, Smithsonian Magazine, Harper's Bazaar, The Washington Post, and The Wall Street Journal. He's worked as a staff writer at the Providence Journal, The Baltimore Sun, and Christian Science Monitor. Ariel won the National Book Critics Circle Award for his first book, My Father's Paradise: A Son's Search for His Jewish Past. Veritas, his book about Karen King and the Gospel of Jesus's Wife, was a finalist for the Edgar Award for best true crime book of the year and for the investigative reporters and editors book award. Find us on Twitter (@bookdreamspod) and Instagram (@bookdreamspodcast), or email us at contact@bookdreamspodcast.com. We encourage you to visit our website and sign up for our newsletter for information about our episodes, guests, and more. Book Dreams is a part of Lit Hub Radio and the Podglomerate network, a company that produces, distributes, and monetizes podcasts. For more information on how The Podglomerate treats data, please see our Privacy Policy. Since you're listening to Book Dreams, we'd like to suggest you also try other Podglomerate shows about literature, writing, and storytelling like Storybound and The History of Literature. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Angel Invest Boston
Yael deCapo and David Chang - TBD Angels

Angel Invest Boston

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 50:14


Join Sal Daher's Syndicate List: Click to Join Sponsored by Peter Fasse, Patent Attorney at Fish & Richardson Born out of COVID in 2020, TBD Angels is Boston's newest angel group. In its first seventeen months it has already invested in forty startups. Members David Chang and Yael deCapo spoke about what TBD offers startups and investors. Highlights: Sal Daher Introduces Yael deCapo and David Chang of TBD Angels TBD Angel's Process is Real-Time Not Batch “We try to match their velocity, which is pretty hard to do, but we occasionally succeed at that.” “There is a tool-based voting that if enough members vote that they're interested in hearing a pitch, we have an automatic way to schedule that pitch.” TBD Angels Invests via a Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) “It's a little bit of an experiment from our standpoint. We started this group in the middle of a pandemic, the beginning of 2020.” Sal Daher Thanks Matt Fates for Introducing Him to TBD Angels In Seventeen Months, TBD Angels Has Invested in 40 Companies Choice of Startups Is Driven by Member Interest and Not by Rigid Criteria Sal Daher Introduces His Effort to Help Angels Invest in Life-Science Startups Sal Daher Credits the Research of Jeff Behrens, PhD on Biotech Funding “...I think it's a great value to the founders also, that they have that broader reach and it's not so siloed...” Sal Daher Continues to Be Involved with Walnut Ventures Which Has a Lot of AI Expertise TBD Angels Has Investors and Startups from Across the Country The Singular Opportunity of Purdue University and Its 500 Professors of Engineering AOA Diagnostics - Addressing Ovarian Cancer, a Silent Killer of Women Kytopen - Scalable Production of Gene Therapies How TBD Angels Connected with AOA Diagnostics Brief Bios of David Chang and Yael deCapo What Moved Yael deCapo to Write Her First Angel Check David Chang and His Interest in Student Entrepreneurship Boston as the World's Bazaar of Biotech Talent “...over a third of the CEOs that we've funded are women over a third, I believe are also people of color...” Topics: angel investing strategies, biotech, robotics / AI

Talk Design
Elaine Kim

Talk Design

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 73:40


After working in fashion for over 20 years, Elaine Kim launched her namesake label, ELAINE KIM, in 2008. Through her fashion collection, Elaine Kim explores a highly personal vision of creativity, craft, and self-expression. Her versatile pieces have garnered her devoted following of editors, stylists, and clients around the world.Elaine Kim's profile and designs have been featured in numerous international publications as well as in WWD, W, Harper's Bazaar, New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Vogue, and Marie Claire. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Money Making Conversations
NYT Best Selling author Zakiya Dalila Harris & Sunni Hickman of VP of Marketing & Sales of The Harlem Globetrotters

Money Making Conversations

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2021 60:20


Rushion McDonald talks to Zakiya Dalila Harris, Writer, and Author of the New York Times Best Selling Book, The Other Black Girl. The psychological thriller incorporates social commentary about diversity in the workplace and the challenges Black women often have to navigate. Named a Most Anticipated Book of 2021 by TIME, The Washington Post, Harper's Bazaar, Entertainment Weekly, Bustle, BuzzFeed, Parade, Goodreads, Fortune, and BBC. Rushion McDonald talks to Sunni Hickman, Vice President of Marketing and Sales, The Harlem Globetrotters. The world-famous Harlem Globetrotters have showcased their iconic talents in 124 countries and territories on six continents since their founding in 1926. Sunni Hickman is the creative powerhouse behind the Harlem Globetrotters 2021 relaunch.https://www.moneymakingconversations.comhttps://www.youtube.com/MoneyMakingConversationshttps://www.facebook.com/MoneyMakingConversations/https://twitter.com/moneymakingconvhttps://www.instagram.com/moneymakingconversations/ Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Fearless Health Podcast
Your Gut Health is Completely Fixable – with Esther Blum | Ep. 18

Fearless Health Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 38:12


Your gut is the foundation of your health and needs to be properly cared for. But let's face it, this can be hard to do! Many people may not even know where to start, or may even think it's too late to get started on a path to better gut health. In this episode, author and dietitian Esther Blum assures us that your gut health is fixable and necessary, no matter your starting point.We answer these questions:- Why is gut health such a key issue for women? - How does diet factor into gut health?- The best food for building great gut integrity!- What is the elemental diet?- And so much more!Esther is a 4x Bestselling Author, Integrative Dietitian and High-Performance Coach, who has helped thousands of women permanently treat the root cause of their health struggles and find joy in their lives once again. She is a widely respected industry expert and the bestselling author of the books Cavewomen Don't Get Fat, Eat, Drink and Be Gorgeous, Secrets of Gorgeous, and The Eat, Drink, and Be Gorgeous Project. She was voted Best Nutritionist by Manhattan Magazine and has appeared on Today, Dr. Oz, A Healthy You with Carol Alt, The ISAAC show, ABC-TV, FOX- 5's Good Day NY, and Fox News Live. She is an in-demand authority frequently quoted in E!Online, InTouch, Time Magazine, The New York Post, The Los Angeles Times, In Style, Bazaar, Self, Fitness, Marie Claire, and Cosmo.-Connect with Esther:Gift: https://estherblum.com/call Website: https://estherblum.comInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/gorgeousesther/ -Get 10% off your supplements with the promo code “podcast” at https://drannmariebarter.com/shop/ Binding fiber support https://drannmariebarter.com/product/binding-fiber-support-capsules/ IBS support probiotic powder https://drannmariebarter.com/product/ibs-support-probiotic-powder/ IBS support Capsules https://drannmariebarter.com/product/ibs-support-probiotic-capsules/ Detox support: https://altfammed.com/product/gi-detox/ Sugar Cravings support: https://altfammed.com/product/sugar-cravings-support/ -Subscribe for more gut health content and share this podcast with a friend! Take a screenshot of this episode and tag Dr. Ann-Marie Barter:http://instagram.com/drannmariebarter -Dr. Ann-Marie Barter is a Functional Medicine and Chiropractic Doctor at Alternative Family Medicine & Chiropractic. She is the clinic founder of Alternative Family Medicine & Chiropractic that has two offices: one in Longmont and one in Denver. They treat an array of health conditions overlooked or under-treated by conventional medicine, called the "grey zone". https://altfammed.com/ https://drannmariebarter.com/

The Optimal Body
129 | Mindset Training with Mike Aidala

The Optimal Body

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 35:45


Struggling with mindset? Wondering how language affects mindset? Curious to dive deeper within yourself? Mike Aidala, a health and wellness expert, explores mindset in its whole capacity. With a look into his background, Mike shares his "addiction" to yoga and the mental space it provided him in helping him perform better with his lifting. He leads by example, setting the example of this dualism in his movement practice, opening up the freedom to embrace all schools of movement. Furthermore, he explains his mind-first approach to setting up goals, and how shifting your language to create more choice can make all the difference. His "shouldfast" techniques drop the judgment, bring more awareness, and allows individuals to be more present with their choices. Then, Mike unveils his journey to riding the wave of vulnerability. He provides his top tips for addressing physical manifestations of emotions and how to combat the fears and repercussions that come with failure. Finally, he offers his top recommendations on how to start diving into yourself. Let's dive into all things mindset. What You Will Learn In This Interview with Mike 3:30 – Mike's Background 5:51 – Addiction to the athletic mindset (lifting + yoga) 7:15 – Opening your movement practices to find mind balance 8:23 – How to approach the mind in setting up goals 11:16 – Shifting language to create choice instead of judgment 12:51 – The “shouldfast:” how to implement language shifts 16:06 – The power of presence 17:13 – How did Mike navigate vulnerability? 21:35 – How emotions physically manifest 25:46 – How Mike approaches his client's failure 30:26 – How to start diving into yourself: gratitude & hot baths 33:19 – Learn more with Mike About Mike Aidala: Mike Aidala is a leading health and wellness expert who has been mentioned in: Men's Journal, GQ, AskMen, Gear Patrol, Well+Good, PopSugar, Harper's Bazaar, Valet Magazine, and more. He is one of the top personal coaches in America and has been coaching and guiding others for over 15 years. Mike's various programs are for individuals who want to establish an enhanced, more familiar relationship with their body and mind. Using a range of modalities, Mike creates personalized programs to build stability, flexibility, and strength for efficient, effective life control. You will learn to pay attention as you move through the world, cultivating an awareness that will lead to a healthy and happy life! Items mentioned in this episode: Mike‘s Website Mike's Handstand Course To learn more about Mike and view full show notes, please visit the full website here: https://www.docjenfit.com/podcast/episode129/ Thank you so much for checking out this episode of The Optimal Body Podcast. If you haven't done so already, please take a minute to subscribe and leave a quick rating and review of the show! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/tobpodcast/message

The Wedding Biz - Behind the Scenes of the Wedding Business
Episode 377 SUNNA YASSIN & MOLLIE JONES-HENNES: Staying Relevant in an Everchanging Industry

The Wedding Biz - Behind the Scenes of the Wedding Business

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 36:24


Andy hopes that you will tune in to this episode of The Wedding Biz as he talks with Sunna Yassin and Mollie Jones-Hennes of Bash Please. Named top planners by Brides, Harper's BAZAAR, and Martha Stewart Weddings, they are a full service creative event production company with studios out of Los Angeles and San Francisco. They are here to talk about what it takes to create an enjoyable and successful partnership, their social media strategy, their pricing philosophy, how they manage the business side of things, and so much more! Sunna and Mollie reveal how they came together as partners, explaining that it happened very organically. They touch upon how they handle the business and financial side of the business in addition to the creative side as well as how they maintain balance between work and their personal lives, emphasizing the importance of finding time for self-care. They also discuss how they feel about virtual meetings and how they stay relevant in an industry that is always changing. The industry changes every six months or so, and Sunna and Mollie credit their relevance with the unique way that they interact with their current clients, resulting in word-of-mouth. Andy had a great time talking with Sunna and Mollie of Bash Please and encourages you to share this interview with three good friends who might get something out of it too! Have you heard about the brand new show on The Wedding Biz Network, Stop and Smell the Roses with Preston Bailey? Listen as Preston shares the secrets, tools, and technologies behind his extraordinary ability to create a theatrical environment out of any space. Also, don't forget about Sean Low's podcast The Business of Being Creative, where Sean discusses the power of being niched, pricing strategies, metrics of success, and so much more. You can find both shows on The Wedding Biz Network.   SUPPORTING THE WEDDING BIZ Become a patron and support Andy and the show! If you are so inspired, contribute!   Time Stamps [0:44] – Today's guests are Sunna Yassin and Mollie Jones-Hennes of Bash Please. [1:50] – We learn about the pivotal moment in Sunna's life that veered her toward her current career. [3:08] – Mollie reflects on her childhood and college years and how they affected her career path. [4:50] – Discover how Sunna and Mollie formed their partnership. [7:03] – Sunna reflects on whether or not there was any trepidation about partnering. [8:52] – Mollie reveals that she more so handles the business side of things whereas Sunna handles the more creative side of things. [10:12] – We learn how Mollie felt when she made the transition into partnership with Sunna. [11:54] – We learn what makes Mollie's and Sunna's partnership unique. [13:20] – For the most part, as they elaborate upon, both Mollie and Sunna are present at meetings with clients. [15:10] – Sunna and Mollie talk about how they feel about virtual meetings. [19:20] – Sunna and Mollie describe an upcoming event as an example of what they normally do. [22:23] – Andy shifts the conversation toward the business side of things. [23:09] – We learn that the experience that both Sunna and Mollie had prior to their partnership ended up being invaluable to it. [24:37] – Mollie and Sunna touch upon what aspect of the job is the most challenging and stressful. [26:48] – We discover Mollie's and Sunna's pricing philosophy. [28:17] – Sunna and Mollie explain how they stay relevant in an industry that is always changing. [31:08] – Mollie and Sunna elaborate upon their social media strategy and how they remain successful on social media. [33:04] – We receive some advice regarding partnering. [35:42] – Andy reveals how to find Sunna and Mollie online.   Find Sunna and Mollie: Bash Please - Website Bash Please - Instagram Page Bash Please - Facebook Page   On Clubhouse, follow Andy @andykushner and join his club “The Wedding Biz” to get additional content and to get direct access to Andy.   Follow The Wedding Biz on Social: The Wedding Biz The Wedding Biz on Instagram: @theweddingbiz The Wedding Biz on Facebook: @theweddingbiz The Wedding Biz Network The Music Makers   Support The Wedding Biz by clicking here.   Title Sponsor: This episode is sponsored by Kushner Entertainment & PartySlate.  

FANTI
Black, Queer & Visible (Ft. Ryan Mitchell)

FANTI

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 57:34


DIS/Honorable Mentions Honorable mention to The King AND Queen Beyonce on the cover of this month's Harper's Bazaar.Honorable mention to Jennifer Hudson and Marlan Wayans for their performances in Respect, which comes out this Friday, August 13th.This Week's Sponsor Deals:Raycon – FANTI listeners can get 15% off their Raycon order at BUY RAYCON dot com slash fanti.Better Help is customized online therapy. FANTI listeners can get 10% off their first month.Go ahead and @ usEmail: FANTI@maximumfun.orgIG@FANTIpodcast@Jarrett Hill@rayzon (Tre'Vell)Twitter@FANTIpodcast@TreVellAnderson@JarrettHill@Swish (Producer Laura Swisher) FANTI is produced and distributed by MaximumFun.orgLaura Swisher is the senior producer. Episode Contributors: Jarrett Hill, Laura Swisher, Tre'Vell Anderson, Ryan Mitchell

The Argument
Are Workplace Diversity Programs Doing More Harm Than Good?

The Argument

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 42:36


It's time to rethink what's working in the modern workplace and what's failing. Amid a pandemic that overturned how so many work, increased calls for racial and social justice put a new pressure on companies to ensure — or at least to seem as if they ensure — equality among their employees. Diversity, equity and inclusion (D.E.I.) programs are an increasingly popular solution deployed by management. But do these initiatives do marginalized employees any good? And who are the true beneficiaries of diversity programs, anyway?Jane Coaston has spent years on the receiving end of diversity initiatives, and for that reason, she's skeptical. To debate D.E.I. programs' efficacy, she brought together Dr. Sonia Kang, the Canada Research Chair in Identity, Diversity and Inclusion at the University of Toronto, and Lily Zheng, a D.E.I. strategy consultant and public speaker, to argue what works and doesn't when it comes to making workplaces fair for all.Mentioned in this episode:Sonia Kang's podcast, “For the Love of Work,” episode “Leaning Into Diversity, Equity and Belonging”Lily Zheng, Harvard Business Review, “How to Show White Men That Diversity and Inclusion Efforts Need Them”Kim Tran, Harper's Bazaar, “The Diversity and Inclusion Industry Has Lost Its Way”Frank Dobbin and Alexandra Kalev “Why Diversity Programs Fail”The Washington Post, “To improve diversity, don't make people go to diversity training. Really.”

The Big Wedding Planning Podcast
#262 Art of the Dinner Party

The Big Wedding Planning Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 4, 2021 63:22


The dinner party is back! Our guest, Nathalie Cadet-James (https://www.luxefetesocial.com/pages/our-story) throws the most amazing dinner parties and you are going to love hearing Nathalie & Christy talk about the most effective ways to give your guests all the "feels" at your next dinner party. Nathalie Cadet-James (https://www.luxefetesocial.com/pages/our-story) is a Former Attorney turned planner and started Luxe Fete, an event planning and design studio, in 2009. Nathalie is an International Event Planner and Designer who has been featured in Harper's BAZAAR (https://www.harpersbazaar.com/wedding/planning/g6965/best-wedding-planners/), BRIDES Magazine (https://www.brides.com/best-wedding-planners-in-america-5090730) and Martha Stewart (https://www.marthastewart.com/7939221/top-wedding-planners) to name a few. She was named one of the Top Planners on the Martha Stewart Top Planners list. As a producer of large weddings, the pandemic and lockdown really helped Nathalie open the door to create dinner parties in a box, allowing for celebrations around the world, and right in your own living room. Big Takeaways * The old white china dinner party is gone. In fact, so much of dinner parties have become a lost art form. * Conversations can be difficult. Conversation starters, included in the Luxe Fete boxes, are a great element of a successful party. Elements of a great dinner party: - Conversation Starters: a way to put down phones and start more purposeful dialogue - Music: it's a great equalizer and mood setter - A great looking table: the centerpiece of the whole event - Good food and drink: think of your favorite restaurant, you can get takeout! Grab some great wine and desserts too. You can also hire a private chef, or cook yourself. - A plan: it's okay if it's not all set out and ready to eat when the guests arrive, as long as you know what's going on, you're going to have a great time Links We Referenced instagram.com/luxefete/ (https://www.instagram.com/luxefete/) instagram.com/luxefetesocial/ (https://www.instagram.com/luxefetesocial/) Nathalie's Dinner Party Music Playlists (https://www.luxefetesocial.com/pages/nats-favorite-dinner-party-music) NY Times Article (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/04/28/style/a-wedding-planner-with-a-lot-on-her-plate.html?searchResultPosition=1) Quotes “You raise a really good point about how people feel about dinner parties. I do think it's a lost art form. I think technology has completely rendered us disconnected.” - Nathalie “I think every gathering needs to have a purpose to really be successful.” - Nathalie “The goal is for all of hosts to be like, ‘Oh shit she is the hostess with the mostest. Amazing music. Amazing dinner party. So thoughtful in conversation. People are becoming friends.People are loving it. Food's outrageous. Oh my goodness." - Nathalie “Just focus on being present, and enjoying your family and friends. And let nature do what it does. Which is ignite, inspire and connect.” - Nathalie Plan your wedding using The Big Wedding Planning Master Class (https://www.thebigweddingplanningmasterclass.com/). A self-paced digital course created with love for you by Christy & Michelle. The Big Wedding Planning Podcast is... * Hosted and produced by Christy Matthews and Michelle Martinez. * Edited by Veronica Gruba. * Music by Steph Altman of Mophonics (https://www.mophonics.com/). * On Instagram @thebigweddingplanningpodcast and be sure to use #planthatwedding when posting, so you can get our attention! * Inviting you to become part of our Facebook Group! Join us and our amazing members. Just search for The Big Wedding Planning Podcast Community on Facebook. * Easy to get in touch with. Email us at thebigweddingplanningpodcast@gmail.com or Call and leave a message at 415-723-1625 and you might hear your voice on an episode * On Patreon. Become a member (https://www.patreon.com/thebigweddingplanningpodcast) and with as little as $5 per month, you get bonus episodes, special newsletters and Zoom Cocktail Hours with Christy & Michelle! Our Partners (https://www.thebigweddingplanningpodcast.com/partners) Special Deals for Listeners - TBWPP Enthusiastically Approved! Wedfuly (https://wedfuly.com/bigwedding/) SuitShop (https://suitshop.com/?utm_campaign=EngagedLeads&utm_content=BWPPPartnership&utm_medium=BWPP&utm_source=ReferralLink) The Flashdance (https://www.theflashdance.com/virtual-party-the-big-wedding-planning-podcast) Cactus Collective (https://www.cactus-collective.com/the-big-wedding-planning-podcast/) Unboring Wedding Academy (https://www.unboringweddingacademy.com/bigwedding/)

Apple News Today
In Conversation: Roxane Gay talks Kelis's farm and the beauty of homegrown food

Apple News Today

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2021 17:12


Kelis is a pop star most widely known for her 2003 hit single, “Milkshake.” She's still performing, but her talents and interests extend beyond the music world. A few years ago, she and her husband bought a farm outside L.A. and started living off the land. Best-selling author Roxane Gay wrote about Kelis's experience running the farm for Harper's Bazaar. In her article, Gay explores why Kelis started farming and the freedom it has brought her. Gay also looks at the barriers that often stand between Black people and homegrown food. Gay's article, called “How Kelis Remixed Her Life,” is available to read (and listen to) in Apple News+.