Podcasts about Andy Warhol

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard

American artist

  • 2,083PODCASTS
  • 2,836EPISODES
  • 46mAVG DURATION
  • 3DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jun 28, 2022LATEST
Andy Warhol

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Andy Warhol

Show all podcasts related to andy warhol

Latest podcast episodes about Andy Warhol

The Unfinished Print
Andrew Stone - Baren and Printmaker: The Beautiful and The Ugly

The Unfinished Print

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 99:08


One's mokuhanga journey takes many twists and turns. One can begin that journey at any age, at any time. For Andrew Stone that journey began at the age of 40, where in the last  fifteen years or so, Andrew has done a deep dive into the nuances of the art form, from technique, to tools. His exploration into what makes mokuhanga, mokuhanga, is fascinating and important.  On this episode of The Unfinished Print, I speak with mokuhanga printmaker and baren maker Andrew Stone. We speak about his Florence Baren Project, his own mokuhanga, his life in Italy, his meeting with baren maker Hidehiko Gotō. We discuss his philosophies on mokuhanga and baren making, what it takes to make such a beautiful tool like the baren, and how they function and work.   Please follow The Unfinished Print and my own mokuhanga work on Instagram @andrezadoroznyprints Twitter @unfinishedprint, or email me at theunfinishedprint@gmail.com Notes: may contain a hyperlink. Simply click on the highlighted word or phrase. Andrew Stone - Lacrime di Rospo blog April Vollmer - is a mokuhanga artist based in New York City. She has been working in the medium for over thirty years. Her book, Japanese Woodblock Print Workshop, is a classic of the genre and a fantastic instructional book to begin mokuhanga. Andrew's wine label prints - here is one such print Andrew describes in his interview.  David Bull/Mokuhankan - David Bull is a Canadian mokuhanga printmaker and business owner based in the city and Prefecture of Tōkyō, Japan.  His company, Mokuhankan, has promoted the making of mokuhanga via the hanmoto or collaboration system of making woodblock prints, where the image begins as a black and white copy, evolving into a multi-layered colour woodblock print through a series of designers, carvers, and printmakers.   etegami - meaning image letter, etegami is a style of calligraphy which was created by Kokei Kunio in the 1960's, by writing his own distinct style of calligraphy on New Years postcards.  Although, sending postcards on New Years has been a tradition in Japan since the 700's. By using watercolours on washi, Kunio creates beautiful postcards which lend a hand to the ephemeral nature of the season and the medium.  lithography - is a printing process which requires a stone or aluminum plate, and was invented in the 18th Century. More info, here from the Tate.  Shin hanga - is a style of Japanese woodblock printmaking which began during the end of the Ukiyo-e period of Japanese printmaking, in the early 20th Century. Focusing on the foreign demand for “traditional” Japanese imagery and motifs such as castles, bridges, famous landscapes, bamboo forests, to name just a few.  Shin hanga was born in 1915 by Watanabe Shōzaburō (1885-1962) when he found Austrian artist Frtiz Capelari (1884-1950) and commissioned Capelari to design some prints for Watanabe's feldgling printing house . From there shin-hanga evolved into its own distinct “new” style of Japanese woodblock printing. It lasted as this distinct style until its innevitable decline after the Second World War (1939-1945). Pop art - is a an art movement generally connected to post war America and commodification. Artists such as Andy Warhol (1928-1987), and Roy Lichtenstein (1923-1997) are well known pop-artists. Rebecca Salter - is a British artist who focused on mokuhanga early in her career, and painting in later life. She is the President of The Royal Academy of Arts, London. Her book Japanese Woodblock Printing is a classic of the genre. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  International Mokuhanga Conference - is a conference conducted by the International Mokuhanga Association for Japanese woodblock printing. It is held every two years and is themed. More info can be found, here.  Mara Cozzolino - is a mokuhanga artist, based in Turin, Italy. Mara's subjects tend to be landcapes and trees. Mara is also the IMC Publicity Advisor. Her interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  Annie Bissett - is a mokuhanga artist and designer based in Rhode Island, USA. Annie's subjects vary, from landscapes, politics, and even tarot. You can find her interview with the Unfinished Print, here.  California forest fires - The State of California in the United States, has dry, hot weather. Because of climate change, this has been exacerbated by a higher population, deforestation, and heavy use. Forest fires have become common yearly events. Impressionism - is a 19th Century art movement where the art is defined by visible brushstrokes, pastel colour, and the depiction of natural light. Artists associated with his movement are, Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), Edgar Degas (1834-1917), Claude Monet (1840-1926).  Fauvists - a group of artists and an art movement of the early 20th Century who focused on the painterly and lasted only a short time, 1904-1908. It is influenced by the Impressionists and is also considered a break from that. A few artists of this short movement are Henri Matisse (1869-1953), André Derain (1880-1954), Jean Puy (1876-1960), amongst others.  Secessionists  - is an independent art movement, and historical break of the avante garde from the conservative ideals of European art. This period was from the late 19th to the early 20th Century. Started in Germany (Munich Secession) and then onto Vienna led by Gustav Klimt  (1862-1918). The several secessionist movements of the late 19th century (Munich, Vienna, Berlin) was grouped as one movement in the 1970's by art scholars.  hanashita - is a thin sheet of gampi paper that is pasted, reverse side, on a piece of wood. This is a guide, carved onto the block and is generally used for the key block and subsequent colour blocks. Methods such as acetate with water based pigment, can also be used rather than the thin gampi paper, which can cause misregistration if not pasted correctly. Biomass plants in the EU - biomass is a form of energy which uses trees as energy. Large biomass plants can be found and subsidized by federal governments in Europe. They take in biological materials such as wood residue, energy crops and other agricultural residues and convert these items into energy. There are both pros and cons for this type of energy generation.  shina - is a type of wood used in mokuhanga. It is part of the linden family of trees. This wood is produced in various parts of the world, such as Japan and Russia. Not all shina is created equal so buyer beware. basswood - is a type of wood from the linden family of trees, soft and generally grainless. Can be used in mokuhanga.   Florence, Italy   - the capital of the Tuscany region of Italy. Famous for its renaissance architecture, and culture. Large art galleries, such as the Bargello National Museum, and the Uffizi Gallery, are located here. fabriano artistico - is a machine made Western watercolour paper, which can be purchased in rolls and sheets. Guerra Pigment - is a family run pigment store located in Brooklyn, New York. Holbein -  is a pigment company with offices located in Japan, The United States, and Canada. They offer high end gouache, watercolour, and pigment pastes.  Paul Furneaux - is a Scottish mokuhanga artist based in Edinburgh, Scotland. He makes abstract mokuhanga, mixed with wood and other mediums.  sizing recipe -  sizing is a term used for a recipe, containing animal glue, alum, and water. It is used to coat your paper, dried, and then remoistened and printed with,  to keep your pigments from bleeding in the paper. Sizing, in the short term, keeps your prints bright and colourful, although over time it has been proven that heavy sizing can deteriorate the print. Some recipes can be found, here, and here. McClains - is an online, and brick and mortar store located in Portland, Oregon, USA. It sells mokuhanga tools, books, and educational items. McClain's interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  takenogawa bamboo skin -  is a bamboo skin, made from a bamboo leaf, which covers the coils on your baren. You can wrap them yourself or have them sent to Japan to be wrapped professionally. Be sure to buy more than a few baren skins as you'll go through a few when wrapping your own baren. Gotō baren clinic Ginza - called Baren Juku, and located in the Ginza, Tōkyō. It was started in 2012. tannin - are a class of molecules which are found in amino acids and alkaloids. They are found in tree bark, wood, leaves, fruits, seeds, plants. They protect the tree from bugs and other infections. Gotō Huidehiko's book on baren -  Mia-0 - is a mokuhanga artist based in Tōkyō, Japan. Her work can be found, here.  Terry McKenna - is a mokuhanga printmaker based in Karuizawa, Nagano, Japan. He studied under Kyōto-based mokuhanga artist Richard Steiner. Terry also runs his own mokuhanga school in Karuizawa. His interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here. Richard Steiner's interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  John Moss -  is a mokuhanga artist based in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. His work focuses on landscape. His work can be found here. His interview with The Unfinished Print can be found, here.  murasaki baren - is a mid-range mokuhanga baren. “murasaki” meaning “purple” , come in two types of weight (medium and heavy), and two types of sizes (10cm and 12cm). They are reasonably priced baren.  gomazuri - is a mokuhanga technique where slight pressure is used with pigments too make a “spotty” image, what look like sesame seeds. It can add depth to your prints.  baren suji zuri - is a Mokuhanga technique used with the baren and by the baren to create a circular design and can be layered with various colours. Paul Binnie's Black Storm (2016) is a fine example. Yuki baren -  is a heavy ball bearing baren made in Japan. It is used to print large flat colours.  Padua, Italy - is a city in the North of Italy, the Veneto region. It is famous for its frescoes and religious heritage. More info can be found, here.  bokashi - is a mokuhanga technique, where the pigment fades from a heavy colour to a softer, broad colour. Made famous by prints designed by Hokusai and Hiroshige, this technique is, for me, the most popular technique utilized by  mokuhanga printmakers. There are various types: Ichimoji-bokashi or straight line graduation, used in the above mentioned Hiroshige and Hokusai prints. Ichimoji-mura-bokashi or straight line gradation with uneven edge. Ō-bokashi or wide gradation, Ate-nashi-bokashi or gradation without definition. Futa-iro-bokashi or two tone gradation, and ita-bokashi or softer-edge gradation, where the block is cut in a specific way to achieve this style of gradation. All of these styles of bokashi technique take practice and skill but are very much doable.  © Popular Wheat Productions opening and closing credit music - Rob Swift, A Turntable Experience, from trhe album Soulful Fruit (1997) logo designed and produced by Douglas Batchelor and André Zadorozny  Disclaimer: Please do not reproduce or use anything from this podcast without shooting me an email and getting my express written or verbal consent. I'm friendly :) Слава Україну If you find any issue with something in the show notes please let me know. ***The opinions expressed by guests in The Unfinished Print podcast are not necessarily those of André Zadorozny and of Popular Wheat Productions.***      

What the Riff?!?
1989 - May: The Cult “Sonic Temple”

What the Riff?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 40:54


Some of the most popular songs from The Cult come from Sonic Temple, their fourth studio album.  They garnered some attention in 1985 when the single “She Sells Sanctuary” off their second album hit the US charts, and they had established a solid following as a “post punk” or “goth rock” band, but Sonic Temple would put them over the top with its more hard rock appeal.The band lineup for this album consisted of Ian Astbury on vocals and percussion, Billy Duffy on guitar, Jamie Stewart on bass and keyboards, and newcomer Mickey Curry on drums.  Prior to Curry, the band had relied on Eric Singer for the first demos, and Chris Taylor for second demos at the drums.While the critical reception was mixed with some considering the work too conventional, the commercial success was undeniable.  The album shot up to the top 10 in both the UK and the US, and was certified gold in the UK and platinum in the US.Creative differences would destabilize the group on their fifth studio album and the group would break up after 1998.  However several reunions took place over the years, and the group is back together as of 2022. Brian leads the discussion of this album.Sun KingAstbury and Duffy wrote this song, inspired by Louis XIV.  Known as the Sun King, Louis XIV is the French King who moved the royal court to Versailles.  The track is an explicitly masculine one.  “I'm a sun king, baby, let me take you by the hand.  Sun king, honey, we can rule across the land.”  Fire WomanThe first single from the album is this well known track.  As with all the tracks, Ian Astbury and Billy Duffy wrote this hit which peaked at number 46 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 2 on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks charts.  Astbury has stated that this is a universal symbol, an archetype of the femme fatale.Edie (Ciao Baby)Edie Sedgwick is the inspiration for this song.  Sedgwick was an actress and socialite who traveled in Andy Warhol's circles in 1960's New York.  Sedgwick lived fast and died young of a drug overdose.  She was 28 when she died.  Her last film was “Ciao! Manhattan.”  This is not the only song inspired by Sedgwick, as Bob Dylan's “Just Like a Woman” is supposedly inspired by Edie Sedgwick as well.Sweet Soul SisterThis track was written in Paris, inspired by the Americanization of European culture.  It was the fourth single released from the album.  The song observes the love/hate relationship that comes with both the attraction and resistance experienced as a response to American culture, particularly in France. ENTERTAINMENT TRACK:The main theme from the television series "Saturday Night Live" Mike Myers joined the cast of Saturday Night Live, and original cast member Gilda Radner died in this month in 1989. STAFF PICKS:So Alive by Love and Rockets Rob begins the staff picks with a group that sounds a bit like INXS.  This single is off the self-titled fourth album from Love and Rockets.  “You're legs are strong and you're so, so long, and you don't come from this town.”  The single made it to number 3 in the U.S., and was considered the number 1 modern rock song in the U.S. for 1989.Walkin' Shoes  by Tora ToraWayne features a rock-blues number from a group out of Memphis, Tennessee.  This underrated song made it to number 47 on the Billboard Hot 100, and the sound reminds us of Motley Crue and Led Zeppelin.  The group won studio time in a Battle of the Bands contest.  Tora Tora is still recording as of 2022.Dreams In the Dark by BadlandsBruce's staff pick is a hair band formed by former Black Sabbath members Ray Gillen (vocals) and Eric Singer (drums), former Ozzy guitarist Jake E. Lee, and former Surgical Steel bass player Greg Chaisson.  After Lee was fired from Ozzy's band by Sharon Osborne, he was motivated to form this band.  As mentioned previously Eric Singer had a hand in the demos of The Cult's album, and would go on to join KISS. Good Thing by Fine Young CannibalsBrian  wraps up this week's staff picks with the second big hit from FYC's album, “The Raw & the Cooked.”  Fine Young Cannibals hail from Birmingham, England, formed in 1984 and disbanded in 1992.       COMEDY TRACK:Debbie Gibson Is Pregnant with My Two-Headed Love Child  by Mojo NixonThis boogie-woogie comedy track is a good example of the type of parody song for which Mojo Nixon is famous.

Times Ticking
The History Of The Cartier Tank

Times Ticking

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 6:46


The Cartier Tank is one of the most iconic pieces of wristwear donned by some of the most popular women and men in history, including Jackie Kennedy-Onassis, JFK, Princess Diana, Andy Warhol, and Michelle Obama.

Unrepresented
The Trials & Tribulations of Being a Girl Punk Band with Transy Warhol

Unrepresented

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 32:21


This week on Unrepresented Magazine Writer Camila Dejesus and Content Producer Frankie Alaniz celebrate pride with queer band Transy Warhol. We talk about what messages they're trying to convey with their music, Where they got their incredible stage presence, and the crazy story about how they all met!

CUNY TV's Twilight Talks
Christopher Makos: Fluidity

CUNY TV's Twilight Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 24, 2022 13:22


Makos recounts the unique social creativity of the Factory and his friendship with Andy Warhol.

The Week in Art
Documenta 15: scandal and legacy. Plus, the Warhol-Prince copyright dispute, and Juan Muñoz

The Week in Art

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 66:17


This week: our associate editor, Kabir Jhala, and editor-at-large, Jane Morris, have been in Kassel, Germany, to see Documenta, the quinquennial international art exhibition. They review the show and respond to the escalation of a long-running row over antisemitism and broader racism, which has resulted in a work being removed from the exhibition. Virginia Rutledge, an art historian and lawyer, discusses the dispute over Andy Warhol's appropriation of a photograph by Lynn Goldsmith of the pop icon Prince. The case will be heard in the US Supreme Court this autumn and has potentially huge implications for artistic freedom. And this episode's Work of the Week is An Outpost of Progress (1992), a drawing by the late Spanish artist Juan Muñoz, inspired by Joseph Conrad's short story of the same name.Documenta 15, Kassel, Germany, until 25 September.Juan Muñoz: Drawings 1982-2000, Centro Botín, Santander, Spain, 25 June-16 October. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Campaign podcast
87: Cannes prizes | Activism at the festival | Andy Warhol

Campaign podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 23, 2022 24:03


Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity is upon us and the prizes are coming thick and fast. There have also been more reflective moments; Ukraine's president made an appearance in a special video address on the first day of the event, and there have been acts of protest over climate change. Campaign's reporter Shauna Lewis and data journalist Jamie Rossouw discuss the key happenings from the festival so far. On top of all that, Campaign's features editor Matt Barker takes us through his feature on Andy Warhol, what he learned about the cultural icon and his impact on adland.Extra readingCampaign's summer issueCannes Lions 2022 live blogSubscribe to Campaign to keep up with the latest news, analysis and features in adland. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Rien ne s'oppose à midi - Matthieu Noël

Historiquement Vôtre réunit des artistes qui ont la banane : le king Elvis Presley qui en a fait sa coiffure aussi mythique que sa musique, puis le groupe new-yorkais pour qui Andy Warhol, qui leur a ouvert les portes de sa Factory, en a dessiné une pour la pochette de leur premier album : le Velvet Underground. Une banane qui cache une musique rock bien plus sombre qu'il n'y paraît. Et un artiste bananophile de génie qui veut qu'on le “laisse manger sa banane tout nu sur la plage” : Philippe Katerine.

Debout les copains !
Ils ont la banane !

Debout les copains !

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 79:35


Historiquement Vôtre réunit des artistes qui ont la banane : le king Elvis Presley qui en a fait sa coiffure aussi mythique que sa musique, puis le groupe new-yorkais pour qui Andy Warhol, qui leur a ouvert les portes de sa Factory, en a dessiné une pour la pochette de leur premier album : le Velvet Underground. Une banane qui cache une musique rock bien plus sombre qu'il n'y paraît. Et un artiste bananophile de génie qui veut qu'on le “laisse manger sa banane tout nu sur la plage” : Philippe Katerine.

CarneCruda.es PROGRAMAS
El mercado del arte. De Andy Warhol a los NFT (LA GALERÍA - CARNE CRUDA #1076)

CarneCruda.es PROGRAMAS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 62:37


Más “La oyente de libros” con Jimena Marcos Especial de La Galería con Sara Rubayo para entender cómo funciona el mercado del arte. ¿Por qué hay artistas que mueven auténticas fortunas y otros, sin embargo, no venden ni un colín.? ¿Quién pone los precios? ¿Qué ocurre en las ferias de arte o en una subasta? ¿Quién decide por qué artista apostar? Más información aquí: https://bit.ly/ArteCC1076 Haz posible Carne Cruda: http://bit.ly/ProduceCC

Llibres
L'Agulla Daurada, literatura i comprom

Llibres

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 59:12


Crazy, Rich Neighbors
Ep. 61 - Breaking Basquiat

Crazy, Rich Neighbors

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 28:31


Cheers to Bombay Sapphire Gin and their three Basquiat cocktail kits! Our Wacko of the Week is a Palm Beach art dealer who was recently busted by the FBI for selling fake Basquiat's, Warhols and more! But he's not alone. The Sunshine State is teeming with fake art. Which Florida museum's Basquiat collection is being called into question and why? What role does a FedEx box play? Our Bougie Bible picks include Mia's go to wig brand and Tiffany's favorite summer scents.FOLLOW US:www.facebook.com/CRNPodcastwww.crazyrichneighbors.com/bougiebiblehttps://www.instagram.com/crazyrichneighbors/Sources:https://nypost.com/2022/06/02/how-a-fedex-box-exposed-a-fake-basquiat-museum-collection/https://nypost.com/2022/05/30/daniel-elie-bouaziz-allegedly-sold-fake-art-in-florida/:https://www.justice.gov/usao-sdfl/pr/palm-beach-art-dealer-charged-carrying-out-art-fraud-schemehttps://appsgp.mypalmbeachclerk.com/eCaseView/search.aspxhttps://www.foodbeast.com/news/bombay-sapphire-basquiat-kits/https://www.cocktailcourier.com/cocktail/the-sprout-in-pisces/

Hot Takes & Deep Dives
Michael Musto on Village Voice, Gossip, Andy Warhol

Hot Takes & Deep Dives

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 50:13


Jess is joined by legendary Village Voice gossip columnist Michael Musto! Musto discusses the origin of outing, psychology of blind items, how an unknown Madonna prevented him from sound-checking with his band in 1982, Gaga's Oscar campaign for House of Gucci and the trouble he got into after Andy Warhol's funeral. He also dishes on Malcolm Forbes, camp John Waters, Fran Leibowitz, getting banned from Twitter and the annoying parts of being a conduit to people becoming fabulous. IG: @jessxnyc | @hottakesdeepdives * getfilteroff.com * code dives5

WhatCulture Wrestling
10 Celebrities You Didn't Know Are Wrestling Fans - Matthew McConaughey! Hayley Williams! Impractical Jokers! Andy Warhol?!

WhatCulture Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 7:57


Pop culture's best hidden marks. Simon Miller presents 10 Celebrities You Didn't Know Are Wrestling Fans...ENJOY!Follow us on Twitter:@SimonMiller316@WhatCultureWWEFor more awesome content, check out: whatculture.com/wwe See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

FT Everything Else
What Warhol's Marilyn tells us about the art market

FT Everything Else

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 33:01


Last month, Andy Warhol's "Shot Sage Blue Marilyn" sold for $195mn, making it the second most expensive piece of art to sell at auction, ever. And as prices keep going up, the art market — auction houses, gallerists, dealers, collectors — want to keep it that way. On the heels of a ‘stonking' art season, we invite two heavy hitters into the studio to walk us through it: arts editor Jan Dalley and art market columnist Melanie Gerlis. Then, Christie's head of 20th- and 21st-century art, Alex Rotter, pulls back the curtain on these record-breaking sales. --------------Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We're on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. --------------Links and mentions from the episode: – Melanie's article ‘Art Basel's Swiss fair defies gloomy economy with soaring sales': https://on.ft.com/3QtSagn – Melanie's auction season roundup: https://on.ft.com/38jn363 – Columnist John Gapper on how ‘The art market cannot get enough Andy Warhol Marilyns': https://on.ft.com/3O3GeAm – Jan's most recent art column, on whether we should send art back to Russia: https://on.ft.com/3OeLzF2 – Robert Armstrong's profile of Larry Gagosian: https://on.ft.com/3IfT0sD – Melanie's books are called The Art Fair Story and Art as an Investment? – Melanie is on Twitter @mgerlis, and Alex is on Instagram @rottweilernyc.—-------------Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast. --------------Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner and Sam Giovinco. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

FT News Briefing
FT Weekend: What Warhol's Marilyn tells us about the art market

FT News Briefing

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 34:02


Last month, Andy Warhol's "Shot Sage Blue Marilyn" sold for $195mn, making it the second most expensive piece of art to sell at auction, ever. And as prices keep going up, the art market — auction houses, gallerists, dealers, collectors — want to keep it that way. On the heels of a ‘stonking' art season, we invite two heavy hitters into the studio to walk us through it: arts editor Jan Dalley and art market columnist Melanie Gerlis. Then, Christie's head of 20th- and 21st-century art, Alex Rotter, pulls back the curtain on these record-breaking sales. --------------Want to say hi? We love hearing from you. Email us at ftweekendpodcast@ft.com. We're on Twitter @ftweekendpod, and Lilah is on Instagram and Twitter @lilahrap. --------------Links and mentions from the episode: – Melanie's article ‘Art Basel's Swiss fair defies gloomy economy with soaring sales': https://on.ft.com/3QtSagn – Melanie's auction season roundup: https://on.ft.com/38jn363 – Columnist John Gapper on how ‘The art market cannot get enough Andy Warhol Marilyns': https://on.ft.com/3O3GeAm – Jan's most recent art column, on whether we should send art back to Russia: https://on.ft.com/3OeLzF2 – Robert Armstrong's profile of Larry Gagosian: https://on.ft.com/3IfT0sD – Melanie's books are called The Art Fair Story and Art as an Investment? – Melanie is on Twitter @mgerlis, and Alex is on Instagram @rottweilernyc.—-------------Special offers for Weekend listeners, from 50% off a digital subscription to a $1/£1/€1 trial are here: http://ft.com/weekendpodcast. --------------Original music by Metaphor Music. Mixing and sound design by Breen Turner and Sam Giovinco. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The Bunker
Painting By Numbers: How Do We Put a Price on Art? 

The Bunker

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 38:47


Who decides the value of a piece of art? And how do they come to their conclusions? In May, Andy Warhol's 'Shot Sage Blue Marilyn' sold at Christie's for a record £158 million, making it the most expensive painting of the 20th century – but it is merely the biggest wave in an international tsunami of art sales. Jelena Sofronijevic speaks to Mary-Alice Stack, Chief Executive at Creative United, and Erling Kagge, polar explorer, former politician, and author of A Poor Collector's Guide to Buying Great Art, to discuss placing a value on creativity.  “The price is reflective of the market, not the value of the artwork.” – Mary-Alice Stack “Now, we don't talk about art, we talk about the art market,” – Erling Kagge “Art fairs are the least best place to buy an artwork.” – Mary-Alice Stack “There was a time when galleries felt like the preserve of the moneyed classes.” – Mary-Alice Stack “There's a sense that if you need to ask the price, you can't afford it.” - Mary-Alice Stack  “Fantastic art is being made every day.” – Erling Kagge “The auction houses are competing against themselves.” – Mary-Alice Stack  “What matters to artists is the creation of the work in the first place.” – Mary-Alice Stack  https://www.patreon.com/bunkercast Written and presented by Jelena Sofronijevic. Group Editor: Andrew Harrison. Lead Producer: Jacob Jarvis Producers: Jacob Archbold and Jelena Sofronijevic. Audio production by Jade Bailey. THE BUNKER is a Podmasters Production https://uk.gestalten.com/products/erling-kagge-buying-great-art  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

True House Stories Podcast with special guests by Lenny Fontana
Man Parrish interviewed by Lenny Fontana for True House Stories # 085 (Part 1)

True House Stories Podcast with special guests by Lenny Fontana

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 30:10


TRUE HOUSE STORIES W/ MAN PARRISHDJ MEME # 085 - PART 1 Man Parrish talks about his early beginnings from being an adopted kid living in Brooklyn to beginning to find his way into music. Parrish is a native New Yorker] of Italian descent. He attended the High School for the Performing Arts and the Academy for Dramatic Arts (NYC) as a teenager. He moonlighted as a non singing, onstage "extra" role in several operas at the Metropolitan Opera House in Manhattan. Parrish left home at the age of 14 and was a member of the extended family that converged nightly at Studio 54, Anvil and other night spots around NYC. His nickname, Man, first appeared in Andy Warhol's Interview magazine. Andy Warhol gave him the name "Man". His early live shows at Bronx hip-hop clubs were spectacles of lights, glitter, and pyrotechnics, which drew as much from the Warhol mystique as the Cold Crush Brothers.

Around The Reel
Around The Reel - "The Invisible Father" with Therese Casper

Around The Reel

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 86:15


On today's show we have the pleasure to speak with filmmaker Therese Casper! Her latest documentary entitled, "The Invisible Father" chronicles her father Piero Heliczer's life, work, relationships and her journey to learn more about the man she never got to know. Piero was one of the original Pop Art Movements establishers. If you know who Andy Warhol is you will relate! It's a powerful film full of heart, sadness and healing! We dive into her documentary, her journey and what she learned making this film. Also, we discuss our experiences with fathers and how our society judges those that are eccentric. Join us for an emotional, heartfelt conversation with the talented Therese Casper!Website:https://www.pieroheliczer.comThe Invisible Father is out now on streaming platforms everywhere!Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREE Entrepreneur Swag Shop! Get your swag! Identity is about being who you are meant to be! Use coupon code AROUNDTHEREEL & save 15%!Support the show

The Roundtable
Barrington Stage Company presents "Andy Warhol in Iran"

The Roundtable

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 14:53


The Barrington Stage Company presents the World Premiere production of “Andy Warhol in Iran,” written by Brent Askari and directed by Skip Greer. The show is running through the June 25th on BSC's St. Germain Stage in Pittsfield, Massachusetts.In 1976 Andy Warhol, the portrait painter of the rich and famous, travels to Tehran to take Polaroids of the Shah's wife. While there, Warhol encounters a young revolutionary who throws his plans into turmoil and makes him realize there is a world beyond himself.Actor Henry Stram plays Andy Warhol. Henry has been seen on Broadway in "Network," "The Elephant Man," "Junk," "Inherit the Wind," "The Crucible," and "Titanic."

Who ARTed
Roy Lichtenstein | Look Mickey

Who ARTed

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 46:51


In 1964, Life Magazine ran with Lichtenstein on the cover and the text read “Is He the Worst Artist in the U.S.?” Lichtenstein responded to criticism of his work saying “I think my paintings are critically transformed, but it would be difficult to prove it by any rational line of argument." Seems like kind of a weak defense. Basically, ‘I think my work is good, but there's really no rational argument in favor of it.' I mean its a bold move. I'll give him that. He painted Look Mickey after his son taunted him saying he couldn't paint something that good. There is something I really love about the idea that basically his entire career was the ultimate “so there” to a child. I mean doing your work out of spite is one thing, but doing it to spite your child, that's some next level pettiness. My guest this week was The Real Michael Lee, a musician, graphic designer and comic artist based out of Iowa. You can find him at www.therealmichaellee.com and or go to his links page to check out all the different spaces he occupies online. In this episode, we dropped a lot of names. Take a minute to look through my back catalog to learn more about Jack Kirby, Pablo Picasso's Guernica, Diego Rivera, Ernie Barnes and Andy Warhol. As I said in the show, feel free to leave a comment on the message boards at Goodpods, the platform with the good sense to feature Who ARTed on their recommendations list and where I am frequently ranked number 1 for visual arts. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Fired Up Fridays with Steve Ryan
Get to know Tavi - Often Called The Modern Picasso

Fired Up Fridays with Steve Ryan

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2022 19:34


Get to know Tavi, Known As The Modern Picasso.Arellano Gustavo's mantra has long been “Color is Freedom”. He grew up reveling in the colorful and vibrant traditions of his Native American and Latino heritage. Creating the spirit of his inner child, each color choice in his artwork is charged with meaning. TAVi art by Arellano Gustavo has been established in the United States arts scene since the late 1980s and his work has been featured in galleries in New York, Arizona, Miami, Chicago, New Mexico, and across California.TAVi's whimsical style includes Arellano's innovative use of “puffy paints”, acrylics, and resin creations, multimedia elements that seek to better embody “color” and bring emotions and inspiration alive on canvas. His unique artistic style is influenced by his love of the works of Andy Warhol, Keith Haring, and Picasso.https://www.arellanogustavo.comFor more podcasts, visit www.steveryan.comSupport the show

Journey of an Aesthete Podcast
On Warhol and Fine Art: A Conversation with Blake Gopnik

Journey of an Aesthete Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 51:21


Every guest on our show is wholly unique. In the case of Blake Gopnik he might be most well known for a definitive and conprehensive biography of Andy Warhol. But one of the many things that goes into making such a good biography, of course is the learning, dedication and research of the author.Nowhere is this more than case than with Blake Gopnik. He is so well versed in so many aspects of the arts and art history, in particular the category of fine arts, that at times I had to work to catch up with him. That is the kind of thing we like to do on our podcast and I hope that whether you are longtime Warhol fan, novice or skeptic, and whatever your relationship to fine art, that you will enjoy this episode as much as we did concocting it.” Blake Gopnik's Biography Blake Gopnik, Warhol, my comprehensive biography of the Pop artist, was published by Ecco at HarperCollins in 2020. I've been the staff art critic at the Globe and Mail, the Washington Post and Newsweek and am now a regular contributor to the New York Times. I got my PhD in art history from Oxford University. Links to Blake Gopnik's Work BlakeGopnik.com Warholiana.com Publisher's page for Blake's Warhol book (and its free endnotes) at HarperCollins.com/Warhol Links to Blake's Socials Twitter: @BlakeGopnik Instagram:@Blake_Gopnik, Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/blake.gopnik --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/mitch-hampton/support

Culture Factor 2.0
Ridhima Ahuja Kahn: Dapper Labs make the Top Shots using Flow Blockchain and serve up Brand Partnerships like Cryptokitties

Culture Factor 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 29:43


Ridhima Ahuja Kahn is the VP of Business Development at Dapper Labs. Her focus is helping build meaningful partnerships with the world's top IPs, creators, and social media platforms as they look to build blockchain-based experiences.Prior to Dapper Labs, she was a Partner at Andreessen Horowitz (a16z) where she focused on sports, social, media & entertainment, collectibles (both in digital & physical), hospitality/travel and food.She has also spent time on the investment teams at the Hewlett Foundation & Grovenor Capital Management.- Tell me about how you shifted into this role at Dapper Labs and was the inspiration behind TopShot birthed at Dapper or was your sports background the impetus to this idea?- What does fandom look like in metaverse ? What does TopShot and Cryptokitties experiences look like there? And do you think experiences are the magic of an NFT and your utility? What do experiences look like in the Metaverse?- Flow blockchain technology is unique to Dapper, reducing the friction of Web 2 native users and Web 3 adventurers, do you think this shift in creating your own blockchain has been part of the the secret sauce for Dapper Labs?- Digital Fashion will likely see a ton of growth due to the concept of wearables and shopping in the Metaverse: Luxury brands will soar to the top fast bc of virtue signaling and the marketing machine they are built on. Can Dapper help creators or smaller brands with NFTs for this use case?- Because we are also an education platform on Culture Factor, can you define DAO  and is Dapper getting involved in the DAO space?- And what would a brainstorming session at Dapper look like in terms of iterating on best use cases, verticals or simply coming up with experiences?Ridhima Ahuja Kahn of Dapper LabsHolly Shannon's WebsiteZero To Podcast on AmazonHolly Shannon, LinkedinHolly Shannon, InstagramHolly Shannon, Clubhousehttps://youtu.be/PKCND4FqGLc#dapper, #metaverse, #blockchain, #creators, #digital, #flow, #create, #labs, #web3, #community, #physical, fashion, #technology, #experience, #nft, #brands 

Skip the Queue
Why retail space is pivotal for today's visitor attractions

Skip the Queue

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 43:49


Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. Your host is  Kelly Molson, MD of Rubber Cheese.Download our free ebook The Ultimate Guide to Doubling Your Visitor NumbersIf you like what you hear, you can subscribe on iTunes, Spotify, and all the usual channels by searching Skip the Queue or visit our website rubbercheese.com/podcast.If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review, it really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned in this episode.Competition ends October 1st 2022. The winner will be contacted via Twitter. Show references: https://www.lumsdendesign.com/https://www.linkedin.com/in/callum-lumsden-b8473a3/https://www.instagram.com/lumsdendesign/https://www.linkedin.com/company/lumsden/ Callum Lumsden is a leading design expert for cultural and visitor attractions. He is the co-founder of Lumsden, a specialist design studio delivering bespoke retail and leisure environments for the world's most renowned museums, galleries and visitor attractions including V&A Dundee, MoMA (NYC), Warner Bros. Studio Tour – The Making of Harry Potter London, and M+ Museum, Hong Kong.  Transcriptions: Kelly Molson: Welcome to Skip the Queue, a podcast for people working in or working with visitor attractions. I'm your host Kelly Molson. In today's episode, I speak with Callum Lumsden, Co-Founder and Creative Director of Lumsden Design. Callum shares his journey to founding Lumsden, an interior design agency that creates iconic retail spaces for museums and attractions all over the world. Listen along to hear why retail space is pivotal for today's visitor attractions. If you like what you hear, subscribe on all the user channels by searching to Skip the Queue.Kelly Molson: Callum, thank you so much for joining me on the podcast today. It's a pleasure to have you with me.Callum Lumsden: Thank you. Thanks for inviting me. I'm looking forward to this.Kelly Molson: I'm glad that you're looking forward to this but we are going to start with our icebreaker questions. Yeah, it might be a think, you never know. So at the start of every podcast, I always ask a few icebreaker questions to our guests. Mostly they're really stupid and just a chance for us to find out a little bit about you. So I would like to know, when you were a child, what did you want to be when you grew up?Callum Lumsden: Oh, that's a good one. What did I want to be? A rock star.Kelly Molson: Oh really?Callum Lumsden: Oh yeah. Yeah.Kelly Molson: Okay. And did you ever come close?Callum Lumsden: I managed to get a flute from school and I was big into a band called Jethro Tull at the time. So Ian, I can't remember his last name. He used to stand on one leg and play a flute. That's as far as I got.Kelly Molson: Oh, right. Okay. Can you do the one-legged flute playing?Callum Lumsden: Maybe I can do the one leg, but not the flute.Kelly Molson: It doesn't sound very rockstar-ish, does it? Flute player.Callum Lumsden: No, no, no, it doesn't, but Jethro Tull were pretty good. But I was also roadie for some mates of mine. They had a proper band and that was in Edinburgh. So I got to get a little bit of taste of that, but I've always been massively interested in rock music or music of any kind, really.Kelly Molson: Oh well this is really handy then, because my next question for you is, what is your karaoke song?Callum Lumsden: It's got to be Sweet Caroline.Kelly Molson: Yeah. It's a classic, isn't it?Callum Lumsden: Yeah. That's the one. Because you can get everybody joining in on that. Because nobody knows the words, but they get the bah bah bah so that always works.Kelly Molson: That's the key to a good karaoke song choice, isn't it? Pick something that everybody else knows. So you're not the only one singing it.Callum Lumsden: Oh, things they know. Yes.Kelly Molson: Great. Okay. Last one. If you could switch lives with anyone for a day, who would it be?Callum Lumsden: Somebody who's just starting to go to art college?Kelly Molson: Well, that's a good choice. Is that because you would be full of the wisdom that you have now or you would want to go in a different direction?Callum Lumsden: Yeah, it might take me in a different direction of what I originally wanted to do, which was to be an artist.Kelly Molson: Hmm. Interesting. Okay. Maybe we'll talk a little bit more about that. All right, firstly though, I want to know what your unpopular opinion is.Callum Lumsden: Here's one. I think musical theatre is the most unattractive part of the creative industries. I absolutely hate musicals.Kelly Molson: Oh no.Callum Lumsden: Come on. Bring it on.Kelly Molson: I love it. Oh no, really? What is it that really upsets you about it?Callum Lumsden: I just think it's so pretentious and naff and horrible. And then-Kelly Molson: Isn't it the naffness that makes it great though?Callum Lumsden: Yeah. And I just love ... I'm surrounded by people who love musical theatre so I really like winding them up about it.Kelly Molson: Do you get dragged along though?Callum Lumsden: No.Kelly Molson: Yeah but you point blank refuse.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Oh yeah. Yeah. I wouldn't even think about ... People don't even think about asking me because I'll just sit there and be embarrassing.Kelly Molson: So not even a little Mamma Mia trip would inspire you.Callum Lumsden: Nope.Kelly Molson: Oh no. I had really high hopes for this interview. I thought we were going to get on so well.Callum Lumsden: Sorry. Is that the end of it?Kelly Molson: We're done. You can leave. Get out of my podcast booth.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Yeah. And let's not get onto ABBA either.Kelly Molson: Oh God. Can we not? Because yeah, that'll go right off. There's a lot of people listening to this that love ABBA and I bet Eurovision as well so-Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Yeah. Sorry everybody.Kelly Molson: All right. Well let's just, we'll park that then. Callum you tell me about your background and how you have come to found Lumsden Design.Callum Lumsden: Well, it started it by me going to art college. At art college, I ended up studying furniture design. Then I went to Royal College of Art to do what was then called interior architecture. And that opened me up to all manner of different people and processes, et cetera. And then when I graduated I knew most of the people in the fashion department and they went off to work for various retailers and their bosses started saying that there's any of your mates, any good interior design, we've got a shop to design. And lots of them said, "Oh I know this guy called Callum. Give him a shout." So that got me into that. So I've been designing shops ever since then.Kelly Molson: Wow.Callum Lumsden: So that's how it started.Kelly Molson: Yeah. And so how long has Lumsden Design been around?Callum Lumsden: Well, it's been in a few different variations because when I left the RCA, I worked for myself and then I went to work for various retailers in house, such as Jaeger for instance. But I was also freelancing myself and then I eventually joined various big design companies. And then I formed London Design Partnership, it was called, oh 20, 30, 35 years ago. Something like that.Kelly Molson: It's the longest job you've ever had.Callum Lumsden: Well, yeah it's gone through various different for formations. I did merge with another design company for a couple of years and then I started what it is now, which is Lumsden Design. Although we're getting rid of the design, just calling it Lumsden now.Kelly Molson: I like that. That's quite rockstar, isn't it? You just got the one name now.Callum Lumsden: Well, yeah, it's keeping the Lumsden name, it's had its advantages, but there's also disadvantages. Because how long can ... Lumsden isn't just me. I have a team of people, a great team of people and everybody has to be part of all of that. And clients need to understand that I can't be there on every single one and all of those kind of things. So this one, this variation, which will stay the same, probably goes back to 2010. Yeah. So 12 years in the way that we're doing it now. Yeah.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Yeah. And so it's really interesting the way that you've ... Because this podcast is obviously for people that work in and for the attraction sector. And you have kind of evolved a little bit over the years, haven't you, in terms of working in that sector. So it that wasn't what you set out doing. Was it?Callum Lumsden: Yeah, there's a bit of happen chance that has gone on. The route to where we are now started probably in the year 1998, when we pitched for the retail for Tate Modern. And I'd always done retail, but I was asked to pitch for Tate Modern. I presume that you've been there or people that are listening to this know it. And we won it and I had no idea about the importance of retail to the cultural sector. And that opened in year 2000, 22 years ago, believe it or not. And then that got me into this sector. So I started, Tate Modern kicked it off. And then it was people like the V&A, the Natural History Museum, the Science Museum.Callum Lumsden: So I started spinning into this and then that went into loads of different places. And I'd always worked in retail, but retail, if you take mainstream retail, from a design perspective, you come up with a concept, you build it and if it's successful, then it gets repeated again and again, and again. The Americans call it cookie cutter. If you think of Gap, whichever Gap you see, it looks exactly the same. With this sector, every single client is different. And then eventually took the decision that we would just concentrate on that sector. And the route to visitor attractions was winning the Warner Brothers project in Leavesden, just outside of London, doing the retail for the Harry Potter-Kelly Molson: The name that everyone always gets wrong.Callum Lumsden: Studio tour. Yeah. It's the Harry Potter Studio Tour. No, no. It's the Warner Brothers Studio Tour, the making of Harry Potter. There we go.Kelly Molson: We had Jeff Spooner on-Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Sorry Jeff.Kelly Molson: Sorry, Jeff. But he said, everybody gets it wrong. They either call it the Harry Potter tour or the Warner Brothers tour. It's always a different, a different name every time.Callum Lumsden: And it's interesting connection with the route to get to them because the reason that I got contacted about pitching for that project was a couple of the directors from Warner Brothers in LA went to the British Museum and we'd done all the retail for the British Museum. And one of the library rooms in the British Museum is called the Greenville room. When you walk into the British Museum, you turn right, and it's where all the high end products are sold. Everything from statues to jewelry to watches to da da. And it's got loads of books. And Harry Potter is that. And they said to the guy who's in charge of British Museum commercial side, who did this? And that was me. Well, me and my team. And we pitched for it and we won it. And that started us into this amazing journey with Warner Brothers and various other places.Kelly Molson: Oh, I love that. It's a really ... I wanted to ask you how you became specialists. And I love that you've said it's like a catalyst process, because that's what happened to us as well. We won a big project for an existing client, for Pernod Ricard. So we worked on a project for the Plymouth Gin Visitor Centre. We created their ticket booking system and their website and it was such a brilliant experience going through that, to understand about the experience economy and visitor experience and how you take somebody on a journey through that. That was the catalyst for us. That was a really exciting project. And it was a world that we just thought we want to be more and more involved in. And it's really lovely to hear that was kind of a similar effect to you. It's brought you into this incredible world of ... It's fun, isn't it? All of these things that we work on, they're really fun.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. And that's what's interesting about all the clients that we work with, they're all entirely different and the we've got a who's who of clients. Abbey Road, everybody in the world knows Abbey Road. You can talk to somebody from China and they'll know what Abbey Road is all about. And that's as much about visitor experiences as the studio tour in Leavesden.Kelly Molson: So I've got quite a few questions for you today, but I just want to touch on what you said earlier, because you were talking about Gap and the cookie cutter experience of their stores. So with that, I guess people work out what works and they just replicate it. Yours is so different because every store that you're working on is completely different. Everything has a different brand story, has different values. How do you even start to approach a project when it's so different each time you do it?Callum Lumsden: Well, it's a very overused word, but immerse ourself in that brand, as much as we can. We sit down or walk around and just talk to people, observe, find out who the visitors are, the fans, are they school kids? And that's the difference in this sector. Because if you go to, say a high street brand, again, you probably got every retailer saying, well, our core customer is ... For the people that we work for, there is a bit of a core customer, but actually it can be anybody from two years old to 82 years old. The Warner Brothers Studio Tour, it's international, it can be grannies and grandpas to a whole trip of school kids to teenagers or moms who were reading the Harry Potter books when they were six, who are now reading that to their own kids.Callum Lumsden: And if you go to, we worked for MoMA in New York, you've got absolute fans of MoMA products. The New York dinner set will go and buy their china and their cutlery at the New York design store, the MoMA design store. Go across the roads to the museum itself and you'll get a tourist, who's come from Austria because ... So actually defining who the ... So understanding that is completely different every single time. The National Theatre that we did in the South Bank, the shop there, the book shop that you went to find a particular book on a particular play, we changed that around to actually make it about stories about the productions that were going on in the theatre, the theatre itself. And they have three or four one time because there's lots of different theatres and that help the retail team there design the products that will fit that store, but still have the bookshop at the back because they weren't making any money out that, but they are making money out of the products.Kelly Molson: Right.Callum Lumsden: And understanding how ... Because it's not just about making the spaces look great or seamless, which is another part of what needs to be done, but they've got to make money. They have to increase revenue. That's why they're there in the first bit, apart from everybody expects to go into, I hate the term gift shop, but 96% of people will go into the shop and buy something-Kelly Molson: Exit through the gift shop. Yeah.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. And they will buy something. So make the most of it.Kelly Molson: It's a fascinating process, isn't it? I think you touched on it there in terms of the commercial, but why is retail space so important to the sector? It is about commercials, right?Callum Lumsden: Yes it is. But it does have benefits as well. Visitor attraction are slightly different to the cultural sector because the cultural sector, the money that's generated goes to the curators to help them buy the objects that they want in their collections. And it also helps in the education part of what they do and the events and everything else. If you take MoMA, their retail turnover is $52 million per year. That's a lot of money.Kelly Molson: That is a lot of money.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. I'm not able to tell you what Warner Brothers is, but let's say it's really quite successful, but that goes back into them to be able to develop the next part because a studio tour can't stand still, everybody has to look at, all right, what are we going to do in the next year, the next two years. Because they want repeat visits. So to be able to do that and to be fair to Warner Brothers, they also put a lot back into the local community education as well, developing their staff, all of those kind of things. So there's a whole load of other aspects to it. So the money that's generated is really important to everybody.Kelly Molson: Yeah. Yeah. Completely. How does it help to sustain their visitor engagement? So what part does retail play in making that visitor maybe come back or be more engaged with the brand?Callum Lumsden: Well, again, the retail offer is done to the merchandise. The merchandise has to be looked at as creatively as possible in terms of, okay, what else can we do that will grab people's attention? So there's an introduction of hampers at Warner Brothers for Harry Potter. So you could actually take a whole Harry Potter based hamper with loads of product in it so you've got a whole set of something. That was introduced and that's been really important. That's been a really successful one. Personalisation, doing lots of different things to actually make a wand that's just for you or all of those kind of things and personalisation is becoming really ... Well it's there. It's become really important also in the cultural sector as well where you can get your own name on it. You can get things custom made according to ... Because people like Adidas and Nike, they're doing that. You can get your trainers personalised, all of that needs to seep into the sector that I work in as well. And that's becoming really successful.Kelly Molson: Yeah. And I guess some of the retail spaces that you've owned, most of the retail spaces that you've designed, they almost become experiences in themselves. Don't they? Like a mini attraction within an attraction.Callum Lumsden: Well, yeah. Well, a lot of ... Yeah. There's quite a lot of stores that we've done that people go to but they don't go into the museum. The Tate Modern is one example. MoMA is another example. But that's not the point. The point is that what is being sold and how you actually design that store needs to reflect the brand of the institution that it is part of. And it should be, in our view, a seamless thing. So you shouldn't feel, all right, well, I'm now going into the shop. You should feel that it's part of the Harry Potter experience or the museum or the theatre experience in terms of look and feel. So that means that the space could be inspired by, well, for Harry Potter, it's about the props that are in there, referring to Diagon Alley in terms of the look and feel of the place.Callum Lumsden: Or, if you take the British museum, it reflects the architecture, because it is a completely ... That's big tourist ... That people want British Museum because it's a fantastic building. It's got an amazing collection. Everything that's in the shop is telling stories about what they've just seen as they've walked around the museum. And that's what they want to take a piece of. They want to take that memory away either for themselves or to buy for somebody. And that's where the click happens between retail and the actual experience of walking around the rest of the building, et cetera.Kelly Molson: I would love to know the process that you go on when you start to work with the visitor attraction. You touched on it earlier about immersing yourself into who their clientele is, who their customers are, who's going to be visiting. Can you share the process that you take? You take the cultural institution on, or the attraction on. So things that they need to think about or research that they need to carry out if they're going to go through this process with you?Callum Lumsden: Well, most of the institutions that we work with or the companies or the brands, they have their research anyway. So the demographic for instance will be well and truly looked at by ... Without exception actually. There's usually something. Except when it's a brand new, we haven't done this before that. That's usually very interesting. We just did the stores for amazing new museum that's been built in Hong Kong called M+, that's M with a plus sign, which has the largest collection of contemporary visual culture in Asia. It's an amazing building. It's taken something like 20 years to finally come to fruition. We've been working with them for five years. It opened last November. Sadly Hong Kong is closed because of COVID, et cetera. So I haven't actually been able to visit what we just sweated tears over.Kelly Molson: Oh gosh, that must be really hard, to not be able to see it.Callum Lumsden: Yeah, it's really difficult. Yeah. But they are anticipating that people from Hong Kong, but also most of, when they're allowed to, people from China, but also Asia, but they're also expecting other international tourists. So deciding who was going to be the demographic for there was a little bit-Kelly Molson: Yeah. Very tricky.Callum Lumsden: Hit and miss. Abbey Road was the same. They knew that everybody, so many people, tourist buses, et cetera, were rocking up to walk across the zebra crossing and really upset London taxi drivers the whole time. But they had no idea people would actually walk into the building to buy anything, but that's been an enormous success. So you have to make assumptions is a long way around of saying that. But most of the time, the details of the demographics, who'll be there, talking to the curators, talking to the management, talking to the retail teams, as well, is our way of doing it.Callum Lumsden: And an awful lot of the time we're working in, such as the M+ in Hong Kong example, working with a brand new building, you've got super important architects who are being commissioned to design these amazing buildings. So being allied with them in terms of their vision for the building is another part of what we like to understand. In terms of the materials they're using, the space they are going to give us, where it's actually going to go, because the location of a shop, it's not always exit through the gift shop. All of those ... Are there other opportunities? So we look at all of that with the client teams that we work with. And then that starts to, for us, that's the kickoff point.Callum Lumsden: Understanding what the merchandise is, a lot of the time that's been developed at the same time as we're ... Because it actually takes longer to get merchandise together than it does to build a shop.Kelly Molson: Oh really?Callum Lumsden: Oh yeah. Sometimes it can be two years. In museums, if you say somewhere like the National Gallery, their most popular product is the sunflower painting by Van Gogh, which they've got on everything from beer maps to fridge magnets, et cetera. Working to get permission to do that from artists can take ages. Andy Warhol, working at Abbey Road, trying to get The Beatles, the guys who are looking after The Beatles or Pink Floyd or Rolling Stones, they are super sensitive about, no, you can't do that. Or you can do that. For Abbey Road to really get the products, they've done it, but it's taken a long time.Kelly Molson: Yeah. I wonder what they' vetoed. No, you can't put my face on a tea towel.Callum Lumsden: Well, I had an idea about Mean Mr. Mustard socks and that didn't happen.Kelly Molson: Disappointing.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. I would've worn them.Kelly Molson: Me too. That's brilliant. Thank you for that insight into the process. I guess then, the brands that you work with are phenomenally well known or they have such rich history or such good stories like Harry Potter, or I know you mentioned the National Gallery there, the designing of the stores and what they're going to look like, interior. That must be the easy part. You've got so much to work with.Callum Lumsden: No, it's never easy because there's lots of layers of people that you need to go through. And navigating that it can be quite interesting, shall we say. Because every everybody's got an opinion.Kelly Molson: And there are quite a lot of boards involved in cultural organisations as well. Aren't there? So there's a lot of layers of people to come through.Callum Lumsden: Well, yeah. And if you're working with a museum, you are working with academics and they don't have conversations, they have debates. And inevitably that debate will mean there'll be 25 people in the room who all have to say something and you come away with, was there a decision there? And then you've got the architects. The architects can be very easy to work with or very opinionated and have one direction. So actually navigating that can be quite entertaining sometimes. We did the V&A Dundee, which is an amazing building, that was designed by a Japanese architect called Kiakumi. And they were fantastic. They were just so ... Yes, this is ... We'd like this, da da. Everything fitted. It was good. But there's other examples that I won't go on air to talk about-Kelly Molson: I was going to ask you, I was going to ask you-Callum Lumsden: Nose to nose.Kelly Molson: Without naming any names, can you tell us about an experience where you couldn't get what you wanted.Callum Lumsden: I usually get what I want.Kelly Molson: Oh, right.Callum Lumsden: Or there's-Kelly Molson: You're very persuasive.Callum Lumsden: Or there's a bit of a compromise. Yeah. There was one example where it just got so stupid that the head of the museum walked into one of the meetings that I was having alongside the retail team and the architects. And he came in and said, I've had enough of this, the architects ... You're no longer involved in this, get out.Kelly Molson: Wow.Callum Lumsden: And let Callum do what he wants to do. So there you go.Kelly Molson: Oh right, I love it.Callum Lumsden: No name, no name was mentioned.Kelly Molson: No names mentioned the power that you have Callum, as well, I love that.Callum Lumsden: I have since worked with those architects on another project and everything was fine.Kelly Molson: We all have our little friction moments.Callum Lumsden: But that was 15 years later and they'd calmed down.Kelly Molson: It took them that amount of time to mellow.Callum Lumsden: Yeah.Kelly Molson: I'm glad there was a happy ending. What about retail spaces that aren't at the actual attraction itself? So we talk about Harry Potter, they have retail stores all over the place. So King's Cross is the one for me because obviously that is very pertinent to the film. So I will be queuing up to get ... Waiting for my train to be announced and I'll see hoards of people queuing up to have their photo taken with their trolley wedged into the wall there and the shop there. Do you get involved in that element as well? So retail-Callum Lumsden: Yes we do. Yeah. We designed that shop and that was a moment of genius by somebody ... A guy called Jonathan-Kelly Molson: Very clever.Callum Lumsden: Johnathan Sands. He saw the opportunity and he opened that up and he eventually joined up with Warner Brothers. He's since moved on. But with those ones, we did that shop. We also did the airport shops, but because of COVID that didn't work out. Then there was Cursed Child, we did all the retail and the theaters for that. And that went world wide, New York, Hamburg Sydney. I can't remember all the cities that that went to. And then we didn't get involved in it, but Warner Brothers opened up the store in New York, a full blown store right next to the Flat Iron building, that's been enormously successful. We didn't get involved in that one, but there's the shops that Warner Brothers have done, but there's also the shops that lots of other people have done copies of. And if you go to Edinburgh, you've got six versions of Harry Potter shops, nothing to do with us.Kelly Molson: No claim on those. Someone once described a retail experience as a bit like a theatrical experience. Not a musical theatrical experience, because we know how you feel about those, but ultimately you are taking the visitor on a journey, aren't you, around the store and you are making that a real experienced for them. Can I ask you, and this might be like what's your favourite child, but what has been your favourite store to design from that perspective?Callum Lumsden: Definitely the Warner Brothers Leavesden store, because that's gone through the number of iterations as well. They've expanded it. We've moved it around. We've done different things. We've developed the restaurants and the cafes. That's been great fun too. Every project, I'm thinking ... Because it's recently opened, the M+ in Hong Kong has been a great experience. And that's an interesting one about where it's going in the sector because within that, it wasn't just about a whole lot of shelves with products on it. A number of what we've called pavilions that were inspired by Hong Kong. And, for instance, the central pavilion in the show is a combination of a place where artists can do master classes and talk about what they're doing. And the retail guys developed products based around the artist or the artist has designed some of those products.Callum Lumsden: And then there's another space where artists are given the market stalls in Hong Kong, which I don't know if you've been to Hong Kong, but the markets are amazing. And the stalls are called pai dongs. We based one of our fixtures on pai dongs, and the idea. And that's what's happening, is that one of the pai dongs could be taken over by an artist to do anything that they want on it.Kelly Molson: Lovely.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. So sculptural or lighting or sounds because they've got sound artists and all of those kind of things. Or it can be handed over almost on a concession basis. So it could be, I don't know, a sports retailer, if they take it over. All of those things, or personalisation again, where you could actually get, if you're buying a wallet, you can get your own initial put on it, all of that kind of stuff. And then another part of it was for gift wrapping where we were commissioning Chinese calligraphers who will actually sign it.Kelly Molson: Oh, wow.Callum Lumsden: Or showing origami, how you can actually use origami to make your gift wrapping look even more different.Kelly Molson: Oh, that's incredible. That's really theatrical, isn't it? That's a real experience.Callum Lumsden: So you've really got activity going on and that's what happens with Harry Potter. When you're buying a wand, you've got somebody showing you how everything works and how to wave it and what to say and all of those kind of things. And that just gives people something. They'll remember that, they'll love that. And hopefully they'll also buy something, but it's adding something extra into that visitor experience. That's the way it's going for mainstream retail as well. That whole thing.Kelly Molson: Yeah.Callum Lumsden: Experiential.Kelly Molson: So I guess it's like the Hamley's thing, isn't it? Because I can remember as kid going around Hamley's and you watch the people, they show you how to use the toys and they show you how they work and to play with them.Callum Lumsden: Yeah, absolutely.Kelly Molson: There's a guy ... Do you know what? I hope I don't misquote this because I think it was Geoff Ramm that told me this story where ... Geoff Ramm is a public speaker and he told me this story about how he just got mugged off but he spent so much money in Hamley's because of somebody who was there demonstrating the product. It was some like paint blocks and they were painting these pictures and then talking them through and his kid was watching them paint and she asked the child what her name was. And then she drew this picture with her initials and blah, blah, blah, and then gave it to her. And he was like, well, that's it. I have to buy that product now, don't I? I've got this picture that I'm taking home with me, but I've also got to buy those things because my kid wants the magic. She's just seen the magic happen.Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Well, if you think about it, you go down to a food market and you've got the guys, come and get your apples and pears and all of that kind of thing. It's actually, it's not you, it's the way that people have always been persuaded to buy things or the butcher show that will remember your name when you walk in and say, did you enjoy that steak last week, we've got a nice piece of roast beef here. It's interaction. It's not just about how great the shop is, it's to do with the staff, the product, the atmosphere, the layout, there's so many different aspects that we've got to work together.Kelly Molson: Yeah. All the facets coming together. I think you've described that perfectly there, Callum, thank you. We're at the end of our interview, which I'm quite sad about, if I'm honest, I've really enjoyed this.Callum Lumsden: Nice of you to say.Kelly Molson: I always ask our guests a final question, which is about a book they love, but actually I've got one more question for you. I would love to know. Your list of clients is incredibly prestigious. Is there anyone that you would love to work with that you've not got your hands on yet?Callum Lumsden: That's a good one, Hamley's.Kelly Molson: Hamley's. Oh okay. Yeah. There's some work that could be done there.Callum Lumsden: Yeah.Kelly Molson: I think if you put stuff out in the universe, you never know what's going to come back, do you?Callum Lumsden: Yeah. Yeah, no, I think there's ... Well, if I ever get to speak to them, I'll tell them-Kelly Molson: You'll tell them.Callum Lumsden: I think what Hamley's used to be and what it is now is in need of a little bit of TLC.Kelly Molson: All right. Well, universe, let's see what you can bring to Callum. Thank you for sharing that. All right. What about a book that you love or something that you love, something that's helped you in your career? What would you recommend to our listeners?Callum Lumsden: Well, there's a beautiful book by a fantastic illustrator called Charlie Mackesy. I think that's how you pronounce his name. It's called The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Horse. And it's all illustrations, but with lovely little writing from him, and it's all about being gentle and kind to people. And that sounds a bit naff, but the illustrations are absolutely fantastic. I follow him on Instagram and it's just a lovely, beautiful book. I came across it as somebody else had it. And then somebody bought it for my birthday and I've actually used it a couple of times when I've done talks, et cetera, to illustrate different things. I highly recommend it. Charlie Mackesy, The Boy, The Mole, The Fox and The Hare.Kelly Molson: Ah, it is a wonderful book.Callum Lumsden: Oh, you know it?Kelly Molson: I do. I also follow him on Instagram and I have the book and it is a beautiful book and a number of people have recommended that book because I think it touched a lot of people at a really challenging time.Callum Lumsden: Yeah.Kelly Molson: As well. I think a lot of people were drawn to that book during the pandemic. And it's become a bit of a staple in, especially in nurseries as well, to be honest. A little bit of love and a little bit of hope that we all needed at that time.Callum Lumsden: Sorry. Lots of other people have recommended it as well. I thought I might have come up with something that would nobody else-Kelly Molson: No, it's a good thing. I always think it's a good thing if people have recommended it, because it's testament to that book, isn't it?Callum Lumsden: Oh yeah.Kelly Molson: It's a-Callum Lumsden: No it is good.Kelly Molson: Yeah. So as ever listeners, if you want to win a copy of that book, if you head over to our Twitter account and you retweet this podcast announcement with the words I would like Callum's book, then you could be in with the chance of winning it.Callum Lumsden: Oh that's nice.Kelly Molson: Callum. Thank you. Yeah. Isn't that lovely, people can win your book choice. Thank you so much for coming on the podcast. Been lovely to chat.Callum Lumsden: My pleasure.Kelly Molson: We will put all of Callum's details in the show notes, we will put links to some of the case studies so you can see some of the incredible work. I'm sure most of you listening have visited many of the places that Callum has designed. So you will see firsthand what they look like, but we'll put links in the show notes and you can go and check that out. And if anyone has a connection at Hamley's that they would like to put Callum's way, pass it on to me and I will make sure he gets that. Thanks Callum.Callum Lumsden: Thank you, Kelly. Nice to see you.Kelly Molson: Thanks for listening to Skip the Queue. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave us a five star review. It really helps others find us. And remember to follow us on Twitter for your chance to win the books that have been mentioned. Skip the Queue is brought to you by Rubber Cheese, a digital agency that builds remarkable systems and websites for attractions that helps them increase their visitor numbers. You can find show notes and transcriptions from this episode and more over on our website, rubbercheese.com/podcast.

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 91: The Last HoJo Restaurant, A Lavish Collie Costume, & Remembering Summer Wildlife Rules

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 90:59


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Cosmic Cowgirl from Diebolt Brewing in Denver. She reviews her weekend in Denver filming her upcoming Amazon Original Special at the Paramount Theatre, which is one of her favorite places to do shows. She talks about eating breakfast at Sam's No3 and hanging out with her good friend and surprise opening act, the iconic George Wallace. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen samples Boulder Canyon Classic Sea Salt kettle chips, which she thinks have a terrific crunch. She then samples Dale's Wild West Elk Jerky, and she loves the salty taste. She finishes her tasting with Old El Paso Zesty Ranch Sauce, which she doesn't think tastes anything like Ranch but offers that it might be ok on tacos. QUEEN'S COURT: It has been a quiet week for the Court, but Kathleen shares that her friend Kathe saw Tanya Tucker in North Carolina last weekend and thinks that Queen Tanya's live show is better than ever.UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on the opening of ABBA's Voyage avatar concert series in London, another Russian oligarch's super yacht is seized in a UAE creek, Anna Delvey defrauds another “friend,” Elon Musk has issued a back-to-the-office ordinance and “the children” revolt, and the world's oldest man celebrates his 113th birthday in Venezuela. “HOLY SHIT THEY FOUND IT”: Kathleen is amazed to read about the discovery in Alabama of the largest prehistoric cave drawings ever found in North America, and a 2,100 year old farmstead found “frozen in time in Israel. RUSSIAN SUPERYACHTS VANISHING FROM GLOBAL TRACKING: In maintaining her obsession regarding crushing the power of Russian oligarchs, Kathleen reads an article stating that superyachts linked to sanctioned Russian oligarchs are vanishing from global tracking systems in an attempt to avoid sanctions, according to an investigation by The Observer. PROTESTERS GONE WILD: Kathleen continues with her reporting on crazy protesters, reading about 2 recent protest actions: a French Open tennis protester ties herself to the Center Court net during the men's semifinal, and the Mona Lisa was smeared with cake in an apparent climate protest. MAN DRESSES AS COLLIE TO BECOME A DOG: Kathleen is baffled reading an article about a Japanese man who spent more than $15,000 to fulfill his dream of transforming into a four-legged animal. The man, known only by his Twitter username, Toco, spent 2 million Japanese yen, or about $15,700, to create a lifelike rough-collie costume that he could inhabit.POST OFFICE VACANCY IN ANTARCTICA: Kathleen thinks she knows a few Termites who would jump at the chance to take a job running the world's most remote post office in Antarctica. The post is at Port Leroy, and responsibilities include counting penguins and running the gift shop. MCDONALD'S AND STARBUCKS LEAVE RUSSIA: Kathleen reads announcements that McDonald's is leaving Russia, with the stores being sold and will continue to operate under a new proposed brand name called “Fun and Tasty.” She also reads that Starbucks is leaving the Russian market, following McDonald's move. GALLERY OWNER CHARGED WITH COUNTERFEIT ART SALES: Kathleen loves the fine art world, and is enthralled with an article about a Florida gallery owner who has been charged with selling fake Banksy, Warhol, and Basquiat paintings to rich Palm Beach buyers. AMERICA'S LAST HOWARD JOHNSON'S RESTAURANT CLOSES: Kathleen reads an announcement that the last surviving Howard Johnson's restaurant has closed, which was located in Lake George NJ. WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching “Under the Banner of Heaven” on Hulu. SEE KATHLEEN LIVE: See Kathleen live on her “Do You Have Any Ranch?” Tour. Tickets available at kathleenmadigan.com/tour See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

New Money Gang
Kanye Enters the Metaverse (Andy Warhol NFTs Coming Soon)

New Money Gang

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2022 4:49


In this episode of Good Morning Metaverse, Justin covers how the metaverse is impacting the art and music landscape. Yeezy himself, Kanye West, is entering the metaverse, The Weeknd is teaming up with Binance, and Andy Warhol's work is being sold as NFTs! Every week we bring you the hottest Metaverse news to keep you informed on how the space is developing. Drop a comment below with your favorite Metaverse project and maybe we'll cover it in a future video!

FHOXCast
Obras de Warhol sendo vendidas como NFT e o perfil de um colecionador apaixonado por fotografia NFT

FHOXCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 5, 2022 17:39


Duas notícias recentes que merecem um olhar mais cuidadoso e mostram como esse mercado está operando.

YORDI EN EXA
¡Hoy recordamos a Andy Warhol!

YORDI EN EXA

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 4, 2022 3:04


Hoy recordamos a Andy Warhol, así que no dejes de escuchar todo lo que dijimos sobre él, sólo aquí con Yordi en exa.

All Of It
'Andy Warhol: Revelation'

All Of It

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 17:38


[REBROADCAST FROM December 7, 2021] Growing up in Pittsburgh, Andy Warhol was raised as a devout Catholic. Even after he moved to New York City and lived as openly gay man, he never abandoned his faith and would regularly attend Mass. Andy Warhol: Revelation, a new exhibition at the Brooklyn Museum, explores the complicated relationship between Warhol's faith and his art. Lead curator Carmen Hermo, as well as José Carlos Diaz, chief curator of the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, speak with us about the intersections between Warhol's identity, art, and faith. Andy Warhol: Revelation runs through June 19.

Fazit - Kultur vom Tage - Deutschlandfunk Kultur
Heidi Horten Collection in Wien - Große Kunst und eine fragwürdige Vergangenheit

Fazit - Kultur vom Tage - Deutschlandfunk Kultur

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 8:05


Die hochkarätige Privatsammlung der Milliardärin Heidi Goëss-Horten wird nun im Wiener Stadtzentrum in einem eigens dafür gebauten Museum ausgestellt. Im Blickpunkt: Werke von Basquiat, Warhol und Rauschenberg - und die Geschichte des Horten-Vermögens.Peter Hoeres im Gespräch mit Marietta Schwarzwww.deutschlandfunkkultur.de, FazitDirekter Link zur Audiodatei

94twenty podcast
94twenty podcast – Episode 92

94twenty podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 42:58


Featured Artist - Ali Angel - In this episode of the podcast, we mention that Pink Floyd joined TikTok!? Also, we talk a little bit about Andy Warhol. Plus, this week's Don Kirshner Junior Junior's "this day in music history" segment. Our featured artist is Ali Angel and she also answers our "Questions of the Week". Make sure to subscribe so you don't miss out on any episode and support us if you feel inclined to - and leave a comment or review to let us hear from you! Links from the episode: Ali Angel Sheena Easton The Monkees The Beatles Andy Warhol Hacks Kate Bush Jr. Walker & The All Stars Brenton Wood Leon Bridges Durand Jones Lady Ray Lake Street Dive Sturgill Simpson Margo Price Chris Stapleton Jack Antonoff David Cobb Talking Heads Prince Fleetwood Mac Red Hot Chilli Peppers The Chicks Jade Bird Nikki Bloom Jillette Johnson John Mayer Alabama Shakes Lizzo

All the Hacks
Save Money, Build Wealth, and Just Keep Buying with Nick Maggiulli

All the Hacks

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2022 53:45


#59: Data scientist and author Nick Maggiulli joins Chris to talk about the most important principles for saving money and building wealth. They also cover investing in a market decline, evaluating risk, reasons to not max out your 401(k), why he likes income-producing assets, and becoming comfortable spending your money. Nick also shares his biggest college admission hack and "maybe the greatest decision” of his life.Nick Maggiulli (@dollarsanddata) is the Chief Operating Officer at Ritholtz Wealth Management and the creator of “Of Dollars and Data”. His book, Just Keep Buying: Proven ways to save money and build your wealth, explores optimizing personal finance and investing with the aim of increasing your wealth.Full show notes at: https://www.allthehacks.com/saving-nick-maggiulliEpisode on YouTube: https://youtu.be/NA0n1qDin8U Partner DealsInside Tracker: 20% off personalized wellness & nutrition plans backed by scienceMasterworks: VIP access to skip the waitlistBabbel: 6 months for the price of 3 with code ALLTHEHACKS Sundays: 50% off your first order of human-grade dog food Selected Links From The EpisodeConnect with Nick Maggiulli:  Twitter | Instagram | WebsiteNick's Book: Just Keep Buying: Proven ways to save money and build your wealthNick's New York City Recommendations: Quality Branded, Sushi Seki, Ko, Ollie's, ThymePodcasts mentioned:All the Hacks #6: The Psychology of Money with Morgan HouselAll the Hacks #19: Becoming a Better Investor with Andy RachleffAll the Hacks #51: Travel Hacking the Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous with Leigh Rowan Full Show NotesHow people should be operating during a decline in the markets [2:48]Making minor tweaks to your portfolio [5:06]Holding cash or investing in the stock market, fast-risk vs. slow-risk decisions, and trying to time the market [5:53]Taking advantage of a bear market [9:47]Investing in income-producing assets [15:09]Advice about investing in individual stocks [19:21]Three reasons to sell your stocks [21:21]Investing in non-income-producing assets [28:58]Should you max out your 401K? [29:57]Asset location and diversifying your portfolio [34:37]Hiring a professional when doing any type of tax-loss harvesting [36:34]Focusing more on income and saving rather than investing as a young adult [38:43]  Transitioning your mindset from saving to investing [44:39] Reasons why merely cutting spending isn't the path to building wealth in the long-run [47:29] The importance of having an absolute measure of wealth, especially if you don't feel “rich” [49:29] Nick Maggiulli's top principles for saving money and building wealth [52:04]Nick shares his greatest college admission hack and tactics (outside of investing) to increase your efficiency [54:45]Nick's favorite New York City recommendations [58:17] Where to find Nick Maggiulli online [59:46]  SponsorsInsideTrackerInsideTracker provides a personalized plan to improve your metabolism, reduce stress, improve sleep, and optimize your health for the long haul. It's created by leading scientists in aging, genetics, and biometrics. They analyze your blood, DNA, and fitness tracking data to identify where you're optimized—and where you're not. With Inside Tracker you'll get a daily Action Plan with personalized guidance on the right exercise, nutrition, and supplementation for your body.For a limited time, you can get 20% off at allthehacks.com/insidetracker BabbelBabbel is a  language learning app that offers fun and bite-sized lessons that make it the perfect way to learn a new language on the go. You can choose from 14 different languages, including, Spanish, French, Italian, and German - all taught through lessons created by over 100 language experts that focus on practical learning you actually use in the real world. So whether you'll be traveling abroad, want to connect with family and friends, or just have some free time, you can join the more than 10 million people who've subscribed to babble and start learning a new language today.Get an additional three months free with a 3 month subscription at babbel.com with the code ALLTHEHACKS SundaysSundays' makes a human-grade dog food with no artificial ingredients, synthetic additives or fillers. You can actually read the entire label and understand all the ingredients , which sadly isn't the case for most dog foods. The food is all air dried, which means the nutrients get preserved longer than most foods. Sure you could also get frozen or refridgerated dog foods or even make it yourself, but this is so much easier, with no defrosting, prep or clean up. For a limited time, get 50% off your first order at allthehacks.com/sundays MasterworksMasterworks is an alternative investing platform that gives you access to one of the most exclusive and overlooked investments in history: blue-chip art. Masterworks lets regular people invest in paintings by legends like Banksy, Basquiat and Warhol without spending millions. I've now used masterworks to invest 14 different paintings, including a 15 million dollar Picasso.Here's how it works: Masterworks will buy a painting they think will appreciate well over time, then they securitize that painting with the SEC, so you can invest in it instead of buying the whole thing. Once they sell the painting, later on, you get your share of the proceeds. It's that simple. They've offered over 100 paintings so far and the three that have sold realized a net annualized gain over 30% per work. They have over 280,000 users and demand is as high as ever. All the Hacks has partnered with them to give you all priority access by going to allthehacks.com/masterworks(see important disclosures at masterworks.io/cd) Connect with All the HacksAll the Hacks: Newsletter | Website | Facebook | EmailChris Hutchins: Twitter | Instagram | Website | LinkedIn

THE SHY LIFE PODCAST
THE SHY LIFE PODCAST - 539: YETI UNCLE JOHN AND THE SURPRISE OF THE FAKE WARHOL!

THE SHY LIFE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 69:47


Here we are for episode 539! In which Paul is surprised to find a fake Warhol in Tallulah Twinklehorn's living room; who exactly is responsible? Paul has his theories... but this time he might not be right! Toppie Smellie's Aunt Tappie (from The Smellcast) also joins us to discuss the painting with a few surprising anecdotes! We also share a chat between Paul and Nick about two editions of "Look In" from 1978! Our next show, #540 sees Paul and his mum discussing the old phone box in his home village which is now used as a place for locals to swap their belongings and how Mrs C is in charge of the whole business! Do please join us if you can! Email us at shyyeti@yahoo.co.uk if you have any comments - you can even send me a sound-file and I'll include it. The music is by Shy Yeti, Muffleyontour and Luca. Sound effects by Paul C and Soundbible. All other content of this episode is Copyright Paul Chandler, 2022. The majority of episode 539 was recorded on the 17th March 2022, but the Look In chats were recorded on the 16th February 2022, Tappie spoke to us on the 19th March 2022 and there is a brief happy birthday greeting for one of our co-hosts right at the end, recorded on the 31st May 2022!

Live Well Be Well
DJ Fat Tony on a life of excess, overcoming adversity and living with AIDS

Live Well Be Well

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 87:14


He's DJ'd for some of the biggest stars on the planet: George Michael, Andy Warhol, Madonna – and at Brooklyn Beckham's wedding most recently. But beneath the glamour lies the struggles and battles with addiction, mental health and his battle with HIV. Tony suffered childhood abuse, addiction to sex, alcohol and drugs, and a diagnosis for AIDS. Today's episode is a truly moving one. Tony opens up about his past, his high flying career; covering the turbulent and at times unbelievable life that Tony has led. The episode is slightly longer than normal and it does contain adult content. THIS EPISODE IS SPONSORED BY BOUCLÉME This episode of Live Well, Be Well podcast is proudly sponsored by www.boucleme.co.uk, a naturally powerful haircare brand that takes waves, curls and coils seriously. Packed full of active plant extracts, essential oils and sumptuous scents, their products nourish hair from the inside out. Bouclème's mission is to help you find your rhythm and fall in love with your hair, while celebrating differences and making a positive impact. They are also giving our listeners a 15% discount when using the promo code BEWELL on their website boucleme.co.uk (valid until 30 June 2022). When you support our sponsors, you support The Live, Well Be Well podcast. www.boucleme.co.uk

Red Scare
Monkeypuns *TEASER*

Red Scare

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 1:58


The ladies discuss monkeypox, the Kravis nuptials, the growing Dimes Square thinkpiece genre, and the Brooklyn Museum's Andy Warhol show.

THE SHY LIFE PODCAST
THE SHY LIFE PODCAST - 538: CELEBRATING 6 YEARS OF THE SHY LIFE!

THE SHY LIFE PODCAST

Play Episode Listen Later May 29, 2022 106:16


Here we are for episode 538! In which Paul and the regulars celebrates the 6th anniversary of The Shy Life Podcast! Yeti Uncle John takes part in an entertainment quiz, Cromitty discusses previous anniversary episodes with clips, Bettina Du Pres gives Paul advice and other regulars call in to share birthday wishes! Our next show, #539 sees us embroiled in a mystery involving Bettina Du Pres and a fake Andy Warhol painting! What IS going on!? Do please join us if you can! Email us at shyyeti@yahoo.co.uk if you have any comments - you can even send me a sound-file and I'll include it. The music is by Shy Yeti and Luca. Sound effects by Paul C and Soundbible. All other content of this episode is Copyright Paul Chandler, 2022. Episode 538 was recorded on the 29th March 2022, with an additional scene recorded on the 28th May 2022. Our clips are from the following SLP episodes - Pilot, #1, (2016), #78-#81 (2017), #168-169 (2018), #252-255 (2019), #340 (2020) and #435 (2021).  

America Unplugged Radio
The Donald Jeffries Show- Unscripted Actress Sally Kirkland

America Unplugged Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 28, 2022 119:59


  The Donald Jeffries Show 5-25-2022 Sally Kirkland Unscripted Actress Sally Kirkland The Donald Jeffries Show 5-25-2022 Sally Kirkland Actress Sally Kirkland has been in an astounding 220 films. Her mother was the fashion editor at Vogue and LIFE magazine, and friends with the likes of Jacqueline Kennedy, whom Sally would later portray in a play. Sally began her career on the off-Broadway circuit and trained under legendary acting coach Lee Strasberg. Her career in film, TV, and theater began in the 1960's and her first director was Andy Warhol. Sally is probably best known for the film “Anna,” for which she garnered the Best Actress Oscar nomination and won the Best Actress Golden Globe, the Independent Spirit Award, and the LA Film Critic's Circle Award. In 1968 she became the first nude actress on stage. Her 220 films “The Sting,” “The Way We Were,” “Coming Apart,” “Cold Feet,” “Best of the Best,” “Revenge,” “JFK,” “ED TV,” “Bruce Almighty”, “Coffee Date” and “Archaeology of a Woman”. In the past couple of years she has starred in “Buddy Solitaire”, “Gnaw” and “The Most Hated Woman in America” co-starring with Melissa Leo and Peter Fonda. And coming out soon, she has starred in “Sarah Q”, “Cuck”, “Invincible” and “The Talking Tree”. Her television credits include: guest starring on “Criminal Minds,” recurring on “Head Case” and “the Simple Life.” Sally had a recurring role on “Felicity”. She starred on the NBC movie, “Brave New World.” She had a recurring role as Barbara Healy in the original “Roseanne” series. She starred in the TV movie, “Heatwave” and recurred as Tracy on “Days of Our Lives.” Sally is also an exhibited painter, poet, renowned acting coach and ordained minister in the Church of The Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness (MSIA). Don Jeffries and Sally talk about her fabulous career, including how she came to play Rose Cherami in Oliver Stone's “JFK,” her relationship with Bob Dylan, friendship with people like Robert DeNiro, and her legendary parties in Hollywood. Kirkland is an ordained minister in the church of Movement of Spiritual Inner Awareness: https://www.msia.org/ IMDB: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000476/ Sally in JFK Movie: https://www.jfk-online.com/jfk100cher.html DONALD JEFFRIES ONLINE: “I Protest” https://donaldjeffries.substack.com/ Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Donald-Jeffries/e/B004T6NFAS%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share THE DONALD JEFFRIES SHOW: https://ochelli.com/series/the-donald-jeffries-show/ OCHELLI LINKS: If You Appreciate what Ochelli.com Radio Does: https://ochelli.com/donate/ Ochelli Effect – Uncle – Age of Transitions – T-shirts and MORE: https://theageoftransitions.com/category/support-the-podcasts/ Ochelli PayPal e-mail: blindjfkresearcher@gmail.com LIVE LISTENING OPTIONS: OCHELLI.COM https://ochelli.com/listen-live/ RADDIO https://raddio.net/324242-ochellicom/ ZENO https://zeno.fm/radio/ochelli-radio/ TuneIn http://tun.in/sfxkx OCHELLI.COM Radio Schedule ALL Times Eastern Sunday I'm Looking Through You 3-5 pm Monday The Ochelli Effect 8-10 pm Tuesday The Ochelli Effect 8-10 pm Wednesday The Donald Jeffries Show 6-8 pm The Ochelli Effect 8-10 pm Thursday The Jack Blood Show 360 6-8 pm The Ochelli Effect 8-10 pm Friday The Ochelli Effect 8-10 pm The Age of Transitions 10-11 pm Uncle The Podcast 11pm-Midnight Saturday + ALL Times ALL other days Random Replays Unscripted Actress Sally Kirkland

The Determined People Podcast

Andy Warhol once said, "in the future everyone will be famous for 15 minutes." Today's broadcast examines his prophetic words.

Madigan's Pubcast
Episode 90: Mayonnaise Tattoos, Living Hobbits, & the Yellow Brick Road to Atlantis

Madigan's Pubcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 80:23


Kathleen opens the show drinking a Good Bug Golden Ale from Lazy Magnolia Brewing in Kiln Mississippi. She reviews her weekend in Huntsville Alabama, golfing at The Ledges (her favorite course there) and meeting fun Termites at the shows as she ran her set to prepare for her upcoming Amazon Special taping in Denver at The Paramount on June 4th. “GOOD BAD FOOD”: In her quest for new and delicious not-so-nutritious junk food AND in continuing her search for the best Ranch, Kathleen tastes Baumhower's Alabama White BBQ Sauce, which she likes but thinks is a little too sweet for her liking. She moves on to sample Cheetos Flamin' Hot Sweet Carolina Reaper cheese puffs, which she spits out and compares to “FIAAAAHHHH!” She finishes her tasting with Nabisco Better Cheddars Snack Crackers, which she likes but prefers regular Cheez-Its 1000% more. QUEEN'S COURT: Kathleen gives an update that Dolly Parton's Imagination Library has expanded to Oklahoma. UPDATES: Kathleen gives updates on the sale of Warhol's “Shot Sage Blue Marilyn”, Mattress Mack makes a huge Astros bet, Boris Becker's prison situation, JetBlue's hostile takeover of Spirit Airlines, “HOLY SHIT THEY FOUND IT”: Kathleen is amazed to read about the discovery of an undersea road to the lost city of Atlantis, a 6-year-old finds a Megalodon tooth in the UK, and a giant sinkhole with a forest inside is found in China. 2022 BEST PLACES TO LIVE IN AMERICA: Kathleen reads the new list of the best places to live in the US for 2022-23, with Huntsville AL dethroning Boulder CO at the top spot. 2022 FATTEST STATES IN AMERICA: Kathleen laughs out loud reading the 2022 list of “The Fattest States in America,” with Mississippi taking the top spot and Colorado being the Fittest. She agrees that she would also join the ranks of the “hearty Termites” in Mississippi if she lived in Biloxi since she absolutely loves the seafood and anything Cajun from Mary Mahoney's restaurant. MONKEYPOX RESURFACES IN AMERICA: As a follow up to Episode 50, Kathleen reads a headline advising that multiple cases of Monkeypox have recently been identified in the US and Canada. She goes on to read about a mysterious “hybrid” monkey that was spotted in Malaysia and appears to be a combination of two different species. FREE DUKE'S MAYONNAISE TATTOOS: Kathleen is a massive fan of Duke's Mayonnaise, and is thrilled to read an article announcing a 1-day promotion where Duke's sponsored 70 free Duke's-themed tattoos at Yellow Bird Tattoo near its headquarters in Richmond, VA. SHERPA SCALES MT EVEREST FOR THE 26TH TIME: Kathleen loves reading about the Nepalese sherpas that work on Everest, and is blown away to read an article advising that Kami Rita Sherpa just beat his own world record for climbs of Everest after his 26th ascension at the age of 52. MAN OPENS PLANE EXIT DOOR WHEN REFUSED ALCOHOL: Kathleen is amused to read an article outlining the antics of a retired California roofer who fled a moving United Airlines plane through the emergency exit after the flight crew refused to serve him alcohol before takeoff. MYSTERIOUS “HOBBIT” SPECIES MAY NOT BE EXTINCT: Kathleen reads an article from Indonesia claiming that sightings of a small “ape-man” could be proof that the Homo floresiensis species (or hobbits,) may not be extinct and is still alive today in report parts of the area. WHAT TO WATCH THIS WEEK: Kathleen recommends watching David Bowie in the 1996 movie “Basquait” on YouTube. SEE KATHLEEN LIVE: See Kathleen live on her “Do You Have Any Ranch?” Tour. Tickets available at kathleenmadigan.com/tour See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.