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Latest podcast episodes about carriers

One of Us
Deliberations of Doom: Vol. 3 Ep 3 – Virus Horror

One of Us

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 50:54


DELIBERATIONS OF DOOM: VOL. 3 EP 3 – VIRUS HORROR In this final leg of the viral load triptych of episodes, Chris, Alan, Madelynne, and Drew take on three more horror(?) films. First up is the 2011 film “Carriers” featuring  Chris Pine, Piper Perabo, Lou Taylor Pucci, Emily VanCamp, and Kiernan Shipka; a bunch of… Read More »Deliberations of Doom: Vol. 3 Ep 3 – Virus Horror

UF Health Podcasts
Keeping mail carriers safe from our pooch pals

UF Health Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021


It may be a cliché, but a dog attacking a mail carrier is no…

1001 RADIO DAYS
THE HOUSE THAT JACQUELINE BUILT and THE TORCH CARRIERS THE ADVENTURES OF PHILIP MARLOWE

1001 RADIO DAYS

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 3, 2021 62:21


I.n April, 1947 the New York Times announced that the summer replacement for Bob Hope would be a new adventure-mystery series, The Adventures of Philip Marlowe. Airing on NBC at 10:00 p.m. on June 17th, the show starred Van Heflin with a script by Milton Geiger based on the stories of Raymond Chandler. Most radio shows had live audiences in the studio. The Philip Marlowe producers decided against the common practice because they thought audiences might detract from the show. However 19 of Los Angeles' top detectives were in the studio during the airing of the first show. No one knows what the detectives thought of the production, but according to the New York Times review, Van Heflin did well but struggled with an awkward script. The reviewer thought the show depended too much on straight narration at dramatic moments instead of action or dialog. "Leaving ones play in the wings, as they say on Broadway, always makes for disconcerting theatre, and this was painfully true in the case of The Adventures of Philip Marlowe." Raymond Chandler wasn't enthralled by the show either. In a letter to Erle Stanley Gardner, author of the Perry Mason novels, Mr. Chandler said "It was thoroughly flat." This initial run of Philip Marlowe went from June 17 to September 19, 1947, with Pepsodent as the sponsor. The announcer was Wendell Niles, music was by Lyn Murray, and the producer was Jim Fonda. After the summer run ended, NBC dropped the show. As far as we know, only four episodes of this series have survived. The character of Philip Marlowe was too good to stay off stage for long though. A year later CBS decided to take a chance on reviving the show. Norman Macdonnell was producer/director; Gene Levitt, Robert Mitchell, Mel Dinelli, and Kathleen Hite wrote the scripts; and Richard Aurandt was responsible for the music. CBS cast Gerald Mohr to star as Philip Marlowe, with Roy Rowan as announcer. Philip Marlowe, being a loner, was really the only regular character, but throughout the three years the series ran a long string of high-quality supporting Hollywood actors appeared on the show. Performing alongside Mohr at various times were Jeff Corey, Howard McNear, Parley Baer, Lawrence Dobkin, Virginia Gregg, Gloria Blondell, and Lou Krugman. The CBS production ran from September 26, 1948 to September 29, 1950 with an additional short summer run from July 7 to September 15, 1951. This revival of Philip Marlowe was more favorably received, probably because of a combination of writing and acting. No one could duplicate the writing of Raymond Chandler, but this group of writers was very good. While Chandler's distinctive similes were largely lacking, the strong dry, sarcastic narration was there, and the way Gerald Mohr delivered the lines had a way of making you forget that they weren't written by Chandler. Mr. Mohr seemed born for the part of the cynical detective. His voice and timing were perfect for the character. In a letter to Gene Levitt, one of the show's writers, Raymond Chandler commented that a voice like Gerald Mohr's at least packed personality; a decided an improvement over his opinion of the original show. By 1949 the show had the largest audience in radio. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Freight Broker TV
FBTV Podcast October 1, 2021 - Fuel Prices

Freight Broker TV

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 43:07


The topic for this FBTV Podcast --- Fuel Prices & Buying A Truck Also in this episode... Loadsmart & Homedepot Hoping To Lower Shipper Rates?FMCSA & The CPAPA Device RecallIt's A No Vote!Fuel Tax Up Fuel Tax Down This and more in this FBTV Podcast from TALTOA. https://taltoa.comhttps://freightbrokertv.com

Screaming in the Cloud
The Maestro of the Keyboards with Jesse Vincent

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 40:03


About Jesse Jesse Vincent is the cofounder and CTO of Keyboardio, where he designs and manufactures high-quality ergonomic mechanical keyboards. In previous lives, he served as the COO of VaccinateCA, volunteered as the project lead for the Perl programming language, created both the leading open source issue tracking system RT: Request tracker and K-9 Mail for Android.Links: Keyboardio: https://keyboard.io Obra: https://twitter.com/obra TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: You could build you go ahead and build your own coding and mapping notification system, but it takes time, and it sucks! Alternately, consider Courier, who is sponsoring this episode. They make it easy. You can call a single send API for all of your notifications and channels. You can control the complexity around routing, retries, and deliverability and simplify your notification sequences with automation rules. Visit courier.com today and get started for free. If you wind up talking to them, tell them I sent you and watch them wince—because everyone does when you bring up my name. Thats the glorious part of being me. Once again, you could build your own notification system but why on god's flat earth would you do that?Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Jellyfish. So, you're sitting in front of your office chair, bleary eyed, parked in front of a powerpoint and—oh my sweet feathery Jesus its the night before the board meeting, because of course it is! As you slot that crappy screenshot of traffic light colored excel tables into your deck, or sift through endless spreadsheets looking for just the right data set, have you ever wondered, why is it that sales and marketing get all this shiny, awesome analytics and inside tools? Whereas, engineering basically gets left with the dregs. Well, the founders of Jellyfish certainly did. That's why they created the Jellyfish Engineering Management Platform, but don't you dare call it JEMP! Designed to make it simple to analyze your engineering organization, Jellyfish ingests signals from your tech stack. Including JIRA, Git, and collaborative tools. Yes, depressing to think of those things as your tech stack but this is 2021. They use that to create a model that accurately reflects just how the breakdown of engineering work aligns with your wider business objectives. In other words, it translates from code into spreadsheet. When you have to explain what you're doing from an engineering perspective to people whose primary IDE is Microsoft Powerpoint, consider Jellyfish. Thats Jellyfish.co and tell them Corey sent you! Watch for the wince, thats my favorite part.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. As you folks are well aware by now, this show is at least ostensibly about the business of cloud. And that's intentionally overbroad. You can fly a boat through it, which means it's at least wider than the Suez Canal.And that's all well and good, but what do all of these cloud services have in common? That's right, we interact with them via typing on keyboards. My guest today is Jesse Vincent, who is the founder of Keyboardio and creator of the Model 01 heirloom-grade keyboard, which is sitting on my desk that sometimes I use, sometimes it haunts me. Jesse, thank you for joining me.Jesse: Hey, thanks so much for having me, Corey.Corey: So, mechanical keyboards are one of those divisive things that, back in the before times when we were all sitting in offices, it was an express form of passive aggression, where, “I don't like the people around me, and I'm going to show it to them with things that can't really complain about. So, what is the loudest keyboard I can get?” Style stuff. And some folks love them, some folks can't stand them. And most folks to be perfectly blunt, do not seem to care.Jesse: So, it's not actually about them being loud, or it doesn't have to be. Mechanical keyboards can be dead silent; they can be as quiet as anything else. There's absolutely a subculture that is into things that are as loud as they possibly can be; you know, sounds like there's a cannon going off on somebody's desk. But you can also get absolutely silent mechanical switches that are more dampened than your average keyboard. For many, many people, it's about comfort, it is about the key feel.A keyboard is supposed to have a certain feeling and these flat rectangles that feel like you're typing on glass, they don't have that feeling and they're not good for your fingers. And it's been fascinating over the past five or six years to watch this explosion in interest in good keyboards again.Corey: I learned to first use a computer back on an old IBM 286 in the '80s. And this obviously had a Model M—or damn close to it—style buckling spring keyboard. It was loud and I'm nostalgic about the whole thing. True story I've never told on this podcast before; I was a difficult child when I was five years old, and I was annoyed because my parents went out of the house and my brother was getting more attention than I was. I poured a bucket of water into the keyboard.And to this day, I'm surprised my father didn't murder me after that. And we wound up after having a completely sealing rubber gasket on top of this thing. Because this was the '80s; keyboards were not one of those, “Oh, I'm going to run down to the store and pick up another one for $20.” This was at least a $200 whoops-a-doozy. And let's just say that it didn't endear me to my parents that week.Jesse: That's funny because that keyboard is one that actually probably would have dried out just fine. Not like the Microsoft Naturals that I used to carry in the mid-'90s. Those white slightly curved ones. That was my introduction to ergonomic keyboards and they had a fatal flaw as many mid-'90s Microsoft products did. In this case, they melted in the rain; the circuit traces inside were literally wiped away by water. If a cup of water got in that keyboard, it was gone.Corey: Everyone has a story involving keyboard and liquids at some point, or they are the most careful people that are absolutely not my people whatsoever because everyone I hang out with is inherently careless. And over time I used other keyboards as I went through my life and never had strong opinions on them, and then I got to play with a mechanical keyboard had brought all that time rushing back to me of, “Oh, yeah.” And my immediate thought is, “Oh, this is great. I wonder if I could pour water into it? No, no.”And I started getting back into playing with them and got what I thought was the peak model keyboard from Das Keyboards which, there was the black keyboard with no writing on it at all. And I learned I don't type nearly as well as I thought I did in those days. And okay. That thing sat around gathering dust and I started getting a couple more and a couple more, and it turns out if you keep acquiring mechanical keyboards, you can turn an interest into a problem but you can also power your way through to the other side and become a collector. And I started building my own for a while and I still have at least a dozen of them in various states of assembly here.It was sort of a fun hobby that I got into, and for me at least it was, why do I want to build a keyboard myself? Is it, do I believe intrinsically that I can build a better keyboard than I can buy? Absolutely not. But everything else I do in my entire career as an engineer until that point had been about making the bytes on the screen go light up in different patterns. That was it.This was something that I had built that I could touch with my hands and was still related to the thing that I did, and was somewhat more forgiving than other things that I could have gotten into, like you know, woodworking with table saws that don't realize my arm it just lopped off.Jesse: Oh, you can burn yourself pretty good with a soldering iron.Corey: Oh, absolutely I can.Jesse: But yeah, no, I got into this in a similar-sounding story. I had bad wrists throughout my career. I was a programmer and a programming manager and CEO. And my wrist hurts all the time, and I'd been through pretty much every ergonomic keyboard out there. If you seen the one where you stick your fingers into little wells, and each finger you can press back forth, left, right, and down, the ones that looked like they were basically a pair of flat capacitive surfaces from a company that later got bought by Apple and turned into the iPads touch technology, Microsoft keyboards, everything. And nothing quite felt right.A cloud startup I had been working on cratered one summer. Long story short, the thing went under for kind of sad reasons and I swore I was going to take a year off to screw around and figure out what the next thing was going to be. And at some point, I noticed there were people on the internet building their own keyboards. This was not anything I had ever done before. When I started soldering, I did figure out that I must have soldered before because it smelled familiar, but this was supposed to be a one-month project to build myself a single keyboard.And I saw that people on the internet were doing it, I figured, eh, how hard could it be? Just one of those things that Perl hackers are apt to say. Little did I know. It's now, I want to say something like eight years later, and my one-month project to build one keyboard has failed thousands and thousands and thousands of times over as we've shipped thousands of keyboards to, oh God, it's like 75 or 78 countries.Corey: And it's great. It's well made. The Model 01 that I got was part of an early Kickstarter batch. My wife signed me up for it—because she knew I was into this sort of thing—as a birthday gift. And then roughly a year later, if memory serves, it showed up and that was fine.Again, it's Kickstarter is one of those, this might just be an aspirational gift. We don't know. And—because, Kickstarter—but it was fun. And I use it. It's great.I like a lot of the programmability aspects of it. There are challenges. I'm not used to using ergonomic keyboards, and the columnar layout is offset to a point where I miss things all the time. And if you're used to typing rapidly, in things like chats, or Twitter or whatnot, were rapid responses valuable, it's frustrating trying to learn how a new keyboard layout works.Jesse: Absolutely. So, we got some advice very early on from one of the research scientists who helped Microsoft with their design for their natural keyboards, and one of the things that he told us was, “You will probably only ever get one chance to make a keyboard; almost every company that makes a keyboard fails, and so you should take one of the sort of accepted designs and make a small improvement to help push the industry forward. You don't want to go do something radical and have nobody like it.”Corey: That's very reasonable advice and also boring. Why bother?Jesse: Well, we walked away from that with a very different take, which was, if we're only going to get one chance of this, we're going to do the thing we want to make.Corey: Yeah.Jesse: And so we did a bunch of stuff that we got told might be difficult to do or impossible. We designed our own keycaps from scratch. We milled the enclosure out of hardwood. When we started, we didn't know where we were manufacturing, but we did specify that the wood was going to be Canadian maple because it grows like a weed, and as you know, not in danger of being made extinct. But when you're manufacturing in southern China and you're manufacturing with Canadian maple, that comes on a boat from North America.Corey: There's something to be said for the globalization supply chain as we see things shipped back and forth and back and forth, and it seems ridiculous but the economics are there it's—Jesse: Oh, my God. Now, this year.Corey: Yeah [laugh], there's that.Jesse: Supply chains are… how obscenity-friendly is this podcast? [laugh].Corey: Oh, we can censor anything that's too far out. Knock yourself out.Jesse: Because what I would ordinarily say is the supply chains are [BLEEP].Corey: Yep, they are.Jesse: Yeah. This time around, we gave customers the—for the Model 100, which is our new keyboard that the Kickstarter just finished up for—we gave customers the choice of that nice Canadian maple or walnut. We got our quotes in advance. You know, our supplier confirmed wood was no problem a few months in advance. And then the night before the campaign launched, our wood supplier got in touch and said, “So, there are no walnut planks that are wide enough to be had in all of southern China. There are some supply chain issues due to the global container shortage. We don't know what we're going to be able to do. Maybe you could accept it if we did butcher block style walnut and glued planks together.”They made samples and then a week later, instead of FedExing us the samples, I got a set of photographs with a whole bunch of sad faces and crying face emojis saying, “Well, we tried. We know there's no way that this would be acceptable to your customers.” We asked, “So, where's this walnut supposed to be coming from that you can't get it?” They're like, “It's been sitting on the docks at the origin since March. It's being forested in Kentucky in the United States.”Corey: The thing that surprised me the most about the original model on Kickstarter campaign was how much went wrong across the board. I kept reading your updates. It was interesting, at some point, it was like, okay, this is clearly a Ponzi scheme. That's the name of the keyboard: ‘The Ponzi', where there's going to be increasingly outlandish excuses.Jesse: I don't think a Ponzi scheme would be the right aspersion to be casting.Corey: There's that more pedestrian scam-style thing. We could go with that.Jesse: We have a lot of friends who've been in industry longer than us, and every time we brought one of the problems that our factory seemed to be having to them, they said, “Oh, yeah, that's the thing that absolutely happens.”Corey: Yeah, it was just you kept hitting every single one of these, and I was increasingly angry on your behalf, reading these things about, “Oh, yeah. Just one of your factory reps just blatantly ripped you off, and this was expected to be normal in some cases, and it's like”—and you didn't even once threatened to burn the factory now, which I thought was impressive.Jesse: No, nobody threatened to burn the factory down, but one of the factories did have a fire.Corey: Which we can neither confirm nor deny—I kid, I kid, I kid.Jesse: Yeah, yeah, yeah. But so what our friends who had been in industry longer that said, it was like, “Jesse, but, you know, nobody has all the problems.” And eventually, we figured out what was going on, and it was that our factory's director of overseas sales was a con artist grifter who had been scamming both sides. She'd been lying to us and lying to the factory, and making up stories to make her the only trusted person to each side, and she'd just been embezzling huge sums of money.Corey: You hear these stories, but you never think it's going to be something that happens to you. Was this your first outing with manufacturing a physical product?Jesse: This was our first physical product.Corey: But I'm curious about it; are you effectively following the trope of a software person who thinks, “Ah, I could do hardware? How hard could it be? I could ship code around the world seconds, so hardware will be just a little bit slower.” How close to that trope are you?Jesse: So, when we went into the manufacturing side, we knew that we knew nothing, and we knew that it was fraught with peril. And we gave ourselves an awful lot of padding on timing, which we then blew through for all sorts of reasons. And we ran through a hardware incubator that helped us vet our plans, we were working with companies on the ground that helped startups work with factories. And honestly, if it hadn't been for this one individual, yes we would have had problems, but it wouldn't have been anything of the same scale. As far as we can tell, almost everything bad that happened had a grain of truth in it, it's just that… you know, a competent grifter can spin a tiny thing into a giant thing.And nobody in China suspected her, and nobody in China believed that this could possibly be happening because the penalties if she got caught were ten years in a Chinese prison for an amount of money that effectively would be a down payment on an apartment instead of the price of a full apartment or fully fleeing the country.Corey: It seems like that would be enough of a deterrent, but apparently not.Jesse: Apparently not. So, we ended up retaining counsel and talking to friends who had been working in southern China for 15 years for about who they might recommend for a lawyer. We ended up retaining a Chinese lawyer. Her name's [Una 00:13:36]; she's fantastic.Corey: Referrals available upon request.Jesse: Oh, yeah. No, absolutely. I'm happy to send her all kinds of business. She looked at the contract we had with the factory, she's like, “This is a Western contract. This isn't going to help you in the Chinese courts. What we need to do is we need to walk into the factory and negotiate a new agreement that is in Chinese, written by a Chinese lawyer, and get them to sign it.”And part of that agreement was getting them to take full joint responsibility for everything. And she walked in with me to the factory. She dressed down: t-shirt and jeans. They initially thought she was my translator, and she made a point of saying, “Look, I'm Jesse's counsel. I'm not your lawyer. I do not represent your interests.”And three-party negotiations with the factory: the factory's then former salesperson, and us. And she negotiated a new agreement. And I had a long list of all the things that we needed to have in our contract, like all the things that we really cared about. Get to the end of the day and she hands it to me and she's like, “What do you think?” And I read it through and my first thought is that none of the ten points that we need in this agreement are there.And then I realized that they are there, they're just very subtle. And everybody signs it. The factory takes full joint responsibility for everything that was done by their now former salesperson. We go outside; we get into the cab, and she turns to me—and she's not a native speaker of English, but she is fluent—and she's like, how do you think that went, Jesse? I'm like, I think that went pretty well. And she's like, “Yes. I get my job satisfaction out of adverse negotiation, and the factory effectively didn't believe in lawyers.”Corey: No, no. I've seen them. They exist. I married one of them.Jesse: Oh, yeah. As it turned out, they also didn't really believe in the court system and they didn't believe in not pissing off judges. Nothing could help us recover the time we lost; we did end up recovering all of our tooling, we ended up recovering all of our product that they were holding, all with the assistance of the Chinese courts. It was astonishing because we went into this whole thing knowing that there was no chance that a Chinese court would find for a small Western startup with no business presence in China against a local factory, and I think our goal was that they would get a black mark on their corporate social credit report so that nobody else would do business with this factory that won't give the customer back their tooling. And… it turns out that, no, the courts just helped us.Corey: It's nice when things work the way they're supposed to, on some level.Jesse: It is.Corey: And then you solve your production problems, you shipped it out. I use it, I take it out periodically.Jesse: We'd shipped every customer order well before this.Corey: Oh, okay. This was after you had already done the initial pre-orders. This was as you were ongoing—Jesse: Yeah, there were keycaps we owed people, which were—Corey: Oh, okay.Jesse: Effectively the free gift we promised aways in for being late on shipping.Corey: That's what that was for. It showed up one day and I wondered what the story behind that was. But yeah, it was—Jesse: Yeah.Corey: They're great.Jesse: Yeah. You know, and then there was a story in The Verge of, this Kickstarter alleges that—da, da, da, da, da. We're like, “I understand that AOL's lawyers make you say ‘alleges,' but no, this really happened, and also, we really had shipped everything that we owed to customers long before all this went down.”Corey: Yeah. This is something doesn't happen in the software world, generally speaking. I don't have to operate under the even remote possibility that my CI/CD system is lying to me about what it's doing. I can generally believe things that show up in computers—you would think—but there are—Jesse: You would think. I mean—Corey: There a lot of [unintelligible 00:17:19] exceptions to that, but generally, you can believe it.Jesse: In software, you sometimes we'll work with contractors or contract agencies who will make commitments and then not follow through on those commitments, or not deliver the thing they promised. It does sometimes happen.Corey: Indeed.Jesse: Yeah, no, the thing I miss the most from software is that if there is a defect, the cost of shipping an update is nil and the speed at which you can ship an update is instantly.Corey: You would think it would be nil, but then we look at AWS data transfer pricing and there's a giant screaming caveat on that. It's you think that moving bytes would cost nothing. Yeah.Jesse: [unintelligible 00:17:53] compared to international shipping costs for physical goods, AWS transfer rates are incredibly competitive.Corey: No, no, to get to that stage, you need to add an [unintelligible 00:18:02] NAT gateway with their data processing fee.Jesse: [laugh].Corey: But yeah, it's a different universe. It's a different problem, a different scale of speed, a different type of customer, too, on some levels. So, after you've gotten the Model 01's issues sorted out, you launched a second keyboard. The ‘a-TREE-us', if I'm pronouncing that correctly. Or ‘A-tree-us'.Jesse: So Phil, who designed it, pronounces is ‘A-tree-us', so we pronounce it A-tree-us. And so, this is a super minimalist keyboard designed to take with you everywhere, and it was something where Phil Hagelberg, who is a software developer of some repute for a bunch of things, he had designed this sort of initially for his own use and then had started selling kits. So, laser-cut plywood enclosures, hand-built circuit boards, you just stick a little development board in the middle of it, spend some time soldering, and you're good to go. And he and I were internet buddies; he had apparently gotten his start from some of my early blog posts. And one day, he sent me a note asking if I would review his updated circuit board design because he was doing a revision.I looked at his updated circuit board design and then offered to just make him a new circuit board design because it was going to be pretty straightforward to do something that's going to be a little more reliable and a lot more cost-effective. We did that and we talked a little more, and I said, “Would you be interested in having us just make this thing in a factory and sell it with a warranty and send you a royalty?” And he said, but it's GPL. You don't have to send me a royalty.Corey: I appreciate that I am not compelled to do it. However—yeah.Jesse: Yeah, exactly. It's like, “No. We would like to support people who create things and work with you on it.”Corey: That's important. We periodically have guest authors writing blog posts on Last Week in AWS. Every single one of them is paid for what they do, sometimes there for various reasons that they can't or won't accept it and we donate it to a charity of their choice, but we do not expect people to volunteer for a profit-bearing entity, in some respects.Jesse: Yeah.Corey: Now, open-source is a whole separate universe that I still maintain that is rapidly becoming a, “Would you like to volunteer for a trillion-dollar company in your weekend hours?” Usually not, but there's always an argument.Jesse: Oh, yeah. We have a bunch of open-source contributors to our open-source firmware and we contribute stuff back upstream to other projects, and it is a related but slightly different thing. So, Phil said yes; we said yes. And then we designed and made this thing. We launched an ultra-portable keyboard designed to take with you everywhere.It came with a travel case that had a belt loop, and basically a spring-loaded holster for your keyboard if you want to nerd out like that. All of the Kickstarter video and all the photography sort of showed how nice it looked in a cafe. And we launched it, like, the week the first lockdowns hit, in the spring of 2019.Corey: I have to say I skipped that one entirely. One of the things that I wound up doing—keyboard-wise—when I started this company four years ago and change, now was, I wound up getting a fairly large desk, and it's 72 inches or something like that. And I want a big keyboard with a numpad—yeah, that's right, big spender here—because I don't need a tiny little keyboard. I find that the layer-shifting on anything that's below a full-size keyboard is a little on the irritating side. And this goes beyond. It is—it requires significant—Jesse: Oh, yeah. It's—Corey: Rewiring of your brain, on some level.Jesse: And there are ergonomic reasons why some people find it to be better and more comfortable. There's less reaching and twisting. But it is a very different typing experience and it's absolutely not for everybody. Nothing we've made so far is intended to be a mass-market product. When we launched the Model 01, we were nervous that we would make something that was too popular because we knew that if we had to fulfill 50,000 of them, we'd just be screwed. We knew how little we knew.But the Atreus, when we launched it on Kickstarter, we didn't know if we were going to have to cancel the campaign because no one was going to want their travel keyboard at the beginning of a pandemic, but it did real well. I don't remember the exact timing and numbers, but we hit the campaign goal, I want to say early on the first day, possibly within minutes, possibly within hours—it's been a while now; I don't remember exactly—ultimately, we sold, like, 2600 of them on Kickstarter and have done additional production runs. We have a distributor in Japan, and a distributor in the US, and a distributor in the UK, now. And we also sell them ourselves directly online, from keyboard.io.So, this is one of the other fascinating logistics things, is that we ship globally through Hong Kong. Which, before the pandemic was actually pretty pleasant. Inexpensive shipping globally has gotten kind of nuts because most discount carriers, the way they operated historically is, they would buy cargo space on commercial flights. Commercial international flights don't happen so much.Corey: Yes, suddenly, that becomes a harder thing to find.Jesse: Early on, we had a couple of shipping providers that were in the super-slow, maybe up to two weeks to get your thing somewhere by air taking, I want to say we had things that didn't get there for three months. They would get from Hong Kong to Singapore in three days; they would enter a warehouse, and then we had to start asking questions about, “Hey, it's been eight weeks. What's going on?” And they're like, “Oh, it's still in queue for a flight to Europe. There just aren't any.”Corey: It seems like that becomes a hard problem.Jesse: It becomes a hard problem. It started to get a little better, and now it's starting to get a little worse again. Carriers that used to be ultra-reliable are now sketchy. We have FedEx losing packages, which is just nuts. USPS shipments, we see things that are transiting from Hong Kong, landing at O'Hare, going through a sorting center in Chicago, and just vanishing for weeks at a time, in Chicago.Corey: I don't pretend to understand how this stuff works. It's magic to me; like, it is magic, on some level, that I can order toilet paper on the internet, it gets delivered to my house for less money than it costs me to go to the store and buy it. It feels like there's some serious negative externalities in there. But we don't want to look too closely at those because we might feel bad about things.Jesse: There's all kinds of fascinating stuff for us. So, shipping stuff, especially by air, there are two different ways that the shipping weight can get calculated. It can either get calculated based on the weight on a scale, or it can get calculated using a formula based on the dimensions. And so bulky things are treated as weighing an awful lot. I'm told that Amazon's logistics teams started doing this fascinating thing where ultra-dense, super-heavy shipments they pushed on to FedEx and UPS, whereas the ultra-light stuff that saved on jet fuel, they shoved onto their own planes.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking databases, observability, management, and security.And - let me be clear here - it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build.With Always Free you can do things like run small scale applications, or do proof of concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free. No asterisk. Start now. Visit https://snark.cloud/oci-free that's https://snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I want to follow up because it seems like, okay, pandemic shipping is a challenge; you clearly are doing well. You still have them in stock and are selling them as best I'm aware, correct?Jesse: Yes.Corey: Yeah. I may have to pick one up one of these days just so I can put it on the curiosity keyboard shelf and kick it around and see how it works. And then you recently concluded a third keyboard Kickstarter, in this case. And—Jesse: Yeah.Corey: —this is not your positioning; this is my positioning of what I'm picking up of, “Hey, remember that Model 01 keyboard we sold you that you love and we talked about and it's amazing? Yeah, turns out that's crap. Here's the better version of it.” Correct that misapprehension, please. [laugh].Jesse: Sure. So, it absolutely is not crap, but we've been out of stock in the Model 01 for a couple of years now. And we see them going used for as much or sometimes more than we used to charge for them new. It went out of stock because of the shenanigans with that first factory. And shortly before we launched the Atreus, we'd been planning to bring back an updated version of the Model 01; we've even gotten to the point of, like, designing the circuit boards and starting to update the tooling, the injection molding tooling, and then COVID, Atreus, life, everything.And so it took us a little longer to get there. But there is a larger total addressable market for a keyboard like the Model 01 than the total number that we ever sold. There are certainly people who had Model 01s who want replacements, want extras, want another one on another desk. There are also plenty of people who wanted a Model 01 and never got one.Corey: Here's my question for you, with all three of these keyboards because they're a different layout, let's be clear. Some more so than others, but even the columnar layout is strange here. Once upon a time, I had a week in which I wasn't doing much, and I figured, ah, I'll Dvorak—which is a different keyboard layout—and it's not that it's hard; it's that it's rewiring a whole bunch of muscle memory. The problem I ran into was not that it was impossible to do, by any stretch, but because of what I was doing—in those days help desk and IT support—I was having to do things on other people's computers, so it was a constant context switching back and forth between different layouts.Jesse: Yeah.Corey: Do you see that being a challenge with layouts like this, or is it more natural than that?Jesse: So, what we found is that it is easier to switch between an ergonomic layout and a traditional layout, like a columnar layout, and what's often called a row-stagger layout—which is what your normal keyboard looks like—than it is to switch between Dvorak and Qwerty on a traditional keyboard. Or the absolute bane of my existence is switching between a ThinkPad and a MacBook. They are super close; they are not the same.Corey: Right. You can't get an ergonomic keyboard layout inside of a laptop. I mean, looking at the four years of being gaslit by Apple, it's clear you can barely get a keyboard into a MacBook for a while. It's, “Oh, it's a piece of crap, but you're using it wro”—yeah. I'm not a fan of their entire approach to keyboards and care very than what Apple has to say about anything even slightly keyboard-related, but that's just me being bitter.Jesse: As far as I can tell, large chunks of Apple's engineering organization felt the same way that you did. Their new ones are actually decent again.Corey: Yes, that's what I've heard. And I will get one at some point, but I also have a problem where, “Oh, yeah, you know that $3,000 laptop with a crappy keyboard, you can't use for anything? Great. The solution is to give us 3000 more dollars, and then we'll sell you one that's good.” And it's, I feel like I don't want to reward the behavior.Jesse: I hear you. I ditched Mac OS for a number of years. I live the dream: Linux on the desktop. And it didn't hurt me a lot—printing worked fine, scanning worked fine, projectors were fine—but when I was reaching for things like Photoshop, and Lightroom, and my mechanical CAD software, it was the bad kind of funny.Corey: I have to be careful, now for the first time in my life I'm not updating to new operating systems early on, just because of things like the audio stuff I have plugged into my nonsense and the media nonsense that I do. It used to be that great, my computer only really needs to be a web browser and a terminal and I'm good. And worst case, I can make do with just the web browser because there are embedded a terminal into a web page options out there. Yeah, now it turns out that actually have a production workflow. Who knew?Jesse: Yep. That's the point where I started thinking about having separate machines for different things. [laugh].Corey: Yeah, I'm rapidly hitting that point. Yeah, I do want to get into having fun with keyboards, on some level, but it's the constant changing of what you're using. And then, of course, there's the other side of it where, in normal years, I spent an awful lot of time traveling and as much fun as having a holster-mounted belt keyboard would be, in many cases, it does not align with the meetings that I tend to be in.Jesse: Of course.Corey: It's, “Oh, great. You're the CFO of a Fortune 500. Great, let me pair my mini keyboard that looks like something from the bowels of your engineering department's reject pile.” Like, what is this? It's one of those things that doesn't send the right message in some cases. And let's be honest; I'm good at losing things.Jesse: This is a pretty mini keyboard, but I hear you.Corey: Or I could lose it, along with my keys. It will be great.Jesse: Yeah. There are a bunch of things I've wanted to do around reasonable keyboards for tablets.Corey: Yes, please do.Jesse: Yeah. We actually started looking at one point at a fruit company in Cupertino's requirements around being able to do dock-connector connected keyboards for their tablets, and… it's nuts. You can't actually do ergonomic keyboards that way, it would have to be Bluetooth.Corey: Yeah. When I travel on the road these days, or at least—well, ‘these days' being two years ago—the only computer I'd take is an iPad. And that was great; it works super well for a lot of my use cases. There's still something there, and even going forward, I'm going to be spending a lot more time at home. I have young kids now, and I want to be here to watch them grow up.And my lifestyle and use cases have changed for the last year and a half. I've had an iMac. I've never had one of those before. It's big screen real estate; things are great. And I'm looking to see whether it's time to make a full-on keyboard evolution if I can just force myself over the learning curve, here. But here's the question you might not be prepared to answer yet. What's next? Do you have plans on the backburner for additional keyboards beyond what you've done?Jesse: Oh, yeah. We have, like, three more designs that are effectively in the can. Not quite ready for production, but if this were a video podcast, I'd be pulling out and waving circuit boards at you. One of the things that we've been playing with is what is called in the trade a symmetric staggered keyboard where the right half is absolutely bog-standard normal layout like you'd expect, and the left side is a mirror of that. And so it is a much more gentle introduction to an ergonomic-style keyboard.Corey: Okay, I can almost wrap my head around that.Jesse: Because if you put your hands on your keyboard and you feel the angles that you have to move on your right side, you'll see that your fingers move basically straight back and forth. On the left side, it's very different unless you're holding your hand at a crazy, crazy angle.Corey: Yeah.Jesse: And so it's basically giving you that same comfort on the right side and also making the left side comfy. It's not a weird butterfly-shaped keyboard; it is still a rectangle, but it is just that little bit better. We're not the first people who have done this. Our first prototype of this thing was, like, 2006, something like that. But it was a one-off, like, “I wonder if I would like this.” And we were actually planning to do that one next after the Model 01 when the Atreus popped up, and that was a much faster, simpler, straighter-forward thing to bring to production.Corey: The one thing I want from a keyboard—and I haven't found one yet; maybe it exists, maybe I have to build it myself—but I want to do the standard mechanical keyboard—I don't even particularly care about the layout because it all passes through a microcontroller on the device itself. Great. And those things are programmable as you've demonstrated; you've already done an awful lot of open-source work that winds up being easily used to control keyboards. And I love it, and it's great, but I also want to embed a speaker—a small one—into the keyboard so I can configure it that every time I press a key, it doesn't just make a clack, it also makes a noise. And I want to be able to—ideally—have it be different keys make different noises sometimes. And the reason being is that when we eventually go back to offices, I don't want there to be any question about who is the most obnoxious typist in the office; I will—Jesse: [laugh].Corey: —win that competition. That is what I want from a keyboard. It's called the I-Don't-Want-Anyone-Within-Fifty-Feet-Of-Me keyboard. And I don't quite know how to go about building that yet, but I have some ideas.Jesse: So, there's absolutely stuff out there. There is prior art out there.Corey: Oh, wonderful.Jesse: One of the other options for you is solenoids.Corey: Oh, those are fun.Jesse: So, a solenoid is—there is a steel bar, an electromagnet, and a tube of magnetic material so that you can go kachunk every time you press a key.Corey: It feels functionally like a typewriter to my understanding.Jesse: I mean, it can make it feel like a typewriter. The haptic engine in an iPhone or a Magic Trackpad is not exactly a solenoid but might give you the vaguest idea of what you're talking about.Corey: Yeah, I don't think I'm going to be able to quite afford 104 iPhones to salvage all of their haptic engines so that I can then wind up hooking each one up to a different key but, you know, I am sure someone enterprising come up with it.Jesse: Yeah. So, you only need a couple of solenoids and you trigger them slightly differently depending on which key is getting hit, and you'll get your kachunk-kachunk-kachunk-kachunk-kachunk.Corey: Yeah, like spacebar for example. Great. Or you can always play a game with it, too, like, the mystery key: whenever someone types in the hits the mystery key, the thing shrieks its head off and scares the heck out of them. Especially if you set it to keys that aren't commonly used, but ever so frequently, make everyone in the office jumpy and nervous.Jesse: This will be perfect for Zoom.Corey: Oh, absolutely, it would. In fact, one thing I want to do soon if this pandemic continues much longer, is then to upgrade my audio setup here so I can have a second microphone pointed directly into my keyboard so that people who are listening at a meeting with me can hear me typing as we go. I might be a terrible colleague. One wonders.Jesse: You might be a terrible colleague, but you might be a wonderful colleague. Who knows?Corey: It all depends on the interests we have. I want to thank you for taking the time to walk me through the evolution of Keyboardio. If people want to learn more, or even perhaps buy one of these things, where can they do that?Jesse: They can do that at keyboard.io.Corey: And hence the name. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me about all this. I really appreciate it.Jesse: Cool. Thanks so much for having me. I had fun.Corey: I did, too. Jesse Vincent—obra on Twitter, and of course, the CTO of Keyboardio. I am Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment, but before typing it, switch your keyboard to Dvorak.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Everything with Everett
My Review of Cellphone Carriers

Everything with Everett

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 27, 2021 73:37


This episode includes an honest real customer review of  Verizon, T-Mobile, and Visible Wireless, it is not paid for or endorsed by  Visible Wireless (by Verizon). This episode does mention a promotion code that is associated with Everett McConnaughey, as a regular paying customer, no compensation has been provided for the content or recording of this episode.The cellphone number that I have has been online and in my possession since 2005. In 2005 I was a junior in high school and had just gotten a Samsung flip phone on my father's wife's Verizon plan. Verizon's service has been amazing in Idaho for decades, and frequently is the only (if any at all) service that you can get in the central mountains. In 2012 I started working for Verizon Wireless as a tier II tech support agent, tasked with helping customers troubleshoot and fix device issues, and service problems. While I worked at Verizon I learned about their billing structure and how a phone plan was $60/month plus there was a $20 (basic phone) or $30 (smartphone) access fee that essentially allowed the customer's device to access the features of their account. I was upset with learning this, and I terminated service for $135 and took my phone to Cricket Wireless for 9 months, before joining T-Mobile in 2013.So much has changed with technology in nearly a decade, so much has improved, but in many ways so much hasn't. I was tired of paying $75 a month for unlimited service when I hardly ever used that service. I switched from a post-pay T-Mobile account to a prepay T-Mobile account in 2017 which lowered my cost in half while I still got all the features you expect with a wireless phone provider. When the 5G was rolled out in Boise in December 2020, I got a new iPhone 12 but the 5G was useless and I had to disable that radio on my phone to opt for 4G LTE service instead. I was finally tired of the boilerplate  "we'd love to help" responses to my frustration, and in August 2021 I decided to try Visible Wireless at $25 a month, with unlimited everything, and on Verizon's 5G network. I flew both carriers on my phone to test them in the situations and locations I frequented and by the end of my T-Mobile billing cycle, I had seen enough to port my number to its fourth carrier and join Visible Wireless. This podcast is my honest unsolicited and uncompensated review of Visible Wireless service, the activation, and porting process, as well as customer service. I am offering access to my "friend" code which will give anyone (and thus myself) service with Visible for just $5 that month. I'll discuss how easy it actually is to save with this network provider that you can live like a king even if you live alone or don't have a family to bring with you.Check out this page: https://www.visible.com/get/3t8jNs, it has all the info you need to know about joining Visible. When you use my friend code, 3t8jNs, you'll get your first month of service for only $5! Live in IDAHO? Please get vaccinated against COVID-19!Most pharmacies throughout Idaho are taking walk-in appointments. Pharmacies such as Walmart, Albertsons, Bi-Mart, Walgreens, Customedica, and Fred Meyer have an adequate supply of COVID-19 vaccine, so you can walk in and get your shot when it's convenient. Visit Idaho Health & Welfare's Website for more details Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEVISIBLE WIRELESS BY VERIZON When you use my friend code, 3t8jNs, you'll get your first month of service for only $5!Support the show (https://paypal.me/emcconnaughey)

Lloyd's List: The Shipping Podcast
The Lloyd's List Podcast: The regulators' view of container chaos

Lloyd's List: The Shipping Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 33:41


Carriers may be following the letter of the law, but not necessarily the spirit of it, and are not always behaving like good corporate citizens, according to our guest this week. Daniel Maffei is the chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission – the Washington agency responsible for regulating the US ocean shipping trades so when he tells liner bosses to ‘put on their commonsense caps' they should probably listen. Head to Lloydslist.com for regular analysis of the container trades and you can subscribe here: https://pages.maritimeintelligence.informa.com/ftp-sub-journey

FreightCasts
Ocean carriers print money - what comes next? EP20 The Stockout

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 30:10


In this episode of The Stockout, host Mike Baudendistel discusses the extraordinary ocean shipping market and the outlook with John D. McCown, founder of Blue Alpha Capital and expert in the maritime industry. Follow The Stockout on Apple PodcastsFollow The Stockout on SpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

Freight Broker TV
FBTV Podcast - The Vaccine Mandate

Freight Broker TV

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021


The topic for this FBTV Podcast --- The Vaccine Mandate Also in this episode... New York Attempts To Ban Diesel Truck SaleBig Truck Sales UpThe elephant in the room? The vaccine mandate.This and more in this FBTV Podcast from TALTOA. https://taltoa.comhttps://freightbrokertv.com

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Freight RFP Process is Broken – Let's Fix It with Maggie Petrovic

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 45:35


The Freight RFP Process is Broken – Let's Fix It with Maggie Petrovic Maggie Petrovic and Joe Lynch discuss the freight RFP process is broken – let's fix it. Maggie is the Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at Emerge, a company that is Reinventing Freight Procurement. About Maggie Petrovic Maggie Petrovic joined Emerge just over a year ago following 8 years with Coyote Logistics as Director of Enterprise Sales. Maggie brings her passion, dedication, and industry knowledge as Vice President of Strategic Initiatives, now responsible for operationalizing Emerge's game-changing products, ensuring the company translates its goals and visions into practices that lead to success, not only internally, but in every customer interaction as well. She has a B.A in Business & Communications from the University of Iowa. About Emerge Emerge, based in Scottsdale, AZ, is one of the fastest-growing startups in the U.S. and is transforming the $800 billion transportation and logistics industry with its digital freight marketplace platform. Emerge's award-winning marketplace provides access to direct capacity and live market conditions helping shippers and carriers make the strongest, most beneficial decisions when procuring domestic freight. Launched in 2017, Emerge is backed by Greycroft, New Road Capital, 9Yards Capital, and the founder of GlobalTranz. Key Takeaways: The Freight RFP Process is Broken – Let's Fix It Maggie Petrovic is the Vice President of Strategic Initiatives at Emerge, a company that is Reinventing Freight Procurement. The freight request for pricing (RFP) process is broken for both shippers and carriers. Shippers hate the current process because: The lack of technology makes the process clunky, cumbersome, and time consuming – so time consuming that most shippers only want to endure the process once per year. Results in paper rates – rates that are only good on paper. Too much focus on the process and not enough focus on building win-win relationships with carriers. Lack of carrier vetting and not enough of the right carriers involved. Carriers hate the current process because: Bid fatigue – too much time wasted on RFPs for shippers that never move freight with your company. Shipper motivations are unclear. Are they seriously looking for new carriers or are they just market testing their current carriers? Predicting the market and developing solid rates for the next 12 months is pretty much impossible. Not enough focus on building relationships with the right shippers. Emerge has created a technology platform that has streamlined the freight RFP process and delivered the following benefits: Freed of the time consuming, clunky process, shippers and carriers can spend more time discussing the freight characteristics and getting to know each other. With the process streamlined, shippers are moving to quarterly RFPs, which enables the carriers to deliver more competitive bids – and live with them (no more paper rates). In addition to their incumbent carriers, shippers have access to thousands of vetted carriers within the Emerge system. Emerge enables shippers to grow their partner network by connecting to thousands of verified carriers and brokers to ensure their loads are always covered. Carriers gain access and bid directly on exclusive contract and spot lanes that they would not otherwise have access to. Emerge's network connects carriers with shippers of all sizes, providing more opportunities for carriers to work in their preferred lanes. Learn More About The Freight RFP Process is Broken – Let's Fix It  Maggie's LinkedIn  Emerge website Emerge LinkedIn Building a Freight Juggernaut Again with Michael Leto The Emerge Story with Andrew Leto Rethinking the Freight RFP Process The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Ready, Set, Engage
Consumers have changed – What's the impact on carriers and advisors?

Ready, Set, Engage

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 14:42


Carriers today are talking about creating deeper ongoing relationships with prospects and policyowners and building ecosystems. Understanding these consumer trends is key to the success of carriers and the advisors.Featuring:Tariq Khan, CEO of Global Diversity MarketingMark Hug, Managing Director of Paradigm Partners International (PPI)Muriel Petri, President and CMO of Life.io

That Annuity Show
115 Building Real Policyholder Relationships with Molly Black

That Annuity Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 56:17


Carriers spend a lot of time talking about building strong policyholder relationships but how many actually have? Molly Black, Chief Product Officer at Life.io joins us today to talk about how her company makes those relationships a reality. What can we learn from their software design that we can apply to our own practices today? Also, do you want to get regular updates on news about Molly and other guests of our show? Go to https://thatannuityshow.com and subscribe to our newsletter. We hope you enjoy the show. Thank you to our show sponsor, ! Links mentioned in this episode: https://www.life.io https://www.linkedin.com/in/molly-morgan-black-56b1832a/

Freight Broker TV
FBTV Podcast - September 9th, 2021

Freight Broker TV

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2021 36:43


The topic for this FBTV Podcast --- Trucking Facts 3G Is OutIRS To Increase Per DiemRates Are Up, So Are Fuel Prices20 Years Later, We Remember 9/11 This and more in this FBTV Podcast Xtra from TALTOA. https://taltoa.comhttps://freightbrokertv.com

TalkCDL Trucking Podcast
Truckers & Companies Lying to EaCh Other

TalkCDL Trucking Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 49:04


TRUCKERS & COMPANIES LYING TO EACH OTHER. There is a major problem in the Trucking Industry. Some truckers are constantly lying to trucking companies. Then there's the trucking companies that lye to truck drivers. Not every trucker is a liar and not every trucking company is a liar, but there are enough on both sides that have really made the industry smell. Lies that Drivers Tell. How long they have been working for a past company. Some drivers exaggerate about their work history. Some drivers lie about their MVR. Some driver lie about their accident history or their criminal background. Look the bottom line is, any good carrier is going to check you out, so just be up front. The next time you interview for a driving job, just start out with, "Let me be ip front about everything before I waist your time Mr. recruiter. You will gain much respect and you have a better chance of a carrier trying to help you verses chalking you up to "just another liar". I do have to keep reminding everyone hearing the podcast, that not all drivers lie, this segment is about the ones that do. Lies that tricking companies tell. We got a brand new Peterbilt we are sticking you in. Will get you home every week, guaranteed. We have a dedicated run we are putting you on if you sign up. Will keep you south. These are some blatant lies that carriers say to drivers to bait them in. Again I will remind everyone that not all carriers intentionally lie to drivers, only the desperate and bad carriers do this. Advice to truckers that lie. When searching for a job, if you are up front with each carrier about something in your past, you will save allot of time by getting the thing that you are worried about, out in the open, with in 30 seconds of each call. There are plenty of carriers that are willing to help you but you sure can waist allot of time trying to fool all the carriers. Advice to Carriers that lie. Reach into your pocket and spend the money needed to find enough drivers interview. If you talk to enough drivers and are honest, you most likely will find a driver that willing to give you a chance. You might also consider upping your pay or investing in better trucks or even hiring a salesmen to find freight that meets the needs of potential drivers. Either way, you have to realize that, in order to have a successful trucking company these days, one must take account that a trucking company is made of its drivers more than anything. TRUCKERS & COMPANIES LYING TO EACH OTHER JJ Keller Helping truckers organize National Carriers Hiring Drivers Students Teams Lease Operators New Kenworth'sCoccon MDR FREE Ap for truckers that deposits money in your account Trucking news with ruthannMolesters, Truck parking scam, Trucking newsTrucking Back In The DayTrucking's white elephant and stuffPassing on the trucking torchTrucking Companies are responsible for their driversTrucking Company Fight TalkCDL Interviews If you are someone in the trucking industry that is wanting to appear on the show, please write to Ruthann@TalkCDL.com and tell us what's on your mind. We are always looking for awesome people in the trucking industry from truckers to carriers to family members at home. We know you have a great story to tell or maybe you would just like to sit in on one of our recordings. Let us know, we look forward to hearing from you.

Two Old Bucks
S2 Ep 34: First day of School, Project Hail Mary, Trapped, Planes,Trains and Automobiles, Dave switches carriers, Del cleans up his act

Two Old Bucks

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 30:10


It's the first day of school for Grayson and he's not happy about it...or is he? Who doesn't like brain breaks?Dave gives a book report on Project Hail Mary by And Weir.  Five stars for geeky science projects, fewer for a sloppy backstory and some character superficiality. Dave gives it 3.5 stars but Goodreads gives it 4.55. Who's right? Read it and  decide.Dave reviews Trapped, a 2-season  Icelandic miniseries on Prime that deals with murder, intrigue, and family secrets in a small town on the north coast of Iceland. Great character actors, lots of twists and turns. 4.5 stars. Del recommends to our Icelandic that they watch it. Dave feels they have all probably seen it already but doesn't mention this, Del being so delicate and all.Del goes on a rant about airline ticket pricing as the Bucks expose a devious algorithm. In a frenzy, Del rants further on auto insurance costs. Maybe he's just a bad driver? Dave means ip address when he says url.Dave switches mobile carriers and, unexpectedly,  hardly rants at all. Send a note to buckstwoold@gmail.com and he'll tell you his new carrier.Del agonizes over what to do with the bars of soap when they get too small. Clearly a man with too much time on his hands. Finally, Del thinks he has another BIG IDEA - cardboard furniture- only to learn it is already out there. Whew! Lots of stuff today. What do you think?      BUCKSTWOOLD@GMAIL.COM

Staying Connected
C-Band Spectrum Could Save U.S. Wireless Carriers' 5G Plans

Staying Connected

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 9:45


Earlier in 2021, the Federal Communications Commission announced the winners of the C-Band spectrum auction – the wireless frequency carriers need to provide the holy grail of 5G services.  AT&T, Verizon Wireless, and T-Mobile have committed billions of dollars to secure the needed spectrum and build-out of their networks, expecting a big payback from consumers and enterprises. In this 10 minute podcast, Kevin DiLallo, a Partner at LB3, and TC2's Joe Schmidt take a closer look at what this revolutionary wireless technology holds for the future. If you would like to learn more about our experience in this space, please visit our Mobility Services – In-Country, Regional, Global and Success Stories webpages.

WIRED Security: News, Advice, and More
A Simple Software Fix Could Limit Location Data Sharing

WIRED Security: News, Advice, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 8:11


Carriers know where you are every time your phone re-connects to the cell network—but with Pretty Good Phone Privacy, they wouldn't have to.

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation
394: Disrupting Corporate Culture Myths with David G. White Jr., Ph.D

Leaders Of Transformation | Leadership Development | Conscious Business | Global Transformation

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 40:39


David G. White, Jr., Ph.D is a partner and co-founder of Ontos Global. He has spent the last 30 years helping large organizations manage and sustain transformation. As a cognitive anthropologist, his research and practice focuses on groundbreaking approaches to organizational culture and transformation based on the new science of the cultural mind. He has written two books that fundamentally challenge — and change — the way culture is thought of and practiced in the business world, the most recent being Disrupting Corporate Culture: How Cognitive Science Alters Accepted Beliefs About Culture and Culture Change and Its Impact on Leaders and Change Agents (Routledge, 2020). From 2003 until 2010 David was Director of Talent and Organizational Capability at Microsoft, where he led the development of Microsoft's integrated platform for people management and leadership development. This competency, career path and key experiences platform was deployed to 100,000 people worldwide. Full Bio What We Discuss in this Episode with David G. White Jr., Ph.D The common myth about corporate culture How corporate culture is actually formed Steps to effectively changing corporate culture The role leaders play in transforming culture Carriers of cultural DNA Challenging the status quo Barriers to leaders changing their approach to corporate culture Becoming aware of the dominant logics that anchor your business Episode Show Notes: https://tinyurl.com/v5j6c7mc 

First Congregational Church of Zephyrhills, FL
"Hard Sayings: Cross Carriers Vs. Bargain Basement Believers Matthew 10:16-25 & 34-38

First Congregational Church of Zephyrhills, FL

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2021 25:52


FamilyLife Today®
Fire Carriers

FamilyLife Today®

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 31:05


No matter what trials the Church has faced in history, the fire of the Gospel has continued. Valerie Bell, Matt Markins, and Mike Handler declare that the Church is meant to carry the fire to the next generation. Show Notes and Resources Find resources from this podcast at https://shop.familylife.com/Products.aspx?categoryid=130. Download FamilyLife's new app! https://www.familylife.com/app/ Check out all that's available on the FamilyLife Podcast Network.  https://www.familylife.com/familylife-podcast-network/

FreightCasts
How Refrigerated Carriers are Adapting to New Buying Trends - Cold Chain Summmit

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 17:23


Danny Christner, CEO of John Christner Trucking, describes changes in food habits and how carriers can stay agile to meet customer expectations. Christner explains the difficulties of modifying food supply chains and his thoughts on if these habitual changes are here to stay. He speaks with FreightWaves Staff Writer Grace Sharkey.Follow FreightWaves on Apple PodcastsFollow FreightWaves on SpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

FreightWaves LIVE: An Events Podcast
How Refrigerated Carriers are Adapting to New Buying Trends - Cold Chain Summit

FreightWaves LIVE: An Events Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021 17:23


Danny Christner, CEO of John Christner Trucking, describes changes in food habits and how carriers can stay agile to meet customer expectations. Christner explains the difficulties of modifying food supply chains and his thoughts on if these habitual changes are here to stay. He speaks with FreightWaves Staff Writer Grace Sharkey.Follow FreightWaves on Apple PodcastsFollow FreightWaves on SpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

The Life Church KC
Keepers or Carriers | Bobby Wade

The Life Church KC

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2021


Winner Take All
Big Tech Censorship: Is Treating Platforms as Common Carriers a Solution? - Eugene Volokh Interview

Winner Take All

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 52:48


Eugene Volokh is founder and coauthor of The Volokh Conspiracy, a leading legal blog. His law review articles have been cited by opinions in eight Supreme Court cases and several hundred court opinions in total, as well as several thousand scholarly articles. Eugene sits down with Alex and Nick to discuss his recent article in the Journal of Free Speech Law that looks at the pros and cons that could occur if the U.S. were to treat social media platforms as common carriers. Companies distinguished as common carriers are generally required to provide service to the public without discrimination.

The Nolecast: Florida State football analysis
Position preview: Can FSU's ball carriers be anywhere near 4th best in the ACC

The Nolecast: Florida State football analysis

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 13, 2021 27:43


The Nolecast is back with its second installment of the positional preview series, this time to examine FSU's ball carriers.Will someone other than Jashaun Corbin and Toafili break through? And how will the run game operate if QB Jordan Travis is not on the field as much?

Skift Airline Weekly Lounge
Latin American Carriers Binge on Aircraft Orders

Skift Airline Weekly Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 20:10


This week, Madhu Unnikrishnan and Edward "Ned" Russell, the team behind Airline Weekly, look at why so many Latin American carriers are buying aircraft and if the OEMs are right that airlines are just starting a massive fleet-replacement cycle. It's early days, but the U.S. Senate passed a massive infrastructure spending bill, so will that mean NextGen could finally get off the ground? And why is Mesa Air struggling with maintenance?   Stay ahead of aviation news with a subscription to Airline Weekly.

Land Line Now
Brokers and carriers: Why the rules don't work

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 12, 2021 50:55


LLN (8/11/21) – What are the rules that govern the relationship between brokers and carriers? And how effective are those rules out in the real world? We'll offer a primer on how it's supposed to work and how well it does. Also, an unusual indicator is giving us some insight into the freight market this year. We'll have that, plus the usual rundown of freight and rates. And with the Senate passing its version of the infrastructure bill covering traditional infrastructure, now they're on to the rest of the president's proposal. We'll have a rundown on what's happening. 0:00 – Newscast. 10:14 – The rules between brokers and carriers. 25:03 – Unusual indicator in the freight market. 39:58 – Infrastructure: One bill down, one to go.

The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway
Office Hours: Apple's Dependency on Wireless Carriers, Productivity, and the Buy Now, Pay Later Revolution

The Prof G Show with Scott Galloway

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 31:07


Scott answers a question about whether fintech disruptors like Klarna and Affirm have a responsibility to educate younger consumers on how to bank responsibly. He also shares his thoughts on how Apple can continue to vertically integrate, offers career advice to someone with a job opportunity in Berlin, and shares how he stays productive.  Music: https://www.davidcuttermusic.com / @dcuttermusic Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pregnancy with Physio Laura

To kick off this fourth episode in the Kids Physio series we are discussing baby carriers. Nicole Pates, a paediatric physiotherapist, discusses: The different types of carriers to consider The link between carriers and attachment What to look for for a safe and appropriate position for your baby When to turn them forward facing Today's episode is episode 4 of 5 in this series. If you want to listen to this entire podcast series all at once and to learn all about whether or not baby toys and activity centres are helpful or harmful then you can find all these episodes live right now inside my online membership program, the Pregnancy Posse. We also have a bonus episode exclusive only to Posse members where Nicole shares with us 4 videos for play based activities for babies aged 0-3 months old. You can find out more about the Pregnancy Posse and trial it for 7 days by visiting thepregnancyposse.com. If you'd like to learn more from Nicole you can find her @nicole_kidsphysio I'd love to know what you thought of this episode, jump over to @physiolaura and tell me what you learnt! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Use Your Words
Government flagging social media to be removed, In Talks with carriers to monitor SMS messages

Use Your Words

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 59:16


A few episodes we talked about how Facebook, Twitter, etc can choose to enforce their policies how they see fit and that by doing this this did not come afoul of the first amendment. Well in July this started to change as the White House admitted that their officials have started to flag material for social media to remove - which is a change in the protocol of the social media companies no longer deciding on what to keep and remove, but instead is now taking it's ques directly from the government. It was also reported that the White House is in talks with carriers to prevent the spreading of misinformation about the Covid Vaccine through SMS messages - something that should be concerning. Of course this has been walked back a little but to what extent? Use Your Words podcast is passion project of two people from Southeastern Wisconsin. Please consider checking out the below links to learn/hear more. And join us every Tuesday for new episodes! Visit our website: https://useyourwords.cc Listen to the podcast on all of your devices: https://useyourwordspod.captivate.fm/listen Send us an email: https://www.useyourwords.cc/contact Read the blog: https://www.useyourwords.cc/blog

FreightCasts
WHAT THE TRUCK?!? EP338 Ocean carriers under fire for not honoring shipping contracts

FreightCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 59:06


On today's episode, Dooner and The Dude are talking about a U.S. company that's suing "collusive" ocean carriers and alleging price manipulation. Jon Monroe, founder, Monroe Consulting, tries to help us make sense of this market and what's going on between shippers and carriers.In the past three years, C.H. Robinson's renewable energy business has grown by 654% as the sector rushes toward an expected sevenfold growth to $2.15 trillion worldwide by 2025. And today, these industry feats face another major hurdle: one of the most volatile transportation markets in history. Jim Mancini, VP of North American Surface Transportation at C.H. Robinson, helps us get a handle on it.Trent Broberg, CEO at Acertus, gets us up to speed on the looming surge in vehicle production.Ayeshah Abuelhiga, founder and CEO, Mason Dixie Foods, talks about the logistics of biscuits.We #PlayItForward with Jason Myers, Icarus Witch bassist and account executive at The Content Factory. He'll also give us PR and promo tips for your freight businesses.Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

What The Truck?!?
Ocean carriers under fire for not honoring shipping contracts

What The Truck?!?

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 59:06


On today's episode, Dooner and The Dude are talking about a U.S. company that's suing "collusive" ocean carriers and alleging price manipulation. Jon Monroe, founder, Monroe Consulting, tries to help us make sense of this market and what's going on between shippers and carriers.In the past three years, C.H. Robinson's renewable energy business has grown by 654% as the sector rushes toward an expected sevenfold growth to $2.15 trillion worldwide by 2025. And today, these industry feats face another major hurdle: one of the most volatile transportation markets in history. Jim Mancini, VP of North American Surface Transportation at C.H. Robinson, helps us get a handle on it.Trent Broberg, CEO at Acertus, gets us up to speed on the looming surge in vehicle production.Ayeshah Abuelhiga, founder and CEO, Mason Dixie Foods, talks about the logistics of biscuits.We #PlayItForward with Jason Myers, Icarus Witch bassist and account executive at The Content Factory. He'll also give us PR and promo tips for your freight businesses.Visit our sponsorSubscribe to the WTT newsletterApple PodcastsSpotifyMore FreightWaves Podcasts

The Insurance Innovators Unscripted Podcast
EP 110 – Reuters Events Part 2: Accelerating Underwriting Transformation To Thrive In A World of New Risks

The Insurance Innovators Unscripted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2021 30:27


Reuters Event Part 2: The world is always changing. It's the only constant. But with the accelerated change of the past 12 months, insurance carriers are racing to adapt to a world of new risks that many underwriters are struggling to keep up with. Carriers need to empower their underwriting organizations with new data andRead More

Fit As A Fiddle
Babywearing and Carriers

Fit As A Fiddle

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2021 36:49


From the beginning of human history, parents have held and worn their babies for various reasons. Adriane Stare, a NYC-Based Babywearing Expert, Postpartum Doula, Lactation Educator and Mom to two boys, joins us today to talk about babywearing. We discuss the unique implications of carrying babies particularly in the first few months of life. Adriane delves into the misconceptions that surround babywearing and touches on the societal influences that impact how families view the topic.After the birth of her first son, Adriane fell in love with babywearing - the most critical skill that she learned as a new parent. She founded Caribou Baby and Wild Was Mama in 2011, Brooklyn's wildly popular Natural Baby and Maternity shops and educational class spaces. For more than a decade, she's helped thousands of families find their confident, joyful groove in parenting by teaching them how to develop real skills and strategies, instead of just buying stuff and quick solutions. Her babywearing work and parenting approach has been featured widely on news and parenting platforms, including Good Morning America, The New York Times, Mother.ly and Crain's New York. Connect with her at www.adrianestare.com

Manufacturing Talk Radio
Finding the Hidden Carriers in a Tight Transportation Market

Manufacturing Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 22:57


Michael Nervick, Founder and CEO of Sleek Technologies (www.sleek-technologies.com) discusses how companies can reduce their transportation costs with software the reveals the small or independent carriers behind the scenes that the big lines use and ways to book transit while saving 18-20%. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Freight Broker TV
FBTV Podcast Xtra! ATA And Their Driver Shortage...

Freight Broker TV

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2021 41:25


It's An FBTV Podcast Extra... - ATA Says' Theres a Driver ShortageBob Costello, Chief Economist for the ATA delivered a presentation to the FMCSA Motor Carrier Safety Advisory Committee meeting last week touting the reasons for the driver shortage. The ATA say's there is a driver shortage, OOIDA says it's a hoax. This and more on this FBTV Podcast from TALTOA. https://taltoa.comhttps://freightbrokertv.com

Miracle Temple Deliverance Ministries Podcast

Carriers of Dead Weight

The Insurance Innovators Unscripted Podcast
EP 109 – Reuters Events Part 1: Accelerating Underwriting Transformation

The Insurance Innovators Unscripted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2021 36:11


Reuters Event Part 1: The world is always changing. It's the only constant. But with the accelerated change of the past 12 months, insurance carriers are racing to adapt to a world of new risks that many underwriters are struggling to keep up with. Carriers need to empower their underwriting organizations with new data andRead More

RTÉ - Morning Ireland
Belfast boxer one of two Irish flag carriers

RTÉ - Morning Ireland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 5:00


Brenda Irvine, mother of Irish Olympic boxer Brendan Irvine, on her son being chosen as a Team Ireland flag bearer for the opening ceremony in Tokyo

Coffee w/#The Freight Coach
#92 - Jared Ross

Coffee w/#The Freight Coach

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 37:27


Jared Ross is the Vice President of Business Development at eCarrierCheck.com. eCarrierCheck is a logistics technology platform. We offer carrier search tools & phone technology to brokers, shippers, and carriers across North America. Our software enables you to: -Find & select Carriers (even ones not on load boards) using a plethora of powerful search search filters. -Find & prospect new Customers & Shippers to work with. -Automatically Collect Rates in Real-Time using our Phone Technology …and much much more!

Holy Culture Radio
556: Gospel Gangstaz - Kingdom Building Conversations

Holy Culture Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2021 15:46


During my early Christian years, I (trig) was blessed to bump into The Cross Movement by way of my brother-in-law, O-Diggity, subsequently enjoying watching them finish Heaven's Mentality and then getting engrossed in the Philadelphia and East-Coast CHH scene which included the early days of folks such as D.A. Truth, Everyday Process, Swift (formerly known as R-Swift), B.E.R.I.D.O.X., Judah Priest, Japhia Life, Carriers of the Cross, Corey Red and Precise, and many more. The Gospel Gangstaz is the first West Coast-based group that I (Trig) heard. They made an impression from the very song that caught my ear. During this interview, they share how they got started, their perspective on ministry, their love for sharing Christ with young men and women, the power of the relationships across the CHH Pioneers. About the Gospel Gangstaz Gospel Gangstaz is a Greater Los Angeles Area-based West Coast Christian hip hop group. The group has featured members formerly affiliated with the Crips and Bloods gangs, Mr. Solo, Chilly Baby, DJ Dove, and Tik Tokk. The Gospel Gangstaz have teamed up with some of the biggest names in Gospel music including Kirk Franklin A-1 Swift CMC's and Mary Mary #CHH #ChristianRap #ChristianHipHop #ArtistInterview #KingdomBuildingConversation #gospelrap #christfocused #wisdomfromtheword #christianliving #christianrapandhiphop #gospelrap #chhpioneers #holyhiphop

Hosanna Mankato
Carriers Of Hope - Highland

Hosanna Mankato

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 19:28


Carriers Of Hope - Highland by Hosanna Lutheran Church - Mankato

Hosanna Mankato
Carriers Of Hope - Main

Hosanna Mankato

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 12:28


Carriers Of Hope - Main by Hosanna Lutheran Church - Mankato

Audiotree Live
Carriers on Audiotree Live

Audiotree Live

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 24:54


Carriers is a peaceful indie rock quartet fronted by former Pomegranates member Curt Kiser. Kiser's methodical approach to low key songwriting helps the band prioritize storytelling in their expansive sound. Check out the killer performance by Carriers live at Audiotree. Download & stream Carriers on Audiotree Live -- https://smarturl.it/AT-Carriers  Support the Artists: http://audiotree.bandcamp.com See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Inside the GENOME
Myriad Live - Let's talk rare hereditary genes with limited guidelines

Inside the GENOME

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 58:56


Myriad Oncology Live episodes are recordings of an open-forum webinar hosted by Dr. Thomas Slavin. The opinions and views expressed in this recording do not necessarily represent those of Myriad Genetics or its affiliates. To participate in a future recording, visit myriad-oncology.com/myriad-oncology-live for a list of dates, times, and subjects.Additional resources cited in this episode:Hu et al NEJM - A population based study of genes previously implicated in Breast Cancer 2021. https://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa2005936Palmer et al. JNCI paper - Contribution of Germline Predisposition Gene Mutations to Breast Cancer Risk in African American Women. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32427313/Antoniou et al NEJM - Breast caner risk in families with mutations in PALB2 2014. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25099575/Yang et al 2020 PALB2 paper Dr. Couch referenced  https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31841383/BCAC study - NEJM 2021 https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa1913948Narod editorial to these two papers - CARRIERS and BCAC. https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMe2035083?query=recirc_curatedRelated_articleBCAC Study paper titled: Breast Cancer Risk Genes - Association in More than 113,000 Women CARRIERS study is titled - A Population Based Study of Genes Previously Implicated in Breast Cancer

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth
How Marketers & Mobile Carriers Intersecting The Mobile Unlock Screen -- Adrian Velthuis // Mobile Posse

MarTech Podcast // Marketing + Technology = Business Growth

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 18, 2021 15:28


Today we're going to discuss how relationships with smartphone carriers are becoming more relevant for marketers. Joining us is Adrian Velthuis, Chief Revenue Officer at Mobile Posse, which is a platform that uses native device content discovery to turn telecom companies into mobile media leaders. In part 2 of our conversation, we're going to discuss how marketers and mobile carriers are intersecting the mobile unlock screen. Show NotesConnect With:Adrian Velthuis: Website // LinkedInThe MarTech Podcast: Email // LinkedIn // TwitterBenjamin Shapiro: Website // LinkedIn // TwitterSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Redeemed Girl Podcast
Episode 12 Carriers of Glory | Ephesians 2:19-21

Redeemed Girl Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 22:00


Land Line Now
Brokers, carriers try new tricks on truckers

Land Line Now

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 14, 2021 51:26


LLN (7/13/21) – Trucking always gives you problems to solve. Some can't get a new rate confirmation from their broker when a receiver turns them away, some have trouble getting their escrow back when they change carriers, and some wonder what their options are when a carrier hands them a 1099 when they should get a W-2. We'll offer some advice. Also, it's back to the drawing board in Missouri when it comes to towing reform. And the exclusion of truckers from the Fair Labor Standards Act is an old source of many industry challenges. We'll discuss that – plus what's causing some members of Congress to flip their votes on important bills. 0:00 – Newscast. 10:15 – Common trucking problems. 25:07 – Towing reform dead again in Missouri. 39:57 – Why can't truckers be paid by the hour?

Anchor Faith Church
Carriers - Kingdom Vessels

Anchor Faith Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 13, 2021 50:05


Oil is a prominent item and theme throughout scripture, symbolic of the Holy Spirit. Pastor Earl takes time to show some types and shadows of the account of Elisha and the widow with the container of oil in 2 Kings. We pray that you would be prompted to evaluate how you are committed to The Church, and what you're filling yourself up with. Stay Connected With Us Website: anchorfaith.com Anchor Faith Church Facebook: www.facebook.com/anchorfaith/ Anchor Faith Church Instagram: www.instagram.com/anchorfaith Pastor Earl Glisson Facebook: www.facebook.com/earlwglisson/ Pastor Earl Glisson Instagram: www.instagram.com/earlglisson/

The Other Side Of Potential
Episode 146: Keeping Family Values Alive In A Family-Owned Business with Bill Carriere

The Other Side Of Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 55:40


Today's guest is Bill Carriere of Carriere Family Farms in California. Bill is a fourth-generation farmer who grew up on the family farm in Glenn California, which is located in the Sacramento Valley. The family business is over 125 years old, with ten family members currently involved. Carriere Farm grows walnuts, almonds, rice, and oil olives. They also operate two walnut hauling and drying facilities, a custom farming operation, and a walnut processing plant, which processes and markets walnuts for 85 local growers, as well as their own. They also distribute around the world.Bill's background includes a degree from the University of California Davis. After earning a BS in agricultural economics, he returned to work on the family farm, working his way up from farm laborer to ranch manager, controller, and finally to president and CEO of the business. In this capacity, he's focused on growing and diversifying the family business.Bill is also a graduate of the California Agricultural Leadership Program, a Glenn County Planning Commissioner, a member of the California Walnut Board, and is the Secretary of the Enloe Hospital Board of Trustees. With all of that going on, he does have some time to enjoy hunting, golf, baseball, and spending time with his family. In this episode, we talk to Bill about the dynamics of family enterprises and how these are playing out between the different generations in the Carriere line as they steer the ship of the business together. Tune in to get it all!What you'll learn about in this episode:An introduction to the rich history of Bill's family and their connection to farming.How Carriere farms grew, involved other family members, and became vertically integrated.Why California is a good climate for growing walnuts and how big the US contribution is.How Bill has gotten through the many droughts in California and secured enough water for farming.The story behind how Bill ended up getting pulled into the family business.Discussing the dynamics of family enterprises and how these played out between the generations.Whether Bill feels pressure to succeed in the business and how he deals with this.How Bill is sharing the responsibility and involving his cousins in the business.Different strategies that were experimented with for how to run the business as a large family team.Events and functions that the family holds to get everybody together and continue the tradition.Whether the Carriers are a family who owns a business, or a business that benefits the family.What conversations the family is having around the next generation stepping into leadership roles.How Bill handles the trade-off between training family members elsewhere and the risk of them not coming back.Final words of wisdom from Bill for people who are scaling family businesses.Click to Download the Transcript