Podcasts about GTM

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  • 270PODCASTS
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  • Jan 17, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about GTM

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Latest podcast episodes about GTM

Go To Market Grit
Former President of NetApp, Tom Mendoza: Sustaining Urgency & Injecting Tension

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 80:51


Tom Mendoza, former President of Sales at NetApp, knows that there is a way to do business while bringing out the good in it. Tom has embedded this throughout his career and continues to make it a philosophical and practical focus. While Tom's incredible journey may speak for itself, we take a deeper look at his core leadership values, how it has inspired his generosity and resilience, and the impact it continues to have on others.In this episode, Tom discusses his humble beginnings in Long Island during the post-WWII era and the namesake for the Mendoza Business School and scholarship program. He expounds on important quotes that he still lives by, and why trust is critical when building a successful company. Tom also shares insight on his massive success at NetApp and how he grew the company from zero to a billion.In this episode, we cover:  Tom's childhood, beginning with his parent's journey to Long Island, NY after World War II, and his first job as an usher at a movie theater. (03:06) “Bring out the good in business”: Tom shares the touching story behind his Notre Dame scholarship program and the Mendoza Business School. (07:11) How the phrase, “catch someone doing something right” came about - and a deep dive into Tom's core leadership mantra. (14:53) A look back on the day Tom played a round of golf with Tiger Woods with Warren Buffett as his caddy. (27:01) NetApp–from zero to a billion: How Tom leveraged his passion for building companies to accelerate NetApp's outstanding revenue growth - and the effect of the dotcom bubble on NetApp and its impact on company culture. (32:38) Why Tom almost retired from NetApp before accepting the role as President - and how NetApp encourages employees to give back to the world. (47:46) Tom's perspective on customer trust and support, and why companies without a sustained sense of urgency fail. (56:43) How Tom combats complacency through injecting tension. (01:08:47) Links: Connect with Tom LinkedIn NetApp Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

Go To Market Grit
President, Global Strategic Customers at Salesforce, Jim Steele: Measuring Your Facetime

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 83:24


Jim Steele, President of Global Strategic Customers at Salesforce, is the man, the myth, and the legend who helped increase Salesforce's revenue from $22 million to over $5 billion. Working since he was 10 years old to support his family, Jim's drive and ambition are still just as strong today as he views new challenges and opportunities with a “beginner's mindset.” As Jim puts it, his 43-year career in sales is a series of stories–in this episode, he reflects on poignant moments that helped shape who he is as a leader in the industry. Jim offers anecdotes from his early days at IBM and paints a vivid picture of Wall Street in the ‘80s. Through his stories, Jim emphasizes an important theme—building authentic relationships—and explores the value of remembering people's names and faces. Jim also discusses the incredible growth of Salesforce, offers takeaways from his 12-year experience, and opens up about his return to the company. In this episode, we cover:  Chateau de Steele: the story behind Jim's Beaver Bar and his legendary open house. (01:49) How Jim became the first chief customer officer, ever - and he describes the lasting effect of his first job at 10 years old. (05:55) Jim's perspective on humility and sincerity - and what he says to people who are not motivated at their job. (10:24) “IBM was the boot camp of sales training”: A key takeaway from Jim's experience at IBM's sales school and how it set the stage for success on Wall Street. (15:16) Through the “three-martini lunches” story, Jim explores Wall Street in the '80s and the value of building trusted relationships. (23:05) Jim's insight on developing personal connections and the value of remembering names and faces. (29:40) A look at Jim's unconventional Salesforce interview experience - and why the Salesforce culture doesn't accept “armchair quarterbacks.” (39:54) Jim reflects on the positive impact of his sabbatical and how COVID-19 gave him a new perspective on work/life balance. (50:14) A conversation about Jim's LVI methodology (listen, validate, and inspire), cultivating genuine relationships, and active listening as a seller. (55:12) Jim's perspective on empowering salespeople - and why Salesforce's unique offering has everything to do with its customers. (01:07:04) What led Jim back to Salesforce, why he loves what he does, and what's next. (01:16:01) Links: Connect with Jim LinkedIn Salesforce Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

Coffee, Collaboration, and Enablement
Greg Kotovos shares his on Kwanzoo and being a small business CRO

Coffee, Collaboration, and Enablement

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 27:31


Greg Kotovos is the Chief Revenue Officer at Kwanzoo.  Greg joined The Collaborator to discuss his journey to CRO and his work in providing insights on building an open go-to-market platform.Greg shared great insights, including:Insights on Kwanzoo and why he joined the team.Kwanzoo is a smaller ABM platform that aligns all phases of the go-to-market motion across marketing, sales, and customer success.His rationale for leading GTM operations from a Customer Success first perspective.There is a lot of gold in here for small-to-mid-size business CROs, give a listen.Support the show (https://join.slack.com/t/trustenablement/shared_invite/zt-zqacvwmv-UCiO74qbmAKJ0n7hoykYFQ)

Stories of Selling Human
How Sales Helped A Pilot, A Shakespeare Actor, and SAAS CEO - AJ Bruno, Quota Path

Stories of Selling Human

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 45:11


Summary: AJ Bruno is an entrepreneur and SAAS startup founder with a blend of sales, business development, and leadership skills. He's founded two companies. He's built, and run the GTM methodology for sales, lead gen, and account management teams. His first company he took from 0-$25 million ARR. His second company company he co-founded is QuotaPath - SaaS sales company whose vision is to create a work where sales people and revenue teams ditch spreadsheets and have a much stronger visibility into commissions, quota, and their goals . AJ is also a father of three girls, commercial multi-engine pilot, and owner of a Beechcraft Baron 58. In this episode we talk about how a guy went from Shakespeare plays, to a call center, to founding his own company. How his approach to sales was a common thread throughout all these roles. Key moments: 07:47 - The importance of clarity and emotion in communication 12:00 - Learn sales through resilience. Setting goals and expectations. 18:30 - Choosing the right company to support you in your sales career 25:40 - AJ's approach to planning the future and living a fulfilled life Connect with AJ https://www.linkedin.com/in/ajbruno3/ (LinkedIN) Connect with Us! https://www.linkedin.com/company/53108426/admin/ (LinkedIN: ) https://stories-of-selling-human.captivate.fm/ (Website: )

The ABM Conversations Podcast - for B2B marketing professionals
How to leverage team-selling and improve customer retention: Kris Rudeegraap

The ABM Conversations Podcast - for B2B marketing professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 27:33


In this episode, Kris Rudeegraap, the co-founder and CEO of Sendoso, shares his insights on two super interesting connected topics – team selling and customer retention. He talks about: --> What is a go-to-market (GTM) fit, and why does Sendoso prioritize GTM fit over product-market fit? --> What is team selling? How it works, and what's the infrastructure needed for it? --> Can startups and SMBs practice team selling? --> 3 major changes that Sendoso made over the years to improve customer retention (their net dollar retention is 120%) --> Sendoso's customer success team structure, and specifically the role of CX Ops in customer success --> What's the right time to expand the customer success team into specific roles and a lot more...

Go To Market Grit
CMO Attentive, Sara Varni: Cold Beer and Cheeseburgers

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 68:45


B2B marketing powerhouse, Sara Varni joins this episode on her final day at Twilio to discuss her journey and what lies ahead as she steps into her new role as Chief Marketing Officer at Attentive. Sara demonstrates a stellar track record of marketing know-how and creativity and has a refreshing take on the ever-changing marketing landscape.In this episode, Sara shares insight on what it means to speak to your audience and uses an example from her Twitter to show how products can market themselves. She reflects on her time at Salesforce and Twilio, discusses why it's important for marketers to recharge, and explores how her disciplined mindset contributes to her success. Sara and Joubin also discuss their shared love of bowling and Sara shares her thoughts on joining Attentive at the beginning of its next phase of growth.In this episode, we cover: “The full slice of life at the bowling alley”: Sara and Joubin connect over their love for bowling. (04:26) How Sara learned from her father's disciplined mentality - and what it means to create a home for her children. (07:17) Sara follows up on her tweet about product marketing - and she shares why her 10 years at Salesforce was “the best marketing training.” (15:14) A look back at the marketing structural changes at Salesforce and Sara's role as CMO - and a conversation about writing memorable copy and earning “the right to speak to your audience.” (26:14) Sara's insight on why managers play a key role in cultivating a motivated team - and her take on the balancing act of working remotely. (35:39) Why it's important for marketers to recharge and how that mindset led Sara from Salesforce to Twilio. (39:53) Twilio's aggressive customer-centric values and go-to-market approach - how Sara navigated her son's autism diagnosis during that stressful time of her career and what gives her peace of mind. (48:31) Advice Sara received from her career coach and the benefits of a consistent feedback loop for people at any stage in their career. (56:16) Reflecting on Sara's last day at Twilio and why she loves being a CMO. (01:02:49) Links: Connect with Sara LinkedIn Twitter Attentive Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

M&A Science
140. Making M&A GTM Successful

M&A Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 46:54


Creating a go-to-market plan is one of the first things to do during an acquisition. In this interview, Gwen Pope, Head of Global Product M&A at eBay, will be sharing how to make M&A GTM successful.  Listen in and learn about: - The importance of getting your house in order - How to pressure test your deal rationale - Steps to building your GTM plan To join our network of M&A practitioners and sign up for our newsletter, go to mascience.com.

Ev Oputa
EP 15. Go-To-Market Strategy (GTM)

Ev Oputa

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 8:52


In this episode, I briefly talk about Go-To-Market Strategy. The Go-to-Market Strategy (GTM) is a marketing strategy that helps you understand what your customers want and how to reach them. GTM requires an understanding of the customer's needs, market conditions, competitive environment, company objectives and resources. Three basic steps in developing a successful GTM: Understand Your Customers Research Your Market Create A Marketing Plan The GTM is important for any business. It's about how you plan and execute your marketing, sales, and customer service strategies. This video covers all the basics that are necessary for developing your own GTM! Connect with me on LinkedIn Subscribe to my Youtube Channel Subscribe to my Podcast Subscribe to my Blog --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/ev-oputa/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/ev-oputa/support

Go To Market Grit
CRO Nextdoor, Heidi Andersen: Nurturing an Elastic Mind

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 73:03


Many people run from uncomfortable situations. Heidi Andersen, CRO at Nextdoor, isn't like most, as she embraces new challenges and makes mental toughness a centrality to her approach. From the very beginning of her story, Heidi has been rooted in hard work and the personal gratification of earning her success. Known as a corporate athlete, Heidi stands out from the pack and proudly holds the torch for women in tech.In this episode, Heidi shares her perspective on leaving Denmark to join Google in California and we explore the fundamental beliefs she inherited from her family before she embarked on that journey. Heidi also shares insight on the fascinating role Nextdoor plays in building supportive communities in neighborhoods across the globe, why she loves to inspire others, her previous side hustle as an Equinox instructor, and more.In this episode, we cover:  The greatest gift Heidi's parents have given her. (02:53) How Heidi navigated her transition from Denmark to Google's Silicon Valley - and why she calls herself “half introvert, half extrovert.” (06:11) Heidi reflects on her time as an Equinox fitness instructor - and a deep dive on the impact that exercise can have on one's sense of belonging. (11:15) Why Heidi prioritizes pursuing what brings her joy - and her perspective on taking on uncomfortable challenges to build mental toughness. (20:59) Heidi's views on her position as a leading woman in the industry and why she focuses on helping women move into successful careers. (27:51) From LinkedIn to Nextdoor: The criteria that Heidi used to evaluate her new opportunity - and an overview of Nextdoor. (35:40) Heidi shares her perspective on Nextdoor going public and how she approaches this new milestone - and a look at how Nextdoor aims to connect neighbors through acts of kindness. (45:13) A discussion about Nextdoor's monetization and growth strategy - and more on Nextdoor's impact on communities. (54:40) Heidi shares insight on her recruiting superpowers. (01:03:50) Links: Connect with Heidi LinkedIn Email: heidi@nextdoor.com Building Mental Toughness for Higher Levels of Performance Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

Podcast Noviembre Nocturno
Katana Zero: Your own personal Hell

Podcast Noviembre Nocturno

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 51:46


Esta historia, es fruto de la alianza entre la revista GTM y noviembre nocturno. Si quieres formar parte de nuestro culto primigenio suscribete a GTM a traves de su web: gamestribune.com o en nuestro podcast de Ivoox. En un futuro no tan lejano el gobierno de la poderosa ciudad de New Mecca desarrollará en secreto el proyecto NULL, una serie de experimentos destinados a la producción de supersoldados destinados a decantar la balanza de la Guerra Cromag. Cientos de sujetos serían entrenados desde niños mediante el uso de una nueva droga experimental. Muy pocos conocen con detalle la naturaleza verdadera de sus efectos... La sustancia sería bautizada como Chronos. Un relato del maestro Antonio Sancho Villar para la revista GTM y Noviembre Nocturno. Ninjas, #Cyberpunk, drogas y cintas de vídeo. Podéis seguir a Antonio en su Instagram: @antoniosanchov Art by #XiangyongWan Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

Recomendados de la semana en iVoox.com Semana del 5 al 11 de julio del 2021

Esta historia, es fruto de la alianza entre la revista GTM y noviembre nocturno. Si quieres formar parte de nuestro culto primigenio suscribete a GTM a traves de su web: gamestribune.com o en nuestro podcast de Ivoox. En un futuro no tan lejano el gobierno de la poderosa ciudad de New Mecca desarrollará en secreto el proyecto NULL, una serie de experimentos destinados a la producción de supersoldados destinados a decantar la balanza de la Guerra Cromag. Cientos de sujetos serían entrenados desde niños mediante el uso de una nueva droga experimental. Muy pocos conocen con detalle la naturaleza verdadera de sus efectos... La sustancia sería bautizada como Chronos. Un relato del maestro Antonio Sancho Villar para la revista GTM y Noviembre Nocturno. Ninjas, #Cyberpunk, drogas y cintas de vídeo. Podéis seguir a Antonio en su Instagram: @antoniosanchov Art by #XiangyongWan

Motorsport – meinsportpodcast.de
Der große Rundumschlag vor dem Fest

Motorsport – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 33:59


Die letzte Ausgabe des Jahres 2021 ist vor gepackt mit dem neusten der Silly Season. Mit im Gepäck die erste Fahreranküdigung von Porsche und Penske zum  LMDH Programm und erste Teaserbilder  zum Prototypen. Die IMSA Meisterschaft ist ein großes Thema bei uns in dieser Folge mit Bekanntgaben zum Programm 2022 und noch vielem mehr aus der Langstreckenmeisterschaft aus den USA. Aus deutscher Sicht sind die News von der ADAC GT Masters und der DTM sehr erfreulich gewesen. Die ADAC GT Masters wird Stand jetzt mit 30 Fahrzeugen die kommende Saison bestreiten, während das KÜS Team Bernhard sich in Richtung DTM orientiert hat und mit Thomas Preining das Programm bestreiten wird. Wir sagen Danke! An alle die diesen Podcast in diesem Jahr begleitet haben als Zuhörer*in, als Gäste oder als Interview Partner bedanken wir uns an dieser Stelle sehr herzlich und bedanken uns für eure Treue! Voting GT Talk Awards  +++ Werbung +++ Der GT Talk auf meinsportpodcast.de wird dir präsentiert von Virtual Racing School. Alle Informationen zu Hardware und zu 1:1 Coaching unter  virtualracingschool.com/ Folgt diesem Podcast auf Spotify, Audio Now oder in deiner Podcast-App der Wahl. +++Social Media+++ Linktree Facebook  Twitter  Instagram  Moderation: Luca Storms  

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh
Best of Changing Channels 2021

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 31:52


Changing Channels host Larry Walsh recounts the highlights of 2021's 26 episodes with some of our top guests and industry luminaries. Many people in the world would say that 2021 is not a year they'd want to repeat, given the ongoing pandemic, inflation, and supply-chain disruptions. Suffice it to say that the world is hardly back to normal. But the channel perseveres. In 2021, Changing Channels invited some of the top channel executives and thought leaders to share their experiences and insights on a variety of strategic and operational topics. Over the course of 26 episodes, our guests spoke about enabling fluid workforces, pricing strategies and methodologies, cloud adoption trends, partner enablement, management strategies, international expansion, and much more. Picking our favorite moments from more than 14 hours of conversations wasn't easy, but we did manage to select some memorable highlights, including these: Lori Cornmesser, vice president of worldwide channel sales at CyCognito, on becoming a channel chief again (time mark: 2:06) Christian Alvarez, senior vice president of worldwide channel sales at Nutanix, on building respected key performance indicators (time mark: 5:40) Frank Rauch, head of worldwide channel sales at Check Point Software Technologies, on gaining executive support for channel programs (time mark: 8:20) Joe Sykora, senior vice president of worldwide channel and partner sales at Proofpoint, on the changing dynamics of partner incentives (time mark: 11:34) Alyssa Fitzpatrick, general manager of worldwide partner sales at Microsoft, on the vendor's co-selling strategies (time mark: 13:45) Renee Bergeron, senior vice president and general manager at AppSmart, on enabling partners to sell through marketplaces (time mark: 16:37) Bill Cate, vice president of marketing and channels at Zebra Technologies, on leveraging the influence of non-transacting partners (time mark: 19:04) Mary Beth Walker, head of global channel strategy at HP, on incorporating sustainability as a value proposition in go-to-market strategies and channel programs (time mark: 20:42) Denzil Samuels, vice president of the global CX Partner Practice at Cisco, on making customer experience a core outcome of channel-delivered services (time mark: 24:25) Follow us, Like us, and Subscribe! Channelnomics: https://channelnomics.com/  LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2NC6Vli  Twitter: https://twitter.com/Channelnomics    Changing Channels Is a Channelnomics Production Follow @Channelnomics to stay current on the latest #research, #bestpractices, and #resources. At @Channelnomics – the voice of thought leadership – we define #channel trends, chart new #GTM strategies, and #partner with industry leaders to champion #diversity in the channel.     Episode Resources Host, Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa   Guests Lori Cornmesser: https://www.linkedin.com/in/loricornmesser/ Christian Alvarez: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christianaalvarez/ Frank Rauch: https://www.linkedin.com/in/frankrauch/ Joe Sykora: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joesykora/ Alyssa Fitzpatrick: https://www.linkedin.com/in/alysfitz/ Renee Bergeron: https://www.linkedin.com/in/reneebergeron/ Bill Cate: https://www.linkedin.com/in/billcate/ Mary Beth Walker: https://www.linkedin.com/in/mary-beth-walker-a276b2184/ Denzil Samuels: https://www.linkedin.com/in/denzilsamuels/   Credits Production: Changing Channels is produced by Modern Podcasting. For virtual content capture and video-first podcasts, check out http://www.modpodstudio.com. Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa Voice-Over: Denise Quan

The Official SaaStr Podcast: SaaS | Founders | Investors
SaaStr 509: Adding Outbound Sales & Marketing to the Product-Led Growth Engine with CMOs of Freshworks, Twilio, 1Password, and Coda

The Official SaaStr Podcast: SaaS | Founders | Investors

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 27:15


Many start-ups today start with an amazing Product Led Growth (PLG) engine that hasn't required an outbound sales and marketing motion. As amazing as this is, if your company wants to move into the mid-market or enterprise business, you're going to have to build and hire a Sales team, and expand the capabilities of your Marketing function. How can you add this GTM motion effectively, without cannibalizing your existing business? How do you balance the two for the right target markets and audiences? Product-market fit, pricing, packaging, messaging, strategic investments, culture, evangelism all play a critical part and will change as soon as you add this team. Hear from the CMOs of top tech companies on they helped Freshworks, Twilio, Salesforce, 1Password, Atlassian, Litmus, CircleCi, Coda and many others have faced this challenge and led their companies through this successful transition. Stacey Epstein, CMO @ Freshworks Sara Varni Bright, CMO @ Twilio Carilu Dietrich, Fractional CMO @ 1Password Viviana Faga, General Partner @ Coda  

Alexander Group's Revenue Growth Model Podcast
Business Services - Episode 4: Go-to-Market Trends and Mandates Sales Compensation

Alexander Group's Revenue Growth Model Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 11:20


Business Services is facing growing pressure to evolve. Acceleration of technology, digital platforms, new competitors and offerings, acquisitions and revenue models are causing an identity crisis. In this podcast episode, hear from Dave Eddleman discusses how the growth phase of your organization impacts sales compensation design and the importance of ensuring that GTM elements are in place and stable before jumping to motivate sales through compensation.

Go To Market Grit
CMO Rippling, Matt Epstein: Building the Supermarket of SaaS

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 67:00


Sometimes social media works and sometimes it doesn't. For Matt Epstein, Chief Marketing Officer at Rippling, it is a little bit of both. In 2011, Matt went viral after uploading a Youtube video detailing why Google should hire him. It was also accompanied by a propeller plane with his URL attached, flying over the Google campus. Apparently, Google was not impressed, however, this bold decision ultimately worked in his favor. The video attracted many companies, which eventually led to the beginning of a fast-paced and fulfilling marketing career.In this episode, Matt discusses his unconventional way of attracting Google's attention and what it was like to pass on other companies in lieu. He talks about how his brashness, which as he puts it, is just a “chip on his shoulder”, attracted the attention of Rippling founder, Parker Conrad. Now, he is along for the ride as he surrounds himself with other like-minded “crazy ones.” Matt also shares his take on why generalists and marketing ops should be “first hires” in SMB and SaaS, and how when you've got something to prove in that space it only increases your ambition. In this episode, we cover:  How Matt's plea to work for Google went viral - and why he hates social media. (01:48) Matt's professional evolution from SigFig to employee #1 at Zenefits and his role in garnering the first customers. (08:04) Why Matt recommends generalists and marketing ops as the first hires in the SMB SaaS space - and a deep dive into how a “chip on your shoulder” and insecurity are powerful motivators for success. (17:00) Matt's decision-making process from applying to Google to passing up on job offers from major tech companies - and Matt reflects on lessons learned at Zenefits. (24:16) How Rippling founder, Parker Conrad, convinced Matt to join the company - and Matt explores the next phase of Rippling's app ecosystem. (34:26) Matt's thoughts on Rippling's recent product launch, marketing their catalog of products, and the challenges of scaling up at a startup. (44:32) A discussion about coping with pressure, why Matt looks for “the crazy ones” when hiring, and why he has no interest in being a founder. (53:26) Links: Connect with Matt LinkedIn Email: mepstein@rippling.com Rippling Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

Screaming in the Cloud
MongoDB's Purposeful Application Data Platform with Sahir Azam

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 35:01


About SahirSahir is responsible for product strategy across the MongoDB portfolio. He joined MongoDB in 2016 as SVP, Cloud Products & GTM to lead MongoDB's cloud products and go-to-market strategy ahead of the launch of Atlas and helped grow the cloud business from zero to over $150 million annually. Sahir joined MongoDB from Sumo Logic, an SaaS machine-data analytics company, where he managed platform, pricing, packaging and technology partnerships. Before Sumo Logic, Sahir was the Director of Cloud Management Strategy & Evangelism at VMware, where he launched VMware's first organically developed SaaS management product and helped grow the management tools business to over $1B in revenue. Earlier in his career, Sahir held a variety of technical and sales-focused roles at DynamicOps, BMC Software, and BladeLogic.Links:MongoDB: https://www.mongodb.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. Set up a meeting with a Redis expert during re:Invent, and you'll not only learn how you can become a Redis hero, but also have a chance to win some fun and exciting prizes. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous nonsense.  Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access to anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers! Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor. List and see all SSH servers, kubernetes clusters or databases available to you. Get instant access to them all using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open source and a pleasure to use.Download Teleport at https://goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com. Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. For the first in-person recording in ages we have a promoted guest joining us from MongoDB. Sahir Azam is the chief product officer. Thank you so much for joining me.Sahir: Thank you for having me, Corey. It's really exciting to be able to talk and actually meet in person.Corey: I know it feels a little scandalous these days, when we're in a position of meeting people in person, like you're almost like you're doing something wrong somehow. So, MongoDB has been a staple of the internet for a long time. It's oh good; another database to keep track of. What do you do these days? What is MongoDB in this ecosystem?Sahir: That's a great question. I think we're fortunate that MongoDB has been very popular for a very long time. We're seeing, you know, massive adoption grow across the globe and the massive developer community is sort of adopting the technology. What I would bring across is today MongoDB is really one of the leading cloud database companies in the world. The majority of the company's business comes from our cloud service; we partner very heavily with AWS and other cloud providers on making sure we have global availability of that. That's our flagship product.And we've invested really heavily in the last I would say, five or six years, and really extending the capabilities of the product to not just be the, sort of, database for modern web scale applications, but also to be able to handle mission-critical use cases across every vertical, you know, enterprises to startups, and doing so in a way that really empowers a general purpose strategy for any app they want to build.Corey: You're talking about general purpose which, I guess, leads to the obvious question that AWS has been pushing for a while, the idea of purpose-built databases, which makes sense from a certain point of view, and then they, of course, take that way beyond the bounds of normalcy. I don't know what the job is for someone whose role is to disambiguate between the 20 different databases that they offer by, who knows, probably the end of this year. And I don't know what that looks like. What's your take on that whole idea of a different database for every problem slash every customer slash every employee slash API request.Sahir: What we see is customers clearly moved to the cloud because they want to be able to move faster, innovate faster, be more competitive in whatever market or business or organization they're in. And certainly, I think the days of a single vendor database to rule all use cases are gone. We're not [laugh] by any means supportive of that. However, the idea that you would have 15 different databases that need to be rationalized, integrated, scripted together, frankly, may be interesting for technical teams who want to cobble together, you know, a bespoke architecture. But when we look at it from, sort of a skills, repeatability, cost, simplicity, perspective of architecture, we're seeing these, sort of like, almost like Rube Goldbergian sort of architectures.And in a large organization that wants to adopt the cloud en mass, the idea of every development team coming up with their own architecture and spending all of that time and duplication and integration of work is a distraction from ultimately their core mission, which is driving more capability and differentiation in the application for their end customer. So, to be blunt, we actually think the idea of having 15 different databases, ‘the right tool for the job' is the wrong approach. We think that there's certain key technologies that most organizations will use for 70, 80% of use cases, and then use the niche technologies for where they really need specialized solutions for particular needs.Corey: So, if you're starting off with a general-purpose database then, what is the divergence point at which point—like in my case, eventually I have to admit that using TXT records in Route 53 as a database starts to fall down for certain use cases. Not many, mind you, but one or two here and there. At what point when you're sticking with a general-purpose database does migrating to something else—what's the tipping point there?Sahir: Yeah, I think what we see is if you have a general-purpose database that hits the majority of your needs, oftentimes, especially with a microservices kind of modern architecture, it's not necessarily replacing your general-purpose database with a completely different solution, it may be augmenting it. So, you may have a particular need for, I don't know deep graph capabilities, for example, for a particular traversal use case. Maybe you augment that with a specialized solution for that. But the idea is that there's a certain set of velocity you can enable an organization by building skill set and consolidation around a technology provider that gives much more repeatability, security, less data duplication, and ultimately focuses your organization in teams on innovation as opposed to plumbing and that's where the 15 different databases been cobbled together may be interesting, but it's not really focusing on innovation, it's focusing more on the technology problems that you solved.Corey: So, we're recording this on site in Las Vegas, as re:Invent, thankfully and finally, draws to a close. How was your conference?Sahir: It's been fantastic. And to be clear, we are huge fans and partners of AWS. This is one of our most exciting conferences we sponsor. We go big, [laugh] we throw a party, we have a huge presence, we have hundreds of customer meetings. So, although I'm a little ragged, as you can probably tell from my voice from many meetings and conversations and drinks with friends, it's actually been a really great week.Corey: It is one of those things where having taken a year off, you forget so much of it, where it's, “Oh, I can definitely walk between those two hotels,” and then you sort of curse the name of God as you wind up going down that path. It was a relief, honestly, to not see, for example, another managed database service being launched that I can recall in that flurry of announcements, did you catch any?Sahir: I didn't catch any new particular database services that at least caught my eye. Granted, I've been in meetings most of the time, however, we're really excited about a lot of the infrastructure innovation. You know, I just happened to have a meeting with the compute teams on the Amazon side and what they're doing with, you know, Wavelength, and Local Zones, and new hardware, and chips with Graviton, it's all stuff we're really excited about. So, it is always interesting to see the innovation coming out of AWS.Corey: You mentioned that you are a partner with AWS, and I get it, but AWS is also one of those companies whose product strategy is ‘yes.' And they a couple years ago launched their DocumentDB, in parentheses with MongoDB compatibility, which they say, “Oh, customers were demanding this,” but no, no, they weren't. I've been talking to customers; what they wanted was actual MongoDB. The couple of folks I'm talking to who are using it are using it for one reason and one reason only, and that is replication traffic between AZs on native AWS services is free; everyone else must pay. So, there's some sub-offering in many respects that is largely MongoDB compatible to a point. Okay, but… how do you wind up, I guess, addressing the idea of continuing to partner with a company that is also heavily advantaging its own first party services, even when those are not the thing that best serves customers.Sahir: Yeah, I've been in technology for a while, and you know, the idea of working with major platform players in the context of being, in our case, a customer, a partner, and a competitor is something we're more than comfortable with, you know, and any organization at our scale and size is navigating those same dynamics. And I think on the outside, it's very easy to pay way more attention to the competitive dynamics of oh, you run in AWS but you compete with them, but the reality is, honestly, there's a lot more collaboration, both on the engineering side but also in the field. Like, we go jointly work with customers, getting them onto our platform, way more often than I think the world sees. And that's a really positive relationship. And we value that and we're investing heavily on our side to make sure you know, we're good partners in that sense.The nuances of DocumentDB versus the real MongoDB, the reality of the situation is yes, if you want the minimal MongoDB experience for, you know, a narrow percentage of our functionality, you can get that from that technology, but that's not really what customers want. Customers choose MongoDB for the breadth of capabilities that we have, and in particular, in the last few years, it's not just the NoSQL query capability of Mongo, we've integrated rich aggregation capabilities for analytics, transactional guarantees, a globally distributed architecture that scales horizontally and across regions much further than anything a relational architecture can accomplish. And we've integrated other domains of data, so things like full text, search, analytics, mobile synchronization are all baked into our Atlas platform. So, to be honest, when customers compare the two on the merits of the technology, we're more than happy to be competitors with AWS.Corey: No, I think that everyone competes with AWS, including its own product teams amongst each other because, you know, that's how you, I guess, innovate more rapidly. What do I know? I don't run a hyperscale platform. Thankfully.If I go and pull up your website, it's mongodb.com. It is natural for me to assume that you make a database, but then I start reading; after the big text and the logo, it says that you are an application data platform. Tell me more about that.Sahir: Yeah, and this has been a relatively new area of focus for us over the last couple of years. You know, I think many people know MongoDB as a non-relational modern database. Clearly, that's our core product. I think in general, we have a lot of capabilities in the database that many customers are unaware of in terms of transactional guarantees and schema management and others, so that's kind of all within the core database. But over the last few years, we've both built and acquired technology, things like Realm, that allows for mobile synchronization; event-driven architectures; APIs to be created on your data Easily; Atlas data lake, which allows for data transformation and analytics to be done using the same API as the core Mongo database; as I mentioned a couple minutes ago, things like search, where we actually allow customers to remove the need for a separate search engine for their application and make it really seamless operationally, and from the developer experience standpoint.And you know, there's no real term in the industry for that, so we kind of describe ourselves as an application data platform because really, what we're trying to do is simplify the data architecture for applications, so you don't need ten different niche database technologies to be able to build a powerful, modern, scalable application; you can build it in a unified way with an amazing developer experience that allows your teams to focus on differentiation and competitiveness as opposed to plumbing together the data infrastructure.Corey: So, when I hear platform, I think about a number of different things that may or may not be accurate, but the first thing that I think is, “Oh. There's code running on this then, as sort of part of an ecosystem.” Effectively is their code running on the data platform that you built today that wasn't written by people at MongoDB?Sahir: Yes, but it's typically the customer's code as part of their application. So, you know, I'll give you a couple of simple examples. We provide SDKs to be able to build web and mobile applications. We handle the synchronization of data from the client and front end of an application back to the back end seamlessly through our Realm platform. So, we're certainly, in that case, operating some of the business logic, or extending beyond sort of just the back end data.Similarly, a lot of what we focus on is modern event-driven architectures with MongoDB. So, to make it easier to create reactive applications, trigger off of changes in your data, we built functions and triggers natively in the platform. Now, we're not trying to be a full-on application hosting platform; that's not our business, our business is a data platform, but we really invest in making sure that platform is open, accessible, provides APIs, and functional capabilities make it very easy to integrate into any application our customers want to build.Corey: It seems like a lot of different companies now are trying to, for lack of a better term, get some of the love that Snowflake has been getting for, “Oh, their data cloud is great.” But when you take a step back and talk to people about, “So, what do you think about Mongo?” The invariable response you're going to get every time is, “Oh, you mean the database?” Like, “No, no. The character from the Princess Bride. Yes, the database.” How do you view that?Sahir: Yeah, it's easy to look at all the data landscape through a simple lens, but the reality is, there's many sub markets within the database and data market overall. And for MongoDB we're, frankly, an operational data company. And we're not focused on data warehousing, although you can use MongoDB for various analytical capabilities. We're focused on helping organizations build amazing software, and leveraging data as an enabler for great customer experiences, for digital transformation initiatives, for solving healthcare problems, or [unintelligible 00:12:51] problems in the government, or whatever it might be. We're not really focused on selling customers'—or platforms of data from—not the customers' data, but other—allowing people to monetize their data. We're focused on their applications and developers building those experiences.Corey: Yeah. So, you're if you were selling customers' data, you just rebrand as FacebookDB and be done with it, or MetaDB now—Sahir: MetaDB?Corey: Yeah. As far as the general Zeitgeist around Mongo goes, back when I was first hearing about it, in I don't know, I want to say the first half of the 2010s, the running gag was, “Oh, Mongo. It's Snapchat for databases,” with the gag being that it lost production data was unsafe for a bunch of things. To be clear, based upon my Route 53 comments, I am not a database expert by any stretch of the imagination. Now, the most common thing in my experience that loses production data is me being allowed near it. But what was the story? What gave rise to that narrative?Sahir: Yeah, I think that—thank you for bringing that up. I mean, to be clear, you know, if a database doesn't keep your data safe, consistent, and guaranteed, the rest of the functionality doesn't matter, and we take that extremely seriously at MongoDB. Now, you know, MongoDB, has been around a long time, and for better or worse—I think there's, frankly, good things and bad things about this—the database exploded in popularity extremely fast, partially because it was so easy to use for developers and it was also very different than the traditional relational database models. And so I think in many ways, customer's expectation of where the technology was compared to where we were from a maturity standpoint, combined with running an operating it the same way as a traditional system, which was, frankly, wrong for a distributed database caused, unfortunately, some situations where customers stubbed their toes and, you know, we weren't able to get to them and help them as easily as we could. Thankfully, you know, none of those issues fundamentally are, like, foundational problems. You know, we've matured the product for many, many years, you know, we work with 30,000-plus customers worldwide on mission-critical applications. I just want to make sure that everyone understands that, like, we take any issue that has to do with data loss or data corruption, as sort of the foundational [P zero 00:14:56] problem we always have to solve.Corey: I tend to form a lot of my opinions based upon very little on what, you know, sorry to say it, execs say and a lot more about what I see. There was a whole buzz going around on Twitter that HSBC was moving a whole bunch of its databases over to Mongo. And everyone was saying, “Oh, they're going to lose all their data.” But I've done work with a fair number of financial services companies, and of all the people I talk to, they're pretty far on one end of that spectrum of, “How cool are we with losing data?” So, voting with a testimonial and a wallet like that—because let's be clear, getting financial services companies to reference anything for anyone anywhere is like pulling teeth—that says a lot more than any, I guess, PR talking points could.Sahir: Yeah, I appreciate you saying that. I mean, we're very fortunate to have a very broad customer base, everything from the world's largest gaming companies to the world's largest established banks, the world's most fastest growing fintechs, to health care organizations distributing vaccines with technologies built on Mongo. Like, you name it, there's a use case in any vertical, as mission critical as you can think, built on our technology. So, customers absolutely don't take our word for granted. [laugh]. They go, you know, get comfortable with a new database technology over a span of years, but we've really hit sort of mainstream adoption for the majority of organizations. You mentioned financial services, but it's really any vertical globally, you know, we can count on our customer list.Corey: How do you, I guess, for lack of a better term, monetize what it is you do when you're one of the open-source—and yes, if you're an open-source zealot who wants to complain about licensing, it's imperative that you do not email me—but you are available for free—for certain definitions of free; I know, I know—that I can get started with a two o'clock in the morning and start running it myself in my environment. What is the tipping point that causes people to say, “Well, that was a good run. Now, I'm going to pay you folks to run it for me.”Sahir: Yeah, so there's two different sides to that, first and foremost, the majority of our engineering investment for our business goes in our core database, and our core database is free. And the way we actually, you know, survive and make money as a business, so we can keep innovating, you know, on top of the billion dollars of investment we've put in our technology over the years is, for customers who are self-managing in their own data center, we provide a set of management tools, enterprise security integrations, and others that are commercially licensed to be able to manage MongoDB for mission-critical applications in production, that's a product called Enterprise Advanced. It's typically used for large enterprise accounts in their own data centers. The flagship product for the company these days, the fastest growing part of the business is a product we call Atlas—or platform we call Atlas. That's a cloud data service.So, you know, you can go onto our website, sign up with our free tier, swipe a credit card, all consumption-based, available in every AWS region, as well as Azure and GCP, has the ability to run databases across AWS, Azure, and GCP, which is quite unique to us. And that, like any cloud data technology, is then used in conjunction with a bunch of other application components in the cloud, and customers pay us for the consumption of that database and how much they use.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I want to zero in a little bit on something you just said, where you can have data shared between all three of the primary hyperscalers. That sounds like a story that people like to tell a lot, but you would know far better than I: how common is that use case?Sahir: It's definitely one from a strategic standpoint, especially in large enterprises, that's really important. Now, to your point, the actual usage of cross-cloud databases is still very early, but the fact that customers know that we can go, in three minutes, spin up a database cluster that allows them to either migrate, or span data across multiple regions from multiple providers for high availability, or extend their data to another cloud for analytics purposes or whatnot, is something that it almost is like science fiction to them, but it's crucial as a capability I know they will need in the future.Now, to our surprise, we've seen more real production adoption of it probably sooner than we would have expected, and there's kind of three key use cases that come into play. One—you know, for example, I was with a challenger bank from Latin America yesterday; they need high availability in Latin America. In the countries they're in, no single infrastructure cloud provider has multiple regions. They need to span across multiple regions. They mix and match cloud providers, in their case AWS being their primary, and they have a secondary cloud provider, in their case GCP, for high availability.But it's also regulatorily-driven because the banking SEC regulations in that country state that they need to be able to show portability because they don't want concentration risk of their banking sector to be on a single cloud provider or single cloud provider's region. So, we see that in multiple countries happening right now. That's one use case.The other tends to be geographic reach. So, we work with a very large international gaming company, majority of their use cases happen to be run out of the US. They happen to have a spike of customers using their game [unintelligible 00:19:58] gamers using it in Taiwan; their cloud provider of choice didn't have a region in Taiwan, but they were able to seamlessly extend a replica into a different cloud to serve low-latency performance in that country. That's the second.And then the third, which is a little bit more emerging is kind of the analytic-style use case where you may have your operational data running in a particular cloud provider, but you want to leverage the best of every cloud provider's, newest, fanciest services on top of your data. So, isn't it great if you can just hit a couple clicks, we'll extend your data and keep it in sync in near real time, and allow you to plumb into some new service from another cloud provider.Corey: In an ideal world with all things being equal, this is a wonderful vision. There's been a lot of noise made—a fair bit of it by me, let's be fair—around the data egress pricing for—it's easy to beat up on AWS because they are the largest cloud provider and it's not particularly close, but they all do it. Does that serve as a brake on that particular pattern?Sahir: Thankfully, for a database like ours and various mechanisms we use, it's not a barrier to entry. It's certainly a cost component to enabling this capability, for sure. We absolutely would love to see the industry be more open and use less of egress fees as a way to wall people into a particular cloud providers. We certainly have that belief, and would push that notion and continually do in the industry. But it hasn't been a barrier to adoption because it's not the major cost component of operating a multi-cloud database.Corey: Well, [then you start 00:21:27] doing this whole circular replication thing, at which point, wow. It just goes round and round and round and lives on the network all the time. I'm told that's what a storage area network is because I'm about as good at storage as I am at databases. As you look at Atlas, since you are in all of the major hyperscalers, is the experience different in any way, depending upon which provider you're running in?Sahir: By and large, it's pretty consistent. However, what we are not doing is building to the lowest common denominator. If there's a service integration that our customers on AWS want, and that service doesn't integrate, it doesn't exist on another cloud provider, or vice versa, we're not going to stop ourselves from building a great customer experience and integration point. And the same thing goes for infrastructure; if there's some infrastructure innovation that delivers price, performance, great value for our customers and it's only on a single cloud, we're not going to stop ourselves from delivering that value to customers. So, there's a line there, you know, we want to provide a great experience, portability across the cloud providers, consistency where it makes sense, but we are not going to water down our experience on a particular cloud provider if customers are asking for some native capabilities.Corey: It always feels like a strange challenge historically to wind up—at least in large, regulated environments—getting a new vendor in. Originally an end run around this was using the AWS Marketplace or whatever marketplace you were using at any given cloud provider. Then procurement caught on and in some cases banned in the Marketplace outright and now, the Marketplace is sort of reformed, in some ways, to being a tool for procurement to use. Have you seen significant uptake of your offering through the various cloud marketplaces?Sahir: We do work with all the cloud marketplaces. In fact, we just made an announcement with AWS that we're going to be implementing the pay-as-you-go marketplace model for self-service as well on AWS. So, it is definitely a driver for our business. It tends to be used most heavily when we're selling with the, you know, sales teams from the cloud providers, and customers want to benefit from a single bill, benefit from, you know, drawing down on their large commitments that they might have with any given cloud providers. So, it drives really good alignment between the customer, us as a third-party on AWS or Azure GCP, and the infrastructure cloud provider. And so we're all aligned on a motion. So, in that sense, it's definitely been helpful, but it's largely been a procurement and fulfillment sort of value proposition to drive that alignment, I'd say, by and large today.Corey: I don't know if you're able to answer this without revealing anything confidential, so please feel free not to, but as you look across the total landscape—since I would say that you have a fairly reasonable snapshot of the industry as a whole—am I right when I say that AWS is the behemoth in the space, or is it a closer horse race than most people would believe, based upon your perspective?Sahir: I think in general, for sure AWS is the market share leader. It would be crazy to say anything otherwise. They innovated this model, you know, the amount of innovation happening at AWS is incredible, you know, and we're benefiting from it as a customer as well. However, we do believe it's a multi-cloud future. I mean, look at the growth of Azure. You know, we're seeing Google show up in large enterprises across the globe as well.And even beyond the three American clouds, you know, we work heavily with Alibaba and Tencent in mainland China, which is a completely different market than Western world. So, I do think the trend over time will be a more heterogeneous, more multi-cloud world—which I'm biased; that does favor MongoDB, but that's the trend we're seeing—but that doesn't mean that AWS won't continue to still be a leader and a very strong player in that market.Corey: I want to talk a little bit about Jepsen. And for those who are unaware, jepsen.io is run by Kyle Kingsbury. Kyle is wonderful, and he's also nuts. If you followed him back when he was on Twitter, you've also certainly seen them.But beyond that, he is the de facto resource I go to when it comes to consistency testing and stress testing of databases. I'm a little annoyed he hasn't taken on Route 53 yet, but hope does spring eternal. He's evaluated Mongo a number of times, and his conclusions, as always are mixed sometimes, shall we say, incendiary, but they always seem relatively fair. What is your experience been, working with him? And do you share my opinion of him as being a neutral and fair arbiter of these things?Sahir: I do. I think he's got real expertise and credibility in beating up distributed database systems and finding the edges of where they don't live up to what we all hope they do, right? Whether it's us or anyone else, just to be clear. And so anytime Kyle finds some flaw in MongoDB, we take it seriously, we add it to our test suite, [laugh] we remediate, and I think we have a pretty good history of that. And in fact, we've actually worked with Kyle to welcome him beating up our database on multiple occasions, too, so it's not an adversarial relationship at all.Corey: I have to ask, since you are a more modern generation of database, then many from the previous century, but there's always been a significant, shall we say… concern, when I wind up looking at it [it again in 00:26:33] any given database, and I look in the terms and conditions and, like, “Oh, it's a great database. We're by far the best. Whatever you do, do not publish benchmarks.” What's going on with that?Sahir: I think benchmarks can be spun in any direction you want, by any vendor. And it's not just database technology. I've been in IT for a while, and you know, that applies to any technology. So, we absolutely do not shy away from our performance or benchmark or comparisons to any technology. We just think that, you know, vendors benchmarking technologies for their—are doing so largely to only make their own technologies look good versus competition.Corey: I tend to be somewhat skeptical of the various benchmark stuff. I remember repeatedly oh, I'll wind up running whatever it is—I think it's Geek Speed—on my various devices to see oh, how snappy and performant is it going to be? But then I'm sitting there opening Microsoft Word and watching the beach ball spin, and spin, and spin, and it turns out, don't care about benchmarks in a real-world use case in many scenarios.Sahir: Yeah, it's kind of a good analogy, right? I mean, performance of an application, sure, the database at the heart of it is a crucial component, but there's many more aspects of it that have to do with the overall real world performance than just some raw benchmark results for any database, right? It's the way you model your data, the way the rest of the architecture of the application interacts and hangs together with the database, many, many layers of complexity. So, I don't always think those benchmarks are indicative of how real world performance will look, but at the same time, I'm very confident in MongoDB's performance comparatively to our peers, so it's not something we're afraid of.Corey: As you take a look at where you've been and where you are now, what's next? Where are you going? Because I have a hard time believing that, “Yep, we're deciding it's feature complete and we're just going to sell this until the end of time exactly as is, we're laying off our entire engineering team and we're going to be doing support from our yacht, parked comfortably in international waters.” That's a slightly different company. What's the plan?Sahir: So, [laugh] you're—we are not parking anything, anytime soon. We are continuing to invest heavily in the innovation of the technology, and really, it's two reasons: you know, one, we're seeing an acceleration of adoption of MongoDB, either with any customers that have used us for a long time, but for more important and more use cases, but also just broader adoption globally as more and more developers learn to code, they're choosing Mongo as the place to start, increasingly. And so that's really exciting for us, and we need to keep up with those customer demands and that roadmap of asks that they have.And at the same time, customer requirements are increasing as more and more organizations are software-first organizations, the requirements of what they demand from us continually increase, which requires continual innovation in our architecture and our functionality to keep up with those and stay ahead of those customer requirements. So, what you'll see from us is, one, making sure we can build the best modern database we can. That's the core of what we do; everything we do now especially is cloud first, so working closely with our cloud partners on that. And even though we're very fortunate to be a high-performance, high-growth company with a very pervasive open technology, we're still in a giant market that has a lot of legacy technologies powering old applications. So, [laugh] you know, we have a long, long runway to become a long-standing major player in this market.And then we're going to continue this vision of an application data platform, which is really just about simplifying the capabilities and data architecture for organizations and developers so they can focus on building their application and less on the plumbing.Corey: I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more, where can they go?Sahir: Clearly, you can go to mongodb.com. You can also reach out to us on our community sites: our own or on any of the public sites that you would typically find developers hanging out. We always have folks from our teams or our champions program of advocates worldwide helping out our customers and users. And I just want to thank you, Corey, for having me. I've followed you online for a while; it's great to finally be able to meet in person.Corey: Uh-oh. It's disturbing having realized some of the things I've said on Twitter and realizing I'm now within range to get punched in the face. But, you know, we take what we can get. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Sahir: My pleasure.Corey: Sahir Azam, Chief Product Officer at MongoDB. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me that is not the reason that AWS is building many new databases. Tell me which one you're building and why it solves a problem other than getting you the promotion you probably don't deserve.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Games Tribune Magazine
GTM BITS 14 | Arcane: League of Legends · Las Claves de su Éxito - Episodio exclusivo para mecenas

Games Tribune Magazine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 98:30


Agradece a este podcast tantas horas de entretenimiento y disfruta de episodios exclusivos como éste. ¡Apóyale en iVoox! ¡Bienvenidos una vez más al Bar de GTM! Volvemos a reunirnos para una agradable tertulia en este nuevo episodio de GTM Bits, dedicando el capítulo a una de las series del momento: Arcane. La obra producida por Riot Games ha superado todas las expectativas, convirtiéndose en una de las series animadas más aclamadas de los últimos años. Así que, para analizar las claves de su éxito, Javier Bello ha vuelto a invitar a Éric Piquer y Mateu Arbó para debatir sobre el tema. Debido a que su emisión todavía es reciente, hemos procurado evitar los spoilers lo máximo posible, centrando nuestro debate en aspectos como su construcción narrativa, las fortalezas de sus personajes y su sobresaliente factura técnica, además de comparativas con otros shows televisivos. Por tanto, esperamos que disfrutéis de esta nueva chachareta, donde escarbaremos en los secretos de la ciudad subterránea y la esplendorosa Pitltover, en busca de los elementos que han elevado a la grandeza a esta serie.Escucha este episodio completo y accede a todo el contenido exclusivo de GTM Restart. Descubre antes que nadie los nuevos episodios, y participa en la comunidad exclusiva de oyentes en https://go.ivoox.com/sq/286786

Go To Market Grit
CMO TripActions, Meagen Eisenberg: The Joy of Living in Awkward

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 72:36


There is a litany of analogies for marketing. An art, a technique, a skill. Yet few strive to combine a multitude of approaches. For Meagen Eisenberg, Chief Marketing Officer at TripActions, she synthesizes a combination of art, science, and the essential ingredient–joy–to form a unique marketing strategy. Meagen is a no BS go-getter who demonstrates an encompassing approach to how she conducts business. She hones in on her own efficiency and ability to think quickly and adapt, and expresses how cultivating that skill has made her a fast decision-maker. To reinforce that speed is a desire to always learn, which is the underlying motivation for her own professional progress. Meagen offers her perspectives on organizational structure, the highly valuable takeaways from mistakes and failures, and how her work at TripActions has adapted, through her own love and joy of the flux of marketing, to the changes of COVID-19. Meagen's straightforward approach carries a lot of weight and is a force we all can consider. In this episode, we cover:  Why TripActions' CRO, Carlos Delatorre, calls Meagen a superhuman - and why she believes in treating her sales team as a customer. (03:56) ‘The key for executives is to keep learning': Meagen discusses her favorite mediums for learning, her love of books, and the various ways she stays on the pulse. (11:58) A discussion about preparing for and executing board meetings - and a look at PG Tuesday. (19:31) Meagen's perspective on company alignment from the top down and how it sets the stage for success. (25:44) The silver lining in failure and Meagen's attitude towards not giving up - and what it means to “live in awkward.” (34:55) The art and science of marketing - and the impact of COVID-19 on TripActions and how that differed from its competitors. (44:46) Meagen reflects on the worst day in her career during the pandemic. (55:14) A walkthrough of Meagen's hiring process during her first six weeks at TripActions, her take on hiring people who solve problems, and why she loves marketing. (01:01:52) Links: Connect with Meagen LinkedIn TripActions Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins Links Referenced: Dan Druker Play Bigger: How Pirates, Dreamers, and Innovators Create and Dominate Markets MOVE: The 4-question Go-to-Market Framework The Hard Thing About Hard Things: Building a Business When There Are No Easy Answers The Ride of a Lifetime: Lessons Learned from 15 Years as CEO of the Walt Disney Company Shoe Dog: A Memoir by the Creator of Nike Andre Agassi: Open: An Autobiography Elon Musk: Tesla, SpaceX, and the Quest for a Fantastic Future

SaaS Sessions
S5E6 - Marketing Analytics 101 ft. Praveen Das, Co-founder of Factors.ai

SaaS Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 33:14


In this episode, we hosted Praveen Das, Co-founder of Factors.ai, to answer frequent questions about marketing data and analytics. We start with discussing how B2B marketing has changed over the years, and how the change has affected data capturing. Also, how new types of GTM influence analyzing the data. Are we in the Data 3.0 world? Data 1.0 was about capturing; Data 2.0 was about stitching it and building relationships. Is Data 3.0 all about delivery? Know more about it in this episode. Learn more about Factors.ai - https://factors.ai/ Connect with Praveen on LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/praveen-das/

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh
Poly's Nick Tidd on Redefining the Value of Technology

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 34:17


Nick Tidd, vice president of global channel sales at Poly, joins Channelnomics' Changing Channels host Larry Walsh to discuss how vendors can better meet customers' evolving technology needs. The COVID-19 pandemic changed the way the world thinks about work as employees grew accustomed to using their own devices and technology platforms. Now, as employees return to the office, they're seeking the same rich technology experience to which they've become accustomed. Employers are stepping up to meet employees' demands, upgrading their existing technology, but in many cases, they're rendering their old equipment obsolete in the process. While upgrading office technology benefits workers, it also raises the question of what to do with the old equipment. In getting rid of this gear, businesses lose money and jeopardize their sustainability efforts if they don't dispose of it with an eye to the long term. Considering the current supply-chain shortages, letting go of that old equipment seems like an avoidable waste of resources. One company addressing this issue is videoconferencing vendor Poly, which has long been a key player in providing offices with the proper devices for communication. Now, Poly is breathing new life into seemingly worthless equipment with its upgrade program, Poly Renew. By offering customers vouchers for new devices if they turn in their old equipment to its partners, Poly is using the program to fill demand for the products customers now want. Simultaneously, Poly is providing a sustainable way for old devices to be disposed of and even refurbished. Nick Tidd, vice president of global channel sales at Poly, joins Channelnomics' Changing Channels host Larry Walsh to discuss how Poly Renew is protecting the end-user, redefining the value of technology, and enabling partners to play a vital role in the renewal process. Follow us, Like us, and Subscribe! Channelnomics: https://channelnomics.com/  LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2NC6Vli  Twitter: https://twitter.com/Channelnomics    Changing Channels Is a Channelnomics Production Follow @Channelnomics to stay current on the latest #research, #bestpractices, and #resources. At @Channelnomics – the voice of thought leadership – we define #channel trends, chart new #GTM strategies, and #partner with industry leaders to champion #diversity in the channel.     Episode Resources Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa Guest Nick Tidd: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nicktidd/

The Customer Experience Podcast
173. Delivering Connected CX By Improving Go-To-Market Strategy w/ Sangram Vajre

The Customer Experience Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 49:34


Everyone wants to know how to operate their business effectively. But depending on which of the three growth stages your company is in, the answer will be different. In this episode, I interview Sangram Vajre, Co-Founder and Chief Evangelist at Terminus and author of MOVE: The 4-Question Go-to-Market Framework, about GTM as a process, the 3 stages of business, and his CX takeaways from his book research. Sangram and I talked about: Why the connected experience is essential for frictionless CX How GTM is a transformational process for acceleration What it means to be a problem company, a product company, or a platform company What 3 things the CEO should own How the MOVE framework applies to scaling       Check out these resources we mentioned: The MOVE Book Sangram Vajre on LinkedIn BombBomb Gong Tim Kopp (TK) on LinkedIn Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey Moore       Subscribe, listen, and rate/review the Customer Experience Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Play, or Google Podcasts, and find more episodes on our blog. Listening on a desktop & can't see the links? Just search for the Customer Experience Podcast in your favorite podcast player.

Go To Market Grit
CRO Unqork, Philip Lacor: Playing the Infinite Game

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 68:13


For some, expanding their horizons is something that they, as individuals, strive to do. Fortunately, Philip Lacor, CRO at Unqork, takes those expansions to another level. Philip thrives as a cross-functional leader and leaves his own stamp by creating challenging and diverse environments for a wide variety of people. From his philosophy on building global teams, to how he rears his own children, diversity is the center of how Philip builds his approaches. Join the conversation as Philip takes us through his multifaceted career path. Coming from the Netherlands, but with a drive to develop a global vision, he offers unique comparisons between how Europeans and Americans work. Language is also a central priority for Philip, and his perspective on the importance of learning new languages and his implementation of that learning in his own life are paramount. We also explore how Philip shapes and values diverse teams, and the ways in which he enacts this conviction. He has a personal passion to see more women in leadership roles, and we learn how he honors his late wife and her amazing contribution to the world through The Lideke Wery Foundation.In this episode, we cover: The moment Philip realized that he wanted to experience the world outside of the Netherlands and start a global career - and his thoughts about the similarities between Europeans and Americans. (05:46) Philip's personal tricks for mastering public speaking and how that plays into his conversations with customers. (08:49) A discussion about learning new languages and how Philip teaches his children to adapt to new environments. (15:51) Why Philip enjoys working cross-functionally and closely with customers - and a walkthrough of Philip's process for building customer-centric teams. (21:10) A look at Philip's short, yet successful time at Envoy and his transition into his role as Unqork's CRO. (29:01) Four traits that successful reps should cultivate in an early-stage company. (38:23) Defining active mental recovery and how it contributes to long-term success - and why it's important to embrace and enjoy where you are. (43:40) Philip reflects on his role as a leader and discusses time management on a global team and his passion for hiring diverse talent. (50:30) The Lideke Wery Foundation: In honor of Philip's late wife, The Lideke Wery Foundation transforms the lives of students in Sri Lanka through learning English and computer education. (59:56) Links: Connect with Philip LinkedIn Email: philip.lacor@unqork.com Unqork Lideke Wery Foundation Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh
Google Cloud's Sandeep Gupta on Driving Fluid Collaboration

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 30, 2021 26:52


Sandeep Gupta, Lead of Strategic Partnerships at Google Cloud, joins Channelnomics Changing Channels host Larry Walsh to discuss how Google Workspace can help ensure productivity and meaningful connection for everyone during this transitory time.  Spurred by difficult conditions wrought by the pandemic over the past two years, the world's been forced to adopt more flexible, fluid work arrangements. Mobile devices, persistent high-speed Internet, and cloud-based applications make working from home relatively easy, and during this adjustment period, options for collaboration have emerged in ways we didn't think possible before 2020.  While working from home – and from anywhere – has its advantages, the primary goal of today's collaboration solutions is to best enable individuals and teams to stay connected in a meaningful way and maximize productivity.  Everything is about collaboration, regardless of where workers are. Now more than ever, users need a smooth, effortless way to communicate, share, and produce. As the world ventures even further into a hybrid environment, it's imperative to build on what we've learned over these past two years.   One company that's making flexible collaboration and productivity its prime mission is Google with its Google Workspace collection of tools, software, products, and services. Workspace is a solution that caters to everyone – individuals, IT managers, teams, and entire businesses – to ensure that they remain linked securely and on the same schedule.  Channelnomics invited Google, a partner in our recent cloud research, along with Ingram Micro Cloud and Microsoft, to join us for our latest podcast. Sandeep Gupta, Lead of Strategic Partnerships at Google Cloud, spoke with Channelnomics Changing Channels host Larry Walsh to explain how Google Workspace enables fluid collaboration and helps businesses achieve consistent productivity in these uncertain times.   Follow us, Like us, and Subscribe!  Channelnomics: https://channelnomics.com/   LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2NC6Vli   Twitter: https://twitter.com/Channelnomics      Changing Channels Is a Channelnomics Production  Follow @Channelnomics to stay current on the latest #research, #bestpractices, and #resources. At @Channelnomics – the voice of thought leadership – we define #channel trends, chart new #GTM strategies, and #partner with industry leaders to champion #diversity in the channel.      Episode Resources  Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa  Guest Sandeep Gupta: linkedin.com/in/sandeep-gupta-5626bb2    Credits  Production: Changing Channels is produced by Modern Podcasting. For virtual content capture and video-first podcasts, check out http://www.modpodstudio.com.  Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa  Voice-Over: Denise Quan 

Go To Market Grit
CBO Duolingo, Bob Meese: Carrying Culture Through Language

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 55:38


Language is without doubt the single most valuable tool we use, and in its use, it ironically builds barriers. Fortunately in recent years with the rise of companies like Duolingo, those barriers are becoming more opaque. In this episode, Bob Meese, Chief Business Officer at Duolingo, joins the show to discuss all the innovative ways that Duolingo is making language learning a more feasible aspect of our lives.Bob started at Google with a solid 8-year stretch that served as a proving ground for his own professional philosophy. An integral component of that philosophy is to be employee-centric in his vision and execution. In his move to Duolingo, Bob carried that thinking forward. Firmly established at Duolingo, Bob shares with us the impact that the company has on their customers, and even with his own family— namely in making language learning just plain fun. Bob also explores the importance of language, and how Duolingo is striking a firm balance between creating revenue and profit while providing such an altruistic product. In this episode, we cover:  A quick look at Bob's time at Google -  and how his philosophy on professional inertia played into his decision to move on to Duolingo. (02:47) Why Bob encourages his star employees to shine, even if it results in their decision to seek opportunities beyond their role and the company. (07:28) A risk worth taking: The journey that led Bob and his family back to Pittsburgh to begin his career at Duolingo. (10:57) An overview of Duolingo including current stats, its evolution, and what is on the horizon. (16:20) A discussion about the monetization of Duolingo, what the company looked like when Bob joined as CRO, and how Duolingo established its identity. (22:51) Bob reflects on his experience with changing company culture - and shares why he would do it all over again as he looks back on his years at Duolingo. (35:14) Duolingo's revenue growth, the timing of the IPO, and why operating as a private company still works after recently going public. (41:05) Joubin and Bob discuss the impact of language and how it is a core part of human identity - and why Duolingo strives to make learning languages more accessible. (47:28) Links: Connect with Bob Twitter Duolingo Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

Podcast Noviembre Nocturno
Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis

Podcast Noviembre Nocturno

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 53:49


El noventa por ciento de la arqueología se hace en la biblioteca, investigando, leyendo. Olvídense de ciudades perdidas y de agujerear el mundo. No hay tesoros ocultos. Y nunca hay una equis que marca el lugar. Al menos, eso es lo que les digo a mis alumnos del Barnett College en las clases de Introducción a la Arqueología. Pero aunque el noventa por ciento de la arqueología se haga en la biblioteca, es ese diez por ciento lo que determina que encuentres lo que buscas, o no. Porque a veces, a veces una equis marca el lugar. Y entonces hay que estar dispuesto a todo para encontrar esas equis, bajo las cuales duermen maravillas desde hace siglos. Un relato de Regino García Martínez basado en el universo de Indiana Jones and the fate of Atlantis. Twitter > https://twitter.com/reginogarciama1 Esta historia es fruto de la alianza entre la revista GTM y Noviembre Nocturno, si quieres formar parte de nuestro culto primigenio suscríbete a GTM a ​través de su web y sígueles en sus redes: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/gamestribune Su web: gamestribune.com twitter: https://twitter.com/GamesTribune Arte de Portada de Sabi Menyhei Escucha el episodio completo en la app de iVoox, o descubre todo el catálogo de iVoox Originals

The Recruiting Brainfood Podcast
Brainfood Live On Air - Ep135 - Recruites Switching Industry Verticals - A Guide

The Recruiting Brainfood Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 72:50


SWITCHING INDUSTRIES: A GUIDE FOR RECRUITERS   The agility of recruiters is one of the main reasons why we are resilient during times of change. Switching industry focus is one of those skills which makes most sense in the present moment as industries rise and fall with the shift to remote, the change in work habits, the change in people's priorities.   Is there a technique or system for doing this? What is the best way to switch an industry? Can we develop a framework?   - What industries are rising, which are falling? - How to make the switch - Big Bang or by increments? - How to accelerate through the change - What are some common errors of those who make the switch? - What are the problems with NOT making a switch?   All this and more in Brainfood Live on Air. We are with senior recruiters who are experts in employer branding and candidate UX -  Alla Pavlova, Recruiter (Riot Games), Christine Ng, Head of Talent & Media (Quantum Motion), Vanessa Raath, Founder (Talent Hunter) & Katrina Hutchinson-O'Neill, CEO (Join Talent)   Episode 135 is supported by our buddies Join Talent Join Talent is EMEA's fastest growing embedded talent solution provider. We deliver a market-leading and super-agile boutique Project RPO solution for scaling businesses - supporting with hiring demand in tech, product, digital, design, commercial/GTM & corporate vacancies.   If you're a recruiter looking to join a rocketship - you should Join Talent

Go To Market Grit
CRO Pendo, Jennifer Brannigan: Un-designing Your Leadership Path

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 67:03


To make the leap from HR to sales may seem like a significant obstacle to surmount. For Jennifer Brannigan, CRO at Pendo, it was an easy choice to make. Her decision to pursue her own interests and passion over a high salary set her on a path toward where she is today. And for her, the journey still continues. As she puts it, her professional roadmap is much like a jungle gym, as it is varied and intriguing. In this episode, Jennifer shares why she transitioned to sales in the midst of an accelerating HR career, and what she learned from her time at NBC Universal and LinkedIn. She also brings a refreshing take as she explains her unconventional subscription to JOMO (the joy of missing out) and provides insight on why she focuses on cultivating potential over check-the-box skillsets.In this episode, we cover: Jennifer's exciting summer job in Ireland - and why she aspires to embrace JOMO (the joy of missing out). (03:18) A look into the neighborhood Jennifer grew up in, located in South Side, Chicago - and why Joubin thinks she would make a great podcast host. (09:07) How Jennifer's experience at NBC Universal transferred into her next role - and what she learned from the challenges that came with her position at LinkedIn. (12:56) Jennifer's perspective on leading LinkedIn's large-scale layoff and how her HR experience prepared her for that difficult task. (17:54) From LinkedIn to Pendo: Jennifer's journey towards her role as CRO - and her thoughts on her career trajectory. (21:55) Joubin and Jennifer explore the positive effect that running and exercise have on their mental health. (30:14) More on Jennifer's path to Pendo: what she looked for in her search and how she spent her first 6 months. (35:15) Pendo's cross-organizational hiring rubric - and Jennifer's viewpoint on hiring potential vs success. (43:48) Jennifer uses her own experiences to rank career, money, company, and manager - and she shares her favorite simple habit and one she'd like to develop. (56:44) Links: Connect with Jennifer Email: jen.brannigan@pendo.io Pendo Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

The CPG Guys
Scaling an Omnichannel Brand with JiMMYBAR's Jim Simon

The CPG Guys

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 48:28


The CPG Guys, Sri & PVSB, are joined in this episode by Jim Simon, the co-founder & CEO of JiMMYBAR, a family company with a female co-founder & creator of "Bars With Benefits" meaning high protein-low sugar great tasting bars with Functional ingredients like immune boosting fruit, Collagen, Turmeric, Guarana Caffeine, Keto friendly nuts. Follow  Jim Simon on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jisimon/Follow JiMMYBAR on LinkedIn at: https://www.linkedin.com/company/jimmybar-whole-food-bars/Follow JiMMYBAR online at: http://www.jimmybars.comJim answers these questions:1) You were involved in tech M&A and your sister was running a restaurant, what made the two of you decide to start up a nutritional bar business?2) Did you hit the right recipes right off the bat or how did you evolve them into actual products?3) There are many things in my life that are non-negotiable. What was non-negotiable from an ingredients or taste perspective in your products?4) What were some of the ROI obstacles that you faced in getting your products listed in physical retail stores and how did that drive your Go To Market strategy, particularly as it relates to food service?5) How did JiMMYBAR develop into an omnichannel brand? How did you go about building and marketing your own brand site and when did you decide to enter the Amazon marketplace? On Amazon are you 1P, 3P or a combination?6) What are the tools and techniques you leveraged to grow your business on Amazon, particularly around supply chain and retail media?7) Your physical retail strategy has been quite successful. Hardly a week goes by without seeing you post on LinkedIn new retail listings: Commissaries, CIBO, TravelCenters, GetGo, GTM, Rite Aid, CVS, Costco and many others. What made it ROI positive when earlier it did not and is there a common path to listing success?8) You seem to have been a travel warrior as you built out your business. What has been the impact of the pandemic on your selling?9) Early in your startup, you made a conscious decision not to seek VC as you built your business. How did you manage scaling your business without substantial external capital and how has that changed?10) How do you think about developing innovation that scales successfully? What are the key elements of this process and where are you focusing for expansion?DISCLAIMER: The content in this podcast episode is provided for general informational purposes only. By listening to our episode, you understand that no information contained in this episode should be construed as advice from CPGGUYS, LLC or the individual author, hosts, or guests, nor is it intended to be a substitute for research on any subject matter. Reference to any specific product or entity does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation by CPGGUYS, LLC. The views expressed by guests are their own and their appearance on the program does not imply an endorsement of them or any entity they represent.  CPGGUYS LLC expressly disclaims any and all liability or responsibility for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, consequential or other damages arising out of any individual's use of, reference to, or inability to use this podcast or the information we presented in this podcast.

BREAK/FIX the Gran Touring Motorsports Podcast

The Mint 400 is the oldest and most prestigious off-road race in America, held each year in the treacherous foothills of Sin City. The multi-day event features a massive vehicle parade down the world famous Las Vegas Strip, a two day festival on historic Fremont Street, and two days of grueling off-road racing on a desolate and punishing 400-mile race course. Off-road and recreational enthusiasts come to watch 500 race teams in 50+ classes from 25 different states and 15 different countries go door-to-door!  Co-host tonight is GTM'er and Veteran Offroader David ‘Drew' Andrews who you might recall from our “All the Torquems” and “Jesus Take the Wheel” episodes -- and joining us is Matt Martelli - Marketing Director for the Mint 400 to tell us about “The Great American Off-Road Race” ! 

Go To Market Grit
CRO Rubrik, Brian McCarthy: Embedding Missionary Values Into Company Culture

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 67:03


Integrity and humility barely begin to describe Brian McCarthy, CRO at Rubrik. Brian's story is one of hard-won progress that is bound to inspire anyone who listens. Coming from a blue-collar household, Brian has always viewed work as a gift and now takes advantage of what it has afforded him and turns it back to building strong communities.Brian's humble beginnings set the stage for his inspiring life story. What his family did not have in money, they made up for in an abundance of love. For that, Brian never felt like he was without and carries that with him in his life and work. In this episode, Brian talks about his upbringing and explores his professional journey. He also provides insight into why he strives to drive those around him to be the best version of themselves each day. Brian's criteria for a good sales leader are also invaluable and worth deep consideration!In this episode, we cover: Brian's journey towards his first job as an adult - and why selling life insurance felt natural to him. (03:59) All in the family: Brian's early years growing up in a blue-collar household, the legacy his father left behind, and how his family came together after his passing. (07:16) How Brian and his wife navigated their lives and careers as a young married couple - and the moment he realized he could build wealth to make a positive impact on the lives of others. (16:36) How Brian's unique and humble mindset as a young VP contributed to his success at Qlik. (25:11) A discussion about the fear of losing and impostor syndrome - and why Brian's short time at AppDynamics had a positive influence on his professional trajectory. (31:33) Feeding the beast: Brian talks about finding creative outlets in and outside of work - and delves into the two buckets that first-line sales leaders fall into. (39:55) How the words “I love you” translate into “I desire what's best for you” and how Brian embodies those words at his core and incorporates that into Rubrik's company culture. (51:08) Why Brian loves his role as CRO - and his perspective on why grit and gratitude go hand in hand. (59:16) Links: Connect with Brian LinkedIn Rubrik Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

PartnerUp The Partnerships Podcast
037 - Drop the stigma, why partner "influence" is now your most valuable currency - Allan Adler

PartnerUp The Partnerships Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 50:53


PartnerUp - we're back! Good to be back too, we've missed ya.One thing we wouldn't miss though is the seemingly universal disdain of the dirtiest word in partnerships: "influence." Unfortunately, I think we all get it. "Partner Influence" has a bad rap for a reason -- it's been abused by too many and ignored as a result. But what about the today's crazy new world in 2022 and beyond makes it time to change how we view and use "partner influence?" Is it time to take back the meaning and measure of "influence" as not only strategic for partnerships, but critical to company growth?Allan Adler of Digital Bridge Partners has seen partner influence change over each era of the Internet. He's founded, operated, sold GTM consulting firms and coached partner strategy for some of the best CEO's and Ecosystem Executives in tech.Instead of a dirty word, Allan pushes for the executive team to take renewed ownership of influence as the real currency in the decade of the ecosystem and shares how we can start measuring that influence... right... now!Don't forget to subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or anywhere you get your pods on the go. And leave a FIVE STAR rating -- because Michele won't accept anything less.If you liked the show, share the episode with your commentary on LinkedIn and hash #partnerup #partnerships. Tag us in on the post so we can comment and share back! Check out all past and future the PartnerUp episodes at https://www.partneruppodcast.com and... don't forget to follow join the world's largest partnerships community at https://www.cloudsoftwareassociation.com to hang out and learn with 4,000+ partnerships professionals.

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh
Channelnomics' Larry Walsh on the 7 Truths About the Channel's Long Tail

Changing Channels with Larry Walsh

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 9, 2021 9:00


Channelnomics' Larry Walsh discusses the debate around the true value of the channel's long tail and explains some of the misconceptions about this cadre of partners. By definition, the long tail is a collection of partners that contribute little and are considered low-value on an individual level but generate a large sum of revenue collectively. In practice, the long tail is a concept that few in the channel completely understand and even fewer know how to address. That begs the question: Can the long tail truly be leveraged? There's always been debate about the long tail's value. Is it a treasure trove of untapped opportunity, rich with partners that, if nurtured, can yield high performance? Or is it an illusion that vendors chase in pursuit of growth that'll likely never come to fruition? There's no simple answer. Vendors across the industry are constantly looking to improve their growth and revenue. The long tail can potentially help or hinder that. There are many common misconceptions about the long tail, some so ingrained that vendors and partners may not realize they're off track. By taking the time to better understand the long tail and get to the root of its composition and dynamics, vendors will be better able to make intelligent decisions about programs and strategic development initiatives around this group of partners. In this episode of Changing Channels, Channelnomics host Larry Walsh shares seven indisputable truths about the channel's long tail and why they matter to channel chiefs and leaders.   Follow us, Like us, and Subscribe! Channelnomics: https://channelnomics.com/  LinkedIn: https://bit.ly/2NC6Vli  Twitter: https://twitter.com/Channelnomics    Changing Channels Is a Channelnomics Production Follow @Channelnomics to stay current on the latest #research, #bestpractices, and #resources. At @Channelnomics – the voice of thought leadership – we define #channel trends, chart new #GTM strategies, and #partner with industry leaders to champion #diversity in the channel.     Episode Resources Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa   Credits Production: Changing Channels is produced by Modern Podcasting. For virtual content capture and video-first podcasts, check out http://www.modpodstudio.com. Host Larry Walsh: https://bit.ly/3beZfOa Voice-Over: Denise Quan

Go To Market Grit
President and COO Coinbase, Emilie Choi: Rising Through the Crypto Ranks

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 8, 2021 64:26


"Crypto" is a term that has recently re-shaped the way the world thinks about money. For Emilie Choi, President and COO at Coinbase, it has been at the forefront of her work and mind for quite some time. Emilie is a true workplace warrior and that is reflected in her leadership at Coinbase as she has cultivated an ethos that endears her entire organization and those she works alongside.In this episode, Emilie doesn't pull the punches as she divulges her own strengths and weaknesses and how she strives to make them both equal assets. She also expounds on fostering connections in the workplace, her mission-oriented mindset, and how it is a mindset she likes to see in entrepreneurs. Emilie also offers essential insight into the current shape of cryptocurrency and the exciting direction that it is headed.      In this episode, we cover: Emilie's competitive advantage and how she transformed her weakness into an asset. (3:35) Sensitivity in the workplace: Emilie opens up about a time when she showed her vulnerability in her “top of mind” email to the organization and how that cultivated a connection across the teams. (7:34) Building out LinkedIn's Corp Dev team in its early stages and how entrepreneurs successfully ran LinkedIn's three business lines. (9:21) Missionary vs mercenary: Emilie shares why it's refreshing to work with crypto entrepreneurs who are mission-oriented - and Joubin taps into his recent experience with hiring a candidate. (13:00) Why Emilie admires Amazon's core business strategy - and her opinion on companies she would hypothetically buy. (17:36) How Emilie's desire to continue learning led her to make a lateral move from LinkedIn to Coinbase - and how she navigated the recruitment process of her team. (22:10) An overview of Coinbase: assets, revenue, long-term trajectory, and their three main focuses - and Emilie breaks down Coinbase's innovation by comparing it to the evolution of mobile phones. (31:10) ‘Volatility is a feature, not a bug': What volatility means for Coinbase - and why Amazon and Adobe serve as an influence for Coinbase as they invest in their future acts. (38:38) Weathering the crypto winter: How Emilie frames investing in crypto to potential buyers - and how she integrates grit and resilience into her role and across the organization. (43:47) Emilie shares her thoughts on Coinbase's %5 employee departure after their pledge to be apolitical - and what she admires about the Coinbase CEO, Brian Armstrong. (49:09) Emilie reflects on what she has learned as she grew into COO and President - and how Coinbase grew to be the number one regulated crypto custodian in the world. (56:22) Links: Connect with Emilie LinkedIn Coinbase Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

Accelerate! with Andy Paul
992: Building the Enterprise Startup, with Tae Hea Nahm

Accelerate! with Andy Paul

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 45:29


Tae Hea Nahm is the co-founder and managing director of Storm Ventures, based in Silicon Valley. He's also the author of Survival to Thrival: Building the Enterprise Startup. Today we're talking about an open-source resource guide for entrepreneurs that Tae Hea has launched. A place where entrepreneurs and their team can share their experiences and learn from others how to scale and unlock growth. We dive into GTM and a newer concept called GTM Fit. Tae Hea says the problem is that Companies find product market fit but don't scale. Because there's a “missing link” between PMF and accelerated growth for the enterprise startup journey. We dig into what that missing link is. We also explore Tae Hea's four steps to find GTM fit, starting with how to Catch the Wave and Nail the Customer Journey. Connect with Andy: LinkedIn Sponsored by: Revenue.io | Unlock exponential growth with an AI-powered RevOps platform | Revenue.io BombBomb | Build better business relationships with video messaging | BombBomb.com Scratchpad | The fastest way to update Salesforce, take sales notes, and stay on top of to-dos | Scratchpad.com Explore the Revenue.io Podcast Universe: Sales Enablement Podcast Selling with Purpose Podcast RevOps Podcast

How to B2B a CEO (with Ashu Garg)
How to Win (Dan Springer, CEO of DocuSign)

How to B2B a CEO (with Ashu Garg)

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 30:04


Dan Springer is a three-time Silicon Valley CEO. He's currently the CEO of DocuSign, which he took public and subsequently scaled to more than $2 billion in run-rate revenue and $50+ billion in market cap. Any losers out there will want to stop listening now, because this episode is all about how to win: how to win as a CEO, how to win at go-to-market, and how to win the war for talent.

Predictable Revenue Podcast
222: How to figure out if your GTM process is broken (and how to fix it)

Predictable Revenue Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 25:31


Sangram Vajre joins Sarah Hicks on this episode of the Predictable Revenue Podcast.  Sangram is a bestselling author who co-founded Terminus in 2014 and ever since has been teaching the business of marketing with his signature frameworks. He's an international keynote speaker, was named one of the top twenty-one B2B marketing influencers in the world, and is the host of a top-fifty business podcast called FlipMyFunnel. Highlights include: crossing the valley of death from $10MM onward (3:20), the telltale signs that your GTM process is broken (5:20), the 4 questions to ask at every stage of your business so you can scale (7:30), transitioning between problem, product, and platform-market fit (11:08), when to bring in RevOps (13:47), what to build when you reach platform-market fit (16:45), and how outbound factors into the 3 stages of your business (20:15).   SHOW NOTES:  How Leading B2B Companies Are Structuring Their Sales Led GTM Teams Building a RevOps structure to increase revenue and customer LTV _________________ Are you looking to create repeatable, scalable and predictable revenue? We can help! ►  https://bit.ly/predictablerevenuecoaching

B2B Mentors
How to Build a 100k Member Community

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 34:08


"At the end of the day, it's still about people, right? It's still about relationships." How to Build a 100k Member Community with Dan Goodstein - B2B Mentors PodcastDaniel Goodstein is president of 3 technology associations with over 100k executive members globally, AI & Digital Transformation evangelist, and a GTM strategy advisor.Follow Dan on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/danielgoodstein/Learn more about IRPA AI on their website here: https://irpaai.com/Get access to all past and future podcast episodes: https://www.activeblogs.com/b2b-mentors/Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.comEpisode Summary:Daniel Goodstein, President of the Institute for Robotic Process Automation & Artificial Intelligence (IRPA AI) and the Digital Enterprise Institute (DEi), joins Connor to talk about the challenges of marketing high-tech business solutions. Learn about the communication obstacles between tech companies and their potential customers, the importance of demonstrating value, and how, in the end, even high-tech businesses are built on people and relationships.Key Takeaways:Technical innovators aren't always great at marketing and sales, and at the same time, sales models are evolving and adapting to the service economy. So, delivering a high-tech message is all about demonstrating the benefits of a particular technology in a potential client's sector.Connecting with potential clients comes down to building relationships, and to do that, you need to speak your prospect's language. Throwing out a lot of technical jargon will not help you communicate the benefits of your product. Customers are much more interested in what solutions you can provide for them than the specifics of how your technology works.Getting your message across, in digital transformation or any other sector, is about storytelling. On one side, we're telling customers how technology can help their business, and on the other, we're helping innovators do a better job of telling their stories — and illustrating their value — to potential clients.More Highlights:Building a professional community is all about providing access to the latest news and information, to people who have been where you are, subject matter experts (SMEs), industry advisors, and even to those coming up behind you. Professional associations and events are essential to building professional networks for their members.Hope you enjoyed this episode of B2B Mentors! Make sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast platform. Leave us a 5-star review, so your friends and colleagues can find us too. B2B Mentors is brought to you by activeblogs.com. Head over to our Content Trifecta page to schedule a chat with Connor about custom marketing content solutions for your company and the Content Trifecta effect!

The Product Marketing Experts
Punchy Messaging with Alexandra Gutow, Director of PMM at Snowflake

The Product Marketing Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 31:39


Messaging is a fundamental aspect of product marketing that includes testing, refining, and a huge amount of internal alignment across the organization. It's a living breathing process that when done right, equates to an impactful impression left on your market. Tune in to hear messaging frameworks that will help you win deals and make your GTM process that much more effective. Crisply articulating the unique aspects of your product that you're bringing to market is key to the success of your GTM process! Follow Alexandra on LinkedIn.Join Alexandra on Sharebird.Questions covered in this episode: Tell me about your career path to becoming a PMM? What's your outlook on the career of Product Marketing? Is it a good place to be right now?  What's one nuance about Messaging that you only know now because you understand it deeply? Around doing it effectively. 

Leadership Is Changing
219: Kristi Venta Diemoz - Be Willing to Have Your Mind Changed

Leadership Is Changing

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 30:50


The strongest leaders are the ones who are willing to take on new information and let their teams be smartest ones in the room.  Kristi Venta Diemoz is the senior manager of GTM (go-to-market) and operations on eBay. In her role, she's responsible for updating their sellers on key programs and changes. Kristi has been at eBay for almost 20 years, working in various roles, from customer service to project management to marketing.  When it comes to engaging with customers, understanding their needs, and delivering changes through integrated Marketing strategies, Kristi is at the forefront of the charge.  Jump right in and learn from Kristi how to be willing to have your mind changed.  On this episode: Learn from an inside perspective how 20 years in one company like eBay can feel like working at 3 different companies when it changes and adapts to evolution in leadership  How a love for people can help you create good experiences for the people you lead as you band together for a common goal  When you support your team and surround yourself with brilliant people, you don't need to be the smartest person in the room  Examples of when humans become the priority within your organization it leads to long term success  How the best leaders are willing to have their minds changed. Be ready to take on new information Secrets in the workplace are unnecessary. Now more than ever, transparency and vulnerability is a valuable culture to set as a leader  Key Takeaways: Become a team and fight together  Start breaking down the silos  Leaders create high performance teams when they get rid of the ego If you're the smartest person in your group, get a new group Be willing to have your mind changed to become a stronger leader The strongest leaders are vulnerable and they share  Tweetable Quotes: “I love people, and I love leading them and creating a good experience.” - Kristi Venta Diemoz “It's really great when I see the company coming under one mission and one vision… Where I've seen that is when the leaders kind of remove their ego and care more about the mission and the success of the company.” - Kristi Venta Diemoz “I think any time you're willing to take on new information and change your mind then you'll always be a much stronger leader - and I think in this world it's more important than ever.” - Kristi Venta Diemoz Connect with Kristi and reach out on https://www.linkedin.com/in/kristi-diemoz/ (LinkedIn)! Resources: Email: denis@leadingchangepartners.com Website: http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/ (http://www.leadingchangepartners.com/)  Leadership Is Changing Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/ (https://www.facebook.com/groups/LeadershipIsChanging/) Leadership is Changing LinkedIn Page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/ (https://www.linkedin.com/company/leadership-is-changing-podcast/)

The ABM Conversations Podcast - for B2B marketing professionals
Sangram Vajre: The MOVE framework for Go-To-Market

The ABM Conversations Podcast - for B2B marketing professionals

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 58:05


In this episode, Sangram Vajre, the Chief Evangelist and co-founder of Terminus and the host of The FlipMyFunnel Podcast, joins us to discuss the MOVE Framework -- an actionable framework for Go-To-Market (GTM). He talks about: --> Why is GTM not a strategy but rather a product of its own --> 6 major truth bombs about Go-To-Market --> Stages of market maturity, and how GTM transforms at each stage --> What is the MOVE framework? What's the right maturity stage for applying it? --> Who are the stakeholders in executing GTM and what are their responsibilities?

M&A Science
131. Making Go to Market Successful

M&A Science

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 47:27


A go-to-market strategy is one of the most important things in an acquisition. In this week's podcast, we're featuring Kison's interview with Pragnya Kashinath, At the time of this interview, she was the Director of M&A, Corporate Strategy at Cognizant. Now, she's an M&A Consultant at Deloitte. Pragnya shares how to create a successful GTM strategy from the very beginning of a transaction and the challenges you need to watch out for. Learn about:   - Pragnya's unique role on the business side versus on the corporate development team - How not to overestimate synergy models - Customizing the customer journey   To join our network of M&A practitioners and sign up for our newsletter go to mascience.com.

Go To Market Grit
COO Bloomreach, Christy Augustine: Thin Mints & Company Building

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 59:27


Carving her own path is certainly one way to describe how Christina Augustine, COO at Bloomreach, has chosen to do her work. With a distinct set of experiences, beginning with a unique college thesis, to owning her own patent, and eventually leading Bloomreach through successful product launches, Christina has held her own over the course of her career. And her fortitude is now paying off. Christina's natural competitiveness has not only helped her shape her own leadership abilities, but she continues to carry these skills forward. While her decision to leave Bain & Company was a difficult one, that decision has returned its value tenfold. From her role as an individual contributor to the now COO at Bloomreach, Christina has brought a tenacity that deserves attention. Check out this episode to learn how she has honed her abilities to evaluate and consciously decide where she wants to be, and how she applies her own grit to the workplace.In this episode, we cover: Christina's college thesis on the Julia set, her experience at HBS, and a look at her patent. (2:20) More on Christina's background and the “gnarly” aspect of her role at Bain & Company - and why she loves volunteering at Girl Scouts. (06:18) Why competitiveness is a great leadership trait and how Christina puts it into practice - and why she chose to make the difficult decision to leave Bain and join Bloomreach as an individual contributor. (15:13) ‘It's an every year decision': Christina explains why she rewrites her resume and reflects on her contributions on an annual basis. (21:51) Powered by Bloomreach: Christina provides an overview of Bloomreach and shares her perspective on their high valuation and what it indicates as they focus on building long-term products. (26:17) The evolution of Christina's roles at Bloomreach, from individual contributor to COO - and how the ‘“north star product vision” impacted the team's decision to build a second product. (35:15) Christina reflects on her early days at Bloomreach and explores their product development journey - and she talks about the impact of Google's SEO algorithm change. (45:09) What Christina's mentors helped her prepare for as she transitioned into her COO position - and why it is important to know when to “do nothing.” (54:18)

SaaSholes
Andrew Hahn Global SaaS Revenue Leader

SaaSholes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 47:28


SAAS Industry Vet Andrew Hahn stopped by to chat SAAS with Kevin Gaither and Pete Jansons Andrew is an incredibly talented, yet flawed CRO. A CRO who helped lead LA's largest SaaS IPO, built three companies to successful exits, & encountered two epic career fails. Andrew is a skilled Global SaaS Revenue Leader who specializes in GTM strategy, scalable operations, and repeatable motions to build multi-channel revenue for start-up, hyper-growth, pre-IPO, and public tech companies. An entrepreneur at heart, Andrew enjoys talking about himself in the 3rd person and run-on sentences... Notes: Steps to Discovery People don't buy from people they like, they buy from trusted consultative experts Why deals stall and what can be done to prevent this stage Demo's Pre/Post/During https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewhahn1121/ Be a SaasHole Patreon Supporter Have an idea for a topic, or guest? Pete@saasholes.net

Go To Market Grit
CEO Alteryx, Mark Anderson: Transformation Starts with Leadership

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 25, 2021 53:19


Mark Anderson, CEO at Alteryx, joins Joubin to talk about how he crafted his leadership ethos, which he often compares to a great game of golf. While Mark is currently at Alteryx, it is his foundation at Palo Alto Networks that serves as the bedrock for how he approaches his work. In this episode, Mark reflects on his time at Palo Alto and offers insight that anyone would be wise to pay close attention to; close attention being an essential part of Mark's ethos, as he says the “absence of a plan” is not part of his DNA. With this mindset, Mark breaks down the deep value of his meticulous planning and how it allows time for each important focus in his life, ranging from work, family, golf, or crucially as salient, when to leave some things by the wayside. Mark and Joubin also discuss their experiences during Palo Alto's acquisition of Evident.io, how it has impacted Mark's approach to the gritty specifics of acquisitions as a whole, and more.In this episode, we cover:  How Mark used his grit to put himself through college - and the parallel between sales and the game of golf. (3:22) Why “the absence of plan” is not part of Mark's DNA - and why he is intentional about the time he puts into work, family, and friends. (7:15) Palo Alto Networks: factors Mark considered as he evaluated the company, a look at his recruitment experience, and his 3 non-negotiables for hiring. (12:55) Mark reflects on some of Palo Alto's wins, including their major stock increase in 2014 and the acquisition of Evident.io. (20:46) More on Palo Alto: Mark talks about Palo Alto's change management approach and some of the challenges of the acquisition process. (26:08) Mark provides an overview of Alteryx and talks about the joys of being on the Alteryx team -  and shares why 2021 became “the year of transformation.” (31:55) Why good leaders should help their teams learn from failures. (42:28) Mark's advice to the aspiring CEO and his takeaways from his journey thus far. (47:26) Links: Connect with Mark LinkedIn Alteryx Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

Full-Funnel B2B Marketing Show
Episode 66: How to differentiate your product in 2022 with Peep Laja

Full-Funnel B2B Marketing Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 58:00


Sign up to all live workshops and podcasts here: https://lu.ma/fullfunnelCopying what others are doing and being a commodity is a safe decision, but you'll always be struggling.GTM strategy shouldn't be dictated by your competitors, but by your customers. Yet in any given B2B market, companies never talk to their customers and just copy what others are doing.Same press releases, social media updates, and blog posts nobody cares about.Same boring ads and landing pages with 0 differentiation.Same boring webinars that are pure product pitches.Same obsolete tactics of promoting gated e-books with sales follow-up.Here is an honest truth:The more you copy others, the more commoditized your product becomes. You'll be always dealing with a question: “Why should I buy from you?”Tune in to learn:1. How to differentiate your B2B product to stand out2. How to measure the efficiency of your messaging3. What's the right way to run a message validation test? What questions should you ask?4. How to combine research insights and improve your message?5. Message teardown of 3 companiesPeep on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/peeplaja/On-Demand B2B Marketing Courses: https://fullfunnel.io/b2b-marketing-courses/Full-Funnel Insider - A Marketing Newsletter For B2B Marketers: https://fullfunnel.io/marketing-newsletter/Join our community for B2B marketers - The Trenches: https://sendfox.com/trenchesUpcoming events: https://lu.ma/fullfunnel/eventsFull-Funnel Marketing Content Hub: https://fullfunnel.io/blog

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
Owning The Customer Experience with Larry Gordon

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 46:42


Owning The Customer Experience with Larry Gordon Larry Gordon and Joe Lynch discuss owning the customer experience. Larry is is the Managing Director, GTM, Emtec Digital, a global technology services company that provides digital software engineering and transformation solutions to clients across multiple industries. About Larry Gordon  Larry Gordon is the Managing Director, GTM, Emtec Digital. Prior to joining Emtec, Larry has held senior leadership positions at Cognizant and Capgemini and has founded and led IT services and software companies in the security, devops and digital transformation segments. He has also been a successful angel investor in the energy and cloud spaces. About Emtec Emtec is a global IT consultancy dedicated to helping world class organizations in the enterprise, education, and government markets drive transformation and growth by employing the latest enterprise technologies and innovative business processes. We empower our clients to accelerate innovation and deliver amazing client experiences to better compete and ultimately lead in their industry. Our “Client for Life” approach is built upon over 20 years of delivering rapid, meaningful, and lasting business value. Our offerings span the IT spectrum from Advisory, Applications (Enterprise, Custom, Mobile and Cloud) as well as Intelligent Automation, Analytic, Cyber Security and Infrastructure Services. Key Takeaways: Owning The Customer Experience Larry Gordon is the Managing Director, GTM, Emtec Digital, a firm that empowers their transportation and logistics clients to accelerate innovation and deliver amazing client experiences. In the podcast interview, Larry explains how the customer experience is increasingly enabled by technology. Consumer technology companies like Amazon have raised the bar on customer experience. Leading transportation, logistics, and warehousing companies are investing to deliver the best customer experience. The 3PL market is separating between the “haves” who have game-changing technology and the “have-nots” who are unable or unwilling to invest in technology. In the past, IT service companies developed systems that were focused on operational and financial functions that were not seen or use by the firm's customers. Today, IT service companies are not just not just developing systems that streamline the process – they are delivering customer experiences. When the customer is regularly interacting with the technology, the bar is very high. IT services companies who are developing customer experiences, work closely with customers (end customers) to understand their unique preferences. Emtec develops digital products or platforms that are customer facing – products that have the ability to delight customers and give your company a competitive advantage. Emtec is a global technology services company providing digital software engineering and transformation solutions to clients in logistics, transportation, and warehousing. Emtec also works some of the leading technology companies in the freight tech space. Learn More About Owning The Customer Experience Larry Gordon LinkedIn Emtec Emtec Digital The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Go To Market Grit
CEO Relativity, Mike Gamson: Fueling the Next Technology Ecosystems

Go To Market Grit

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 56:44


Mike Gamson, CEO of Relativity, has joined the show this week to provide his take on leadership, sales, and the evolution of his career leading up to Relativity. Mike's path into becoming a CEO is a varied one and his diverse range of experiences has helped him hone in on essential insights, which he very humbly shares. With a background in liberal arts, Mike has an interesting story about how he became a leader in the world of sales and technology. It all began when he made the decision to move to Costa Rica after an epic surfing trip along the coasts of South America. At one point, he faced a crossroads and had to decide between staying in Costa Rica or going back home. He chose the former and opened his own burrito shop. Afterward, Mike served as Advent's head of product development, which set the stage for the rest of his career.In this episode, Mike walks through the transitions in his career and shares why he was initially hesitant to join LinkedIn. He also talks about the crucial leadership skills and values he gained at LinkedIn under Jeff Weiner's tutelage and dives into Relativity, Chicago's “best-kept secret,” and the exciting innovations that Relativity is bringing on board. In this episode, we cover:  Mike's fascinating professional journey leading up to LinkedIn; from turning down Goldman Sachs to opening his own burrito shop in Costa Rica - and he and Joubin discover some of the striking similarities they share. (02:03) The evolution of Mike's role at LinkedIn - and what factored into his decision to come on as an individual contributor. (9:47) The challenges LinkedIn faced in its early stages, as leadership navigated the company's identity - and how the question, “what kind of leader do you aspire to be?” helped Mike tap into his core leadership principles. (15:37) Mike recounts moments when he was challenged to make decisions to preserve LinkedIn's values as he grew into his sales leadership role - and how Jeff Weiner's coaching gave him a more compassionate understanding of how to do business more broadly. (21:17) Why Relativity was the “best-kept secret in Chicago” - and why Mike feels passionate about leveraging tech companies to build ecosystems within their communities. (28:04) Mike's views on investing in companies full-time and how his love for learning plays a role in his decision - and more on his transition to CEO of Relativity and how he gained his footing. (33:37) A look at Mike's life as CEO: what he factors into his daily decisions, lessons learned, and his advice to those who are thinking of the next layer up job. (40:34) Mike elaborates on philosophies that he lives by, including his stance on hiring talent, why “yet” is the most powerful word in the English language, the power of being here by choice, and more. (45:21) Joubin and Mike discuss three important leadership traits - and the importance of asserting agency over your time to create a personal life harmony. (50:33) Links: Connect with Mike LinkedIn Relativity Connect with Joubin Twitter LinkedIn Email: gtmg@kleinerperkins.com  Learn more about Kleiner Perkins

PreSales Podcast by PreSales Collective
73. PreSales Operations w/Megan Lin Gibbons

PreSales Podcast by PreSales Collective

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 34:01


On the PreSales Podcast, James Kaikis and Megan Lin Gibbons connect on the topic "PreSales Operations". Megan, Head of Operations, Sales Engineering, talks about what the PreSales Operations role is and how it makes a positive impact on the business. Megan provides specifics on what the functions responsibilities are as well as how to measure the impact of operations. To continue the discussion, join our PreSales Collective Slack Channel #role_operations

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life
SalesImpact In Talks to Raise $6m at $80m Valuation as they pass $4.5m Run Rate For Their Sales Coaching Platform

The Top Entrepreneurs in Money, Marketing, Business and Life

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 19:43


Learning platform for GTM teams