Podcasts about Merck

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  • 1,287PODCASTS
  • 2,263EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • May 12, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Merck

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Latest podcast episodes about Merck

Börsenradio to go Marktbericht
Marktbericht Do. 12.05.2022 - DAX trotz Endspurt im Minus, Apple nicht mehr wertvollstes Unternehmen

Börsenradio to go Marktbericht

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 23:48


Endspurt im DAX, so könnte die Überschrift am Donnerstag lauten. Zunächst sah es eher aus, als würde die Börse die Gewinne der letzten Tage stramm abverkaufen. Deutliches Minus und Kurse unter 13.500 Punkten, dann kam es zum Endspurt, der den DAX fast bis ins Plus führte. Am Schluss waren es dann doch -0,6 % und 13.730 Punkte. Der ATX in Wien gab -1,6 % ab auf 3.033 Punkte, der ATX TR auf 6.249 Punkte. Und auch an der Wall Street stehen deutlich rote Vorzeichen. Gewinner im DAX waren die Vortagesverlierer Delivery Hero mit +6,1 %, Bayer mit +4,1 % und Infineon mit +3,1 %. Stärkste Verlierer waren Sartorius mit -5,3 %, Merck mit -5,6 % und Schlusslicht BMW mit -7,9 %. Diskutiert wurde international vor allem über die schwache Apple Performance, die folgerichtig nicht mehr das wertvollste Unternehmen der Welt sind, sondern von Ölkonzern Saudi Aramco abgelöst wurden. Deutlicher Absturz auch bei den Kryptowährungen, Bitcoin fällt auf den tiefsten Stand seit Ende 2020. Hören Sie Vermögensverwalter Frank Benz von der Benz AG zu seinen Favoriten im aktuellen Umfeld, zur Encavis Aktie CFO Dr. Christoph Husmann, zur Situation in China Deutsche Beteiligungs AG CEO Torsten Grede, zur Hilfe für die Ukraine von All for One CFO Stefan Land, zu neuen Kunden in Q1 11880 CEO Christian Maar, zur Zinswende und der Sippenhaft der Immobilienbranche Deutsche Konsum REIT CEO Rolf Elgeti, zum Wachstum der Cliq Digital Vorstand Ben Bos und Ausschnitte der MKK-Interviews mit Pferdewetten.de CEO Pierre Hofer und Brockhaus Technologies CEO Marco Brockhaus.

Trader's Breakfast
US-Tech-Werte eingebrochen

Trader's Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2022 6:22


Der technologielastige Nasdaq 100 büßte 3,1 Prozent auf 11 968 Zähler ein. Der Leitindex Dow Jones Industrial hielt sich zwar mit einem Abschlag von 1 Prozent auf 31 834 Zähler besser als die Nasdaq-Börse. Für den marktbreiten S&P 500 ging es um 1,7 Prozent auf 3935 Punkte nach unten auf den tiefsten Stand seit mehr als einem Jahr.Aus dem Handel ging der Leitindex Dax mit plus 2,2 Prozent auf 13 829 Punkte. Der MDax der mittelgroßen Börsentitel gewann 2,1 Prozent auf 28 613 Zähler. Der Dax wird heute im Minus bei 13 555 Punkten erwartet.Heute sind in Europa keine wichtigen Konjunkturdaten zu erwarten.In den USA werden neben den wöchentlichen Erstanträgen auf Arbeitslosenhilfe die Erzeugerpreise gemeldet.Adidas, E.ON, Fresenius Medical Care, HeidelbergCement, HelloFresh, K+S und VW halten ihre Hauptversammlung ab.Geschäftszahlen kommen von Allianz, Merck, RWE, Siemens, 1&1, Bechtle, Cancom, Commerzbank, Freenet, ProSiebenSat.1, Salzgitter, United Internet, Varta, CEWE Stiftung, Deutsche Beteiligungs AG, Deutsche Euroshop, Eckert & Ziegler, Encavis, GFT Technologies, Grenke, Hamburger Hafen und Logistik, KWS Saat, Nordex, Patrizia, Sixt, Verbio, Zeal Network, Wienerberger, Bouygues und Telefonica.Support the show

Bringing Chemistry to Life
On the COVID pill and other process chemistry tales

Bringing Chemistry to Life

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 31:50


Visit https://thermofisher.com/bctl to register for your free Bringing Chemistry to Life T-shirt and https://www.thermofisher.com/chemistry-podcast/ to access the extended video version of this episode and the  episode summary sheet, which contains links to recent publications and additional content recommendations for our guest. You can access the extended video version of this episode via our YouTube channel to hear, and see, more of the conversation!Process chemists are the silent heroes of modern pharmaceutical sciences. They take a drug molecule coming out of medicinal chemistry research and make sense of its chemical synthesis. With tight deadlines they often must completely reinvent chemical syntheses to meet strict efficiency and cost requirements necessary to move drugs to commercial production. It's a challenging job that requires discipline and pragmatism, but a certain dose of chemical creativity at the same time.Patrick Fier, from Merck, represents the perfect profile of a great process chemist. He makes the most of the incredible resources and the culture of innovation available at Merck. His chemistry is creative and intriguing, he shows that unique mix of disruptive thinking and disciplined determination that is needed to design state-of-the-art chemical syntheses. And his talent gave him the opportunity to lead the development of Molnupiravir, the so-called COVID pill, one of the most promising antivirals used in severe Coronavirus cases.In this unique episode we have the rare opportunity to get to know a chemist who really played a key role in helping address the COVID pandemic. Keywords:  process chemistry, COVID, molnupiravir, COVID pill, pharmaceutical development, drug, antivirals, C-H functionalization, sulphonamides, phenol synthesis, medicinal chemistry, Merck Sharp & Dome

Madison / Savile Inspired Podcast
How to Become the Authority in Your Industry

Madison / Savile Inspired Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 49:33


Learn from Beate Chelette how she turned her passion into a global business and eventually selling it to Bill Gates in a multimillion dollar deal. I learned so much from Beate in this episode and I'm excited to share it with all of you! Beate will go over the best and fastest way to Grow Your Authority in Your field.  In business, as a leader and visionary, you begin with a Strategy, then a System, then Grow your Authority starting with Mindset. Her clients include Amazon, Reckitt (the maker of Lysol), Chevron, Merck, Johnson & Johnson, the Women's Legislative Caucus of California Cal State University Dominguez Hills, Shelter Inc., Mental Health First Aid and thousands of small businesses.She is amongst the “Top 100 Global Thought Leaders” by PeopleHum and “One of 50 Must-Follow Women Entrepreneurs” by HuffPost.Beate is the author of the #1 International Award-Winning Amazon Bestseller “Happy Woman Happy World – How to Go from Overwhelmed to Awesome”–a book that corporate trainer and best-selling author Brian Tracy calls “a handbook for every woman who wants health, success and a fulfilling career.”More on Beate CheletteBeate Chelette is the Growth Architect and Founder of The Women's Code and provides visionaries and leaders with strategies, blueprints and results-oriented, tangible tools and techniques that give clear steps to improve business systems, strengthen leadership skills and teams so that you can scale your impact.A first-generation immigrant who found herself $135,000 in debt as a single parent, Beate bootstrapped her passion for photography into a highly successful global business and eventually sold it to Bill Gates in a multimillion-dollar deal. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/beatechelette/?hl=enFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/beate.cheletteLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/beatecheletteTwitter: https://twitter.com/BeateCheletteWebsite: https://beatechelette.com/What do you think?If you love what you are hearing, don't forget to SUBSCRIBE and LEAVE A REVIEW.  I would love to hear your thoughts! Share with me your thoughts, comments, feedback or suggestions on topics/stories you would want to hear about in the future. You can leave comments in the REVIEW section of the podcast if you are listening on iTunes or send us a message on our website HERE.Follow Madison / Savile on LinkedIn, FaceBook and Instagram or sign up on our website for exclusive offers and updates.Follow me Diana Nguyen on LinkedIn. 

Flavor of Leadership
Busting 3 Myths About Emotions with Lisa Welsher

Flavor of Leadership

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 51:00


Today, Lisa Welsher, Founder of Empowered by Emotions, joins us to talk about emotional intelligence and how we navigate through our emotions. Among many other thought-provoking revelations, Lisa affirms that emotions are neutral and that there is no such thing as negative emotions.For more than 30 years, Lisa worked with multiple Fortune 500 companies, like Goldman Sachs, Sony, TacoBell, Mcdonald's, and Merck, helping them improve their teams' performances. In March 2020, Lisa founded Empowered by Emotions to empower people with master-level emotional intelligence.Our conversation revolves around using emotional intelligence to generate positive responses from our teams at work and our families at home. Lisa describes and explains the three possible reactions to emotions, what she means when she affirms that negative emotions don't exist, and how to engage with our emotions to get the best out of them. We also talk about fear and anxiety, guilt and shame, and the three myths around emotions. Some Questions I Ask: Tell us about your journey from being a management consultant to Fortune 500 companies for over 25 years and then owning a software company to the point where you focus on emotional intelligence? (3:25)Explain a little more about what engaging with your emotions means or what it looks like (7:42)How can we be more emotionally intelligent at our jobs and at home? (30:36)In This Episode, You Will Learn:The benefits of learning to engage with our emotions (6:42)What are the three responses to emotions (11:03)There is an emotion behind every action we take (14:36)How engaging with our emotions look like. A practical example (25:35)How we can use emotional intelligence to shape our kids' bahevior (36:16)Guilt is good. It helps build our morals (43:05)Resources:Empowered by Emotions websiteBook: Daniel Goleman - Emotional Intelligence: Why It Can Matter More Than IQConnect with Lisa: LinkedInLet's Connect!WebsiteLinkedInInstagram FacebookEmail: clint@flavorofleadership.com See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Gude, Südhessen!
Erste Details zu 9-Euro-Ticket in Darmstadt

Gude, Südhessen!

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 7:31


9-Euro-Ticket kommt auch in Darmstadt, Spenden für die Ukraine landen oft im Müll und Eintracht-Fans werden abgezockt. Das und mehr hören Sie heute im Podcast. Alle Hintergründe zu diesen Themen finden Sie hier: https://www.echo-online.de/lokales/darmstadt/9-euro-ticket-in-darmstadt-es-bleiben-offene-fragen_25512255 https://www.echo-online.de/lokales/darmstadt/grundsteinlegung-fur-mercks-azubi-palast-in-darmstadt_25514556 https://www.echo-online.de/lokales/darmstadt-dieburg/kreis-darmstadt-dieburg/wenn-spenden-fur-ukrainische-fluchtlinge-in-der-tonne-landen_25514345 https://www.main-spitze.de/lokales/kreis-gross-gerau/ruesselsheim/russelsheim-auf-dem-raab-gelande-tut-sich-was_25515206 https://www.echo-online.de/sport/fussball/eintracht-frankfurt/preis-irrsinn-in-sevilla-werden-eintracht-fans-abgezockt_25513918 https://www.echo-online.de/panorama/aus-aller-welt/rekord-warhol-werk-fur-195-millionen-dollar-versteigert_25514996

Between the Bells
Morning Bell 10 May

Between the Bells

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 4:23


Yesterday, the Aussie share market started the new trading week extending its losses from the previous trading session. The benchmark S&P/ASX200 index slipped 1.2%, reaching its lowest level since mid-March. It comes as China intensifies its zero-COVID policy, which in turn has deepened the supply chain crisis. Looking at the sector performances, the market was broadly sold off, with both the real estate and tech sectors posting the biggest losses. The energy, consumer staples and healthcare sectors did however manage to all close slightly higher.The best performer yesterday was once again medical device company, PolyNovo (ASX:PNV), in part due to its directors toping up on PNV shares, however it also seems investors are taking advantage of its share price weakness to purchase more shares. Meanwhile, the worst performers included NOVONIX (ASX:NVX), Imugene (ASX:IMU) and Magellan Financial Group (ASX:MFG). Investors are continuing to sell Imugene shares, following the termination of its supply agreement with Merck. The most traded stocks by Bell Direct clients yesterday included Fortescue Metals Group (ASX:FMG), ANZ (ASX:ANZ) and Macquarie Group (ASX:MQG).In the US, the sell-off continued with all three benchmarks coming under pressure. The Dow Jones fell more than 600 points, the S&P500 down 3.2% and the Nasdaq slipped 4.3%. All sectors were in the red, apart from the consumer staples sector. Amid the losses, the benchmark 10-year Treasury yield hit its highest level since late 2018, trading well above 3%, which continued to crush tech names like Meta, Alphabet, Netflix, and Apple.What to watch today:If you go by the SPI futures, the market is set to open 1.39% lower.Reporting wise, capital market business, Pendal Group (ASX:PDL) will be releasing its half-year results today. Economic news wise, business confidence for April will be announced today. Business confidence currently stands at a five-month high of 16 points, however April's reading is forecasted to fall to 12 points.Moving to commodities, the oil price tumbled around 6% as China's lockdowns weigh on demand outlook. The gold price extended its decline to fall more than 1% on Monday, as the US dollar pushed to near two-decade highs. And the spot iron ore price has fallen about 4%, trading at $US136 a tonne.Private toll road developer, Atlas Arteria (ASX:ALX) is holding its AGM today.Trading Ideas:Citi have maintained its Buy rating on Domino's Pizza (ASX:DMP) with a price target of $108.42. At its current share price $67.60, this implies about 60% share price growth in a year. Trading Central has a bearish signal on Northern Star Resources (ASX:NST) indicating that the stock price may fall from the close of $9.06 to the range of $7.10 - $7.50 in the next 35 days according to standard principals of technical analysis.  

Börsenradio to go Marktbericht
Marktbericht Do. 05.05.2022 - DAX dreht nach starkem Start ins Minus - US-Fed klotzt

Börsenradio to go Marktbericht

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 17:15


Die US Notenbank kleckert nicht, sie klotzt. Sie wird die Bilanz drastisch verkürzen und so ordentlich Liquidität aus dem Markt nehmen. Das ist ein starkes Mittel, um die Inflation zu bekämpfen, sagt Dr. Thomas Gitzel, Chefvolkswirt der VP Bank. Vermutlich muss die Fed die Zinsen am Ende gar nicht so stark anheben. Anleger schauten aber erstmal auf die Zinsanhebung von 50 Basispunkten, die ohnehin schon eingepreist war, und reagierten erleichtert. 14.300 Punkte stand der DAX zum Handelsbeginn am Donnerstag. Aber dann folgte ein langsames Ausbluten über den Tagesverlauf. 400 Punkte. Schlusskurs 13.902 Punkte, ein halbes Prozent im Minus. Größte Gewinner waren Merck, Siemens Healthineers und Symrise. Die Versorger RWE und E.ON dagegen am Ende des DAX. Zahlen kamen unter anderem von Vonovia, die Übernahme der Deutschen Wohnen zahlt sich aus, BMW machts wie VW am Vortag und verdreifacht den Gewinn und die Lufthansa verdoppelt den Umsatz und halbiert den Verlust. Öl steigt auf über 113, der Euro fällt wieder zurück auf 1,05, Gold gibt leicht nach auf 1.873 USD.

Between the Bells
Morning Bell 3 May

Between the Bells

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 4:56


Yesterday, the Aussie share market experienced a broad sell off, with the benchmark ASX200 index falling 1.2% to 7,347 points. Sectors wise, all sectors were in the red. The hardest hit sectors were the tech, real estate, and communication services sectors, which all fell more than 2%.Looking at the ASX200 leaderboard, corporate bookmaker, PointsBet (ASX:PBH) led the way, advancing 5.7%, after Goldman Sachs retained its buy rating on the stock, with a $5.78 price target. That's an 80% premium to its current share price. Also performing well were travel stocks Qantas (ASX:QAN), Flight Centre (ASX:FLT) and Webjet (ASX:WEB), which was likely due to Qantas' trading update, which revealed that domestic travel numbers are rebounding faster than expected. On the other end, Imugene (ASX:IMU) was the worst performing stock, down 13.6% after the biotech company scraped its supply agreement with MSD, which is a tradename of Merck & Co.The most traded stocks by Bell Direct clients yesterday included the Vanguard Australian Shares Index ETF (ASX:VAS), Lake Resources (ASX:LKE) and Pilbara Minerals (ASX:PLS).On Wall Street, the benchmarks started the new trading week lower, however by the late afternoon, the Dow, S&P500 and Nasdaq all managed to stage a late comeback to close in positive territory. Volatility in the bond market likely contributed to the swings in stocks. When the 10-year Treasury yield broke through 3%, which it hasn't done since November 2018, this signalled that the bond market selloff had hit its peak and most likely wouldn't continue until we get beyond the Fed's update on Wednesday. What to watch today:Despite the positive close in the US, if you go by the SPI futures, the Aussie share market is set to open 0.34% lower this morning.  Economic news wise, all eyes will be on the RBA. The Reserve Bank is widely expected to announce a 15 basis point rate increase when it releases a post-policy meeting statement at 2.30pm AEST.All eyes will also be on Woolworths (ASX:WOW) as the retail giant is set to release its third quarter sales update. In commodities, the oil price reversed its losses, to trade slightly higher, around US$105 a barrel. This was off the back of fears that supply might be impacted by a potential European Union ban on Russian crude. The gold price slumped more than 2%, as increased prospects of faster rate hikes by the Fed Reserve lifted both US Treasury yields and the US dollar. And the spot iron ore price is trading nearly 3% higher at US$142 a tonne.There are two new companies debuting on the Aussie share market today. Firstly, share advisory services company, Equity Story Group. It will be trading under the ticker code EQS. And secondly, gold, silver and copper exploration company, Sierra Nevada Gold. Its ticker code SNX.If you're a shareholder of Brickworks (ASX:BKW), you can expect to receive your dividend payment today.Both Santos (ASX:STO) and TPG Telecom (ASX:TPG) are holding their AGMs today.Trading Ideas:Bell Potter have maintained its Speculative Buy rating on PointsBet (ASX:PBH) with a slightly reduced valuation, from $7.50 to $6. At its current share price of $3.17, this implies 89% share price growth in a year. Trading Central has a bearish signal on Michael Hill (ASX:MHJ) indicating that the stock price may fall from the close of $1.10 to the range of $0.56 - $0.66 in the next 142 days according to standard principals of technical analysis.  

Super Awkward Funcast
The Defecation Trial, Nazis Win Again and A New Fauci Flip Flop

Super Awkward Funcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022 119:58


Here's the 54th episode of the Funcast in which Elle details what's going on with the Johnny Depp-Amber Heard Defecation-I mean-Defamation Trial, the latest ramblings from the US President Joe Biden about Ukraine, Psaki's latest Press Briefings, Fauci's new flip flop, the new Ministry of Truth and much more.    When you're done with this episode, if you haven't yet, please watch the latest Sunday episode of Fearlessly Authentic with Lucky Burrito, Elle Latham, etc. here: Fearlessly Authentic   SOURCES:   Johnny Depp-Amber Heard Trial Exhibits   NEW 5 HOUR AUDIO JOHNNY DEPP & AMBER HEARD (4+ Hours actually)   Johnny Depp-Amber Heard Defamation Trial Playlist   Nick Wallis Depp vs. Heard Trial   Johnny Depp & Amber Heard Abuse Claims: Australia's Bloody Aftermath! NEW UNCENSORED AUDIO!!    Correction: The date of this incident was not December 15th, 2015. The finger incident actually occurred in March 2015. I apologize for the mistake.    Johnny Depp Trial Twitter Thread   Elon Musk-Johnny Depp Trial Twitter Thread   Twitter Stockholders   Elon Musk sold around $8.4 billion worth of Tesla shares this week as he moved to buy Twitter    Correction: I misspoke and said Elon Musk dumped $4 billion in Tesla shares. It was actually $8.4 billion.   Twitter Time Out   Dr. Fauci on why the U.S. is ‘out of the pandemic phase'   Fact check: Fauci's 2004 comments on flu vaccine, natural immunity taken out of context   Washington Journal Influenza Vaccine   Pandemic entering new phase: Fauci   Pfizer asks FDA to clear COVID-19 booster shot for children ages 5 to 11   Pfizer submits application for COVID booster dose in children ages 5-11   Moderna seeks authorization for COVID vaccine for kids as young as six months   COVID-19: Moderna asks FDA to authorize vaccine for young kids, Merck antiviral pill sales top $3B   Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Approves First COVID-19 Treatment for Young Children   President Biden delivers remarks in support of Ukraine (7:00-10:00)   White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki holds press briefing (28:00-29:00, 35:00-39:00, 42:30-44)   Disinformation board to tackle Russia, migrant smugglers   Author Nina Jankowicz On Disinformation And Her New Book   Old tweets from Biden's new disinformation czar get flagged by conservatives for pushing disinfo   Newly discovered: Nina Jankowicz Tweet   Department of Homeland Security   LIVE: White House Press Secretary holds press briefing       Thanks so much for listening! Please spread the word and leave comments if you want. Don't be shy.   Enjoy the trip down the rabbit hole and make some snacks. It's gonna be a bumpy ride..  

Masks Off
Get in the Game with Guest Megan Bendtzen

Masks Off

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 47:49


Are you ready to laugh? This was such a fun and yet, important conversation that Tia and Kim had with Megan. Megan is trying to bring more fun, play and laughter into the world but in particular to the workplace. After working for years in “Corporate America,” she knew that she had a purpose in life and that she had to take that chance and jump off the proverbial cliff in order to be who she authentically is and to align with her true self. She was tired of wearing the “imposter mask” and decided that the world needed her talent of bringing laughter and fun to the workplace by helping to plan and implement fun meetings as an example. Megan has such an infectious energy that you can not help but to be drawn into her. "Celebrate your victories… and also celebrate your stumbles, because if you are learning and growing, those are your biggest victories of all. As long as we are learning, we are winning. There is no such thing as failure unless we fail to keep going." ~ Megan Bendtzen Three takeaways: 1. What steps did Megan take to decide to leave her corporate career? ~ 14 minutes 2. What joke did Megan tell about the mushroom? ~ 20 minutes 3. What was Megan's message about making mistakes? ~ 30 minutes To claim Megan's Free Gift, a fun-o-meter quiz, go to https://bit.ly/TheDoctorofFun About Megan Megan Bendtzen is a Speaker, Motivator and Event/Game Host, known for her signature Leadership Development Game Shows. She has made it her mission to infuse fun back into the corporate mindset so employees are more engaged, energized and happier. Megan has studied Leadership, Communication, Engagement, Personal Growth and Relationships for over 18 years. She has worked with thousands of people and delivered hundreds of impactful seminars on these and related topics to companies such as Merck, Marriott, Best Western, VCA Hospitals and others. She is the author of an e-book called "Let's Get Serious About Having Fun" and has been featured on The List TV Show, NBC, Fox 26 Houston, iHeart Radio, The Unstoppable Female Entrepreneur Summit and many other media outlets and podcasts sharing her out-of-the-box ideas and fun tips. Connect with Megan Go to https://bit.ly/TheDoctorofFun to connect with her social media To join us on our Free 2022 Summer “Connect & Grow” live calls the 1st Tuesday of each month at 12 pm Eastern time through August 2nd – please click this link https://bit.ly/3xLVnRK to register for the Zoom link. Go to our Teachable Online School and check out our courses including our signature FREE “Balancing Your Backpack” Course and FREE “I AM WHOLE” Course https://masksoff.teachable.com/courses To Contact Us: Instagram: @masksoffcommunity FB Masks Off Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/masksoffcommunity Masks Off Email: podcastmasksoff@gmail.com

Trader's Breakfast
Gemischte Vorgaben aus den USA

Trader's Breakfast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 6:04


Die Aktien im asiatisch-pazifischen Raum legten am Donnerstagmorgen zu, da die Anleger in der Region auf die Reaktion der Märkte auf die jüngste geldpolitische Entscheidung der Bank of Japan warteten.Der Dow Jones Industrial schloss mit einem Plus von 0,2 Prozent bei 33 302 Punkten. Der marktbreite S&P 500 gewann letztlich 0,2 Prozent auf 4184 Zähler. Der technologielastige Nasdaq 100 drehte im späten Geschäft gar ins Minus und verlor am Ende 0,1 Prozent auf 13 003 Punkte.Der Dax stieg um 0,3 Prozent auf 13 794 Punkte. Der MDax der mittelgroßen Börsenunternehmen ging 0,3 Prozent fester mit 29 816 Punkten aus dem Handel. Heute wird der Dax wieder im Plus bei 17 854 Punkten erwartet.Neben dem Geschäftsklimaindex für die Eurozone steht heute eine erste Schätzung für die Inflationsrate im April an. Im März war die Teuerung mit 7,3% auf den höchsten Stand seit mehr als 40 Jahren gestiegen.In den USA werden neben den wöchentlichen Erstanträgen auf Arbeitslosenhilfe die persönlichen Konsumausgaben und Zahlen zum Bruttoinlandsprodukt im ersten Quartal veröffentlicht.Die Münchener Rück und RWE halten heute ihre Hauptversammlung ab.Geschäftszahlen kommen von HelloFresh, Linde, Kion Group, Nemetschek, Wacker Chemie, Drägerwerk, Fielmann, Takkt, Sanofi, TotalEnergies, Nokia, Altria, Amazon, Apple, Baidu, Caterpillar, Church & Dwight, Comcast, Domino's Pizza, Eli Lilly, Gilead Sciences, Intel, Mastercard, McDonald's, Merck & Co., Southwest Airlines, Stryker, Thermo Fisher, Twitter, Verisign und Western Digital.Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/kommponisten)

The Hacking HR Podcast
The Hacking HR Podcast - Episode 408

The Hacking HR Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 22:34


Interview with Garvita Chaturvedi – Garvita is the Employee Experience Lead for the Americas at Merck. She is a senior Human Resources Professional with progressive experience in Fortune 100 companies.

Heiko Thieme Börsen Club
Heiko Thieme: "Wir werden schwitzen, aber wir werden überleben. Europa ist die Lösung, nicht das Problem"

Heiko Thieme Börsen Club

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 13:33


Der DAX rutscht in der letzten Aprilwoche unter 14.000 Punkte, die Stimmung ist schlecht. Die Nachrichtenlage allerdings ist nicht nur schlecht. Frankreich-Wahl, ifo-Geschäftsklimaindex. Das sollte Anlass geben zur Hoffnung. Heiko Thieme: "Man sollte mit dem Aufbauen von Positionen beginnen. Ich erwarte die 12.000 Punkte. Kurzum: Es sind enorme Herausforderungen!" Aber Börsianer sollten nach den Chancen fragen. "Ich als Antizykliker kaufe das, was gefallen ist, nicht das, was gestiegen ist." Heiko Thieme sendet einen klaren und eindringlichen Appell. Nicht nur an die Clubmitglieder. "Wir sollten nicht blind sein vor den Herausforderungen und wir sollten keine Angst vor Putin haben. Putin sollte nicht die Welt bestimmen, sondern die Welt sollte Putin in seine Schranken weisen. Das ist die Aufgabe des freien Marktes, und da sehe ich echte Chancen!". Mit welcher Strategie Anleger jetzt agieren und auf welche Werte, Indizes oder Aktien sie setzen, erfahren Sie exklusiv in dieser Clubausgabe. Behandelte Aktien u.a.: Paypal, Netflix, Novavax, SAP, VW, Twitter, Continental, Merck, Infineon, Henkel, Deutsche Bank, Siemens Energy, Boeing, IBM, Intel, DAX, Dow Jones. Gekürzte Clubausgabe! Gesamtlänge für Clubmitglieder: 48 Minuten. Zur aktuellen Ausgabe: https://go.brn-ag.de/181 Werden Sie Clubmitglied: https://www.heiko-thieme.club/anmeldung-monatsabo/

MoneyBall Medicine
How Akili Built a Video Game to Help Kids with ADHD

MoneyBall Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 51:04


Can a video game help improve attention skills in kids with ADHD? According to Akili Interactive in Boston, the answer is yes. They've created an action game called EndeavorRx that runs on a tablet and uses adaptive AI  to help improve focus, attentional control, and multitasking skills in kids aged 8 to 12. And it's not just Akili saying that: In 2020 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration agrees cleared EndeavorRx as a prescription treatment for ADHD, based on positive data from a randomized, controlled study of more than 600 children with the disorder. It was the first video game ever approved as a prescription treatment for any medical problem, and Harry's guest this week, Akili co-founder and CEO Eddie Martucci, says  it opens the way for a new wave of so-called digital therapeutics. Even as Akili works to tell the world about EndeavorRx and get more doctors to prescribe the game for kids with ADHD (and more insurance companies to pay for it), it's testing whether its approach can help to treat other forms of cognitive dysfunction, including depression, the cognitive side effects of multiple sclerosis, and even Covid-19 brain fog.Please rate and review The Harry Glorikian Show on Apple Podcasts! Here's how to do that from an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch:1. Open the Podcasts app on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. 2. Navigate to The Harry Glorikian Show podcast. You can find it by searching for it or selecting it from your library. Just note that you'll have to go to the series page which shows all the episodes, not just the page for a single episode.3. Scroll down to find the subhead titled "Ratings & Reviews."4. Under one of the highlighted reviews, select "Write a Review."5. Next, select a star rating at the top — you have the option of choosing between one and five stars. 6. Using the text box at the top, write a title for your review. Then, in the lower text box, write your review. Your review can be up to 300 words long.7. Once you've finished, select "Send" or "Save" in the top-right corner. 8. If you've never left a podcast review before, enter a nickname. Your nickname will be displayed next to any reviews you leave from here on out. 9. After selecting a nickname, tap OK. Your review may not be immediately visible.That's it! Thanks so much.TranscriptHarry Glorikian: Hello. I'm Harry Glorikian, and this is The Harry Glorikian Show, where we explore how technology is changing everything we know about healthcare.Can a video game help improve attention skills in kids with ADHD?According to Akili Interactive in Boston, the answer is yes. They've created an action game called EndeavorRx that runs on a tablet and uses adaptive AI  to help improve focus, attentional control, and multitasking skills in kids aged 8 to 12.And it's not just Akili saying that.The U.S. Food and Drug Administration agrees.In 2020 the FDA cleared EndeavorRx as a prescription treatment for ADHD, based on positive data from a randomized, controlled study of more than 600 children with the disorder. It's the first video game ever approved as a prescription treatment for any medical problem.Kids are advised to play the game for 25 minutes a day, five days a week. After two months of play, two-thirds of parents of kids in the controlled study said they saw a meaningful change in their children's day-to-day impairments. The FDA's approval of EndeavorRx opens the way for a new wave of so-called digital therapeutics, designed to treat all kinds of problems with cognitive functioning, including depression, the cognitive side effects of multiple sclerosis, and even Covid-19 brain fog.Akili is busy telling the world about EndeavorRx and working to get more doctors to prescribe the game for kids with ADHD and more insurance companies to pay for it. And here today to tell us about all of that is Akili's co-founder and CEO Eddie Martucci.Harry Glorikian: Eddie, welcome to the show.Eddie Martucci: Thanks, Harry.Harry Glorikian: So I'm dying to get into the company and all the things you guys are doing. But, like, before we jump into the company, I'd love our audience to get to know you a little bit. Right, because you're a long time health entrepreneur. You got your PhD at Yale in the departments of pharmacology and molecular biophysics and biochemistry, where you studied structure based drug design. But how did your personal path lead you from molecular biology, which is near and dear to my heart, to video games to treat cognitive impairment? I mean, that that's not exactly the Venn diagram I would see that somebody would just put together.Eddie Martucci: No, it's not. And there is no there is no path for this. Right. Because this is so different and so new. I would say my personal passion is just new science findings. Like I just love brand new science. I was a researcher for a short stint while I did a PhD. I think I had some pretty cool research. But really, if I zoom back, it's new science and new discoveries that are moving the health world forward. And that can be whether it's insights about some part of our biology that we didn't know before, that leads us to understand the human body better. Or in the case of what I've really done from a professional perspective, it's scientific insights that can lead to new treatment modalities. And so that's really what got me most excited. I think the path that was most impactful for me, you know, I was a biochemist at Providence College and a biochemist and biophysicist at Yale, and I love proteins and structural biology and all that. I still do. But I came out of my PhD and and worked with a group called PureTech Health in Boston. And Puretech is really just this unique new health care company where they've done everything from, they have research and development and discovery, but they also have in many ways nailed down a process of starting new companies off of groundbreaking science. And so while I was in grad school, I was exposed to a couple entrepreneurs that really put a light bulb in my head that, wow, this is something I should look into. And then I got training at PureTech in Boston. And that's what kind of got me thinking about brand new medicine and brand new modalities that were never considered medicine before. And the rest is history. Once you get a framework where you can start thinking like that, then it's just work.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I mean, I knew Daphne, I think when she started PureTech and her advisory board was like, I mean, Nobel Prize winning, who's who sort of. Right. Just watched it evolve over time. But, you know, when you were at PureTech, I think one of their focuses was neurophysiological disorders. I mean, is that the real bridge that helped start Akili? Because I remember that came out of Adam Gazzaley's lab at UCSF, if I remember correctly.Eddie Martucci: Yeah. Adam Gazzaley is where we found the core technology that which we call SSME, which has gone on to power our products, including our FDA approved product. But yes, what I was working on at PureTech, including directly with Daphne, who's really brilliant in helping and bringing new big ideas to life and board members, including people like Ben Shapiro, who used to be at Merck. And he was one of my longest term board members. It doesn't hurt to have folks like Bob Langer in the room once every quarter to bounce ideas off of as well. So like, a very privileged place to start a company. But yes, I was working on novel CNS technologies, in fact. In fact I was working on a few and one in particular that was new devices, new devices for various neurological conditions. And it was really from that effort in thinking about what are the newest modalities of medical devices that we leaped one big bridge further and said in 2010 or about or maybe 2009, could we go further from a user experience perspective now that the whole world is carrying cell phones and tablets every day? Could we go further? Could we could we think about digital? And that was right around the time when everyone and their mother was talking about digital helping medicine. And because we were in the headspace of novel therapeutic modalities, I think it was a natural leap to say, what about digital being the medicine? And then we had to find the science. And that's where I found Adam Gazzaley and, and, and we got off to the races with that technology from UCSF.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. I mean this whole area of digital therapeutics, I've been talking about it for years now and trying to convince people and they look at me really weird when I say digital therapeutics and I try to explain it to them. But so but the game you have built is called EndeavorRx. If I got that correctly. And can you tell? Me more about the game itself. Like, what are the operative features or game mechanics that are thought to increase attention in kids who play the game?Eddie Martucci: You kind of have to back up to the core technology. So the way we build the business is not building one product or one game. We're building a platform technology, meaning a technology that is not made for a single disorder. But instead the problem we're going after and that we started with all of those years ago, about a decade ago, is cognitive functioning. Cognitive dysfunction in medicine is not targeted well by molecular pharmacology. That is the problem statement. We don't target cognition very well in medicine, if at all. And so our whole theory and thesis for the business was, if we could bring in the best technologies in the world, that through software could actually target cognitive functioning directly, then we would be bringing a pillar of medicine that does something much, much different than what medicine does today. So the technology out of UCSF that we started the company around, that we have branded the Selective Stimulus Management Engine, the way this technology works, which will then help you understand how the products in for ADHD children works. The way this technology works is it is giving constant stimulus, both visual and motor. So it's creating conflicting and overwhelming stimulus to activate the part of the brain that controls attention, which is the midline prefrontal cortex. So the front part of the brain that really controls attention and speed of processing and integration, this technology is patented to be able to activate that part of the brain very strongly, but also enhance what's called long range coherence. So as you're using this technology, not only is the front part of the brain activating much more, so you can apply your attention downwards.Eddie Martucci: And I'll get to exactly how this manifests, I promise. It is also more seamlessly based on the neurological data we have. It appears to more seamlessly be helping the brain communicate to the sensory processing regions. And so the way this manifests in ADHD children, when they're using our product EndeavorRx, which is meant for children 8 to 12 years old with ADHD who struggle with the attentional issues. This product is basically experienced like a racing video game where children are running a little alien figure down a course that is ever adapting. And they're getting information, meaning things that fly up to the screen that they have to make decisions on. And that's ever adapting because we have these deep, personalized algorithms so that everyone gets their own experience. So basically what people feel is they're using this technology that feels like a game, and it's just constantly challenging them in different ways. What's happening in the brain and this is how it's designed, is that the game is presenting very specific stimuli for each user that is pushing them at the edge of their processing ability. And that's part of the IP we have, is how to do that in a really seamless way so that by the end of using a game you haven't just been using a game, you have been essentially taxing the weak link in your attentional processing every single second for hours.Harry Glorikian: I think every CEO of that we may know mutually needs to be prescribed this game.Eddie Martucci: You know, CEOs and investors have been probably the most common people that in meetings will stop me and say, hey, I think I need this.Harry Glorikian: Yes. So how did you ideate and test the game mechanics?Eddie Martucci: Yeah. This is this is really a tenet of the business where we decided early on that to truly—we want to disrupt medicine and we want to create and integrate our type of medicine into mainstream medicine. Far too often, digital is kind of left to early adopters or on the sidelines of real medicine, excuse me. And our whole thesis was you have to run real validated and literally gold standard, rigorous clinical research. So when we had done this, no one had done a well designed trial before to study something that looks like a video game. And so that's really where we spent the first handful of years of our existence is after we built the kind of data infrastructure, which we can talk about, and the adaptive algorithms. We then invested years in how to run good clinical trials with this type of product that's an experiential product. So our goal all along was being able to run the same or better rigor of randomized controlled trials that you'd expect from a drug for this same disease area. Obviously, as an interactive product that you can see and you interact with, that means you have to take a little bit of a different approach.Eddie Martucci: So we had to do a lot of work with some of our advisors and with places like Duke University on how to blind the protocol. Because it has to blind very differently. And how to how to have a control, an active controller sham that is actually controlled. And there's many nuances like that. But at the end of the day, the trials we run are meant to replicate or be analogous to drug trials, where you have really strong controls up front, that you're not biasing individuals and that the outcomes—and this is the differentiator in digital—that the outcomes are gold standard accepted outcomes for whatever you're studying. And so that was what we've done. What we did the first time we were in a trial, we were like, it took a lot of work and we were nervous about it. But we have a clinical ops team now and we've run a few dozen trials across, I think, nine or ten disease populations, so we've become pretty good at it.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, I was going to say, I mean, coming up with the first one, everybody's probably scratching their head trying to figure out, are we doing the right thing? But, and I have this discussion with some of the people I work with all the time, what's the proprietary special sauce in the case of digital therapy? I mean, is there a defensible algorithm or insight at the heart of something like EndeavorRx that would be comparable to a patented small molecule in the you know, in the traditional drug industry?Eddie Martucci: In our case, yes. And I'll tell you about that. I think what this really comes down to, though, that question about digital therapeutics, it's like a business question for the industry. To answer that question, it's important to recognize there's nuance in the industry. So the vast majority of digital approaches, I think, are tough to protect because they're taking well known human practices and putting them into an app. Right. So there's 90 percent of the digital therapy companies or products out there are using different forms of behavioral therapy or disease management techniques or strategies, and they're bringing them into an app that is not bad. It's hopefully very, very good for patients. There's a few validated products there that are, no question, good for patients. I think it does make those types of products harder to protect. We've taken a bit of a different tack. We're a little bit, I guess, iconoclastic within the industry in that what gets us excited is software that even though it's software, it's more drug like in that it's directly targeting and activating the dysfunctional physiology in the body. You can measure that and by virtue of that, you're having a really unique effect. Eddie Martucci: The second big difference is we are using algorithms that have not been ever reported on before. So we take much more of a drug lens where we actually do protect we patent our technology. So we call this whole class “physiologically activating digital therapeutics.” Some people have referred to them as mechanistic digital therapeutics or disease modifying. There's different phrases, but this idea of unique algorithms that you actually can protect with patents and copyrights, which we do. So we have about 50 issued patents for the technology that underlies EndeavorRx and another 100 that are filed on our various technologies. And you can demonstrate this has a real, unique physiological effect. I think what it enables, at least for these types of products is a feeling from the health care world that this is much more what I'm used to seeing in my traditional medicine where it's unique. I can't just go get this anywhere because I trust that this one product is the only one that has this unique technology. And by the way, it's been proven to work. And I trust that they're a stable company that's going to be around for a while. Those things are really important to our model.Harry Glorikian: Well, it's a good thing that I've been explaining it to people the right way. So at least now that we've talked, you know, my explanation is aligning correctly. So I'm happy about what I'm reading is correct. Let's take a step back. So, there's a lot of kids with ADHD who have no problems concentrating on something for hours if they're really interested in it. But it strikes me the key feature of the of the product is not just keeping kids engaged. It's supposed to build or improve those skills. Is that the key thing that makes the game special or unusual or different from any other pastime, say, building LEGO spaceships?Eddie Martucci: Yes, absolutely. So the engagement is critical, but the differentiator is the challenging and improving of that core cognitive functioning. And you don't get that just by engaging in something. And actually, the vast majority of entertainment products you engage with will allow you to either passively engage, meaning you could watch YouTube videos for hours and hours, but you're not actually challenging your brain or actively engage, but in a way that you don't really have to challenge what you don't do well. So in most video games, you can choose what most of us do in life, choose the path of least resistance, because we like certain ways of using a product. Our product is unique in that this this patented algorithm forces you—it's essentially measuring second by second where you're weak and processing the various streams of information and it is forcing you to work on those areas where you are weakest. But it's doing it naturalistically. It feels like you're using a treatment, but it's really that level of focus on, for lack of a better word, it's really that level of focus of delivery of that algorithm that's actually going to stress you where it, for lack of a better word, hurts the most. That is the differentiator. The other big differentiator is, is the personalized algorithms that that we built in. And this is where, frankly, technology and data rich medicine has never gone before. But within seconds of using the experience, this product is tailoring to each individual user. And this is true whether we're talking about kids with ADHD or some of our trials and products and adults with depression or MS, these products can actually tailor to your functional level and then move you along from there. So those two those two bits of how the algorithm works are critically important. The engagement is really the delivery vehicle to make sure you're getting that level of medicine.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, definitely, if this was available to people in a larger age range, there are people that I definitely need to recommend this to when well then that becomes available.Eddie Martucci: But well, that's the interesting thing about cognitive dysfunction, right? The way I talk about it sometimes is cognitive functioning and or problems with cognitive functioning go across disease, right? They're in many ways disease agnostic. Almost anything that touches the brain results in some level of cognitive dysfunction or at least some proportion of patients that have longer term cognitive dysfunction. But it also goes above and below disease, meaning subclinical. So there are people that are not diagnosed with issues that, you know, that probability-wise there's 20 or 30 percent that are significantly below the mean they're struggling with these things. So this is a this is a basic human function that rears its head in a really nasty way in many diseases, but is actually relatable to all of us.Harry Glorikian: Yeah. So. I mean, there's a lot of challenges when you're trying to design something like this. A ten year old will not spend much time playing a mobile game unless it's it's just as compelling as, you know, anything that they could download as a mobile app. So. How did you guys, what steps did you guys take? You know, it's almost like game design and, you know, therapeutic outcome, you know, together in one package. And so how did you guys, what steps did you guys take to make sure this thing was fun?Eddie Martucci: Correct. Yeah. And it does depend on the population. Right. So we have products, obviously a marketed product in for children with ADHD, but we're developing products and have trials and data and adults of various ages. The I think you're right. If you focus on children, there's a there's an engagement bar that is not easy. Right. Kids are highly discerning. They know a good game and a bad game. And what we like to say is we have no delusions that we're going to come out with the next blockbuster entertainment game. That is not how we built the company. However, we do want to have a game that looks and feels like the type of games that you actually like to play. So it has to be worlds better than edutainment, as people call it, educational software, because kids know. And so the way we did that is this is one thing that makes Akili very unique. Instead of outsourcing or kind of outsourcing game development or adding game development at the end of our development cycle, we actually have built the company to have cognitive science, clinical science, and game development fully integrated from the earliest days. And data science, for what it's worth, is really a kind of foundational thread for all of those. And it's hard. It's really hard. I mean, developing a product that has both these things, the strong science and the engagement, is really hard, but it's also really hard for people from all these different industries to, you know, be speaking the same language and work together because the development processes are different, the language you use is different. Your mindset of how you think about developing is different. And so for us, what I always talk about is it's literally daily attention. I'm unwilling to sacrifice or give up on it. We have to do both. Well, I think where we are today with EndeavorRx as our first product out of the platform, it's a really good product. It was built to show clinical efficacy and engage people to a minimal degree. It does that. Some kids love it. They will play for months at a time, you know, five days a week for four months. But yeah, there's a lot of people that kind of get through it and then plenty of kids that say, I really don't want to use this. So we've built features around the edges, things like an app for parents to allow them to track and monitor and incentivize their children. And we try to educate our users on why you're doing this. And so it's got to be a mix of the engagement itself, but also a little bit of inherent motivation that, hey, your doctor's in the loop, this is your medicine. It's important to put the work in and accomplish it.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: Let's pause the conversation for a minute to talk about one small but important thing you can do, to help keep the podcast going. And that's leave a rating and a review for the show on Apple Podcasts.All you have to do is open the Apple Podcasts app on your smartphone, search for The Harry Glorikian Show, and scroll down to the Ratings & Reviews section. Tap the stars to rate the show, and then tap the link that says Write a Review to leave your comments. It'll only take a minute, but you'll be doing a lot to help other listeners discover the show.And one more thing. If you like the interviews we do here on the show I know you'll like my new book, The Future You: How Artificial Intelligence Can Help You Get Healthier, Stress Less, and Live Longer.It's a friendly and accessible tour of all the ways today's information technologies are helping us diagnose diseases faster, treat them more precisely, and create personalized diet and exercise programs to prevent them in the first place.The book is now available in print and ebook formats. Just go to Amazon or Barnes & Noble and search for The Future You by Harry Glorikian.And now, back to the show.[musical interlude]Harry Glorikian: What makes you optimistic? Because I've been, you know, enamored with this space for a while now and trying to watch like where it's going to grow and what's going to get in its way. And so what makes you optimistic about digital therapeutics, either as a venture scale business or a public company. Because I know you guys are thinking about that. Tell me what you're thinking.Eddie Martucci: Yeah, a couple of things that make me very optimistic. I think the foundational groundwork is now done and we've shown it can be done. So we know that these products now can be developed, they can be protected, they can be brought through clinical trials and actually help patients. That's the most important thing. They can undeniably with strong clinical data, help patients and they can be brought through the FDA and now being prescribed by docs. So these prescription digital therapeutics, there's only a couple of them on the market. But literally at this point there's been now thousands of docs, not merely tens or hundreds, but we're talking now about thousands of docs who have prescribed prescription digital therapeutics to patients, where a couple of years ago that would have been essentially zero. So the foundations are there more. Every month that goes on, it becomes a a self-fulfilling cycle where doctors and patients hear about it, they're aware of it. They know someone who's tried it. And it's becoming a little bit common nature to think, wait, isn't there something digital that I've heard about for this? I think that will flip in the coming years to I expect to have a digital treatment or I expect to be told the digital option for my doc. So that makes me that makes me optimistic is that the groundwork is there. We know it can be done.Eddie Martucci: The second thing is, frankly, society is demanding better medicine in many different ways. They're demanding, and mainly I'm talking about patients in many respects, they're demanding more accessible medicine. They're obviously…we all got the efficiency bug of telemedicine during COVID. And while I've seen the data that that has significantly receded, I don't think the concept of online or digital in medicine has receded from anyone's mind. I think we all know that it's far more efficient and we should expect to see more products that are digital in nature, whether that's scheduling with a doc or taking a treatment. And so I think there's this kind of wave in society that is that is pushing people to recognize that we should be open to these types of products. The other thing is, whereas docs and patients years ago when we did market research, there was a level of skepticism that was pretty healthy. I now see a level of openness where if there's good data and there's especially in our case, things like FDA approval and strong clinical data, there's a better chance than not that both patients and doctors are going to be not only acceptable or accepting, but they're going to want to at least try something like this. So all the groundwork is there. We've just got to keep keep plugging away because it's new.Harry Glorikian: I talk about the whole digital therapeutic space in my book. And I always tell people look, if a product like this works for you, you're not going to have a side effect profile the way you have with some of the small molecule drugs that I've seen. It's trial and error with those things. And sometimes things don't go as well as you want them to and you end up with a very angry child if the drug doesn't do what it's supposed to do.Eddie Martucci: It's egregious. It's egregious. I mean, medicines, pharmacological medicines for neurological conditions are critically important. Don't get me wrong, I think they're critically important. And EndeavorRx is not meant to be an alternative to medication, especially if it's working well for for a child. But the problem is, there are many components of these conditions that are just not well addressed. And so you're left as a clinician to try to use these blunt instruments, these molecules which weren't delivered for these problems or rather weren't designed for these problems. You're trying to use them, but you're fighting the side effect profile as much as you're fighting the efficacy the whole time. And so you're right. Trial and error is the right phrase. Like the fact that we're still doing trial and error in CNS conditions all these years later is crazy. And there's a better way because we now can have these more targeted products that are part of the patient's toolbox.Harry Glorikian: Yeah, and we need more of them, so. Yeah, great. But let's talk about the business model, right? I mean, this is, you know, feels like fresh territory, right? And if I think about mobile games generally don't make money unless you sell millions of copies. Right. So you have you must have a different business model in mind from the beginning. I suspect this business model revolved around, you know, selling Akili games as a prescription based therapeutic at a cost that would be more typical for a drug than a mobile game.Eddie Martucci: Right. Right. So the concept here is we want the products to get to the patients that really need them and we want to involve the doctor in the loop and we want to have products that are proven. And so all of that to me says a core medicine model, meaning prescription treatment, as you said, covered ideally by insurance largely, but with a little bit of out-of-pocket burden from the patient. You're right, the general cost is a little bit more in line with pharmacology, although the good news in mental health and behavioral health is that's that's relatively inexpensive. We're not talking about multi-thousand-dollar therapies here. We're talking about something that is in the low hundreds per month. And for the patient, really more like $30 to $50 a month. So these are the cost structures that we think are tenable and have been working well in behavioral medicine. And that's really where we're starting. But we're in the early days. I think one of the beauties of digital is we don't have to just stay there, meaning that is the core of the model, a prescription that scales and is paid for by both insurance and patient.Eddie Martucci: But I think there's a lot of potential to evolve and iterate the model that has more consumer elements to it. For instance, like your best technology products, we can adapt the product itself to grow with you. Like your best technology products. We can serve, you know, services and help on the side beyond or in between your use of the actual treatment. So there's a level of connectivity with our end user and consumer that is that actually looks a lot more like best in class consumer software where you can have a long term relationship with a patient. Now, we have not pulled any of those levers yet, but I think what we're most excited about is the bringing both of those models to bear. A medical model, but that has some aspects to it that can actually grow and extend more like software. I actually think that's where the field will go. But it is early days. We'll have to see how this we'll have to see how this shakes out.Harry Glorikian: Well, that's why I always I always tell people, like, you know, once you digitize something like you get to have a broader imagination about what is possible in that realm as opposed to, you know, sticking to exactly what we did before.Eddie Martucci: Exactly.Harry Glorikian: But taking a step back here, no one has ever marketed a prescription based video game or won marketing approval from the FDA for such a product. Right. So how did you frame yourself? You walk in there and you say, “Hey, here, play this. And you're going to like it.” What were the hurdles? What did you have to overcome to get regulatory approval for this? What was it like dealing with the FDA?Harry Glorikian: No, it's a great question. Yeah, the FDA process is fascinating. We know it is rigorous, it's long, it's mostly collaborative. Right. The FDA wants to learn and help. But I think, number one, most importantly, there's unfortunately a myth out there today that digital therapeutics are actually medical devices generally don't have to go through efficacy analysis by the FDA. So I see this myth all the time. People say, well, you know, on the medical device side, they only look at safety. And so, unfortunately, with broad brushes, people have painted digital therapeutics as part of that. They've said, well, digital therapeutics may or may not have evidence, but the FDA looks at safety. I can unequivocally tell you that could not be farther from the truth. I would say 95 percent of our interactions with the FDA, which took the better part of two years because our product was so novel, you can imagine we were not only innovating the delivery mechanism, it's a video game. We were innovating the target, which is cognitive functioning, which there are no products labeled for cognitive functioning. And we were trying to look at what are the endpoints that, you know, that read on cognitive functioning. All of this is new, but not 95 percent of the questions we had, and that's—please don't quote me on the specifics, this is not a deposition—but in that range, were about efficacy. And we went through every little bit of our efficacy data so that the FDA could understand it, so that they could audit it.Eddie Martucci: We even, midway through our regulatory process, brought on a fifth study. So we have five studies in our FDA label package. So we brought on the most recent study to show to address some questions FDA had around efficacy in the longer run or efficacy along with medication. So this was a very rigorous process. I always tell people the good news about this is you can trust it when it comes out because this is something that looks and feels a lot like the drug process, right? There's a lot of scrutiny put on the trials and the legitimacy of the trials. So so it looked a lot like that. It's highly iterative. From a business side, the one tough part with FDA is when you're when you have a new classification for a product, so a 510K de novo, so they're creating a classification, there is no hard timeline on the review. And so when you're a startup and you're building a business, you kind of just keep iterating until you get to a label or not, right? And luckily in our case, we did. But yeah, I mean, as a startup, you're going through a nearly two-year approval. It's stressful. It's stressful, but it's good for the industry, I believe, because it's really forcing a high bar of science.Harry Glorikian: Well, no. And I mean, that's what you want. You don't want a low bar and then things go wrong, like you want it to be held to a higher standard. And usually when the FDA is taking on something new, they've also got to take the time to catch up to where you are. Right. They can't just walk in the room and be ready for this. So you're sort of paving the path for everybody that's coming behind you, which is a I guess there's a good part of that and a bad part of that.Eddie Martucci: Yes. Yes.Harry Glorikian: So there's a lot of stakeholders and gatekeepers in this space that we're talking about, right. Patients, parents, physicians, payers. I mean, each one of them needs to be persuaded that digital therapy or digital therapeutics are, you know, beneficial and worth prescribing or worth paying for. So, anything special you're doing to sort of win them all over?Eddie Martucci: Well, we're doing the work to put time and attention towards it. So you're right. Just because it's digital does not mean people will use it or understand it. So you've got to sit with patients and educate. Just because docs have a new tool doesn't mean they'll trust it. So you've got to spend time to make sure they understand the data and more importantly, understand where we're trying to play in the treatment paradigm. Right. Because, again, we're not … the easy answer for a digital is, “Oh, this is supposed to be a digital equivalent of a drug.” No. It's more nuanced than that. This is supposed to help in a very specific way. And insurers are probably the biggest barrier because it's so new for them. Right. This is this is very new. They don't really, they're not really built to be able to adjudicate digital products. Right. And unfortunately, we've got some of these types of myths floating around, like the FDA medical device myth, which understandably makes insurers uncomfortable. Right. If they if that's what they've heard, they say, well, how in the world am I supposed to adjudicate efficacy if the FDA doesn't? I guess I'll look at this with all the other hundreds of wellness apps out there.Eddie Martucci: So it's education time. Honestly, it's education time to unravel these myths, to really sit and make sure these stakeholders understand the data and the utility of the product. In terms of special things, one of the one of the nice things about growing a company, especially with digital company in this day and age, is you can test and iterate really quickly on all of these fronts. And so when we test you've got to have the meetings and you've got to fit into their review cycles. But for patients and docs, you know, we, we take a very clear test and learn approach. We are releasing certain types of educational content or certain types of marketing messages in pilot phase. Right now we see what works, we see what doesn't. We adapt. We do the same thing with the distribution infrastructure, frankly. Like how in the world do you get a video game therapeutic from your doctor? We built the infrastructure. We tested, we changed, we scrapped half of it and started again. So that is the beauty of living in a digital world. We can we can do that type of testing and learning.Harry Glorikian: And good old AB testing on what works and what doesn't.Eddie Martucci: Totally.Harry Glorikian: All right, let's step out of ADHD for a minute. You've been talking about other neurophysiological sort of conditions. And I think the website, if I'm not mistaken, mentions depression, cognitive dysfunction, multiple sclerosis, autism spectrum disorder, and a few other future treatments is. Is there something about the EndeavorRx platform or the proprietary adaptive algorithm that gives you the ability to sort of generalize? And I think you mentioned that earlier, but sort of to dig into that a little bit.Eddie Martucci: Yeah. So it really starts with what technology are looking for. And so we don't source technologies that are meant for any one condition. That is more common in the behavioral therapy space where there's behavioral therapy for disease X because it's a tried and true technique specific to the disease. The way we work is looking for technologies that actually activate specific brain regions and have data that they do that well. And so the interesting thing that we found about cognitive functioning, and we knew a little bit about this, but you know, I don't like to have revisionist history and say we we knew it all, with cognitive dysfunction and disease, independent of the etiology or the cause of why the brain is having issues, the downstream manifestation actually tends to bucket into very similar issues. And so our theory was, and so far it's proven true, is if you could bring technologies that are meant for the neurological processing issues, not the disease, not specifically the disease, then any condition that results in similar issues, you should be able to have a functional impact on. Because we're not we're not targeting, you know, dopamine reuptake and a dopamine driven disorder. We're not targeting myelination in am anti-myelinating disorder. We are targeting the end result, which is how well the brain is communicating. So we've because we start there, we, we theoretically have the ability to go across disease, and we've actually shown it now. So the same technology that has a treatment label for ADHD has been able to power two studies, including a larger randomized controlled study in multiple sclerosis adults, and showed clinically meaningful, large changes in speed of processing and related cognitive functions. That's the same technology under the ADHD product. ADHD and MS could not be farther from each other in terms of cause, but because the resulting functionally in the same in the same area, that's then you get that benefit. So that's our theory and that's how we're going to continue to develop products and take a functional and a neural network approach, if you will. And, and ideally, we have a much more efficient product pipeline because of it.Harry Glorikian: So. In your mind, like what are the biggest unanswered questions, either for EndeavorRx or for the Akili business. Is it more product? Is it more market? I mean, for example, do you worry about whether it'll work, you know, in the real world, as well as it did in your initial studies, whether doctors will prescribe the game, whether payers will cover it. There's all these issues. And so I'm just wondering where you think the biggest hurdles lie?Eddie Martucci: Sure. Yeah, I think I think my number one is not about the product. It's really systemic to the to the health care system and industry, which is it's important to me that the insurance industry, the doctors write prescriptions, but more importantly, the insurance industry and broader we could call it the payer industry. Right. Anyone that should be paying for medicine pays for digital therapeutics. Right. I don't think this should be the only class of medicine where patients bear the entire cost. That makes no sense. So we are not there yet for sure. Right. We're in such the early days that I think some payers are waiting, but I think we're starting to see a turn. We're beyond skepticism, beyond intrigue, probably into early acceptance. And I think the work needs to be done. And frankly, we need we need a couple folks in this industry and by folks, I mean both people, but also organizations to step up as the early pioneers for their patients. I think that's really important. Now, again, I have empathy for why that part of the industry moves slower. They're trying to protect patients. There's obviously cost arguments as well. And there are some of these myths or misconceptions out there about the industry. But I think when education is done right and when payers really engage, we're going to start to see a broader payer ecosystem adopting this like they would any other medicine. So I think that's kind of the biggest near-term barrier. And slightly longer term, I think the business model is a question. Which no one likes to hear, no investor likes to hear. And we're a company that's going to go public. I don't mean the business model is a question in that we don't know if we can make money or build a business. I just mean, what is…so, the foundations we know are there. Doctors will prescribe, patients will pay, payers are starting to pay. It has a benefit in people's lives. So the foundations are there. The business will grow. What the eventual business model is, is TBD, frankly. What is the top end business model that's going to allow a company to thrive at scale? I think we have to invest to learn that. And I'd say the same thing about the product. In terms of the product, it's not whether it will work, it's not whether it can help patients on the market. We've shown all of that. It's at this point, how well can you develop that product on the market so that it engenders long term compliance so that engenders loyalty and use in the future? And so I think in both those scenarios, I guess the health care system's got to get there. Which is a secondary priority, more like an opportunism. We don't want to miss the opportunity to find the best business model or to iterate on the products because we have the ability to do so. I don't want to miss that opportunity to grow the best business model we possibly can.Harry Glorikian: So you mentioned going public once or twice, and so I saw that there's paperwork with the SEC to go through a public filing with a special purpose entity backed by Chamath, whose I think it was Social Capital, through his venture fund. What's the thinking behind becoming public? Why now?Eddie Martucci: Yeah. I think I always had a mantra and I didn't come up with it. This is from advisors to me and mentors: Stay private as long as you possibly can for the business to be able to adapt and iterate and a little bit more of a clean way. But I think that time has come, and the reason I say that is we have a product that is being prescribed by doctors now and we have a pipeline where I've already talked about it. We could help potentially up to dozens of different populations who are struggling today. On top of that, the need and urgency around mental health and behavioral health has had a step function change in the last year. Right. We know that President Biden talked about it at the State of the Union. The surgeon general has put out a national state of emergency on youth mental health. So the time is right for a real investment here and the time is right for the company to fill that need. We know all the all the foundations are right. So I've always wanted to wait till that moment why we chose this specific entry point and vehicle, which we hope is kind of middle of this year, that Akili becomes a publicly listed company is, I think, the opportunity to not only have capital and the type of flexible capital that the public markets gives you, but in the case of a special purpose acquisition company, the expertise of that acquiring entity, in this case, Chamath Palihapitiya, who's extremely well known and amazing at building disruptive technologies for different industries that scale to ubiquity using technology and data.Eddie Martucci: But actually that the SPAC vehicle here is Social Capital Suvreta. Suvreta being a well known biotech hedge fund who specializes in early commercial biotech companies. So rarely do you get to become public with the right amount of capital, but also some new expertise around the table, strategic expertise in a disruptive business. And I think we get both of those with this deal. So we're still, it's too early to tell if the whole thing will go through. We're certainly crossing our fingers and hopefully if people listen to this in the longer future, Akili is already a public company and thriving.Harry Glorikian: Well, I mean, it's a good thing I spoke to you now so that we could speak a little bit more freely than when you're under that public rubric.Eddie Martucci: But oh, no, I'm already I'm already watching my words. It is important. It's a level of maturity as a business. Now, we have we've grown for about a decade. We grew methodically and slowly. We have over 100 employees now. And, you know, businesses change and mature. And I think it's the right time for us to do it.Harry Glorikian: Oh, yeah. I mean, a lot of the companies that I interact with as an investor, I mean, when we're going to go public, it's like, “Oh, we got to do this, we've got to get that ready. We got to get accounting ready. We got it.” I mean, you've got to go through it methodically because being public is is not for the faint of heart for sure. So, well, I wish you the greatest success. I look forward to staying in touch and, you know, keeping up to date on how things are going with the company. And, you know, I hope a ton of people listen to this because it's easier for them to hear it from you than hear it from me.Eddie Martucci: Thanks, Harry. This is a lot of fun. And thanks for your focus in innovation and these new areas that are really going to transform patients' lives. So I'm hoping we're doing our part there.Harry Glorikian: Thanks.Harry Glorikian: That's it for this week's episode. You can find a full transcript of this episode as well as the full archive of episodes of The Harry Glorikian Show and MoneyBall Medicine at our website. Just go to glorikian.com and click on the tab Podcasts.I'd like to thank our listeners for boosting The Harry Glorikian Show into the top three percent of global podcasts.If you want to be sure to get every new episode of the show automatically, be sure to open Apple Podcasts or your favorite podcast player and hit follow or subscribe. Don't forget to leave us a rating and review on Apple Podcasts. And we always love to hear from listeners on Twitter, where you can find me at hglorikian.Thanks for listening, stay healthy, and be sure to tune in two weeks from now for our next interview.

A Health Podyssey
Alexandra Bhatti Assesses US Child Care Vaccination Laws

A Health Podyssey

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2022 18:39


This episode is sponsored by the Rural Health Research Gateway at the University of North Dakota.Vaccine requirements have been much in the news lately tied to the COVID-19 pandemic, but disputes over requiring vaccines have been with us for decades.How to balance respecting individual autonomy with protecting public health is not a new issue. It's played out in particular force when it comes to children.All states have vaccine requirements for children as they enter school and those requirements are often pretty widely known. Less well known are those requirements related to child care, which can affect children long before they reach school age.Alexandra Bhatti from Merck joins A Health Podyssey to discuss vaccine requirements for child care in the United States.Bhatti and coauthors published a paper in the April 2022 issue of Health Affairs assessing child care vaccination requirements in the United States. They found considerable variation across the 50 states and Washington, DC.While all jurisdictions require children up through age five to meet certain requirements to attend school or child care programs, the states are uneven in their breadth, enforcement, and implementation of these requirements.If you enjoy this interview, order the April 2022 issue of Health Affairs for research on access to care, hospitals and more.Subscribe: RSS | Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts

HR Leaders
Employee Experience, Leading with Purpose and HR's Future with Technology

HR Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 41:19


In this episode of the HR Leaders podcast, I'm joined by my guest, Senior Vice President & Chief Talent Officer at Merck. This episode of the HR Leaders Podcast is brought to you by Workhuman, makers of the world's smartest peer-to-peer recognition platform and hosts of Workhuman Live, one of HR's most uplifting, can't-miss conferences which is taking place May 16th-19th in Atlanta.Click here: https://bit.ly/3LwMb7l to join Workhuman Live and save 15% by using promo code: HRPOD.Episode highlights00:00 - Intro01:25 - About Carl02:38 - Advice for Leaders looking to move abroad09:20 - How AI and advanced analytics will change work25:44 - How to approach employee engagement31:03 - Quick-fire QuestionsDid you enjoy the episode? Subscribe to HR Leaders for more content like this http://bit.ly/2wFkCEqYou can learn more about us at www.hrdleaders.com/podcastDiscussion topics include:HR Innovation, Talent Management, HR Tech & Analytics, Heath & Wellbeing, Culture & Engagement, Leadership & Coaching, Learning & Development, Recruitment & Retention.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung
Opening Bell: Twitter, Microsoft, Coca-Cola, Alibaba, JD.com, Aerovironment, Abbvie, Merck & Co.

AKTIONÄR TV-Expertensendung

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 15:28


Vor dem Wochenende dominierten an der Wall Street die roten Vorzeichen. Der Dow Jones gab 2,8 Prozent ab. Der Nasdaq verlor 2,6 Prozent und der S&Pmusste 2,8 Prozent abgeben.

Your Morning Coffee Podcast
YMC Special Edition - Merck Mercuriadis

Your Morning Coffee Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 44:28


On this very special edition of the YMC podcast, hosts Jay Gilbert and Mike Etchart have an in-depth conversation with the founder of the Hipgnosis Song Fund, Merck Mercuriadis.    Subscribe to the newsletter! YourMorning.Coffee!

Combinate Podcast - Med Device and Pharma
029 - "Purpose" with Marla Phillips

Combinate Podcast - Med Device and Pharma

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 94:22


On This Episode, I was joined by Marla Phillips of Pathway for Patient Health. Marla and I discuss: Pathway for Patient Health Training the Next Generations - What students can do? Quality for the 21st Century Chief Quality Officer Forum FDA/Industry Collaborations How Xavier Health Came to be and the Future of Xavier Health Supply by Design The importance of doing things with purpose ------------------------------------------------------------- Pathway for Patient Health: Link Pathway for Patient Health Quality Science Program : Link Pathway for Patient Health Hiring Portal: Link Good Supply Practices/Supply by Design: Link 1 & Link 2 USP GOOD DISTRIBUTION PRACTICES—SUPPLY CHAIN INTEGRITY: Link Future of Xavier Health: Link ----------------------------------------------------------------- Marla Phillips PhD founded Pathway for Patient Health in 2018, and leads cultural, quality and supply chain initiatives with regulators and industry professionals for the betterment of patient health around the world. Phillips is a frequently invited speaker for major industry association conferences across the country each year, including the PDA/FDA Joint Regulatory Conference, AdvaMed Medtech Conference, Cold Chain Global Forum, USP, IPEC, and the FDA's own Association of Food and Drug Officials. In 2008, Phillips founded, Xavier Health at Xavier University. In this role, Phillips was asked to co-lead with FDA the CDRH Case for Quality metrics initiative from 2014-2016, which culminated in work that continues to support the Case for Quality program. She led the Good Supply Practices (GSP) initiative with the FDA Office of the Commissioner, CDER, pharmaceutical and medical device professionals, and suppliers, which has been published for global industry adoption. Additionally, Phillips founded the FDA/Xavier PharmaLink Conference, FDA/Xavier MedCon Conference, AI Summit and Combination Products Summit for global regulators and industry professionals. Phillips began working in the pharmaceutical industry for Merck in 1996 where she took on roles of increasing responsibility, culminating in position of Head of Quality Operations at the Merck North Carolina facility. She has expertise in leading FDA inspections and readiness, quality, analytical testing and validation, supply chain, stability program management, process validation, manufacturing, and packaging operations. Phillips holds a B.S. in Chemistry from Xavier University, and a Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill.

Starting to know - Business
How do leaders develop in their lives? with Beate Chelette

Starting to know - Business

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 42:19


Beate Chelette is The Growth Architect and founder of The Women's Code and designs processes, best practices, and systems for leaders who want to grow, build and scale their business, and achieve measurable results and profits they can count on. Recent clients include Chevron, Merck, the Women's Legislative Caucus of California Cal State University Dominguez Hills, the Greater Los Angeles Realtor Association, Advertising Agency TracyLocke, and thousands of small businesses. Beate's website: https://beatechelette.com/ Starting to Know: https://startingtoknow.com/ Ishu Singh's website:https://ishusingh.com/

Alles auf Aktien
Der Netflix-Schock und Volkswagens neue Auto-Welt

Alles auf Aktien

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 18:46


In der heutigen Folge „Alles auf Aktien“ sprechen die Finanzjournalisten Anja Ettel und Philipp Vetter über Big Blue im Aufwind und schwere Zeiten für Corona-Profiteure. Außerdem geht es um Johnson&Johnson, Halliburton, IBM, Daimler Truck, Continental, Merck, Delivery Hero, Amgen, Oracle, Verisk Analytics, ResMed, Verisign, American Tower, Nasdaq, LinkedIn, Mercedes, BMW, Toyota, Tesla, Nio, BYD, X Peng, Foxconn, Apple, Google, Waymo, General Motors, Uber, Stellantis, Hyundai und Sixt.

Veterinary Vitals
Spotting Signs of Animal Cruelty with Dr. Melinda Merck

Veterinary Vitals

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 22:30


In this episode, Dr. Melinda Merck talks about the signs of animal cruelty. Dr. Merck provides expert consultations and case work on a variety of animal related cases, including criminal and civil cases. She has training and experience in a wide range of crime scene and forensic science topics. She provides expert case review including veterinary reports, investigation findings and crime scene analyses. Support the show (http://www.tvma.org)

The CEO Sessions
How to Find a Great Mentor with CEO of Wunderman Thompson, Audrey Melofchik

The CEO Sessions

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 46:00


Is it time to be more thoughtful about finding great mentors in your career? It's not always an easy process, but it makes a big difference in accelerating your career and getting promoted. Having great mentors can also help you deal with complex leadership problems and improve your work-life balance. I hosted CEO of Wunderman Thompson, North America, Audrey Melofchik, on today's show and she shares a powerful strategy to help you find a great mentor. Wunderman Thompson is a New York based marketing agency, 20,000 strong in 90 markets across the world. Audrey has more than two decades of experience building successful brands, She is known for prioritizing creative excellence, fostering strong client relationships, and promoting a strong culture. She's also served as president of DDB and Velocity and worked with clients like Johnson and Johnson, Kroger, Afllac, Uber, Hewlett Packard, and Merck. As an industry advocate, she is also deeply involved in mentoring and growing the next generation of diverse leaders through her involvement in the All Stars Project and She Runs It, and was even named by She Runs It as 2020 Working Mother of the Year. LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/audrey-melofchik-bretherick-6527ab/ Company Link: https://www.wundermanthompson.com/ What You'll Discover in this Episode: What it's like winning “Working Mother of the Year” as CEO during a Pandemic. The organization that was founded in 1912 to highlight women leadership in advertising. Why it's not like MadMen anymore! What to ask yourself first when you're considering staying in or leaving a job. The secret sauce behind Wonderman Thompson's success. How to identify great mentors and sponsors. They one trait she'd instill in every employee… GRIT. The most important presentation skill… that most leaders overlook. ----- Connect with the Host, #1 bestselling author Ben Fanning https://www.benfanning.com/speaker/ (Speaking and Training enquiries) https://my.captivate.fm/followbenonyoutube.com (Subscribe to my Youtube channel) https://www.linkedin.com/in/benfanning/ (LinkedIn) https://www.instagram.com/benfanning1/ (Instagram) https://twitter.com/BenFanning1 (Twitter)

One Knight in Product
Pragmatic Digital Transformation in Traditional Industries (with Dan Chapman, Director, Product Line Leader @ Merck)

One Knight in Product

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2022 40:59


An interview with Dan Chapman. Dan is a British export to the US where he's busy building internal products to help make smart scientists more successful. Dan's strong on product principles but flexible on the details as he tries to transfer book talk into action for one of the biggest pharmaceutical companies in the world. We talk about a lot, including: His work with Merck, how there are actually two Mercks and a summary of the differences between them and why they diverged The challenges & opportunities of working in product management when your end users are hardcore scientists, and whether this is the one time you actually do need to be an industry expert to be an effective product manager Whether situations like the Theranos scandal loom large over the medical research industry, and how "move fast & break things" doesn't work when people's lives are on the line That tricky balancing act where you're trying to be agile and move fast whilst working for a company (and an industry) that values process, predictability & compliance Whether working for a big multinational means he's defaulted to having to use SAFe and why legacy waterfall companies are attracted to such frameworks Whether being an introvert in product management is a barrier or a superpower, and how to survive all the meetings & presentations when your natural tendency is not to want to be in the room Why idealistic product principles only get you so far, how to work out which ones matter, which don't, and why waterfall might actually be the better option sometimes (

My Veterinary Life
Discussing the Merck Wellbeing Study 3.0

My Veterinary Life

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 14, 2022 31:19


We are so excited to bring you this special episode of My Veterinary Life Podcast We have two extraordinary guests today. Dr. Joseph Hahn from Merck Animal Health and Dr. Jen Brandt from the AVMA. We discuss the findings from the most recent Merck Wellbeing Study and what tangible steps we can take to improve the culture in our workplace. It's a informative and inspiring conversation and we can't wait to share it with you. Remember we want to hear from you! Please be sure to subscribe to our feed on Apple Podcasts and leave us a ratings and review. You can also contact us at MVLPodcast@avma.org You can also follow us on social media @AVMAVets #MyVetLife #MVLPodcastTo find out more information on the Merck Wellbeing Study please visit: https://www.merck-animal-health-usa.com/about-us/veterinary-wellbeing-study

Her Story - Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare
70: Empowering Girls Across the Globe, with Jessica Posner Odede, CEO, Girl Effect; Co-founder and Board Member, Shining Hope for Communities

Her Story - Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 27:36


Meet Jessica Posner Odede:Jessica Posner Odede is the CEO of Girl Effect. She is also a Co-founder and Board Member of Shining Hope for Communities (SHOFCO). Previously, she was an Associate Direction at Novastar Ventures. Jessica is the author of “Find Me Unafraid: Love, Loss and Hope in an African Slum.” She received a bachelor's in African American Studies from Wesleyan University. Key Insights:From Denver, Colorado to Nairobi, Kenya, Jessica Posner Odede is changing the world for adolescent girls. What is Girl Effect? Girl Effect utilizes media and technology to connect adolescent girls to services and opportunities, like education, finance, and healthcare. They work to decrease barriers and combat internalized gender norms, to create a world where girls are able to take control of their bodies, health, and livelihoods. (1:36)Creating Demand. Investments in services for adolescent girls has increased over time; however, the public and social sector fall short in decreasing the demand gap. Driving demand for important services requires tackling gender norms, decreasing barriers, and providing role models. (17:44)COVID's Impact on Women. There are 20 million girls out of school due to the pandemic, and many will never go back. The pandemic has decreased schooling and vaccination rates, and increased gender-based violence. The pandemic has created additional challenges for women across the world. (23:32)This episode is hosted by Julie Gerberding, M.D. She is a member of the Advisory Council for Her Story and the Chief Patient Officer and Executive Vice President at Merck.Relevant Links:Learn more about Girl EffectFollow Jessica on TwitterWatch “WISE On-Air: A Conversation On Girl Empowerment Through Media”

TD Ameritrade Network
Oncology Stocks As High Risk, High Reward

TD Ameritrade Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 5:31


Merck & Co. (MRK) stock price is up over 19% over the past year. Mizuho's Mara Goldstein says that they maintain a buy rating on the MRK stock with a $100 price target. She states that the key takeaway from the cardiovascular event is potential revenue diversification drivers. Goldstein states that a $10B in peak revenue from the cardiovascular pipeline in the mid-2030s would be a strong offset. Also, the SPDR Biotech ETF (XBI) is down 21% year-to-date.

A Healthier Future
Merck Executive Chairman Ken Frazier on Equity in Healthcare

A Healthier Future

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2022 35:03


With all the systematic social divisions at play, how do we actively address inequity in healthcare? As a strong advocate for equity in healthcare and across the board, our guest this week on A Healthier Future weighs in on this topic. Kenneth C. Frazier, Executive Chairman at Merck, joins the podcast to explore different approaches to promoting equity in healthcare and society at large. Ken shares his inspiration behind joining General Catalyst and how their responsible approach to innovation contributes to equity in healthcare. He stresses the role of leaders and businesses in blurring the lines across race, gender, and social class (among other constructs). Ken also grazes the topic of history and its role as common ground as opposed to a cause for division. He ties it all together with some words of wisdom for young people looking to get ahead in life, and leaders looking to make a difference. Listen to the full episode to hear: Why responsible innovation is necessary for healthcare How Ken's background influenced his decision to become a change-oriented leader How the OneTen Initiative is creating a more equitable workforce Why history is a platform for common ground How business owners can contribute to a more equitable society Ken's words of advice for young professionals and business leaders Key Links: https://intermountainhealthcare.org/ (Intermountain Healthcare) https://www.generalcatalyst.com/ (General Catalyst) https://www.merck.com/ (Merck) https://www.linkedin.com/in/ken-frazier-3b552032/ (Ken's LinkedIn)

Future Talk | Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany
Future Talk | Episode 27 | Bioelectronics: The right impulses for patients | Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany

Future Talk | Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 28:18


Future Talk Podcast: Bioelectronics and our central nervous system speak the same language

Future of Agriculture
FoA 305: Strategic Investing in the Future of Animal Agtech with Stephen Murray of Merck Animal Health Ventures

Future of Agriculture

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 35:24


Thank you to our quarterly presenting sponsor Merck Animal Health Ventures: https://www.merck-animal-health.com/animal-health-ventures/ I'm very pleased to welcome the leader of the Merck Animal Health Ventures Team, Stephen Murray, joining me on today's episode. Originally brought up on a sheep and beef farm in New Zealand, Stephen spent the first part of his career as a dairy veterinarian in that country. He decided to leave private practice for industry, which led him through a series of roles and acquisitions to working for Merck Animal Health in 2011. Stephen built the animal health ventures group from its foundation in 2016 - developing the team, ways of thinking and processes that are needed to invest, partner and work with young technology businesses that are of strategic interest to Merck Animal Health.  Today's episode covers how an established industry leader embraces technology as a core competency, what the acquisition of Antelliq meant to that end, the role of strategic investors in the early stage startup ecosystem, and his thoughts for where the future of animal agtech is headed.

OIS Podcast
Lessons Learned by AbbVie's Stewart

OIS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 28:28


When Andrew Stewart moved into his current role of global eye care general manager at AbbVie, his top two priorities were to help continue to grow Ozurdex® and to help get the company ready for the launch of Abicipar.The phrase about “the best-laid plans…” proved true, as the FDA declined to approve the company's Biologics License Application (BLA) for abicipar due to higher than acceptable rates in intraocular inflammation. “It was an economic decision and a patient decision to stop moving forward with the product,” Andrew told host Firas Rahhal, MD, a retina specialist and partner at Retina Vitreous Associates Medical Group.Andrew and his team learned from the experience and set about carrying out the strategic vision for all AbbVie's retina products worldwide. Part of that vision includes an emphasis on longer-duration, longer-acting drugs, drops, and other therapies, as well as on novel cell and gene therapies.Andrew brings over two decades of pharmaceutical industry experience to AbbVie, including long tenures at Allergan (now part of AbbVie), Bristol-Myers Squibb and Merck. A New York transplant now based in southern California, Andrew brings a strong combination of chemical engineering, science, and business experience to his global role.Listen to the podcast today to hear Andrew and Dr. Rahhal discuss:• How Andrew and his team bounced back after the abicipar decision• His experience as an Allergan executive during its transition to AbbVie• How he moved from business development in multiple therapeutic areas to global marketing for retina• What's next for AbbVie's retina business[Listen Now]

Voices In Validation
Laboratory Review Process and Its Impact on Compliance

Voices In Validation

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 36:04


The pharmaceutical quality control laboratory serves one of the most important functions in pharmaceutical production and control. Poor laboratory practice may yield compliance issues, higher costs, increased cycle time, and delayed product introductions. Avoiding all that means consistent lab review processes and good document controls. Here to review effective laboratory review processes, and their importance to regulatory compliance is David Strauss of SciCord.   About Our Guest: David Strauss, CEO and Founder, SciCord David co-founded SciCord LLC in 2014.  SciCord implemented the first production ELN solution in 2015 and has continued to grow both in functionality and customer base.  SciCord's solution has evolved to encompass integrated ELN & LIMS functionality with plug-and-play modules preconfigured to automate many laboratory functions.    Prior to 2014, David created an ELN application for GSK which virtually eliminated paper from the worldwide pre-clinical organization and was credited with a 30% productivity increase. David grew the application over 15 years to service more than 6000 scientists who in turn created over 800,000 experiments. As ELN champion, David was involved and often led the design, development, testing, validation, implementation, and regulatory compliance defense. David started his career with Merck, working in the lab and then specializing in information and laboratory automation.   Voices in Validation brings you the best in validation and compliance topics. Voices in Validation is brought to you by IVT Network, your expert source for life science regulatory knowledge. For more information on IVT Network, check out their website at http://ivtnetwork.com. 

BioCentury This Week
Ep. 109 - What's Next for Novartis? Plus: AACR, Merck KGaA

BioCentury This Week

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 20:28


COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19
Ep. 510 - Lockdowns in China, and Merck's COVID-19 Pill

COVID NoiseFilter - Doctors Explain the Latest on COVID-19

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 10:00


Today, in episode 510, our expert Infectious Disease Doctor and Community Health Specialist discuss what you need to know about Public Health. We talk about how lockdowns in China have been spreading, as well as how Merck's COVID-19 pill has been heavily used despite concerns. As always, join us for all the Public Health information you need, explained clearly by our health experts. Website: NoiseFilter - Complex health topics explained simply (noisefiltershow.com) Animations: NoiseFilter - YouTube Instagram: NoiseFilter (@noisefiltershow) • Instagram photos and videos Facebook: NoiseFilter Show | Facebook TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@noisefiltershow --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/noisefilter/message

Amplifying Scientific Innovation
Amplifying Scientific Innovation® Video Podcast, Wendy Lund, Chief Communications Officer, Organon

Amplifying Scientific Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 29:46


In Episode 14, Season 4 of the Amplifying Scientific Innovation® Video Podcast, Dr. Sophia Ononye-Onyia, Founder and CEO of The Sophia Consulting Firm, interviewed Wendy Lund, Chief Communications Officer at Organon, a global healthcare company formed through a spinoff from Merck (known as MSD outside of the U.S. and Canada) with a mission to deliver impactful medicines and solutions for a healthier every day. In recognition of the last day of Women's History Month, this episode showcases Ms. Lund's unique perspectives on science advocacy, health equity and influential leadership with a focus on women's health. For full transcript, please visit: https://sophiaconsultingfirm.com/blogs-%2B-articles/f/amplifying-scientific-innovation%C2%AE-wendy-lund-cco-organon

A Shot in the Arm Podcast with Ben Plumley
Medicine & Humanity: A Profile of Dr. Julie Gerberding

A Shot in the Arm Podcast with Ben Plumley

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 67:56


In this episode we meet internationally renowned infectious disease specialist, Dr. Julie Gerberding, and profile her life from young HIV doc in San Francisco, to the head of the CDC, and onto the pharmaceutical company Merck, where she most recently Chief Patient Officer. Another new chapter of her life begins as she was recently announced as the new CEO of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.  This episode was made in partnership with the Bay Area Global Health Alliance, a network of academic institutions, nonprofits, and innovative tech, biotech and pharmaceutical companies -- all committed to advancing global health equity and #innovation. You can find this episode and past episodes of A Shot in the Arm Podcast with Ben Plumley on this (and other) podcast platforms. Please subscribe and give us 5 stars! For more information: https://www.bayareaglobalhealth.org  https://www.merck.com https://www.cdc.gov https://bayareaglobalhealth.org/alliance-for-advancing-health-online https://www.fnih.org/ #BayAreaGlobalHealth #ShotArmPodcast #Merck #NIH #CDC #FNIH #HIV #COVID-19 #HPV #therapeutics #Vaccines #Vaccinequity #Vaccineconfidence #pandemicspreparation #publicprivatepartnerships #Healthcareworkers #healthcareforthehomeless #accesstomedicines

Her Story - Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare
68: Building Up Women Leaders, with Ceci Connolly, Joanne Conroy, M.D., Kristi Ebong, Julie Gerberding, M.D., and Sanjula Jain, Ph.D.

Her Story - Envisioning the Leadership Possibilities in Healthcare

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 30, 2022 12:46


Re-meet the Hosts:This episode showcases the Her Story Advisory Council. Ceci Connolly is the President & CEO of the Alliance of Community Health Plans. Joanne M. Conroy, M.D., serves as CEO and President of Dartmouth-Hitchcock and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health. Kristi Ebong is the head of Partnerships and Market Development at Define Ventures. Julie L. Gerberding, M.D. is Chief Patient Officer and Executive Vice President at Merck. Sanjula Jain, Ph.D. is a co-founder of Think Medium and is an SVP of Market Strategy and Chief Research Officer at Trilliant Health.Key Insights:For young professionals starting their careers, to established leaders looking to refine their skills, Her Story is the show for you. We tell stories by women, for women, to expand the vision of what is possible in healthcare.Bringing Others Along. Ceci emphasizes that women leaders should play a role in supporting and advancing the next generation of leaders. (1:01)Women Together. Dr. Conroy describes how groups of female leaders can help each other find their purpose, create impact, and make meaningful goals a reality. (2:38)Competitive Advantage. Kristi points out that being a woman can be a competitive advantage in male-dominated fields, by providing an outside perspective on the industry. (5:42)Building Your Toolbox. Dr. Gerberding encourages leaders to think of their career as a toolbox – each experience should add a new tool. The more versatile you are, the more opportunities you will have long-term. (7:39)Navigating Healthcare. Dr. Jain describes how healthcare is a complex industry. Her Story explores the multitude of career paths within and associated with healthcare. (9:52)

BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast
Episode 16 - Ash Wellness with David Stein

BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 28, 2022 41:24


In the 16th episode of BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast, the team sits down to speak with the founder of Ash Wellness. David Stein speaks about what led him to create a company that offered inclusive and accessible healthcare by enabling providers and businesses to provide at-home diagnostics care to their patients. He shares his personal story, experiences of others and how Ash hopes to change the end-to-end experience of at home diagnostic testing. David Stein – Co-founder and CEO of Ash Wellness David Stein is the CEO of Ash Wellness, a B2B at-home diagnostic company launching remote care services for healthcare organizations and D2C businesses. Ash Wellness offers white-labeled operations management, testing via a CLIA/CAP certified lab network, kitting and fulfillment, and modern technology infrastructure. In his role, David is responsible for mission vision, strategy oversight, fundraising, and corporate development. He is a graduate of the Cornell Tech MBA program. David lives in New York City, and is passionate about parties and healthcare access. The crew asked David the following questions: For our listeners who may not be aware, can you speak to the great work that Ash Wellness does and what it is? Your background has been in myriad of avenues in healthcare, can you talk to us about what led to your decisions to follow the opportunities to start Ash Wellness? You mentioned how Ash started with the LGBTQ+ community, is that who you are still primarily focused on right now? This past month, we celebrated National LGBTQ Health Awareness week, can you talk about what this week means and where we are in this journey? How has the pandemic changed Ash's business model and the overall business? How have partnerships allowed Ash to expand their services? How did the Chipotle app inform the design of at-home diagnostics testing? What advice would you give to early careerists in healthcare? Are there any specific hard or soft skills that you picked up at the first job or in grad school that you would recommend to listeners? In this week's episode of Talking with Nakin, we look back at a previous episode that examined the antiviral pills by Merck and Pfizer. The guys discuss what continued options to combat COVID-19 look like as the pandemic evolves. As more data has come out there are large discrepancies in the effectiveness of Molnupiravir and Paxlovid. The US government has spent over $2B on Molnupiravir and many hospitals are no longer willing to use it while Paxlovid has a lot of restrictions as to who can take it and what it cannot be taken with. Grab a drink and join us for another episode of BYOB: The Healthcare Podcast! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/byob-health/message

Biotech 2050 Podcast
95. Gene writing, Dr. Jake Rubens, Co-Founder & CIO, Hari Pujar, COO, Tessera Therapeutics

Biotech 2050 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 25:59


Jacob(Jake)Rubens, Co-Founder, Chief Innovation Officer Jake is Co-Founder and Chief Innovation Officer of Tessera Therapeutics, as well as a Principal at Flagship Pioneering. Jake joined Flagship Pioneering in 2015 and works as part of a venture-creation team, founding and growing companies based on new biotechnology. At Flagship, Jake launched Kaleido Biosciences and co-founded Sana Biotechnology. Jake was the Head of Innovation at Cobalt Biomedicine, where he invented and developed the company's Fusosome platform prior to its merger with Sana Biotechnology. Before joining Flagship, Jake received his Ph.D. in microbiology from MIT, working in the Synthetic Biology Center with Professor Tim Lu with the support of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. At MIT Jacob invented gene circuits that allow engineered cells to do novel analog, digital, and hybrid computations, enabling the emerging field of “intelligent” cell therapies. Jake's work has resulted in multiple pending patents and publications, including articles in Nature and Nature Communications. Jake was honored in 2017 in Forbes' 30 under 30 list in science. Hari Pujar, Chief Operating Officer Hari is Chief Operating Officer of Tessera, as well as Operating Partner at Flagship Pioneering. At Tessera, his responsibilities span across research, manufacturing, program strategy and management and IP. Hari is a global Biopharmaceutical executive with 20+ years of value creation in the biologics and vaccine industry. Before Flagship, Hari served as Chief Technology Officer of Spark Therapeutics, leading the technical operations, process and technology development and quality assurance organizations. At Spark, Hari was responsible for growing and scaling the company's cutting-edge technology capabilities for an expanding development pipeline. Prior to Spark, Hari was head of Technical Development & Manufacturing at Moderna Therapeutics. At Moderna, he built and led the technology and early manufacturing organizations that delivered on supply for more than a dozen clinical programs in a brand-new technology area. Previously, Hari held a variety of scientific and cross-functional leadership positions during 18+ years at Merck & Co in the company's commercial, R&D and manufacturing divisions, culminating in the franchise leadership of pediatric and adult vaccines representing over $2B in revenue. Hari has a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Delaware and an MBA from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a Fellow of the American Chemical Society and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineers.

YoD PodCast
Episode 36: Why Your Company Should Think Like an Entertainment Company | Brian Martin

YoD PodCast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 55:55


info@yourowndevelopment.coFinn and Joel catch up with the multi-talented Brian Martin and discuss entertainment and Corporate America, how to navigate those worlds, and how to show up and when you number is called... show out!IG: BristarishimTwitter: Bristar619Website: BriStar CollectiveBRIAN MARTIN-FOUNDER OF THE BRISTAR COLLECTIVE. BRIAN IS AN ESTABLISHED BUSINESS LEADER WITH OVER 30 YEARS OF DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL OPERATIONS, CONSULTING, AND TRAINING EXPERIENCE. BRIAN'S EXPERIENCE INCLUDES LEADING EFFORTS IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL, ADVERTISING, HOSPITALITY AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS INDUSTRIES. BRIAN HAS HELD LEADERSHIP ROLES WITH SPRINT, NEXTEL, MERCK, RICOH, AND MCKESSON. VISIONARY, STRATEGIST, JOURNALIST, MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKER, PANELIST, FACILITATOR, MODERATOR, CAREER COACH, VOCAL AND VOICE OVER ARTIST, PERFORMER, AND ADVOCATE ALL DESCRIBE BRIAN'S MULTIPLE TALENTS AND INTERESTS. BRIAN IS THE FOUNDER OF THE BRISTAR COLLECTIVE, A BOUTIQUE CONSULTING FIRM HEADQUARTERED IN LAS VEGAS. THE BC HAS THREE SERVICE VERTICALS.ENTERTAINMENT – MUSIC/ARTIST MANAGEMENT, PR AND MEDIA RELATIONS, PROMOTIONS, PERFORMANCE, PUBLISHING, AND ARTIST DEVELOPMENT.STRATEGY- BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT AND EXPANSION CONSULTING SERVICES. LEARNING - CORPORATE AND COMMUNITY TRAINING SERVICES IN DIVERSITY EQUITY AND INCLUSION, UNCONSCIOUS/IMPLICIT BIAS, LEADERSHIP SKILLS DEVELOPMENT AND SYSTEMS INTEGRATION. BRIAN ALSO OWNS STARMAX CUSTOM CONTENT STUDIOS WITH HIS BUSINESS PARTNER R&B LEGEND MAXINE JONES, FORMERLY OF THE MULTI-PLATINUM SELLING R&B GROUP ENVOGUE. BRIAN IS THE STATE DIRECTOR FOR PROJECT REDIRECT NV. PRD IS A PERSON-CENTERED HUMAN SERVICES NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION. PRD NV PROVIDES DAY AND VOCATIONAL TRAINING SERVICES TO INDIVIDUALS WITH PHYSICAL AND INTELLECTUAL DISABILITIES. BRIAN IS ALSO A WELL-KNOWN COMMUNITY LEADER. BRIAN IS AN ACTIVE AND PASSIONATE CHILDREN'S AND PRO EQUALITY ADVOCATE. BRIAN HAS BEEN RECOGNIZED BY THE GAY & LESBIAN ALLIANCE AGAINST DEFAMATION (GLAAD) FOR HIS WORK IN THE FIGHT AGAINST WORKPLACE DISCRIMINATION. BRIAN SERVES ON THE NATIONAL BOARD OF GOVERNORS FOR THE HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN. BRIAN ALSO SERVES AS THE HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN'S DIVERSITY EQUITY AND INCLUSION LIAISON FOR THE LAS VEGAS COMMUNITY. IN ADDITION, BRIAN SERVES ON THE CHILDREN'S DISCOVERY MUSEUM'S DIVERSITY EQUITY AND INCLUSION ADVISORY COUNCIL.