Podcasts about Monastery

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Complex of buildings comprising the domestic quarters and workplace(s) of monks or nuns

  • 551PODCASTS
  • 1,631EPISODES
  • 28mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 14, 2022LATEST
Monastery

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Best podcasts about Monastery

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Latest podcast episodes about Monastery

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Sava (Sabbas), Enlightener and first Archbishop of Serbia (1236)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 2:46


This best-loved Saint of the Serbian people was born in 1169, the son of Stephen Nemanja, Grand Prince of Serbia. He was named Rastko by his parents. At the age of fifteen he was appointed governor of the province of Herzegovina, but worldly power was of no interest to him, and he began to wish to give himself more fully to God. He secretly left home and traveled to Mount Athos, where he became a novice at the Monastery of St Panteleimon. His father learned where he had gone and sent soldiers to bring him back, but before the soldiers could claim him, he was tonsured a monk with the name of Sabbas (Sava), after St Sabbas the Sanctified (December 5).   In time, under the influence of his son, Stephen Nemanja abdicated his kingship, and in 1196 he became a monk under the name of Symeon, traveling to the Holy Mountain to join his son. Symeon was quite old, and unable to endure all the ascetic labors of long-time monks, so his son redoubled his own ascetical struggle, telling his father, "I am your ascesis." The two monks together founded the Chilander Monastery, which became the center of Serbian piety and culture. Saint Symeon reposed in 1200, and his body soon began to exude a miracle-working myrrh; thus he is commemorated as St Symeon the Myrrh-streaming (February 13).   Saint Sava retired to a hermit's life in a cell on the Holy Mountain, but was compelled to return to the world: his two brothers were at war with one another, causing much bloodshed in Serbia. The Saint returned home with his father's holy relics, mediated between his brothers, and persuaded them to make peace with one another over their father's tomb, restoring peace the Serbian land. At the pleas of the people, St Sava remained in Serbia thereafter. He persuaded the Emperor and the Patriarch of Constantinople to grant autocephaly to the Church in Serbia. Against his will, he was ordained first Archbishop of his land in 1219. He labored tirelessly to establish the Orthodox Faith, for, though his father had been a Christian, many of the people were still pagan. In old age he resigned the episcopal throne and went on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. While returning from his pilgrimage, he fell asleep in peace in 1236.

Skywalking Through Neverland: A Star Wars / Disney Fan Podcast
Classic Marvel STAR WARS Comics #35: DARK LORD'S GAMBIT

Skywalking Through Neverland: A Star Wars / Disney Fan Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 71:04


https://youtu.be/uw7wnuHHDS4   Classic Marvel Star Wars Comics Issue 35 "DARK LORD'S GAMBIT" (February 1980) features Darth Vader at his manipulative finest. As the title suggests, Vader succeeds in manipulating the Tagge family and Luke Skywalker into vulnerable positions he can then exploit at his leisure. This issue also features Leia in a miniskirt, and it's quite shocking!   Richard and Sarah discuss this comic, the artwork and writing, and find FTOOM! Fast Facts (classic comic people or places that appear now in Star Wars books, comics and films). Ready? VOOORP!!   Classic Marvel Star Wars Comics is on YouTube! Watch and read along with us.   Since this comic series lends itself so well to a visuals, we recommend watching on YouTube. We will continue to describe the issues as we're talking, for those of you who are visually impaired.     Classic Marvel Star Wars Comics #35 “Dark Lord's Gambit" Description:   Title: "Dark Lord's Gambit!" Release Date: February 26, 1980 Writer: Archie Goodwin Artwork: Carmine Infantino, Gene Day, Nelson Yomtov Cover Art: Carmine Infantino, Bob Wiacek Editors: Jim Shooter, Archie Goodwin   Synopsis:   Darth Vader finally learns the name of the boy who destroyed the Death Star, and sets a plan in motion to get his revenge. He enlists the aid of General Ulric Tagge as well as his younger sister Sister Domina Tagge to help him in the endeavor. Domina is a member of the Order of the Sacred Circle who have thus far remained neutral in the Galactic Civil War, but that will soon change and each side in the conflict, The Empire and Rebellion, will send a representative to the planet Monastery to present his case.   Vader is to represent the Galactic Empire, and Domina requests Luke Skywalker to  represent the Alliance. While Luke thinks he may be in over his head on this diplomatic mission, Domina reassures him, even though her true intentions are revenge for Luke's involvement in the apparent death of Orman Tagge.   As usual, we take our Facebook Group Comments on the cover into account as we analyze this issue. Become a part of our Facebook Group to contribute!     Support The Show   Skywalking Through Neverland T-Shirts at TeePublic! Check them out HERE.   Contact Us   Instagram: http://instagram.com/skywalkingpod   Twitter: https://twitter.com/SkywalkingPod   Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/skywalkingthroughneverland   Join us every week on YouTube for a behind-the-scenes look at our show. We also bring you to Disneyland, Red Carpet Events and Theme Park Openings.   Send emails to share@skywalkingthroughneverland.com and follow us on Facebook.  

Saint of the Day
Venerable Benedict Biscop, Abbot of Wearmouth (689-690)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 1:19


He came from a noble Northumbrian family in Britain, and was tonsured a monk in 653 at Lerins in Gaul. In 669 he was made Abbot of the Monastery of Saints Peter and Paul in Canterbury. He traveled to Rome in 671 to be instructed in monastic practice according to the Rule of Saint Benedict (of Nursia). Returning to Northumbria he established two new monasteries, the first to follow St Benedict's Rule in the British Isles. He went to Rome once again in 678-679, this time bringing back the archcantor of St Peter's, who taught the monks of St Benedict's monasteries the chant and liturgical practices used in Rome.   Under the holy abbot's guidance, these monasteries became flourishing centers of Christian worship, scholarship and art. The Venerable Bede (May 26) was one of his disciples. Saint Benedict reposed in peace in 689 or 690, having greatly strengthened the Church and the Christian faith in Britain.

Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler
One Simple Practice In FOUR Simple Steps For YOUR Transformative Journey! Kamal Ravikant

Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 67:13


If you've ever wanted to welcome in magic into your life and feel better about your life, then do we have the love yourself like your life depends on it show for you.   Today I'll be talking with Kamal Ravikant, self-published phenom, poet, entrepreneur, and investor, and one of my all-time favorite guests I've had on the show (he was also the first). He's also the author of one of the most beautiful, brilliant, and important reads out there today, “Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends on It”   That is just what I want to talk with him about today, about one simple practice and four simple steps that can completely transform your life. Plus we'll talk about living like you've died, why being depressed is a good day, CocaCola signs and market street, two last leaves and an open heart, and what in the world rubber snakes and Jesus have to do with anything.   Kamal Ravikant meditated with Tibetan monks in the Dalai Lama's monastery, served in the US Army infantry, and a bestselling author, on the one simple practice and four simple steps that can completely transform your life.   Key Points Discussed:  What in the world happened to you two months ago and what was going through your mind? (03:55) How has the Satori experience changed you? (08:09) What works for the inside practically and how it changed Kamal's mindset (15:24) What was the original bursting of the artery that sent you down this whole path of loving yourself? (20:15) Loving ourselves with the same intensity we would use to pull ourselves up if we were hanging off a cliff with our fingers (23:45) The power of weaving in “Thank You” into everything we put into ourselves (28:45) Going into flow by embracing ourselves and the importance of committing to loving ourselves (32:54) Setting people up for success by having them listen to the same piece of music every time they're meditating (42:31) What does light have to do with anything? (49:34) The need for an internal change before anything else changes (52:12) How the “Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends on It” book will help people (57:27) How important is giving love? (59:41) How much would our world change if we got this concept? (1:04:21)   To find out more visit: https://www.amazon.com/Love-Yourself-Like-Your-Depends-ebook/dp/B0086BX8UE - Love Yourself Like Your Life Depends on It https://amzn.to/3qULECz - Order Michael Sandler's new book, "AWE, the Automatic Writing Experience" www.automaticwriting.com  ……. Follow Michael and Jessica's exciting journey and get even more great tools, tips, and behind-the-scenes access. Go to https://www.patreon.com/inspirenation   For free meditations, weekly tips, stories, and similar shows visit: https://inspirenationshow.com/   We've got NEW Merch! - https://teespring.com/stores/inspire-nation-store   Follow Inspire Nation, and the lives of Michael and Jessica, on Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/InspireNationLive/   Find us on TikTok - https://www.tiktok.com/@inspirenationshow   

New Books in Religion
Dominique Townsend, "A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Religion

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 83:38


Founded in 1676 during a cosmopolitan early modern period, Mindröling monastery became a key site for Buddhist education and a Tibetan civilizational center. Its founders sought to systematize and institutionalize a worldview rooted in Buddhist philosophy, engaging with contemporaries from across Tibetan Buddhist schools while crystallizing what it meant to be part of their own Nyingma school. At the monastery, ritual performance, meditation, renunciation, and training in the skills of a bureaucrat or member of the literati went hand in hand. Studying at Mindröling entailed training the senses and cultivating the objects of the senses through poetry, ritual music, monastic dance, visual arts, and incense production, as well as medicine and astrology. Dominique Townsend investigates the ritual, artistic, and cultural practices inculcated at Mindröling to demonstrate how early modern Tibetans integrated Buddhist and worldly activities through training in aesthetics. Considering laypeople as well as monastics and women as well as men, A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery (Columbia UP, 2021) sheds new light on the forms of knowledge valued in early modern Tibetan societies, especially among the ruling classes. Townsend traces how tastes, values, and sensibilities were cultivated and spread, showing what it meant for a person, lay or monastic, to be deemed well educated. Combining historical and literary analysis with fieldwork in Tibetan Buddhist communities, this book reveals how monastic institutions work as centers of cultural production beyond the boundaries of what is conventionally deemed Buddhist. Jue Liang is scholar of Buddhism in general, and Tibetan Buddhism in particular. My research examines women in Tibetan Buddhist communities past and present using a combination of textual and ethnographical studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/religion

New Books in Buddhist Studies
Dominique Townsend, "A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Buddhist Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 83:38


Founded in 1676 during a cosmopolitan early modern period, Mindröling monastery became a key site for Buddhist education and a Tibetan civilizational center. Its founders sought to systematize and institutionalize a worldview rooted in Buddhist philosophy, engaging with contemporaries from across Tibetan Buddhist schools while crystallizing what it meant to be part of their own Nyingma school. At the monastery, ritual performance, meditation, renunciation, and training in the skills of a bureaucrat or member of the literati went hand in hand. Studying at Mindröling entailed training the senses and cultivating the objects of the senses through poetry, ritual music, monastic dance, visual arts, and incense production, as well as medicine and astrology. Dominique Townsend investigates the ritual, artistic, and cultural practices inculcated at Mindröling to demonstrate how early modern Tibetans integrated Buddhist and worldly activities through training in aesthetics. Considering laypeople as well as monastics and women as well as men, A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery (Columbia UP, 2021) sheds new light on the forms of knowledge valued in early modern Tibetan societies, especially among the ruling classes. Townsend traces how tastes, values, and sensibilities were cultivated and spread, showing what it meant for a person, lay or monastic, to be deemed well educated. Combining historical and literary analysis with fieldwork in Tibetan Buddhist communities, this book reveals how monastic institutions work as centers of cultural production beyond the boundaries of what is conventionally deemed Buddhist. Jue Liang is scholar of Buddhism in general, and Tibetan Buddhism in particular. My research examines women in Tibetan Buddhist communities past and present using a combination of textual and ethnographical studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/buddhist-studies

New Books in East Asian Studies
Dominique Townsend, "A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in East Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 83:38


Founded in 1676 during a cosmopolitan early modern period, Mindröling monastery became a key site for Buddhist education and a Tibetan civilizational center. Its founders sought to systematize and institutionalize a worldview rooted in Buddhist philosophy, engaging with contemporaries from across Tibetan Buddhist schools while crystallizing what it meant to be part of their own Nyingma school. At the monastery, ritual performance, meditation, renunciation, and training in the skills of a bureaucrat or member of the literati went hand in hand. Studying at Mindröling entailed training the senses and cultivating the objects of the senses through poetry, ritual music, monastic dance, visual arts, and incense production, as well as medicine and astrology. Dominique Townsend investigates the ritual, artistic, and cultural practices inculcated at Mindröling to demonstrate how early modern Tibetans integrated Buddhist and worldly activities through training in aesthetics. Considering laypeople as well as monastics and women as well as men, A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery (Columbia UP, 2021) sheds new light on the forms of knowledge valued in early modern Tibetan societies, especially among the ruling classes. Townsend traces how tastes, values, and sensibilities were cultivated and spread, showing what it meant for a person, lay or monastic, to be deemed well educated. Combining historical and literary analysis with fieldwork in Tibetan Buddhist communities, this book reveals how monastic institutions work as centers of cultural production beyond the boundaries of what is conventionally deemed Buddhist. Jue Liang is scholar of Buddhism in general, and Tibetan Buddhism in particular. My research examines women in Tibetan Buddhist communities past and present using a combination of textual and ethnographical studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/east-asian-studies

New Books Network
Dominique Townsend, "A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 83:38


Founded in 1676 during a cosmopolitan early modern period, Mindröling monastery became a key site for Buddhist education and a Tibetan civilizational center. Its founders sought to systematize and institutionalize a worldview rooted in Buddhist philosophy, engaging with contemporaries from across Tibetan Buddhist schools while crystallizing what it meant to be part of their own Nyingma school. At the monastery, ritual performance, meditation, renunciation, and training in the skills of a bureaucrat or member of the literati went hand in hand. Studying at Mindröling entailed training the senses and cultivating the objects of the senses through poetry, ritual music, monastic dance, visual arts, and incense production, as well as medicine and astrology. Dominique Townsend investigates the ritual, artistic, and cultural practices inculcated at Mindröling to demonstrate how early modern Tibetans integrated Buddhist and worldly activities through training in aesthetics. Considering laypeople as well as monastics and women as well as men, A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery (Columbia UP, 2021) sheds new light on the forms of knowledge valued in early modern Tibetan societies, especially among the ruling classes. Townsend traces how tastes, values, and sensibilities were cultivated and spread, showing what it meant for a person, lay or monastic, to be deemed well educated. Combining historical and literary analysis with fieldwork in Tibetan Buddhist communities, this book reveals how monastic institutions work as centers of cultural production beyond the boundaries of what is conventionally deemed Buddhist. Jue Liang is scholar of Buddhism in general, and Tibetan Buddhism in particular. My research examines women in Tibetan Buddhist communities past and present using a combination of textual and ethnographical studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in History
Dominique Townsend, "A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 83:38


Founded in 1676 during a cosmopolitan early modern period, Mindröling monastery became a key site for Buddhist education and a Tibetan civilizational center. Its founders sought to systematize and institutionalize a worldview rooted in Buddhist philosophy, engaging with contemporaries from across Tibetan Buddhist schools while crystallizing what it meant to be part of their own Nyingma school. At the monastery, ritual performance, meditation, renunciation, and training in the skills of a bureaucrat or member of the literati went hand in hand. Studying at Mindröling entailed training the senses and cultivating the objects of the senses through poetry, ritual music, monastic dance, visual arts, and incense production, as well as medicine and astrology. Dominique Townsend investigates the ritual, artistic, and cultural practices inculcated at Mindröling to demonstrate how early modern Tibetans integrated Buddhist and worldly activities through training in aesthetics. Considering laypeople as well as monastics and women as well as men, A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery (Columbia UP, 2021) sheds new light on the forms of knowledge valued in early modern Tibetan societies, especially among the ruling classes. Townsend traces how tastes, values, and sensibilities were cultivated and spread, showing what it meant for a person, lay or monastic, to be deemed well educated. Combining historical and literary analysis with fieldwork in Tibetan Buddhist communities, this book reveals how monastic institutions work as centers of cultural production beyond the boundaries of what is conventionally deemed Buddhist. Jue Liang is scholar of Buddhism in general, and Tibetan Buddhism in particular. My research examines women in Tibetan Buddhist communities past and present using a combination of textual and ethnographical studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

New Books in Literary Studies
Dominique Townsend, "A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Literary Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 83:38


Founded in 1676 during a cosmopolitan early modern period, Mindröling monastery became a key site for Buddhist education and a Tibetan civilizational center. Its founders sought to systematize and institutionalize a worldview rooted in Buddhist philosophy, engaging with contemporaries from across Tibetan Buddhist schools while crystallizing what it meant to be part of their own Nyingma school. At the monastery, ritual performance, meditation, renunciation, and training in the skills of a bureaucrat or member of the literati went hand in hand. Studying at Mindröling entailed training the senses and cultivating the objects of the senses through poetry, ritual music, monastic dance, visual arts, and incense production, as well as medicine and astrology. Dominique Townsend investigates the ritual, artistic, and cultural practices inculcated at Mindröling to demonstrate how early modern Tibetans integrated Buddhist and worldly activities through training in aesthetics. Considering laypeople as well as monastics and women as well as men, A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery (Columbia UP, 2021) sheds new light on the forms of knowledge valued in early modern Tibetan societies, especially among the ruling classes. Townsend traces how tastes, values, and sensibilities were cultivated and spread, showing what it meant for a person, lay or monastic, to be deemed well educated. Combining historical and literary analysis with fieldwork in Tibetan Buddhist communities, this book reveals how monastic institutions work as centers of cultural production beyond the boundaries of what is conventionally deemed Buddhist. Jue Liang is scholar of Buddhism in general, and Tibetan Buddhism in particular. My research examines women in Tibetan Buddhist communities past and present using a combination of textual and ethnographical studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literary-studies

New Books in Education
Dominique Townsend, "A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery" (Columbia UP, 2021)

New Books in Education

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 83:38


Founded in 1676 during a cosmopolitan early modern period, Mindröling monastery became a key site for Buddhist education and a Tibetan civilizational center. Its founders sought to systematize and institutionalize a worldview rooted in Buddhist philosophy, engaging with contemporaries from across Tibetan Buddhist schools while crystallizing what it meant to be part of their own Nyingma school. At the monastery, ritual performance, meditation, renunciation, and training in the skills of a bureaucrat or member of the literati went hand in hand. Studying at Mindröling entailed training the senses and cultivating the objects of the senses through poetry, ritual music, monastic dance, visual arts, and incense production, as well as medicine and astrology. Dominique Townsend investigates the ritual, artistic, and cultural practices inculcated at Mindröling to demonstrate how early modern Tibetans integrated Buddhist and worldly activities through training in aesthetics. Considering laypeople as well as monastics and women as well as men, A Buddhist Sensibility: Aesthetic Education at Tibet's Mindröling Monastery (Columbia UP, 2021) sheds new light on the forms of knowledge valued in early modern Tibetan societies, especially among the ruling classes. Townsend traces how tastes, values, and sensibilities were cultivated and spread, showing what it meant for a person, lay or monastic, to be deemed well educated. Combining historical and literary analysis with fieldwork in Tibetan Buddhist communities, this book reveals how monastic institutions work as centers of cultural production beyond the boundaries of what is conventionally deemed Buddhist. Jue Liang is scholar of Buddhism in general, and Tibetan Buddhism in particular. My research examines women in Tibetan Buddhist communities past and present using a combination of textual and ethnographical studies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/education

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Simon the Outpourer of Myrrh, Founder of Simonopetra Monastery, Mt Athos (1287)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 2:49


He lived during the years when Constantinople was held in captivity by the Crusaders, and the Imperial government was in exile in Nicaea. Simon fled the world at a young age and traveled to the Holy Mountain, where he submitted himself to a strict but wise Elder for many years. In time, seeking greater seclusion, he moved to a small cave on the western side of Mt Athos, near a cliff that towered a thousand feet above the sea. One night, a few days before the Feast of the Nativity, he saw a star move across the sky and come to rest above the cliff near his cave. Taking this as a demonic delusion, he ignored it; but on the Eve of Nativity, the star once again took its place above the cliff, and Simon heard a voice from heaven saying 'Be in no doubt, Simon, faithful servant of my Son! See this sign, and do not leave this spot in search of greater solitude as you have in mind, for it is here that I want you to establish your monastery, for the salvation of many souls.' Soon afterward, three young monks from wealthy Macedonian families, who had heard of the Saint's holiness, came and laid their wealth at his feet, asking that he accept them as disciples. Simon sent for builders and ordered them to construct a monastery on the very edge of the precipitous cliff. The builders at first refused, saying the work was much too dangerous; but, persuaded by a miracle worked through the Saint's prayers, they were convinced. As soon as the building was finished, the monastic community began to grow rapidly.   In his own lifetime St Simon was the source of many miracles, prophecies and healings. Once the monastery was attacked by Saracen pirates. Simon went to meet them with gifts, hoping to dissuade them from attacking. When the pirates attacked him, they were blinded, and the arm of one of them was paralyzed when he attempted to strike the Saint. All of them were healed when the holy man prayed for them, and at this wonder they all repented, received Baptism and became monks.   Saint Simon reposed in peace. A fragrant, healing balm afterwards flowed from his tomb in great quantities, so that he came to be called Myroblytis, 'Myrrh-gusher' or 'Outpourer of Myrrh.' In subsequent years, the monastery was destroyed and rebuilt more than once, and no trace now remains of the tomb.

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Friday, December 17, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsFriday of the Third Week of Advent Lectionary: 193All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint Hildegard of BingenAbbess, artist, author, composer, mystic, pharmacist, poet, preacher, theologian—where to begin in describing this remarkable woman? Born into a noble family, she was instructed for ten years by the holy woman Blessed Jutta. When Hildegard was 18, she became a Benedictine nun at the Monastery of Saint Disibodenberg. Ordered by her confessor to write down the visions that she had received since the age of three, Hildegard took ten years to write her Scivias (Know the Ways). Pope Eugene III read it, and in 1147, encouraged her to continue writing. Her Book of the Merits of Life and Book of Divine Works followed. She wrote over 300 letters to people who sought her advice; she also composed short works on medicine and physiology, and sought advice from contemporaries such as Saint Bernard of Clairvaux. Hildegard's visions caused her to see humans as “living sparks” of God's love, coming from God as daylight comes from the sun. Sin destroyed the original harmony of creation; Christ's redeeming death and resurrection opened up new possibilities. Virtuous living reduces the estrangement from God and others that sin causes. Like all mystics, Hildegard saw the harmony of God's creation and the place of women and men in that. This unity was not apparent to many of her contemporaries. Hildegard was no stranger to controversy. The monks near her original foundation protested vigorously when she moved her monastery to Bingen, overlooking the Rhine River. She confronted Emperor Frederick Barbarossa for supporting at least three antipopes. Hildegard challenged the Cathars, who rejected the Catholic Church claiming to follow a more pure Christianity. Between 1152 and 1162, Hildegard often preached in the Rhineland. Her monastery was placed under interdict because she had permitted the burial of a young man who had been excommunicated. She insisted that he had been reconciled with the Church and had received its sacraments before dying. Hildegard protested bitterly when the local bishop forbade the celebration of or reception of the Eucharist at the Bingen monastery, a sanction that was lifted only a few months before her death. In 2012, Hildegard was canonized and named a Doctor of the Church by Pope Benedict XVI. Her liturgical feast is celebrated on September 17. Reflection Pope Benedict spoke about Hildegard of Bingen during two of his general audiences in September 2010. He praised the humility with which she received God's gifts, and the obedience she gave Church authorities. He praised too the “rich theological content” of her mystical visions that sum up the history of salvation from creation to the end of time. During his papacy, Pope Benedict XVI said, “Let us always invoke the Holy Spirit, so that he may inspire in the Church holy and courageous women like Saint Hildegard of Bingen who, developing the gifts they have received from God, make their own special and valuable contribution to the spiritual development of our communities and of the Church in our time.” Click here for more on Saint Hildegard of Bingen! Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Art · The Creative Process

Latest Spirituality & Mindfulness interview from The Creative Process' MAIN CHANNEL. To listen to more of our interviews across the arts and other disciplines, visit tinyurl.com/thecreativepod, tinyurl.com/thecreativespotify, or wherever you get your podcasts. This ARTS podcast focuses on interviews with visual artists, curators & museums, but you can find hundreds more conversations across the arts, culture, society & the environment on our main channel. We hope you'll check it out!For more than 30 years, Master Shi Heng Yi has been studying and practicing the interaction between mind and body. His strength is the ability to smoothly combine this knowledge with physical exercises and to practice Martial art –Kung Fu and Qi Gong. He has an academic background but he prefers to live at the Shaolin Temple Europe, Monastery located in Otterberg, Germany. Since 2010 he has been taking care of the settlement and he personifies sustainable development and spreading Shaolin culture and philosophy.· www.shihengyi.online · www.shaolintemple.eu · www.creativeprocess.info · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

Southern Oddities
Ave Maria Grotto - Cullman, Alabama

Southern Oddities

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 12:06


Cullman is the largest city and county seat of Cullman County, Alabama..located just 50 miles north of Birmingham. Five German families moved to the area in March 1873; and by 1874, the town was incorporated and named after Colonel Cullmann. Over the next 20 years, Cullmann encouraged around 100,000 Germans to immigrate to the United States, with many settling in the Cullman area. In the 1840s monks from Metten Abbey in Germany, a monastery founded in 700 A.D., came to America, to minister to the growing German-speaking immigrant population. St. Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, became the first foundation of the German monks, and in the 1870s monks from St. Vincent were sent to Alabama to serve the needs of German Catholics. In 1891 those monks gathered to establish St. Bernard Abbey in Cullman, Alabama. One of those monks, was Bavarian born Joseph Zoettl, the creator of Ave Maria Grotto.[FOLLOW ON SOCIAL MEDIA & MORE]TWITTER: www.twitter.com/SouthernOddPodINSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/SouthernOddPodJARED'S TWITTER: www.twitter.com/jared_ordisJARED'S INSTAGRAM: www.instagram.com/jared.ordis[ADDITONAL INFORMATION]Questions or Business Inquiry, Email Us @ ordisstudios@gmail.comResearched was used for this episode of Southern Oddities, and we couldn't have made it possible without the journalism and dedication from these awesome sources of information: Roadside America [Story 2015] Ave Maria Grotto [Main Website] Wikipedia [Ave Maria Grotto] Wikipedia [Cullman, Alabama] Encyclopedia of Alabama [Ave Maria Grotto] Atlas Obscura [Ave Maria Grotto] The Bama Buzz [The Hidden History of Cullams Ave Maria Grotto] St Bernard Abbey [Main Website]"Southern Oddities" is created & produced by Jared Ordis, an Ordis Studios production. This show is part of the Ordis Studios Network Copyright © 2021 by Ordis Studioswww.ordisstudios.com

The God Show with Pat McMahon
What if you decided to live your life in service to a Monastery. You might be in the company of The Hermits of Big Sur

The God Show with Pat McMahon

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021


What if you decided to live your life in service to a Monastery. You might be in the company of The Hermits of Big Sur

SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά
Greek Orthodox monastery in danger of Western Australia's fire - Κινδύνεψε Ελληνορθόδοξο μοναστήρι από πυρκαγιές στην Δυτική Αυστραλία

SBS Greek - SBS Ελληνικά

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 6:41


Greek Orthodox monastery in danger of Western Australia's fire  - «Καρδιοχτύπια» στην ομογένεια για το μοναστήρι του Άι Γιάννη του Θεολόγου που βρίσκεται κοντά στο πύρινο μέτωπο 

agri-Culture
Ep 145 Mother Katherine: Holy Myrrhbearers, Batman!

agri-Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 37:27


We're not taking you to church, but we are going to a monastery (you never thought we'd start a podcast with that one, I bet).  Join us, as we talk to Mother Katherine at the Holy Myrrhbearers Monastery in Otego, New York.  Join us, and over 50 sheep, 12 goats, 3 chickens, and a guardian dog.  And Mother Katherine runs the whole livestock department, if you believe that.One of the most interesting people we've ever met.  All that, and her fellow sisters knit a mean pair of woolen socks – to order.  Call them if you don't believe us, or if you want some, too.  (607) 432-3179Links:https://holymyrrhbearers.com/monastery.html https://www.oca.org/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sephardi_Jews https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monastery https://www.thegrowlerguys.com/belgium-and-beyond-the-trappist-breweries-and-beers/ https://www.britannica.com/topic/AsclepiusSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/agriCulturePodcast)

Saint of the Day
Our Venerable Father Patapius (6th or 7th c.)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 1:48


He was born at Thebes in Egypt, and at a young age left his pious parents, his inheritance and his acquaintances to dwell in the Egyptian desert, devoting himself to ceaseless prayer. After many years, he reputation spread and, despite his desire for solitude, throngs of pilgrims would seek him out for his prayers and counsel. To escape the attentions of men, he did a surprising thing: he abandoned the desert and moved to Constantinople, settling in the Blachernae district, where, amid the bustle of the city, he was able to pass unnoticed, more secure in his solitude than he had been in the caves of Egypt.   As he grew in obedience to the commandments of Christ, the grace of working miracles grew in him, and once again he gradually became known. Once a blind man cast himself before Patapius on the street, and the Saint cured him instantly by calling on the name of Christ. Once he healed a man crippled by dropsy, anointing him with the oil from a vigil lamp and signing him with the Cross.   After blessing the Church for many years with his prayers and miracles, St Patapius fell asleep in peace, and was buried in the church of the Monastery of the Egyptians near Constantinople. In 1904 his precious and incorrupt relics were uncovered in the course of some building at a small monastery near Corinth. From that time the monastery has been dedicated to St Patapius, and many miracles are worked there.

Rare Drop Roleplay
Ancient Relics and Hokey Religions: Episode 43

Rare Drop Roleplay

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 6, 2021 150:28


Jake, Josh, Michael, Izzee, and Evan are back to continue their adventure! After causing some trouble and escaping town, the crew wound up at Ekko's Monastery, searching for Ekko's Master!Gaming Community Expo '21 Tickets and Information: https://www.gcxevent.com/ Check out all our latest giveaways here! https://loot.raredrop.co/Love Coffee? Check out Kings Coast Coffee Co.:https://kingscoast.coffee/Join the Loot Pool:https://patreon.com/raredropBe the coolest kid on the block with some Rare Drop Co merch:https://shop.raredrop.co/Visit us at:https://raredrop.co/Watch the streams:https://twitch.tv/RareDrophttps://twitch.tv/GCXEventhttps://twitch.tv/JNJtabletophttps://twitch.tv/therealjoshThttps://twitch.tv/jnjakehttps://twitch.tv/ItsEvbohttps://twitch.tv/MstrYoda_I_amFollow them on Twitter:https://twitter.com/RareDropCohttps://twitter.com/GCXEventhttps://twitter.com/JNJtabletophttps://twitter.com/therealjoshThttps://twitter.com/JnJake_https://twitter.com/ItsEvbohttps://twitter.com/MaddogmsdJnJ Tabletop TikTok:https://www.tiktok.com/@jnjtabletop?

Today's Catholic Mass Readings
Today's Catholic Mass Readings Saturday, December 4, 2021

Today's Catholic Mass Readings

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 4, 2021


Full Text of ReadingsSaturday of the First Week of Advent Lectionary: 180All podcast readings are produced by the USCCB and are from the Catholic Lectionary, based on the New American Bible and approved for use in the United States _______________________________________The Saint of the day is Saint John DamasceneJohn spent most of his life in the Monastery of Saint Sabas near Jerusalem, and all of his life under Muslim rule, indeed protected by it. He was born in Damascus, received a classical and theological education, and followed his father in a government position under the Arabs. After a few years, he resigned and went to the Monastery of Saint Sabas. He is famous in three areas: First, he is known for his writings against the iconoclasts, who opposed the veneration of images. Paradoxically, it was the Eastern Christian emperor Leo who forbade the practice, and it was because John lived in Muslim territory that his enemies could not silence him. Second, he is famous for his treatise, Exposition of the Orthodox Faith, a summary of the Greek Fathers, of which he became the last. It is said that this book is for Eastern schools what the Summa of Aquinas became for the West. Third, he is known as a poet, one of the two greatest of the Eastern Church, the other being Romanus the Melodist. His devotion to the Blessed Mother and his sermons on her feasts are well known. Saint John Damascene's liturgical feast is celebrated on April 30. Reflection John defended the Church's understanding of the veneration of images and explained the faith of the Church in several other controversies. For over 30 years, he combined a life of prayer with these defenses and his other writings. His holiness expressed itself in putting his literary and preaching talents at the service of the Lord. Saint of the DayCopyright Franciscan Media

Modern Medieval: The Podcast

As the world darkens during the winter months we thought what better subject to discuss than Light? . . . Icon Image: Earth at the center of the spheres of the universe, Gossuin de Metz, The Image of the World. Copy of the XIII th century. Manuscript on parchment, 208 folios, 180 × 115 mm, BnF, Manuscripts department, French 14964, f. 117, National Library of France.  . . For an academic perspective on medieval theories of vision, see Sarah Stanbury's 'The Visual Object of Desire in Late Medieval England': https://www.upenn.edu/pennpress/book/14396.html . . To read about the Church of the Holy Cross at Pătrăuți Monastery in Romania: https://www.medievalists.net/2021/06/the-power-of-sunlight-in-medieval-churches/ . . For more on Stonehenge and its celestial configurations: https://www.english-heritage.org.uk/visit/places/stonehenge/things-to-do/stone-circle/celestial-stonehenge/

Orthodox Christian Daily Prayer and Hours
J07. Valaam Monastery Choir: Chants from Valaam

Orthodox Christian Daily Prayer and Hours

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 26, 2021 69:25


Website: valaam.ru

The Musafir Stories - India Travel Podcast
Darjeeling with Vaibhav Dewan

The Musafir Stories - India Travel Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 25, 2021 57:57


This week, The Musafir Stories speaks with a dear friend, traveler and host of the podcast Baap beeti, Vaibhav Dewan!Today's destination: Darjeeling and Kalimpong!Nearest Airport: Bagdogra Airport, IXBNearest Railway Station: New Jalpaiguri, NJPPrerequisites - NAPacking - Make sure to carry warm clothes and accessoriesTime of the year - April, September-October is a good timeLength of the itinerary: 6-7 daysItinerary Highlights:Vaibhav shares his itinerary around Darjeeling and Kalimpong, traveling with a toddler! The journey starts with a flight to Bagdogra or New Jalpaiguri, depending on your mode of transport.The team hails a cab ride from the station to reach Darjeeling. The first day is spent seeing around the area, including the Cable car/ropeway, which is one of the longest in Asia.The area near Chowrasta and the Mall road are full of tourists along with eateries as well as local shops to shop for souvenirs as well as restaurants and cafes.A visit to St.Joseph's school, North Point is also well worth the time, and is the location of the popular bollywood flick, “Yaariyan”Tenzing Norgay Rock and Gombu Rock are other attractions in memory of the famous Sherpa mountaineers, Tenzing and Gombu Norgay.While in Darjeeling, make sure to try out the world famous Darjeeling tea. A visit to a tea estate also helps one understand the history of tea as well as the numerous types of tea grown in this area.The local markets around the mall road also have a variety of momos sold by locals, make sure to try that out.Other nature related places that should make it to your itinerary include Rock Garden, which has a variety of plants and trees and involves a small trek to a waterfall.Next up on the itinerary was a trip to the Dali monastery, along with the museum - a great chance to interact with the monks and understand the buddhist religion and culture. There are other popular monasteries like Ghum, Aloo bari, Bhooti Basti among others.A visit to Darjeeling is incomplete without experiencing the Darjeeling Himalayan railway - make sure to take a joy ride on the popular ‘toy train'. A short trip to Batasia loop is a must do - the location of the popular hit “mere sapno ki rani' starring Rajesh Khanna and Sharmila Tagore! The railways are also a UNESCO world heritage site!Next stop is the Japanese peace pagoda built by the Nipponzhan Myohoji foundation to promote peace in the aftermath of the 1945 bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.Another important point of interest is Tiger Hill, one of the most visited spots to get a view of Mt. Kanchenjunga, the third highest peak in the world at 8586m, after Mt. Everest and Mt.K2.Some popular eateries in the area include Keventers, Glenarys, Kunga's, Nathmull's, HImalayan coffee, Margaret's deck. Also don't forget to try the local spicy chilli - Daale, but try at your own risk!Kalimpong is not too far away from Darjeeling but provides an offbeat experience compared to it's more popular sibling. Places to check out include Lamahatta park, Durpin monastery, Cacti park and pineview nursery, Graham's homeschools, Morgan house and Crookety, Mangal Dham among others.Links:Vaibhav's podcast - Baap Beeti: https://open.spotify.com/show/5cELVD4HYXq0sAQ2lSKaccInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/pregnantpapa/Twitter: https://twitter.com/dewanekhaasLink to the Andaman Islands episode: https://shows.ivmpodcasts.com/show/the-musafir-stories-india-travel-podcast-yg3r-RgjYIgajKrExt2J2/episode/99-andaman-islands-with-vaibhav-dewan-mznq-IqY1WlDHPAvAzyb7?startTime=0Photo by Joy Amed on UnsplashFollow the Musafir stories on:Twitter : https://twitter.com/musafirstories?lang=enFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/themusafirstories/Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/musafirstoriespodcast/?hl=enwebsite: www.themusafirstories.comemail: themusafirstories@gmail.comYou can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.You can check out our website at http://www.ivmpodcasts.com/

What God is Not
What Silence is Not with Mother Cecilia

What God is Not

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 74:44


We're joined this week by Mother Cecilia. Mother Cecilia is one of the original founders of Christ the Bridegroom Monastery, and has been at the monastery for 12 years. Silence is a topic near and dear to her heart, and in this episode she talks about what silence is not, in an effort for us to understand what silence is.References:The Silence of God by Andrew PetersonFollow and Contact Us!Follow us on Instagram and FacebookWe're on YouTubeSupport us on PatreonJoin our Goodreads GroupFr. Michael's TwitterChrist the Bridegroom MonasteryEmail us! whatgodisnotpodcast@gmail.com

Music Matters
Manchester Camerata at The Monastery in Gorton

Music Matters

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 20, 2021 44:01


Tom Service travels to the Monastery in Gorton, the new home of the Manchester Camerata, to find out how the orchestra is embedding in to the community. Gorton was once the engine-room of the world as it kickstarted the Industrial Revolution, building the engines for the cotton mills. Having since suffered from socio-economic decline, Gorton is now being regenerated and the Manchester Camerata is doing something very new in its move to The Monastery, providing a weekly Music Café for local residents living with Dementia, making lasting connections with a local youth charity, and providing affordable concert tickets for the local community. Andreas Staier has just released a new disc of J.S. Bach's Well-Tempered Clavier Book 2. Tom talks to Andreas about Bach's decision to compile a second book of Preludes and Fugues for keyboard and how the work fits in his overall output, and especially his later works. Tom also visits director of Dash Arts, Josephine Burton, and musicians Yuriy Gurzhy & Mariana Sadovska, as they rehearse for their new work, Songs for Babyn Yar. He finds out about the horrors of Babyn Yar and talks to the musicians about how they are creating a fitting musical memorial to this dark chapter in Ukrainian Holocaust history. We also hear from Claire Mera-Nelson, Director of Music for Arts Council England, about the findings of a new 'Creating a more Inclusive Classical Music' report, launched as part of the Fair and Inclusive Classical Music project.

Mobile Suit Breakdown: the Gundam Anime Podcast

Show Notes With last week's general discussion of the plot of Char's Counterattack out of the way, it's time to start diving deep on specific aspects of the film. This week: environmental justice advocate Colin joins us to discuss the environment, and environmentalism, in Char's Counterattack. Plus in the research Thom explores what it might mean that the Federation is headquartered in Lhasa while Nina looks at how a 1988 audience might have responded to talk of 'nuclear winter'. From the Talkback In preparation for our conversation, Colin had us read "Principles of Environmental Justice" by the Delegates to the First National People of Color Environmental Leadership Summit held on October 24-27, 1991, and "The Progressive Plantation" by Lorenzo Kom'boa Ervin. You can find Colin on Twitter at @padgettish and listen to them co-host for Wow! Cool Robot!!'s coverage of Zeta Gundam, or their own much less serious podcast about Medabots at Medawatch. They also recommended the Environmental Justice Network as a resource. Lhasa, Tibet Timeline of major events in Tibetan history from the BBC. Tibetan history via Britannica. Wikipedia pages for the history of Tibet, Lhasa, the 5th Dalai Lama, Tibet under Qing rule, and Mongol invasions of Tibet. General Tibetan history: “Tibetan Nation: A History Of Tibetan Nationalism And Sino-tibetan Relations,” by Warren Smith. Routledge. 1997. Tourist guide to the Potala Palace (which definitely appears in the movie) and the Jokhang Temple (which probably does). By She Jingwei for China Global Television Network, Mar. 26, 2019. Available at https://news.cgtn.com/news/3d3d514d30496a4e33457a6333566d54/index.html. Recent History: Tibet and China: “Tibet, China and the United States: Reflections on the Tibet Question.” By Melvyn C. Goldstein for The Atlantic Council of the United States. 1995. Available at https://web.archive.org/web/20061106021854/http://cc.purdue.edu/~wtv/tibet/article/art4.html. Topgyal, Tsering. “Identity Insecurity and the Tibetan Resistance Against China.” Pacific Affairs 86, no. 3 (2013): 515–38. http://www.jstor.org/stable/43590713. “The Monastery as a Medium of Tibetan Culture,” Donald S. Lopez, Jr. For Cultural Survival Quarterly Magazine. March 1988. Available at https://www.culturalsurvival.org/publications/cultural-survival-quarterly/monastery-medium-tibetan-culture. “Timeline of Destruction of Tibetan Buddhist Monasteries in China,” by Alexander Berzin. 1994. Available at https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/history-culture/buddhism-in-east-asia/timeline-of-destruction-of-tibetan-buddhist-monasteries-in-china “Threat from Tibet? Systemic Repression of Tibetan Buddhism in China,” by Ryan Cimmino for Harvard International Review. Sept. 16, 2018. Available at https://hir.harvard.edu/repression-tibetan-buddhism-china/. “Genocide in Tibet,” by Maura Moynihan for the Washington Post, Jan. 25, 1998. Available at https://www.washingtonpost.com/archive/opinions/1998/01/25/genocide-in-tibet/27c0891c-57f1-4a7c-b873-a1071d93cbfd “'Prosecute them with Awesome Power' - China's Crackdown on Tengdro Monastery and Restrictions on Communications in Tibet.” Human Rights Watch. July 6, 2021. Available at https://www.hrw.org/report/2021/07/06/prosecute-them-awesome-power/chinas-crackdown-tengdro-monastery-and-restrictions International Resolutions and Recognition on Tibet (1959 to 2004), assembled by Lobsang Nyandak Zayul for the Department of Information and International Relations, Central Tibetan Administration. Available at https://tibet.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/International-rsolutions-on-Tibet.pdf The Dalai Lama: “Chronology of Events [in the Dalai Lama's life].” From the Office of His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Available at https://www.dalailama.com/the-dalai-lama/events-and-awards/chronology-of-events “14th Dalai Lama,” by Britannica. Available at https://www.britannica.com/biography/Dalai-Lama-14th/Life-in-exile “Dalai Lama caught in the middle as India and China reboot ties,” by Sugam Pokharel for CNN. March 30, 2018. Available at https://www.cnn.com/2018/03/30/asia/india-tibet-china-dalai-lama-intl/index.html “Dalai Lama opens exhibit of Tibetan art at Ueno,” by Ray Mahon for Stars and Stripes. Sept. 28, 1967. Available at https://www.stripes.com/news/dalai-lama-opens-exhibit-of-tibetan-art-at-ueno-1.18977. The 1980s Negotiations: Norbu, Dawa. “China's Dialogue With the Dalai Lama 1978-90: Prenegotiation Stage of Dead End?” Pacific Affairs 64, no. 3 (1991): 351–72. https://doi.org/10.2307/2759468. “Tibet 1985: The Last Fact-Finding Delegation - A Personal Account” by Tenzin Phuntsok Atisha.” 2020. Available at https://www.atc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/Tibet-1985-EBOOK.pdf. A report about the 1980s negotiations, based on declassified documents created by US officials at the time. “U.S. Officials Hoped Chinese Liberalization Program for Tibet in Early 1980s Would Bring Significant Improvements,” by Robert A. Wampler for National Security Archive. Feb. 28, 2013. Available at https://nsarchive2.gwu.edu/NSAEBB/NSAEBB414/. Press release: “Sino-Tibetan Contacts to Resume,” by Chhime R. Chhoekyapa from the Office of His Holiness the Dalai Lama, including an annexed timeline of negotiations between the Dalai Lama and Beijing. May 2, 2008. Available at https://www.c3sindia.org/geopolitics-strategy/sino-tibetan-contacts-to-resume/ Additional relevant Wikipedia entries on the "Great Game," the 1959 Tibetan uprising, Tibetan unrest 1987-1989, the Tibet Autonomous Region, Chushi Gangdruk, the Tibetan independence movement, the Convention of Lhasa, and the Seventeen Point Agreement. Japan, Chernobyl, & Nuclear Anxiety Wikipedia pages for the Chernobyl disaster, its effects, and its cultural impact, Page on the Chernobyl accident from the World Nuclear Association. About the "Red Forest." Page on the "Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident." Wikipedia pages for the band The Blue Hearts (ザ・ブルーハーツ), and for "On Your Mark," the Change and Aska song with the Ghibli/Miyazaki AMV (anime music video). Radiophobia. Specific pages on the nuclear-power debate, the anti-nuclear movement (in general and in Japan), and anti-nuclear organizations. Japanese-language page on the anti-nuclear movement. Website for the Citizens Nuclear Information Center (原子力資料情報室) (shortened to CNIC), a Japanese anti-nuclear organization (in Japanese), History and timeline for CNIC (in English). CNIC English-language newsletters, Oct. 1987, Dec.1987, and Jan-Feb 1988. Contemporary articles the Chernobyl disaster: Silk, L. (1986, May 02). Economic scene|: Chernobyl's world impact. New York Times (1923-) Retrieved from https://www.proquest.com/historical-newspapers/economic-scene/docview/110930284/se-2?accountid=35927 Hudson, Richard L., Terence Roth. "Chernobyl: Coping with Consequences --- Lingering Fallout: A Year Later, Mishap at Chernobyl Damps Atom-Power Industry --- Siemens Plant-Building Unit Battles Germany's Greens, Seeks to Reassure Public --- in Britain, Cuddly Reactors." Wall Street Journal Apr 23 1987, Eastern edition ed.: 1. ProQuest. 10 Nov. 2021. STUART D. "BIG AREA STRICKEN: SPREAD OF RADIOACTIVITY WAS FAR GREATER THAN INDICATED BEFORE FALLOUT FROM CHERNOBYL DISASTER AFFECTED LARGER AREA THAN FIRST REPORTED." New York Times (1923-) Aug 22 1986: 2. ProQuest. 10 Nov. 2021. Taylor, Robert E. "Scope of Chernobyl Accident is Unclear to West as Fallout Continues to Spread." Wall Street Journal May 05 1986, Eastern edition ed.: 1. ProQuest. 10 Nov. 2021. "Panel Says Japan should Boost Nuclear Power use." Wall Street Journal Jul 21 1986, Eastern edition ed.: 1. ProQuest. 10 Nov. 2021. WEINSTEIN, BERNARD L. and HAROLD T. GROSS. "Japan is Spending Heavily to Avoid Oil." New York Times (1923-), Mar 27, 1988, pp. 1. ProQuest, https://www.proquest.com/historical-newspapers/japan-is-spending-heavily-avoid-oil/docview/110543916/se-2?accountid=35927. ERIK E. "After Accident at the Soviet Station, Nuclear Power is Questioned again." New York Times (1923-), May 02, 1986, pp. 1. ProQuest, https://www.proquest.com/historical-newspapers/after-accident-at-soviet-station-nuclear-power-is/docview/110943137/se-2?accountid=35927. Other articles and papers: Zhukova, Ekatherina. “Foreign Aid and Identity after the Chernobyl Nuclear Disaster: How Belarus Shapes Relations with Germany, Europe, Russia, and Japan.” Cooperation and Conflict, vol. 52, no. 4, Sage Publications, Ltd., 2017, pp. 485–501, https://www.jstor.org/stable/48590276. Okabe, Aki. “Japan Reacts to Chernobyl.” Earth Island Journal, vol. 2, no. 2, Earth Island Institute, 1987, pp. 14–15, http://www.jstor.org/stable/43881866. Great book about film director and screenwriter Honda Ishiro (本多 猪四郎): Ryfle, Steve, et al. Ishiro Honda: A Life in Film, from Godzilla to Kurosawa. Wesleyan University Press, 2017. English and Japanese Wikipedia pages for the Kurosawa Akira (黒澤 明) film, 生きものの記録 or "I Live in Fear." About the Stanley Kubrick film "Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb." Not mentioned in the research but when I was editing and got to the part about Nazi scientists, I remember the existence of this satirical song, "Wernher Von Braun" by Thomas Andrew Lehrer (1965). Mobile Suit Breakdown is written, recorded, and produced within Lenapehoking, the ancestral and unceded homeland of the Lenape, or Delaware, people. Before European settlers forced them to move west, the Lenape lived in New York City, New Jersey, and portions of New York State, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Connecticut. Lenapehoking is still the homeland of the Lenape diaspora, which includes communities living in Oklahoma, Wisconsin, and Ontario. You can learn more about Lenapehoking, the Lenape people, and ongoing efforts to honor the relationship between the land and indigenous peoples by visiting the websites of the Delaware Tribe and the Manhattan-based Lenape Center. Listeners in the Americas and Oceania can learn more about the indigenous people of your area at https://native-land.ca/. We would like to thank The Lenape Center for guiding us in creating this living land acknowledgment. You can subscribe to Mobile Suit Breakdown for free! on fine Podcast services everywhere and on YouTube, visit our website GundamPodcast.com, follow us on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook, or email your questions, comments, and complaints to gundampodcast@gmail.com. Mobile Suit Breakdown wouldn't exist without the support of our fans and Patrons! You can join our Patreon to support the podcast and enjoy bonus episodes, extra out-takes, behind-the-scenes photos and video, MSB gear, and much more! The intro music is WASP by Misha Dioxin, and the outro is Long Way Home by Spinning Ratio, both licensed under Creative Commons CC BY 4.0 licenses. All music used in the podcast has been edited to fit the text. Mobile Suit Breakdown provides critical commentary and is protected by the Fair Use clause of the United States Copyright law. Gundam content is copyright and/or trademark of Sunrise Inc., Bandai, Sotsu Agency, or its original creator. Mobile Suit Breakdown is in no way affiliated with or endorsed by Sunrise, Bandai, Sotsu, or any of their subsidiaries, employees, or associates and makes no claim to own Gundam or any of the copyrights or trademarks related to it. Copyrighted content used in Mobile Suit Breakdown is used in accordance with the Fair Use clause of the United States Copyright law. Any queries should be directed to gundampodcast@gmail.com

The Cultural Hall Podcast
Monastery Mornings Ep. 556 The Cultural Hall

The Cultural Hall Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 48:08


This warmhearted memoir describes how a small, insecure boy with a vibrant imagination found an unlikely family in the company of monks at Holy Trinity Abbey, in the mountains of rural Latter-day Saint Utah. Struggling with his parents' recent divorce, Michael O'Brien... The post Monastery Mornings Ep. 556 The Cultural Hall appeared first on The Cultural Hall Podcast.

The Dark Web Vlogs
What Happens At The Holy Cross Abbey Monastery I Haunted

The Dark Web Vlogs

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 9:58


What Happens At The Holy Cross Abbey Monastery I HauntedWalk through the maze of dark corridors and feel the spectral energy that continues to linger at the historic Abbey Monastery. Stories of spirits at the monastery include Brother Mark, who was the leader of the glee club. He used to sit up in the bell tower and play the organ in the afternoons. Now, the automated carillon plays hymns around noon. But sometimes the carillon plays not at the appointed time as if someone is playing them.You may also come face to face with apparitions of former monks that are spotted wandering the halls. There is a secret tunnel in the basement that connects the monastery to the Ullathorne Hall. It was used to discretely cross between buildings. Today the secret apparently is divulged by the spirits that remain here, for it is where the darkest and heaviest reports of spectral activity have been documented.

The Creative Process Podcast
(Highlights) MASTER SHI HENG YI

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2021


“Just getting to know what is Buddhism, which is the foundation of every monastery. The Shaolin Temple is in the core, first of all it's a Buddhist monastery and when you are starting to read about Buddhism, one of the key sentence in the beginning is: With your thoughts you are creating the world…So it's very rarely clearly stated that it is the thoughts that are creating the world. Nevertheless, if you are now looking at the practices that the Shaolin Temple offers, that is quite physical. There is a lot of physicality in there, so you might think but why are you saying with thoughts you create the world, but you have so many different physical activities. It is because if you want to have mental freedom. If you want to approach freedom, you cannot just approach freedom by doing things or trying to chase freedom. The freedom that we are looking for is the type of freedom that is derived and that is very closely related to its counterpart, which is very hard restriction or very hard structure. So if you want to experience what freedom is, look at the restrictions of your life.”For more than 30 years, Master Shi Heng Yi has been studying and practicing the interaction between mind and body. His strength is the ability to smoothly combine this knowledge with physical exercises and to practice Martial art –Kung Fu and Qi Gong. He has an academic background but he prefers to live at the Shaolin Temple Europe, Monastery located in Otterberg, Germany. Since 2010 he has been taking care of the settlement and he personifies sustainable development and spreading Shaolin culture and philosophy.· www.shihengyi.online · www.shaolintemple.eu · www.creativeprocess.info · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

The Creative Process Podcast

For more than 30 years, Master Shi Heng Yi has been studying and practicing the interaction between mind and body. His strength is the ability to smoothly combine this knowledge with physical exercises and to practice Martial art –Kung Fu and Qi Gong. He has an academic background but he prefers to live at the Shaolin Temple Europe, Monastery located in Otterberg, Germany. Since 2010 he has been taking care of the settlement and he personifies sustainable development and spreading Shaolin culture and philosophy.· www.shihengyi.online · www.shaolintemple.eu · www.creativeprocess.info · www.oneplanetpodcast.org

What God is Not
On the Spot Lectio: Psalm 16

What God is Not

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 58:43


This week Father Michael and Mother Natalia do an on-the-spot Lectio Divina of Psalm 16 (Septuagint )/Psalm 17 (Vulgate).We are grateful to everyone who donated to the Monastery fundraiser this past weekend. The nuns released a video called Be Poor with Me: Reflections on Poverty which was shown at the fundraiser. Happy viewing!Follow and Contact Us!Follow us on Instagram and FacebookWe're on YouTube!Join our Goodreads GroupFr. Michael's TwitterChrist the Bridegroom MonasteryEmail us! whatgodisnotpodcast@gmail.com

The Counsel of Trent
#528 – FFAF: Reflections on the “Three Hearts” Pilgrimage

The Counsel of Trent

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 11, 2021 15:50


In this free-for-all-Friday Trent reflects on the recent pilgrimage in Oklahoma he and his son took part in that included walking 22 miles and worshipping at the Clear creek Monastery.

Saint of the Day
Our Venerable Father Arsenios of Cappadocia, the Wonderworker (1924)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 10, 2021 2:47


“Cappadocia (in eastern Turkey) is virtually devoid of Christians now, but in 1840, when St Arsenios was born there, there were still vital Orthodox communities. He became a monk and was sent to his native town, Farasa, to serve the people. He became known as a mighty intercessor before God, praying for all who came to him, Muslims as well as Christians. His countless miracles of healing became known throughout Cappadocia; those who could not come to see him would sometimes send articles of clothing for him to pray over. He became known as Hadjiefendis, a Muslim term of honour for pilgrims, because he made pilgrimage to the Holy Land every ten years on foot. He never accepted any gifts in return for his prayers and healings, saying ‘Our faith is not for sale!'   “He concealed his holiness as much as he could beneath a rough and sharp-tempered exterior. If anyone expressed admiration for him, he would reply "So you think I'm a saint? I'm only a sinner worse than you. Don't you see that I even lose my temper? The miracles you see are done by Christ. I do no more than lift up my hands and pray to him." But as the Scriptures say, the prayers of a righteous man avail much, and when St Arsenios lifted up his hands, wonders often followed.   “He lived in a small cell with an earthen floor, fasted often and was in the habit of shutting himself in his cell for at least two whole days every week to devote himself entirely to prayer.   “Father Arsenios predicted the expulsion of the Greeks from Asia Minor before it happened, and organized his flock for departure. When the expulsion order came in 1924, the aged Saint led his faithful on a 400-mile journey across Turkey on foot. He had foretold that he would only live forty days after reaching Greece, and this came to pass. His last words were "The soul, the soul, take care of it more than the flesh, which will return to earth and be eaten by worms!" Two days later, on November 10, 1924, he died in peace at the age of eighty-three. Since 1970, many apparitions and miracles have occurred near his holy relics, which reside in the Monastery of Souroti near Thessalonica. He was officially glorified by the Patriarchate of Constantinople in 1986.” — Source: Orthodox Parish of St John of Kronstadt (UK) The primary source for the life of St Arsenios is Saint Arsenios the Cappadocian, compiled by Elder Païsios of the Holy Mountain, who was baptized as an infant by the Saint.

Saint of the Day
Saint Germanus, Archbishop of Kazan (1568)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 6, 2021 1:09


He was born in Tver to a princely family. Drawn to a life of holiness from his earliest childhood, he became a monk at the age of twenty-five, at the Monastery of St Joseph of Volokolamsk. In time he became Archimandrite of the Monastery of the Dormition at Staritsk; but after a few years he returned to Volokolamsk to live in solitude. When his teacher St Gurias (October 4), first Archbishop of Kazan, reposed, Germanus succeeded him as Archbishop, but continued to live as ascetically as when he was a hermit. He was offered the office of Metropolitan of Moscow, but refused. As a faithful shepherd of his church, he fearlessly confronted Tsar Ivan the Terrible for his many and various cruelties; for this he was killed in 1568 by the Tsar's assassins.   Note: Recently, a bizarre movement has arisen among some nationalist sectarians in Russia to canonize Ivan the Terrible. Among the many obvious reasons against such an action (which has been firmly rejected by the Patriarch of Moscow), we could list the Tsar's murder of some of the Church's own Saints, Germanus among them.

CrossPolitic Studios
The Theology Pugcast: A Monk Without a Monastery

CrossPolitic Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 64:11


Tom introduces an article by Louis Markos entitled: Detectives of Significance. This article addresses an earlier time in Christian history which had a much deeper and wider view of reality and meaning. Part of the task of theology was to interpret such deeper meanings guided by the richly layered meanings communicated in the Bible and […]

The Theology Pugcast
The Theology Pugcast: A Monk Without a Monastery

The Theology Pugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 64:11


Tom introduces an article by Louis Markos entitled: Detectives of Significance. This article addresses an earlier time in Christian history which had a much deeper and wider view of reality and meaning. Part of the task of theology was to interpret such deeper meanings guided by the richly layered meanings communicated in the Bible and in creation. Markos then turns to detective stories, Sherlock Holmes and The Name of the Rose, to show how even rationalist characters desire something more than a narrow reading of reality. Chris and Glenn jump in with many insights into the rich web of meaning Christianity offers when seen in light of its engagement with truth, beauty, and goodness. Article Referenced: https://www.touchstonemag.com/archives/article.php?id=25-05-030-f

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Joannicius the Great, hermit on Mt Olympus (846)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 3:17


He was born in Bithynia of peasant stock. He worked as a swineherd, then became an officer in the Imperial army, where he served with such distinction in the war against the Bulgars that the Emperor Constantine VI wanted to take him into his personal service. "But the sight of massacres and horrors of war had brought home to him the vanity of this life. He asked leave of the Emperor to retire from the service, in order to wage unseen warfare in the ranks of the angelic army" (Synaxarion). In the coming years he traveled widely, sometimes living as a hermit, sometimes living in monasteries, more than once founding a monastic community. Wherever he went he lived in stillness, solitude and strict asceticism. He was famed for his spiritual counsel, his prophecies, his many miracles of healing ailments bodily and spiritual, and for his friendship with animals. Once a monk who doubted the Saint's miracles was eating at table with him when a large bear burst in upon them. Joannicius called the bear and it came and lay at his feet; he then told it to lie at the feet of his frightened guest and said "At their creation, the animals looked with veneration on man, who is made in the image of God, and he had no fear of them. We are afraid of them now because we have transgressed God's commandments. If we love the Lord Jesus and keep his commandments, no animal will be able to do us any harm." The monk departed greatly edified.   In the last years of Joannicius' life, when he was about ninety years old, the Emperor Theophilus sought his counsel on the veneration of icons. The Saint's answer was pointed: "Whoever refuses due honor to the images of Christ, of the Mother of God and of the Saints, will not be received into the Kingdom of Heaven, even if he has lived an otherwise blameless life."   Once Joannicius traveled to Constantinople to aid the Patriarch in some matters concerning the order of the Church. When he returned to his hermitage, he found that some jealous monks had set it on fire. Knowing who they were, he nevertheless addressed them kindly and invited them to share with him some food that he had managed to salvage from the fire. He did not attempt to rebuild his hermitage, but, taking the fire as a sign of his impending departure from this life, he traveled to the monastery of Antidion, where he had first entered into the monastic life and there, having predicted the day of his death, he reposed in peace. At the moment of his death, the monks of Mt Olympus saw a pillar of fire ascending from the earth to the sky.   The Saint's relics have been the source of many miracles. His skull is kept and venerated at the Monastery of the Pantocrator on Mt Athos. The widely-used prayer "My hope is the Father; my refuge is the Son; my shelter is the Holy Spirit; O Holy Trinity, glory be to Thee!" is attributed to St Joannicius.

Saint of the Day
Holy Virgin Martyr Winefride of Treffynnon (Holywell), Wales (7th c.)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 3, 2021 1:00


"Saint Winefride (in Welsh, Gwenfrewi) was a maiden of noble birth who lived in North wales in the seventh century. The niece and spiritual daughter of Saint Beuno (21 April), she entered the Monastery of Gwytherin after his death, where she lived under the spiritual direction of Saint Eleril. The son of a neighbouring chieftan, Caradoc by name, seized by an unchaste passion, pursued her and struck off her head with a sword. The spot where her head fell became known as Treffynnon or Holywell, because of the appearing of a healing spring for those who would take its waters with faith. Holywell remains a great place of pilgrimage in Britain to this day." (Synaxarion)

The Theology Pugcast
A Monk Without a Monastery

The Theology Pugcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 64:11


Tom introduces an article by Louis Markos entitled: Detectives of Significance. This article addresses an earlier time in Christian history which had a much deeper and wider view of reality and meaning. Part of the task of theology was to interpret such deeper meanings guided by the richly layered meanings communicated in the Bible and in creation. Markos then turns to detective stories, Sherlock Holmes and The Name of the Rose, to show how even rationalist characters desire something more than a narrow reading of reality. Chris and Glenn jump in with many insights into the rich web of meaning Christianity offers when seen in light of its engagement with truth, beauty, and goodness. Article Referenced: https://www.touchstonemag.com/archives/article.php?id=25-05-030-f --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/the-theology-pugcast/support

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor
How to deal with attachment? - Hot Seat with Nikhil (Listener Special)

The Habit Coach with Ashdin Doctor

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 9:20


In this listener special episode of #TheHabitCoach Podcast, Host Ashdin answers an interesting question from the listener Nikhil - "What is attachment according to you, its importance in today's life and a practical way to approach it?"Ashdin answers by explaining how pandemic has changed many aspects of our lives that led to change our perspective towards 'attachment' and 'detachment'. Further, he talks about his own definition of 'attachment' and shares some super simple habits that can be a practical way to approach it. Tune in to this awesome episode to hear a fresh perspective on our 'attachments'. Send questions to Ashdin Doctor for The Habit Coach Hot Seat Below: ( https://forms.gle/13vgf4MAk7zYKBd38 )Check out the Awesome180 Habit Coach app: ( https://bit.ly/2XTBvfC )Website: Awesome180 ( http://awesome180.com/ ) You can follow Ashdin Doctor on social media:Twitter: ( https://twitter.com/Ashdindoc )Linkedin: ( https://www.linkedin.com/in/ashdin-doctor/ )Instagram: ( https://www.instagram.com/ashdindoc/ )Facebook: ( https://www.facebook.com/ashdin.doc.9 )You can listen to this show and other awesome shows on the IVM Podcasts app on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/ios, or any other podcast app.

Holistic Christian Life - Worshiping God - Mind, Body, Soul
Lessons From a Pandemic with Mat. Constantina Palmer - Ep. 134

Holistic Christian Life - Worshiping God - Mind, Body, Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 44:52


Join Cynthia for this inspiring interview with Mat. Constantina Palmer.  The author of The Sweetness of Grace and The Scent of Holiness is just the person to talk with about the last year and a half. Matushka had some plans that fell through this past year on top of everything else we have all been going through.  She gained insight through accepting God's will in her life and in this world, and shares why we should give thanks that He is allowing us to live during these difficult years. Constantina R. Palmer lives with her husband, an Orthodox priest, in the province of Newfoundland and Labrador in Canada, serving the Holy Lady of Vladimir (OCA) Orthodox Mission, the only Orthodox parish on the island of Newfoundland.  She teaches Sunday School to children of various ages, striving to present the great mysteries of the Orthodox faith in a form and context they can grasp.  She is also a social worker with the provincial government's social housing corporation.  She is the author of The Scent of Holiness: Lessons from a Women's Monastery and The Sweetness of Grace: Stories of Christian Trial and Victory. Is it time to make some changes in your life? Do you want to stop the madness and get on track with your health? Maybe coaching is right for you. I've helped many people gain their health back over the years, and would love to talk with you. Just reach out with the link below to get on my schedule. From time to time I have openings for new clients and accept them on a first come first serve basis. Book a Discovery Call Is it time to make some changes in your life? Maybe coaching is right for you. Just reach out with the link below to get on my schedule. From time to time I have openings for new clients and accept them on a first come first serve basis.

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron
The Oldest Complete New Testament? Codex Sinaiticus

Biblical Archaeology Today w/ Steve Waldron

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 5:05


In 1844, Constantin Von Tischendoff found a copy of the Bible at St. Catherine's Monastery. Debate ensued over its antiquity. The same with Codex Vaticanus found in the 1400s. God bless you and thank you for listening! Join us again!

Saint of the Day
St Symeon the New Theologian (1022)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 1:22


As a young man he became a monk in the Studite Monastery in Constantinople; later he bacame abbot of the Monastery of St Mamas, also in Constantinople. After a life of great asceticism, including many trials, criticisms and afflictions, he reposed in peace. (He reposed on March 12, but since this day always falls during the Great Fast, his feast is kept today.) His teaching on the soul's ability to enter directly into communion with God in this life aroused some opposition in his own time, and the title 'New Theologian' was not always applied in a positive sense. His experiential, mystical teachings are firmly rooted in his doctrine of the Church: his writings contain many powerful affirmations of the centrality of participation in the Mysteries in our struggle for salvation. He is the author of many sublimely beautiful sermons, writings and hymns, a number of them in metered verse. With St John the Evangelist and St Gregory, Patriarch of Constantinople, he is one of only three whom the Church has officially called "Theologian."

Saint of the Day
Blessed Fool for Christ Andrew of Totma (1637)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 2:00


"Saint Andrew came of a family of devout, unlettered peasants. He obtained an education by going to church and, on the death of his parents, became a novice at the Monastery of Galich, in the diocese of Kostroma. The Abbot, who was remarkable for his wisdom, discerned Andrew's spiritual gifts and encouraged him to undertake the unusual and difficult ascesis of Foolishness-for-Christ. Andrew left the monastery to lead a wayfaring life, but often returned to reveal his thoughts and deeds to his starets. On his Elder's death, he settled near the Church of the Resurrection in the town of Totma, where he was completely unknown. He spent the whole night in prayer and during the day begged alms that he forthwith gave to the poor. He went barefoot summer and winter and lived on nothing but bread and water. Every year he made a pilgrimage to the holy places of the region. One day he was accosted by the chief of an outlandish tribe. The man was suffering from an eye complaint and asked Andrew, who was already looked upon as a wonderworker, to cure him. Andrew fled, but the wild man washed his eyes in the snow trodden by the Saint and was healed.   "Worn out by ascesis and privation, Saint Andrew foreknew the day of his decease. He called a priest, confessed and communicated in the holy Mysteries, and not long after he fell asleep in the Lord, a heavenly scent pervading the room where his body lay. Some time later, the Saint appeared to a sick woman as she slept, holding the Gospel for her to venerate and telling her to pray at his tomb. When she awoke, the woman was healed." (Synaxarion)

Saint of the Day
St Stephen the Blind, Prince of Serbia (1476)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 1:46


He was born in 1417. Stephen and his younger brother Gregory were taken captive by the Turks and blinded on the day of Pascha 1441; several years later they were ransomed back to their father. After his father's death, Stephen, though blind, ruled Serbia for a short time, but was deposed in a coup and exiled to Albania. There he met St Angelina, whom he married in 1461. Their marriage was blessed with three children. Once again Stephen was threatened by the Turks and fled with his family to Trieste in Italy. There he held firmly to the Orthodox faith despite strong pressures to convert to Roman Catholicism. The holy prince, having patiently endured the many hardships of his life, reposed in peace in 1476. Years after his death, a heavenly light miraculously appeared over his tomb. When the tomb was opened, his relics were found to be incorrupt; the sick were healed by touching them, and the blind received their sight. The relics were placed in the Monastery of Krushedol, founded by his widow St Angelina. The Monastery was sacked in 1716 by the Turks, who burned the church and cut the holy relics to pieces. Some fragments still remain at the reconstructed monastery.

The Lakers Legacy Podcast
Ep. 374: Monk, Nunn Meditations (Lakers Preseason Game 1 Recap & Impressions)

The Lakers Legacy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 43:54


No more Monk-ey-ing around! Actual, tangible Lakers basketball is back! Unless your Malik Monk and you're ready to microwave up the court, of course. Monk, Nunn, Friar Tuck(er), oh my! "The Monastery" was in full display sans LeBron and Westbrook in the Lakers' 1st Preseason Game vs the Nets. These are our thoughts... ... Don't forget to go to https://www.Manscaped.com and use the promo code FANSIDED20 to get 20% OFF YOUR ORDER AND FREE SHIPPING! ... Intro/Outro Music Provided By: Hello Harry - "Forever" (Search His Page Up on SoundCloud for More #Litty Beats) ... Please also Rate & Review us 5-stars on the Apple Podcast App.Patreon: Patreon.com/TheLakersLegacyPodcast YouTube - Lakers Legacy Twitter - @LakersLegacyPod Instagram: @lakerslegacypod Listen & Subscribe to us on: Apple, Spotify, Anchor, Google Play, etc. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

With Gratitude, Matt
A Monastic Path, A Family Life, and Timeless Lessons, with Neal Tew.

With Gratitude, Matt

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 50:03


Neal Tew is a proud father of fours kids living in Cincinnati, Ohio. Over the years, his brilliance and talent has helped him create many new ventures in his life including his own financial planning firm, a new boutique marketing firm called Brandstrength, a ground breaking youth squash association, and he is now the author of a new book titled, The Gospel Life: Three Years in a Monastery. On this episode, Matt discusses Neal's faith and his longing to explore his spirituality which led him down many interesting paths including his studies of comparative religion at Harvard and the years he spent at a Catholic Monastery detailed in the book. This discussion is fascinating and full of many wonderful observations and lessons that will spark something for anyone who listens. Information about Neal's recent book and his efforts to promote the wisdom of the monks can be found on his website: nealtew.com. You can also learn more about Neal and his marketing business at  https://www.linkedin.com/in/nealtew/

Saint of the Day
Our Father among the Saints Michael, Metropolitan of Kiev (992)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 1:57


When Prince Vladimir, Equal to the Apostles (July 15), received holy Baptism, he sent an embassy to Constantinople asking that clergy be sent to enlighten the Russian land and to establish Christ's Church there. Patriarch Nicolas II Chrysoberges (December 16) appointed Michael, a wise and blameless bishop, to be Metropolitan of Russia. Saint Michael traveled to Kiev with six bishops and a large number of clergy to aid him in his daunting work. He began by baptising the Prince's family and the nobles of Kiev. Prince Vladimir used his authority to have the pagan idols pulled down, and enjoined all the people to accept Baptism. Thus the people of Kiev gathered en masse on the banks of the Dnieper and were baptized by the Metropolitan and his clergy, establishing Kiev as the first Christian city in Russia. Paganism was deeply entrenched everywhere in this wild land, and the proclamation of the Gospel was difficult and dangerous. Nonetheless, the holy Metropolitan in his own lifetime was able to cast down the idols in Novgorod and Rostov and establish the Church there.   Metropolitan Michael reposed in peace in 992, having planted in Russia the seeds of Russian Orthodoxy, which in coming generations would become the very soul of the Russian people. His relics were found to be incorrupt in the twelfth century and were translated to the Monastery of the Kiev Caves.