Podcasts about Arabs

Semitic people inhabiting the geographic and cultural region located primarily in Northern Africa and Western Asia

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    Gersnet Podcast
    Average against Arabs

    Gersnet Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 64:36


    Although Rangers finally won their first match in four attempts, it was far from inspiring at Ibrox. Colin is joined by the returning Ross and Brian to analyse the win over Dundee Utd and where we stand going into the international break. The pod is brought to you in association with our partners: Forrest Precision Engineering, Football Prizes and Zenith Coins. Use discount code GN10 for 10% at Zenith's site. The Gersnet Podcast: the independent Rangers FC podcast, by fans, for fans. LIVE and FREE every Sunday on YouTube at 9.30pm with match preview shows ahead of each game as well. All available from a range of other platforms on the following day (including iTunes and Spotify).

    The Olive Tree Reconciliation Fund
    OT575 - "Israel - Whose vision?" - Ofer Amitai with Julia Fisher 1 of 3

    The Olive Tree Reconciliation Fund

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 12:59


    Julia Fisher talks to Ofer Amitai - Joining us from Jerusalem, Ofer is the pastor of a congregation called El Roi and also the director of the Israel Prayer Centre. So when it comes to finding out what God is doing in Israel, Ofer is one the the people I turn to. We're talking in Mid July 2022 – Israel is facing yet another election in November … what has happened to bring this about? Our aim is to build bridges... To build bridges of understanding and support, in a spirit of reconciliation, between believers (both Jewish and Arab) in the Holy Land (Israel and the Palestinian Areas) and Christians worldwide. www.olivetreefund.org

    America's Roundtable
    A Conversation with US Senator Jim DeMint and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows | The Second Anniversary of the Abraham Accords | U.S. Economy — Inflation, Energy Prices and Rising Interest Rates | Crisis at the U.S. Southern Border

    America's Roundtable

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 34:11


    Join America's Roundtable Radio co-hosts Natasha Srdoc and Joel Anand Samy in a conversation with Former U.S. Senator Jim DeMint and Former White House Chief of Staff and Former US Congressman Mark Meadows on the vital issues impacting America and the world. The distinguished guests reflect on the second anniversary of the historic Abraham Accords and the opportunities to expand this principled initiative that is advancing peace and prosperity in the Middle East. On September 15, 2020, President Donald Trump hosted a historic signing ceremony for the Abraham Accords formally normalizing diplomatic relations between Israel and Arab states — the United Arab Emirates and the Kingdom of Bahrain. Furthermore, this historic breakthrough led to the Kingdom of Morocco and Muslim majority nations Sudan and Kosovo to join the Abraham Accords. Europe's Kosovo established its first embassy in Israel locating it in Jerusalem, the Jewish state's capital city. The Abraham Accords refer to the agreements of diplomatic relations and full normalization between Israel and partner countries including the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Morocco, Sudan, and Kosovo. The conversation with Senator DeMint and Congressman Meadows will provide listeners with an update on the U.S. economy with persisting inflation, rising interest rates by the Federal Reserve Bank, the immigration crisis impacting the nation and specifically border states, and the forthcoming mid-term elections in 2022. According to the Associated Press (https://apnews.com/article/inflation-mortgages-mortgage-rates-90d3b63fe4dd8b81d6765375d403cb8e), "Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the 30-year rate rose to 6.02% from 5.89% last week." The report showed that the average long-term U.S. mortgage rates climbed over 6% this week for the first time since the housing crash of 2008, and threatening to sideline even more homebuyers from a rapidly cooling housing market. This discussion will delve into how government policies affect families and the private sector, specifically small and medium size businesses. Brief bios Former US Senator Jim DeMint | Chairman, Conservative Partnership Institute (https://www.cpi.org/staff/jim-demint/) Jim DeMint has fought tirelessly for freedom, prosperity, and traditional American values against the Washington swamp for over two decades. Today, he leads and trains a new generation of conservative warriors as Chairman of the Conservative Partnership Institute. DeMint represented South Carolina in the U.S. House (1999-2005) and U.S. Senate (2005-2013). Known for policy innovation, he authored leading conservative reforms to health care, education, taxes, and entitlements. DeMint garnered national acclaim from conservatives for leading efforts to ban congressional earmarks, the source of billions of dollars of wasteful spending for decades which had led to corruption and widespread abuse. He also successfully led the fight to stop the McCain-Kennedy amnesty bill in 2007. DeMint is also the Founder of the Senate Conservatives Fund, which played a major role in the election of many of the Senate's leading conservatives like Mike Lee, Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, and Tom Cotton. President Trump appointed DeMint to the White House Economic Advisory Board in 2020. DeMint's latest book, They're Lying to You, was a number 1# best seller on Amazon. Former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows | Senior Partner, Conservative Partnership Institute (https://www.cpi.org/staff/mark-meadows/) President Trump called Mark Meadows “the guy who never stops working.” Mark's work is that of a true public servant. From his days in the U.S. House of Representatives to his time as President Trump's chief of staff to his current role as CPI's Senior Partner, Mark has worked tirelessly to shift the focus from the desires of Washington politicians to the needs of the American people. Working with the House Freedom Caucus, which he co-founded in 2015, he helped strip key provisions of Obamacare as it crushed the American people with sky-high premiums and fewer healthcare choices. He helped pass the historic tax cuts of 2017. And he changed the dynamic of the Republican conference and helped oust then-House Speaker John Boehner. Mark and his fellow Freedom Caucus members would go on to successfully defend President Trump from the bogus Russia collusion attacks and impeachment. By the time he became chief of staff in 2020, Mark had already spent countless hours working with the 45th president to give the American people a seat at the table. Mark was President Trump's gatekeeper and top advisor, steering the White House through one of the most tumultuous years in American history, as COVID-19 lockdowns, race riots, and other assertions of leftist power ripped through the country. When Mark left government service in January 2021, he wanted to keep up the fight. That made CPI his obvious landing spot. As senior partner, he helps lead CPI's strategic initiatives on Capitol Hill, with other partner organizations, and with grassroots activists across the country. Mark also paved the way for other former Trump administration officials to join CPI's staff and partner organizations. In December 2021, he released his book, “The Chief's Chief,” about his time in the White House. https://ileaderssummit.org/services/americas-roundtable-radio/ https://ileaderssummit.org/ | https://jerusalemleaderssummit.com/ America's Roundtable on Apple Podcasts: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/americas-roundtable/id1518878472 Twitter: @JimDeMint @MarkMeadows @supertalk @ileaderssummit @NatashaSrdoc @JoelAnandUSA America's Roundtable is co-hosted by Natasha Srdoc and Joel Anand Samy, co-founders of International Leaders Summit and the Jerusalem Leaders Summit. America's Roundtable radio program - a strategic initiative of International Leaders Summit, focuses on America's economy, healthcare reform, rule of law, security and trade, and its strategic partnership with rule of law nations around the world. The radio program features high-ranking US administration officials, cabinet members, members of Congress, state government officials, distinguished diplomats, business and media leaders and influential thinkers from around the world. America's Roundtable is aired by Lanser Broadcasting Corporation on 96.5 FM and 98.9 FM, covering Michigan's major market, SuperTalk Mississippi Media's 12 radio stations and 50 affiliates reaching every county in Mississippi and also heard in parts of the neighboring states, including Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Tennessee, and through podcast on Apple Podcasts and other key online platforms.

    Khatt Chronicles: Stories on Design from the Arab World
    Ghalia Elsrakbi & Lauren Alexander in conversation with Huda AbiFarès

    Khatt Chronicles: Stories on Design from the Arab World

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 35:20


    Ghalia Elsrakbi is a design professional, researcher, and design educator. After obtaining her a Master's degree in Design at the Sandberg Institute, Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam, she joined the post-academic interdisciplinary program " Design Negation" at Jan van Eyck Academy in Maastricht. Her research was dedicated to the investigation of populist politics from the perspective of design and theory. ***** About Khatt Chronicles *****Khatt Chronicles podcast features remarkable designers, illustrators, and researchers from the Arab World. We host engaging conversations about their practice, vision, and aspirations. In line with the rest of the Khatt foundation projects, focuses on new developments with Arab typography and design. By Arab, we mean people working with the Arabic language, script, and audience, who are not necessarily Arabs. These initiatives are dedicated to the younger generation as an alternative medium. It also focuses on the younger generations of designers to fulfill three primary objectives:1. Promote designers in the Arab World to the region and the rest of the world.2. Continue the mission of Khatt foundation as a network between designers to support fostering and exploring new ideas.3. Present these podcasts for inspiration and educational reasons.The podcast is an ongoing platform covering design initiatives and developments around the world. Our aim is to identify and highlight designers from the Arab World that have made meaningful contributions in their fields or have demonstrated excellence in design.Through storytelling, the Khatt Chronicles podcast will get you to know the designers on a personal level, and get to learn about how they think, and what makes them tick.Khatt Chronicles podcast is in collaboration with afikra.FollowInstagram: @khatt_chroniclesTwitter: @khttnetYouTube: Khatt Chronicles - YouTubeKhatt.net_Khatt Chronicles: https://www.khtt.net/en/page/28678/khatt-design-chronicles***** About afikra *****afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on afikra.com

    The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast
    288. Arabs vs Jews? Maybe Not | Ambassador Ron Dermer

    The Jordan B. Peterson Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 105:45 Very Popular


    Dr. Peterson's extensive catalog is available now on DailyWire+: https://utm.io/ueSXh The numerous heated and hotly debated conflicts surrounding Israel are almost always threatening to boil over and cast the Middle East into unceremonious chaos. Ambassador Ron Dermer sits down with Dr Jordan B Peterson to discuss the issues, the misnomers, and the underlying truths surrounding one of the most resilient peoples and countries in history. Ron Dermer is an American-born political consultant who served as Israel's Ambassador to the United States from 2013 to 2021. As Prime Minister Netanyahu's top advisor, Dermer was a driving force behind many of the era's most important diplomatic developments, such as the monumental Abraham Accords, which normalized Israel's relations with several Arab nations. Dermer earned a degree in Finance and Management from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania and a degree in Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) from Oxford University.  After moving to Israel, Dermer became a columnist for The Jerusalem Post and served as a close advisor to Natan Sharansky.  In 2004, he co-authored with Sharansky the best-selling book, “The Case For Democracy: The Power of Freedom to Overcome Tyranny and Terror,” which has been translated into ten languages. —Links—For Ambassador Ron Dermer:The Reform Islam Needs - https://www.city-journal.org/html/reform-islam-needs-12374.htmlProud to Have Been an American - https://www.nysun.com/article/opinion-proud-to-have-been-an-americanJohn Kerry is Wrong - https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=I_m1QlPxQ88Ron Dermers Podcast, “Diplomatically Incorrect”- https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/diplomatically-incorrect-with-ambassador-ron-dermer/id1616923197?uo=4  —Chapters—(0:00) Coming Up(1:02) Intro(5:00) The Abraham Accords, Timeline of the Gulf(14:00) The 200 Pound Gorilla, Israel(18:15) Conflicting Goals(21:33) Saudi Arabia Moving Toward Peace?(26:21) Why do we reduce the complexities of the Middle East to a single conflict?(32:00) Shocked by the Numbers, Burundi(44:00) President Trump and the Middle East(50:09) A Bit Too Convenient(53:12) Israel's Right to Exist(1:00:23) Denying History, Crossing the Rubicon(1:10:43) Modernity VS. Medievalism(1:23:20) US Foreign Policy(1:32:47) How President Biden Can Win the Nobel Peace Prize // SUPPORT THIS CHANNEL //Newsletter: https://mailchi.mp/jordanbpeterson.com/youtubesignupDonations: https://jordanbpeterson.com/donate // COURSES //Discovering Personality: https://jordanbpeterson.com/personalitySelf Authoring Suite: https://selfauthoring.comUnderstand Myself (personality test): https://understandmyself.com // BOOKS //Beyond Order: 12 More Rules for Life: https://jordanbpeterson.com/Beyond-Order12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos: https://jordanbpeterson.com/12-rules-for-lifeMaps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief: https://jordanbpeterson.com/maps-of-meaning // LINKS //Website: https://jordanbpeterson.comEvents: https://jordanbpeterson.com/eventsBlog: https://jordanbpeterson.com/blogPodcast: https://jordanbpeterson.com/podcast // SOCIAL //Twitter: https://twitter.com/jordanbpetersonInstagram: https://instagram.com/jordan.b.petersonFacebook: https://facebook.com/drjordanpetersonTelegram: https://t.me/DrJordanPetersonAll socials: https://linktr.ee/drjordanbpeterson #JordanPeterson #JordanBPeterson #DrJordanPeterson #DrJordanBPeterson #DailyWirePlus #podcast #politics #rondermer #israel #middleeast #middleeastconflict #israelipalestinianconflict #palestine #ambassador #arabs #jews

    The afikra Podcast
    GILBERT ACHCAR | Anti-war Activism | Conversations

    The afikra Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 49:04


    Gilbert Achcar spoke about his work as an academic and his recent book, "The People Want."Gilbert Achcar is a Lebanese academic and writer. He is a Professor of Development Studies and International Relations at the School of Oriental and African Studies of the University of London. His research interests cover the Near East and North Africa, foreign policy of the United States, Globalization, Islam, and Islamic fundamentalism. He is also a Fellow at the International Institute for Research and Education. Achcar obtained degrees in philosophy and social sciences at the Lebanese University and was a member of the Revolutionary Communist Group. He took up residence in France in 1983, and completed his doctorate in social history and international relations at the University of Paris VIII, where, in 1991, he began teaching political science, sociology and international relations. In 2003 he took up a research position at the Marc Bloch Centre in Berlin, which he maintained until he assumed a professorship at SOAS. His works include The Arabs and the Holocaust, Marxism, Orientalism, Cosmopolitanism, The People Want: A Radical Exploration of the Arab Uprising, and many more. Created & hosted by Mikey Muhanna, afikra Edited by: Ramzi RammanTheme music by: Tarek Yamani https://www.instagram.com/tarek_yamani/About the afikra Conversations:Our long-form interview series features academics, arts, ‎and media experts who are helping document and/or shape the history and culture of the Arab world through their ‎work. Our hope is that by having the guest share their expertise and story, the community still walks away with newfound curiosity - and maybe some good recommendations about new nerdy rabbit holes to dive into headfirst. ‎Following the interview, there is a moderated town-hall-style Q&A with questions coming from the live virtual audience ‎on Zoom.‎ Join the live audience: https://www.afikra.com/rsvp   FollowYoutube - Instagram (@afikra_) - Facebook - Twitter Support www.afikra.com/supportAbout afikra:‎afikra is a movement to convert passive interest in the Arab world to active intellectual curiosity. We aim to collectively reframe the dominant narrative of the region by exploring the histories and cultures of the region- past, present, and future - through conversations driven by curiosity. Read more about us on  afikra.com

    VOMOz Radio
    MIDDLE EAST: Going The Right Direction

    VOMOz Radio

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2022 23:32


    Brother Hayel learned that truth first-hand when he started reading the Bible. In its pages he knew he'd found the One True God. He couldn't stop reading God's Word, and hungrily opened it each day. Having found truth, Hayel couldn't keep himself from sharing the good news with his fellow Druze—even knowing he would be persecuted for doing so. Hayel desires to see his people, the Druze, changed by the gospel. This people group includes about 1.5 million individuals across Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria; they are distinct ethnically and religiously from the Muslims and others around them. Druze who choose to become Christians face intense persecution. Hayel was forbidden to share his Christian faith, but he refused to stop. He was kicked out from his home and ostracized, but he regards that sacrifice as nothing compared to knowing Jesus. Today, Hayel is working with Brother Dan to share the gospel with Druze. Dan never planned on living in the Middle East. He was a businessman serving on his local church missions committee when God put Syria on his mind, even though he admits that deep down in his heart he had hatred for Arabs and Muslims. Yet he chose obedience and ended up on a missions trip to Syria before the war there. Through that experience and the people he met, God scrubbed Dan's heart clean of hatred and gave him a passion to see people in the region reached for Christ—a passion so strong he and his wife moved to the region. Today, Hayel and Dan serve Druze people through social media ministry. They speak to the Druze in their homes and their heart language with the gospel—through their phones. Listen as they share more about how God brought them together, how their hearts were transformed, and what their ministry to the Druze looks like. Join in prayer for God to open the hearts of the Druze people to receive the message of the gospel!

    The Todd Herman Show
    Chain-analysis: how we got so broken and how we get back  Episode 322 - Hour 2 Chain Analysis How We Got So Broken

    The Todd Herman Show

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 60:42


    THE THESIS: We can get back on track if we get serious about examining where we left the track.  THE SCRIPTURE & SCRIPTURAL RESOURCES:  Jesus did not tell the apostles to distribute copies of what Jesus said to have people read, he told them to baptize people and teach them to follow His way. He told them to create church communities: Acts 2 The Holy Spirit Comes at Pentecost 2 When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. 2 Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. 3 They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. 4 All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues[a] as the Spirit enabled them. 5 Now there were staying in Jerusalem God-fearing Jews from every nation under heaven. 6 When they heard this sound, a crowd came together in bewilderment, because each one heard their own language being spoken. 7 Utterly amazed, they asked: “Aren't all these who are speaking Galileans? 8 Then how is it that each of us hears them in our native language? 9 Parthians, Medes and Elamites; residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia,[b] 10 Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya near Cyrene; visitors from Rome 11 (both Jews and converts to Judaism); Cretans and Arabs—we hear them declaring the wonders of God in our own tongues!” 12 Amazed and perplexed, they asked one another, “What does this mean?” 13 Some, however, made fun of them and said, “They have had too much wine.” Peter Addresses the Crowd 14 Then Peter stood up with the Eleven, raised his voice and addressed the crowd: “Fellow Jews and all of you who live in Jerusalem, let me explain this to you; listen carefully to what I say. 15 These people are not drunk, as you suppose. It's only nine in the morning! 16 No, this is what was spoken by the prophet Joel: 17 “‘In the last days, God says,     I will pour out my Spirit on all people. Your sons and daughters will prophesy,     your young men will see visions,     your old men will dream dreams. 18 Even on my servants, both men and women,     I will pour out my Spirit in those days,     and they will prophesy. 19 I will show wonders in the heavens above     and signs on the earth below,     blood and fire and billows of smoke. 20 The sun will be turned to darkness     and the moon to blood     before the coming of the great and glorious day of the Lord. 21 And everyone who calls     on the name of the Lord will be saved.'[c] 22 “Fellow Israelites, listen to this: Jesus of Nazareth was a man accredited by God to you by miracles, wonders and signs, which God did among you through him, as you yourselves know. 23 This man was handed over to you by God's deliberate plan and foreknowledge; and you, with the help of wicked men,[d] put him to death by nailing him to the cross. 24 But God raised him from the dead, freeing him from the agony of death, because it was impossible for death to keep its hold on him. 25 David said about him: “‘I saw the Lord always before me.     Because he is at my right hand,     I will not be shaken. 26 Therefore my heart is glad and my tongue rejoices;     my body also will rest in hope, 27 because you will not abandon me to the realm of the dead,     you will not let your holy one see decay. 28 You have made known to me the paths of life;     you will fill me with joy in your presence.'[e] 29 “Fellow Israelites, I can tell you confidently that the patriarch David died and was buried, and his tomb is here to this day. 30 But he was a prophet and knew that God had promised him on oath that he would place one of his descendants on his throne. 31 Seeing what was to come, he spoke of the resurrection of the Messiah, that he was not abandoned to the realm of the dead, nor did his body see decay. 32 God has raised this Jesus to life, and we are all witnesses of it. 33 Exalted to the right hand of God, he has received from the Father the promised Holy Spirit and has poured out what you now see and hear. 34 For David did not ascend to heaven, and yet he said, “‘The Lord said to my Lord:     “Sit at my right hand 35 until I make your enemies     a footstool for your feet.”'[f] 36 “Therefore let all Israel be assured of this: God has made this Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Messiah.” 37 When the people heard this, they were cut to the heart and said to Peter and the other apostles, “Brothers, what shall we do?” 38 Peter replied, “Repent and be baptized, every one of you, in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins. And you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit. 39 The promise is for you and your children and for all who are far off—for all whom the Lord our God will call.” 40 With many other words he warned them; and he pleaded with them, “Save yourselves from this corrupt generation.” 41 Those who accepted his message were baptized, and about three thousand were added to their number that day. The Fellowship of the Believers 42 They devoted themselves to the apostles' teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer. 43 Everyone was filled with awe at the many wonders and signs performed by the apostles. 44 All the believers were together and had everything in common. 45 They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need. 46 Every day they continued to meet together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts, 47 praising God and enjoying the favor of all the people. And the Lord added to their number daily those who were being saved. THE NEWS & COMMENT: The electorate stopped applying religious and character litmus tests when hiring people for government through the vote [AUDIO] - Kammi Harris lying about the border being secure. [AUDIO] -  Chuck Todd: “We're now as a nation battling a threat from within. Is the threat equal or greater than what we faced after 9/11?” Kammi Harris: “…there is an oath that we always take which is to defend and uphold our constitution against all enemies foreign and domestic.” On 9/11: Liar and DHS boss, Alejandro Mayorkas warned today of threats posed by individuals in the U.S. "radicalized to violence" by ideologies "of hate, anti-government sentiment, false narratives propagated on online platforms, even personal grievances" ALSO on 9/11: “US prosecutors may negotiate plea deal with 9/11 architect Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, other conspirators: Report.” . . . reinstitute that test at every level of government, starting in school boards and zoning commissions We made government school compulsory and allowed the government to supposedly negotiate with its big donors, the government school employee collectively known as unions [AUDIO] - Middle school teacher at @NSLA244 says she kneeled for BLM in the classroom and changed the words in the pledge. She also taught her students to protest and become activists and suggests throwing bricks at people with opposing views.  . . . we are constitutionally obliged to provide for education, NOT to provide schools. Return to that, freedom involves choice, serfdom involves diktats.  We let Jefferson's separation of church and state letter become imposition of state on religious expression NY Times Hit Piece On Hasidic Education Published On Eve Of NY Regents Vote To Undermine All Religious Schools; A New York Times article attacking boys' Hasidic schools was published today, on the eve of the New York State Board of Regents vote on regulations poised to undermine the way Jewish religious schools have operated for generations.  The timing of The Times' attack appears planned to influence the vote. WHY did the wise-Latina do the right thing, here? If this was a Christian group, would she have also done the right thing? Could it be that God is reaching her? Maybe Justice Thomas is witnessing to her? Justice Sotomayor Stays NY State Court Order Forcing Yeshiva University To Recognize “Pride Alliance” Club -- “Yeshiva shouldn't have been forced to go all the way to the Supreme Court to receive such a commonsense ruling in favor of its First Amendment rights.” Eric Baxter, Vice President and Senior Counsel at Becket, said, “We are grateful that Justice Sotomayor stepped in to protect Yeshiva's religious liberty in this case.” We let a court pretend that not engaging in interstate commerce IS actually engaging in interstate commerce, which is what gave rise to the federalization of the states and gave teeth to the power of the extra-constitutional administrative state which has metastasized into the Deep State: Men in Black: How the Supreme Court Is Destroying America Levin in National Review (before it's permanent case of TDS) discussing the court's ever-expanding power Authoritarians come in (at least)  two flavors: 42% of Republicans prefer strong unelected leaders to weak  elected ones. 42% of Dems say the president should be able to remove judges whose decisions "go against the national interest." We let so-called journalists hide campaign donations behind the First Amendment  NPR Skips the D-Word on Las Vegas Reporter's Killer, Alludes to Trump Instead [AUDIO] - The @EverettHerald asked the @MurraSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

    VOMRadio
    MIDDLE EAST: Going The Right Direction

    VOMRadio

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2022 25:19


    “If you read the Bible, He can change you and God will be with you.” Brother Hayel learned that truth first-hand when he started reading the Bible. In its pages he knew he'd found the One True God. He couldn't stop reading God's Word, and hungrily opened it each day. Having found truth, Hayel couldn't keep himself from sharing the good news with his fellow Druze—even knowing he would be persecuted for doing so. Hayel desires to see his people, the Druze, changed by the gospel. This people group includes about 1.5 million individuals across Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria; they are distinct ethnically and religiously from the Muslims and others around them. Druze who choose to become Christians face intense persecution. Hayel was forbidden to share his Christian faith, but he refused to stop. He was kicked out from his home and ostracized, but he regards that sacrifice as nothing compared to knowing Jesus. Today, Hayel is working with Brother Dan to share the gospel with Druze. Dan never planned on living in the Middle East. He was a businessman serving on his local church missions committee when God put Syria on his mind, even though he admits that deep down in his heart he had hatred for Arabs and Muslims. Yet he chose obedience and ended up on a missions trip to Syria before the war there. Through that experience and the people he met, God scrubbed Dan's heart clean of hatred and gave him a passion to see people in the region reached for Christ—a passion so strong he and his wife moved to the region. Today, Hayel and Dan serve Druze people through social media ministry. They speak to the Druze in their homes and their heart language with the gospel—through their phones. Listen as they share more about how God brought them together, how their hearts were transformed, and what their ministry to the Druze looks like. Join in prayer for God to open the hearts of the Druze people to receive the message of the gospel! Never miss an episode of VOM Radio! Subscribe to the Podcast.

    HaYovel | The Heartland Connection
    The Oslo Accords Are Dead: Here is the CRAZY REASON WHY

    HaYovel | The Heartland Connection

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 24:49


    The Palestinian Authority is busy trying to illegally take over Area C in Judea and Samaria, which in effect, will create a de facto Palestinian State. At the same time, terrorist organizations in Area A of Judea and Samaria have gotten so large and violent that the IDF is in the midst of rooting them out.  Two years ago, the PA officially reneged on all agreements with Israel, including security agreements. This means that the Oslo Accords, which are now nearly thirty years old, are officially dead.  On today's program, we explain why any attempts from the PA to form an agreement with Israel, or create legitimacy with the international community, mean absolutely nothing. The Oslo Accords are dead, the IDF is cleaning house, and the Arabs are trying to take over Judea and Samaria.

    Indian History with Dr. Veenus
    Mahmud of Ghazni & the Turkish Invasion of India

    Indian History with Dr. Veenus

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2022 7:07


    The Arabs were the first Muslims to invade India. But their conquests in India were confined to Sind and Multan. It was left to the Turks to complete the work begun by the Arabs. The Turks, however did not invade solely with the object of spreading Islam in India. They wanted to loot India as well. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/venus-jain3/message

    Real Black Consciousnesses Forum
    American Negro - The European, Israelis And Arabs Are Your Open Enemy!

    Real Black Consciousnesses Forum

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 62:14


    #European #African #Arab Email the podcast: rbcforum313@yahoo.com https://cash.app/$BlackConsciousnes Join us as we have a very controversial but yet necessary conversation about the enemies of the American Negro. It is absolutely imperative that our people, village, and community understand who are their friends in this world, and who has historically been their enemy. So, make sure you like, share, and comment on such a powerful conversation. Thanks in advance! RBCF! Follow Us On: Twitter: https://twitter.com/Prest_St_BigVJInstagram: https://instagram.com/realblackco... Youtube: https://youtube.com/user/detroitrocFB: https://facebook.com/RealBlackConscio.. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/realblackforum/message

    Saint of the Day
    Our Holy Father Symeon Stylites (459)

    Saint of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 1:52


    Born in Syria, he was a shepherd, but at the age of eighteen he left home and became a monk, practicing the strictest asceticism. At times he fasted for forty days. After a few years at a monastery he took up an ascetical discipline unique at that time: mounting a pillar, he stood on it night and day in prayer. Though he sought only seclusion and prayer, his holiness became famous, and thousands would make pilgrimage to receive a word from him or to touch his garments. Countless nomadic Arabs came to faith in Christ through the power of his example and prayers. To retreat further from the world, he used progressively taller pillars: his first pillar was about ten feet high, his final one about fifty. He was known also for the soundness of his counsel: he confirned the Orthodox doctrine at the Council of Chalcedon and persuaded the Empress Eudocia, who had been seduced by Monophysite beliefs, to return to the true Christian faith. After about forty years lived in asceticism, he reposed in peace at the age of sixty-nine.   He was at first suspected of taking up his way of life out of pride, but his monastic brethren confirmed his humility thus: They went to him as a group, and told him that the brotherhood had decided that he should come down from his pillar and rejoin them. Immediately he began to climb down from the pillar. Seeing his obedience and humility, they told him to remain with their blessing.

    CONFLICTED
    Saddam vs. Ayatollah

    CONFLICTED

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 83:10


    In our previous episode on the Iranian revolution, we left the Ayatollah Khomeini sitting high and mighty in Tehran. Little did he know, next door in Baghdad, an Arab strongman nursed revolutionary, expansionary ambitions of his own: Saddam Hussein, the Lion of the Arabs and Defender of the Eastern Gate, the ultimate symbol of corrupt and tyrannical dictatorship. Taking up where we left off back in episode 9, with Iraq reeling from the bloody 1958 coup that replaced the Hashemite monarchy with a military dictatorship, this episode describes Saddam's blood-soaked rise to power and his tragic and ultimately futile decision to invade Iran, thus inaugurating the 20th century's bloodiest and costliest conventional war. Listen to exclusive bonus content and get all episodes ad-free by subscribing to Conflicted Extra on Apple Podcasts and Spotify for just 99p/month. Join our FB Discussion group to get exclusive updates: https://www.facebook.com/groups/450486135832418 Find us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MHconflicted And Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MHconflicted Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    Saint of the Day
    Our Holy Mother Theodora of Salonica (879)

    Saint of the Day

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 0:59


    "A wealthy and devout woman, she lived on the island of Aegina, but, when the Arabs over-ran the island, she moved to Salonica. There, she gave her only daughter to a monastery, where she received the monastic name Theopista. Her husband Theodorinus died very soon, and then Theodora became a nun. She was a great ascetic. She often heard angelic singing, and would say to her sisters: 'Don't you hear how wonderfully the angels are singing in heavenly light?' She entered into rest in 879, and a healing myrrh flowed from her body, which gave healing to many.

    New Books in Sports
    Shaul Adar, "On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World" (Pitch Publishing, 2022)

    New Books in Sports

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 68:01


    In December 2020, an Israeli football club made worldwide headlines. The news that a UAE royal had bought 50 per cent of Beitar's shares shook Israel and the football world. Beitar, proclaimed by some of its own fans as 'the most racist club in the country', is a club like no other in Israel. While Israeli football as a whole is a space where Israelis of all ethnicities and foreigners can co-exist, Beitar won't even sign a Muslim player for fear of its own far-right supporters' group, La Familia.  On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World (Pitch Publishing, 2022) is the fascinating tale of a club that began as a sports movement of a liberal national Zionism party and became an overt symbol of right-wing views, Mizrahi identity and eventually hardcore racism and nationalism. The book explores the radicalisation of Beitar and the fight for the soul of the club between the racists and open-minded fans. It is also a story of Jerusalem, the most volatile place on Earth, and how the holy city and the influence of religion have shaped Beitar. Founded in 1936, the club took its name from a Zionist organization set up in 1923 by students in the capital of Latvia, Riga, following a visit by Ze'ev Jabotinsky, the Zionist Revisionist and founder of the para­military group Irgun. Beitar's story mirrors that of its city. For thirty years, under the British Mandate, impoverished young Mizrahim (Jews from Arab countries) had kicked a ball around Jerusalem's Musrara neighbourhood with Arab friends. The war of 1948 changed that. Subsequent events sharpened the divide, leading to the unrepentant racism of La Familia, Beitar “ultras” who began by making monkey noises at a player from Cameroon and graduated to chants threatening death to Arabs. Employing violence and intimi­dation, they ensured no Muslim could play for Beitar, thereby betraying a key element of Jabotinsky's scheme – equality for Arabs. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sports

    New Books in Middle Eastern Studies
    Shaul Adar, "On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World" (Pitch Publishing, 2022)

    New Books in Middle Eastern Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 68:01


    In December 2020, an Israeli football club made worldwide headlines. The news that a UAE royal had bought 50 per cent of Beitar's shares shook Israel and the football world. Beitar, proclaimed by some of its own fans as 'the most racist club in the country', is a club like no other in Israel. While Israeli football as a whole is a space where Israelis of all ethnicities and foreigners can co-exist, Beitar won't even sign a Muslim player for fear of its own far-right supporters' group, La Familia.  On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World (Pitch Publishing, 2022) is the fascinating tale of a club that began as a sports movement of a liberal national Zionism party and became an overt symbol of right-wing views, Mizrahi identity and eventually hardcore racism and nationalism. The book explores the radicalisation of Beitar and the fight for the soul of the club between the racists and open-minded fans. It is also a story of Jerusalem, the most volatile place on Earth, and how the holy city and the influence of religion have shaped Beitar. Founded in 1936, the club took its name from a Zionist organization set up in 1923 by students in the capital of Latvia, Riga, following a visit by Ze'ev Jabotinsky, the Zionist Revisionist and founder of the para­military group Irgun. Beitar's story mirrors that of its city. For thirty years, under the British Mandate, impoverished young Mizrahim (Jews from Arab countries) had kicked a ball around Jerusalem's Musrara neighbourhood with Arab friends. The war of 1948 changed that. Subsequent events sharpened the divide, leading to the unrepentant racism of La Familia, Beitar “ultras” who began by making monkey noises at a player from Cameroon and graduated to chants threatening death to Arabs. Employing violence and intimi­dation, they ensured no Muslim could play for Beitar, thereby betraying a key element of Jabotinsky's scheme – equality for Arabs. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/middle-eastern-studies

    New Books in Israel Studies
    Shaul Adar, "On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World" (Pitch Publishing, 2022)

    New Books in Israel Studies

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 68:01


    In December 2020, an Israeli football club made worldwide headlines. The news that a UAE royal had bought 50 per cent of Beitar's shares shook Israel and the football world. Beitar, proclaimed by some of its own fans as 'the most racist club in the country', is a club like no other in Israel. While Israeli football as a whole is a space where Israelis of all ethnicities and foreigners can co-exist, Beitar won't even sign a Muslim player for fear of its own far-right supporters' group, La Familia.  On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World (Pitch Publishing, 2022) is the fascinating tale of a club that began as a sports movement of a liberal national Zionism party and became an overt symbol of right-wing views, Mizrahi identity and eventually hardcore racism and nationalism. The book explores the radicalisation of Beitar and the fight for the soul of the club between the racists and open-minded fans. It is also a story of Jerusalem, the most volatile place on Earth, and how the holy city and the influence of religion have shaped Beitar. Founded in 1936, the club took its name from a Zionist organization set up in 1923 by students in the capital of Latvia, Riga, following a visit by Ze'ev Jabotinsky, the Zionist Revisionist and founder of the para­military group Irgun. Beitar's story mirrors that of its city. For thirty years, under the British Mandate, impoverished young Mizrahim (Jews from Arab countries) had kicked a ball around Jerusalem's Musrara neighbourhood with Arab friends. The war of 1948 changed that. Subsequent events sharpened the divide, leading to the unrepentant racism of La Familia, Beitar “ultras” who began by making monkey noises at a player from Cameroon and graduated to chants threatening death to Arabs. Employing violence and intimi­dation, they ensured no Muslim could play for Beitar, thereby betraying a key element of Jabotinsky's scheme – equality for Arabs. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/israel-studies

    New Books Network
    Shaul Adar, "On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World" (Pitch Publishing, 2022)

    New Books Network

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 68:01


    In December 2020, an Israeli football club made worldwide headlines. The news that a UAE royal had bought 50 per cent of Beitar's shares shook Israel and the football world. Beitar, proclaimed by some of its own fans as 'the most racist club in the country', is a club like no other in Israel. While Israeli football as a whole is a space where Israelis of all ethnicities and foreigners can co-exist, Beitar won't even sign a Muslim player for fear of its own far-right supporters' group, La Familia.  On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World (Pitch Publishing, 2022) is the fascinating tale of a club that began as a sports movement of a liberal national Zionism party and became an overt symbol of right-wing views, Mizrahi identity and eventually hardcore racism and nationalism. The book explores the radicalisation of Beitar and the fight for the soul of the club between the racists and open-minded fans. It is also a story of Jerusalem, the most volatile place on Earth, and how the holy city and the influence of religion have shaped Beitar. Founded in 1936, the club took its name from a Zionist organization set up in 1923 by students in the capital of Latvia, Riga, following a visit by Ze'ev Jabotinsky, the Zionist Revisionist and founder of the para­military group Irgun. Beitar's story mirrors that of its city. For thirty years, under the British Mandate, impoverished young Mizrahim (Jews from Arab countries) had kicked a ball around Jerusalem's Musrara neighbourhood with Arab friends. The war of 1948 changed that. Subsequent events sharpened the divide, leading to the unrepentant racism of La Familia, Beitar “ultras” who began by making monkey noises at a player from Cameroon and graduated to chants threatening death to Arabs. Employing violence and intimi­dation, they ensured no Muslim could play for Beitar, thereby betraying a key element of Jabotinsky's scheme – equality for Arabs. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

    HaYovel | The Heartland Connection
    Who Has the Best Chance to Become Israel's Next Prime Minister?

    HaYovel | The Heartland Connection

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 17:21


     Betzalel Smotrich and Itamar Ben-Gvir have decided to run together in the upcoming elections in November. Ayelet Shaked has stated that she is remaining in the election race despite bad poll numbers. Also the IDF has been doing an incredible job in stopping smuggling across Israel's borders with Egypt and Jordan even as we have seen a huge uptick in smuggling since the beginning of the year. And a Jew was violently attacked by a mob of Arabs at Samuel's Tomb near Jerusalem after he raised an Israeli flag. All this and more on today's show!

    New Books in History
    Shaul Adar, "On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World" (Pitch Publishing, 2022)

    New Books in History

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2022 68:01


    In December 2020, an Israeli football club made worldwide headlines. The news that a UAE royal had bought 50 per cent of Beitar's shares shook Israel and the football world. Beitar, proclaimed by some of its own fans as 'the most racist club in the country', is a club like no other in Israel. While Israeli football as a whole is a space where Israelis of all ethnicities and foreigners can co-exist, Beitar won't even sign a Muslim player for fear of its own far-right supporters' group, La Familia.  On the Border: The Rise and Decline of the Most Political Club in the World (Pitch Publishing, 2022) is the fascinating tale of a club that began as a sports movement of a liberal national Zionism party and became an overt symbol of right-wing views, Mizrahi identity and eventually hardcore racism and nationalism. The book explores the radicalisation of Beitar and the fight for the soul of the club between the racists and open-minded fans. It is also a story of Jerusalem, the most volatile place on Earth, and how the holy city and the influence of religion have shaped Beitar. Founded in 1936, the club took its name from a Zionist organization set up in 1923 by students in the capital of Latvia, Riga, following a visit by Ze'ev Jabotinsky, the Zionist Revisionist and founder of the para­military group Irgun. Beitar's story mirrors that of its city. For thirty years, under the British Mandate, impoverished young Mizrahim (Jews from Arab countries) had kicked a ball around Jerusalem's Musrara neighbourhood with Arab friends. The war of 1948 changed that. Subsequent events sharpened the divide, leading to the unrepentant racism of La Familia, Beitar “ultras” who began by making monkey noises at a player from Cameroon and graduated to chants threatening death to Arabs. Employing violence and intimi­dation, they ensured no Muslim could play for Beitar, thereby betraying a key element of Jabotinsky's scheme – equality for Arabs. Roberto Mazza is visiting professor at Northwestern University. He is the host of the Jerusalem Unplugged Podcast and to discuss and propose a book for interview can be reached at robbymazza@gmail.com. Twitter and IG: @robbyref Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/history

    ESV: Chronological
    August 28: Nehemiah 4–5

    ESV: Chronological

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 6:37


    Nehemiah 4–5 Nehemiah 4–5 (Listen) Opposition to the Work 4 1 Now when Sanballat heard that we were building the wall, he was angry and greatly enraged, and he jeered at the Jews. 2 And he said in the presence of his brothers and of the army of Samaria, “What are these feeble Jews doing? Will they restore it for themselves?2 Will they sacrifice? Will they finish up in a day? Will they revive the stones out of the heaps of rubbish, and burned ones at that?” 3 Tobiah the Ammonite was beside him, and he said, “Yes, what they are building—if a fox goes up on it he will break down their stone wall!” 4 Hear, O our God, for we are despised. Turn back their taunt on their own heads and give them up to be plundered in a land where they are captives. 5 Do not cover their guilt, and let not their sin be blotted out from your sight, for they have provoked you to anger in the presence of the builders. 6 So we built the wall. And all the wall was joined together to half its height, for the people had a mind to work. 7 3 But when Sanballat and Tobiah and the Arabs and the Ammonites and the Ashdodites heard that the repairing of the walls of Jerusalem was going forward and that the breaches were beginning to be closed, they were very angry. 8 And they all plotted together to come and fight against Jerusalem and to cause confusion in it. 9 And we prayed to our God and set a guard as a protection against them day and night. 10 In Judah it was said,4 “The strength of those who bear the burdens is failing. There is too much rubble. By ourselves we will not be able to rebuild the wall.” 11 And our enemies said, “They will not know or see till we come among them and kill them and stop the work.” 12 At that time the Jews who lived near them came from all directions and said to us ten times, “You must return to us.”5 13 So in the lowest parts of the space behind the wall, in open places, I stationed the people by their clans, with their swords, their spears, and their bows. 14 And I looked and arose and said to the nobles and to the officials and to the rest of the people, “Do not be afraid of them. Remember the Lord, who is great and awesome, and fight for your brothers, your sons, your daughters, your wives, and your homes.” The Work Resumes 15 When our enemies heard that it was known to us and that God had frustrated their plan, we all returned to the wall, each to his work. 16 From that day on, half of my servants worked on construction, and half held the spears, shields, bows, and coats of mail. And the leaders stood behind the whole house of Judah, 17 who were building on the wall. Those who carried burdens were loaded in such a way that each labored on the work with one hand and held his weapon with the other. 18 And each of the builders had his sword strapped at his side while he built. The man who sounded the trumpet was beside me. 19 And I said to the nobles and to the officials and to the rest of the people, “The work is great and widely spread, and we are separated on the wall, far from one another. 20 In the place where you hear the sound of the trumpet, rally to us there. Our God will fight for us.” 21 So we labored at the work, and half of them held the spears from the break of dawn until the stars came out. 22 I also said to the people at that time, “Let every man and his servant pass the night within Jerusalem, that they may be a guard for us by night and may labor by day.” 23 So neither I nor my brothers nor my servants nor the men of the guard who followed me, none of us took off our clothes; each kept his weapon at his right hand.6 Nehemiah Stops Oppression of the Poor 5 Now there arose a great outcry of the people and of their wives against their Jewish brothers. 2 For there were those who said, “With our sons and our daughters, we are many. So let us get grain, that we may eat and keep alive.” 3 There were also those who said, “We are mortgaging our fields, our vineyards, and our houses to get grain because of the famine.” 4 And there were those who said, “We have borrowed money for the king's tax on our fields and our vineyards. 5 Now our flesh is as the flesh of our brothers, our children are as their children. Yet we are forcing our sons and our daughters to be slaves, and some of our daughters have already been enslaved, but it is not in our power to help it, for other men have our fields and our vineyards.” 6 I was very angry when I heard their outcry and these words. 7 I took counsel with myself, and I brought charges against the nobles and the officials. I said to them, “You are exacting interest, each from his brother.” And I held a great assembly against them 8 and said to them, “We, as far as we are able, have bought back our Jewish brothers who have been sold to the nations, but you even sell your brothers that they may be sold to us!” They were silent and could not find a word to say. 9 So I said, “The thing that you are doing is not good. Ought you not to walk in the fear of our God to prevent the taunts of the nations our enemies? 10 Moreover, I and my brothers and my servants are lending them money and grain. Let us abandon this exacting of interest. 11 Return to them this very day their fields, their vineyards, their olive orchards, and their houses, and the percentage of money, grain, wine, and oil that you have been exacting from them.” 12 Then they said, “We will restore these and require nothing from them. We will do as you say.” And I called the priests and made them swear to do as they had promised. 13 I also shook out the fold7 of my garment and said, “So may God shake out every man from his house and from his labor who does not keep this promise. So may he be shaken out and emptied.” And all the assembly said “Amen” and praised the LORD. And the people did as they had promised. Nehemiah's Generosity 14 Moreover, from the time that I was appointed to be their governor in the land of Judah, from the twentieth year to the thirty-second year of Artaxerxes the king, twelve years, neither I nor my brothers ate the food allowance of the governor. 15 The former governors who were before me laid heavy burdens on the people and took from them for their daily ration8 forty shekels9 of silver. Even their servants lorded it over the people. But I did not do so, because of the fear of God. 16 I also persevered in the work on this wall, and we acquired no land, and all my servants were gathered there for the work. 17 Moreover, there were at my table 150 men, Jews and officials, besides those who came to us from the nations that were around us. 18 Now what was prepared at my expense10 for each day was one ox and six choice sheep and birds, and every ten days all kinds of wine in abundance. Yet for all this I did not demand the food allowance of the governor, because the service was too heavy on this people. 19 Remember for my good, O my God, all that I have done for this people. Footnotes [1] 4:1 Ch 3:33 in Hebrew [2] 4:2 Or Will they commit themselves to God? [3] 4:7 Ch 4:1 in Hebrew [4] 4:10 Hebrew Judah said [5] 4:12 The meaning of the Hebrew is uncertain [6] 4:23 Or his weapon when drinking [7] 5:13 Hebrew bosom [8] 5:15 Compare Vulgate; Hebrew took from them for food and wine after [9] 5:15 A shekel was about 2/5 ounce or 11 grams [10] 5:18 Or prepared for me (ESV)

    The Straight Up Start Up
    On entrepreneurship with Amr Awadallah عن ريادة الاعمال مع عمر عوض الله

    The Straight Up Start Up

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2022 31:29


    This season we brought you one of the most influential Arabs in the tech industry, Dr.Amr Awadalla.From the heart of Cairo made his way up to leading positions in the most influential companies in Silicon Valley, from Yahoo! to Google. he did not stop there, as the entrepreneurial bug bit him, and he ventured to create his own start-ups.This episode is one you can't miss out on! Listen to learn more.بدأنا في هذا الموسم مع اكثر العرب المؤثريين في عالم التكنولوجيا في وادي السيليكون من قلب القاهرة شق طريقه إلى مناصب قيادية في أكثر المؤسسات نفوذاً في وادي السيليكون ، من موقع Yahoo! لجوجل. ومع ذلك ،اصيب بشف مخاطرة ريادة الأعمال ، وغامر بتأسيس شركته الناشئة.هذه الحلقة لا يمكنك تفويتها!استمع لتتعلم أكثر.

    John Rosemberg Podcast
    WHY DO AFRICAN HATE ( FBA) 5.0

    John Rosemberg Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 27:49


    The Tikvah Podcast
    Hussein Aboubakr on the Holocaust in the Arab Moral Imagination

    The Tikvah Podcast

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2022 33:44 Very Popular


    Fifty years ago, at the 1972 Olympic summer games in Munich, 11 Israeli olympians were held hostage and murdered by members of the Palestinian terrorist group Black September. Recently, the Palestinian Authority president Mahmoud Abbas, while meeting with the German chancellor, was asked about the event and whether he would apologize for what happened. Abbas declined to apologize, and instead accused the Israelis of having enacted “50 Holocausts” against the Palestinians. Why would Abbas, when asked about a crime Palestinians perpetrated against Israelis, reach for the Holocaust as a weapon? To answer that question, the Egyptian writer Hussein Aboubakr joins this week's podcast. In conversation with Mosaic's editor Jonathan Silver, he explains what Abbas and so many Arabs think about the Holocaust, and why, in the Arab mind, that event is inextricably tied up with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, in a twisted logic that has brought many to believe that Israelis are the new Nazis and Palestinians the new Jews.  Musical selections in this podcast are drawn from the Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, op. 31a, composed by Paul Ben-Haim and performed by the ARC Ensemble.

    Faecraft
    Jinn

    Faecraft

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2022 74:04


    Chelsea learns that she's been confusing I Dream of Jeannie with Bewitched for her entire life while Holly chooses which jinn origin story is the best (hint: witches always win). Hear all about jinn and their evolution from Muslim spirits with the same moral obligations as humans into the Will Smith genie that horrifies us today!Sources:El-Zein, Amira. Islam, Arabs, and the Intelligent World of the Jinn. Syracuse University Press; 2009.Duggan, Anne E. “From Genie to Efreet: Fantastic Apparitions in the Tales of The Arabian Nights.”  Journal of the Fantastic in the Arts, 26.1, 2015.Lebling, Robert. Legends of the Fire Spirits: Jinn and Genies from Arabia to Zanzibar. Berkely, 2010. O'Meara, Simon. “From Space to Place: The Quaranic Infernalization of the Jinn. “Locating Hell in Islamic Traditions, ed. Christian Lange, Brill, 2016. Jinn in popular culture- WikiListsA History of Genies in Folklore- IGNI Dream of Jeannie- wikipediaDoes the name Shazam! sound familiar to you? Here's why- DirectTV.comJambi- Pee-Wee's Playhouse wikiGenie- Disney WikiMusic:Intro and outro: ​Underneath the Christmas Tree (Instrumental) by myuu http://www.thedarkpiano.com/ Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/ Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/q8fX3In7Qng

    The Forgotten Exodus
    Libya

    The Forgotten Exodus

    Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 36:28 Very Popular


    Throughout most of her life, Giulietta Boukhobza rarely talked about the life she left behind in Libya when she was 16. However, today, with antisemitism on the rise and Israel under constant threat, she shares her family's story of their harrowing escape from Libya as part of an effort to raise awareness for future generations. Joining Boukhobza is filmmaker Vivienne Roumani-Denn, the creator of “The Last Jews of Libya,” a documentary about how her family and others were forced out of their North African homeland, who provides the historical backdrop for Boukhobza's story, illustrating how life was never easy for Jews in Libya, but it was still home.  Boukhobza's story is also one of triumph. Together with her husband David Harris, the longtime CEO of American Jewish Committee, they demonstrate that speaking up and fighting for what you believe is the only option.  ___ Show notes: Sign up to receive podcast updates here. Learn more about the series here. Song credits:  "Enta Omri" (live) by Umm Kulthum Kamar Barik; Gushe Cheman; Rampi Rampi; Aksaray'in Taslari; all by Turku, Nomads of the Silk Road Pond5:  “Desert Caravans”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Tiemur Zarobov (BMI), IPI#1098108837 “Sentimental Oud Middle Eastern”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI), Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989. “Frontiers”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Pete Checkley (BMI), IPI#380407375 “Adventures in the East”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI) Composer: Petar Milinkovic (BMI), IPI#00738313833. “Middle Eastern Arabic Oud”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Beta (BMI); Composer: Sotirios Bakas (BMI), IPI#797324989 “A Middle East Lament”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Alpha (ASCAP); Composer: Dan Cullen (PRS), IPI#551977321 “Mystic Anatolia”: Publisher: Pond5 Publishing Alpha (ASCAP); Composer: Okan Akdeniz (MSG), IPI#37747892568 “Modern Middle Eastern Underscore”: Publisher: All Pro Audio LLC (611803484); Composer: Alan T Fagan (347654928) ___ Episode Transcript: GIULIETTA BOUKHOBZA: My family was in Libya for many, many years. You were a second-class citizen, but you didn't know better. You knew that if somebody hits you in the street, you don't go to the police, because the police will take the side of the Arab. They didn't care. You were just a Jew and a Zionist.  MANYA BRACHEAR PASHMAN: The world has overlooked an important episode in modern history: the 800,000 Jews who left or were driven from their homes in Arab nations and Iran in the mid-20th century. This series, brought to you by American Jewish Committee, explores that pivotal moment in Jewish history and the rich Jewish heritage of Iran and Arab nations as some begin to build relations with Israel.  I'm your host, Manya Brachear Pashman. Join us as we explore family histories and personal stories of courage, perseverance, and resilience.  This is The Forgotten Exodus.  Today's episode: Leaving Libya. GIULIETTA: We were all hiding in our houses, all the Jews. And there were news about buildings, that they were burned. We didn't know at the time that they had killed some families. And my particular family, we were able to leave, actually the famous Quatorze Juillet, the 14th of July, the Bastille Day. So it was freedom for us too, and we ended up, we went to Italy. MANYA: Until recently, Guilietta Boukhobza never talked about the life she left behind in Libya at the age of 16, and for many years her children rarely inquired. Only recently, her oldest son has started to ask his mother what happened to her family, their family, more than 50 years ago. What prompted her parents to leave everything behind, besides what each family member could fit inside a suitcase? GIULIETTA: One suitcase. So we were eight children, and a mother and a father. Each one got his suitcase. I don't even remember what we put in it. I have no memory. It's so funny. I don't remember making the bag. I vaguely remember getting into this kind of truck, arriving at the airport.  I remember arriving in Rome and starting to cry. Because I was saying, and it's true, we were very, very happy to get out of there, but still there is trauma. That you just leave there, you arrive to a train station and you start crying and you say ‘I want to go home.' What the hell is home? They'll kill you there. MANYA: Her father's favorite wool blanket. A handmade rug her mother treasured. The journals Giulietta had kept since the age of ten. Though she doesn't remember any of these items going into a suitcase, these are the mementos that over the years have reminded Giulietta of her childhood in Misrata and Tripoli. The contents of those suitcases mattered very little at the time.  GIULIETTA: In my family they came, they almost killed us. I mean, I still remember coming, and we're alive by a miracle so, we are grateful that we were not killed. MANYA: World events, ignorance about history, and the naïveté that often accompanies that ignorance also propel Giulietta to share her story. She is bewildered and alarmed by the rising tide of antisemitism and anger toward Israel. Israel is not perfect. Not by any stretch. But neither is America, the country that has given her freedoms and opportunities that she never knew existed for Jews growing up in Libya.   Giulietta has a unique vantage point. She is married to the longtime CEO of American Jewish Committee, David Harris, who has shown her that speaking up and fighting for what you believe is the only option.  In 2017, David wrote Letter from a Forgotten Jew, a column stylistically written from a first-person perspective based on the stories he had heard from Jews that fled Arab countries such as Iraq and Libya. In reality, it was an ode to his wife whose experience had been ignored for too long. Since then, Giulietta has shared pieces of her story and occasionally picks up her own pen to offer her perspective on world events.   GIULIETTA: Now, everything that happened to me I see in a different light. It's not any more about me. I was just, how do you say, I just happened to be at the wrong time at the wrong place. So, I don't want you to feel bad for me or feel sorry for me. I talk like almost as if it is not me. I'm talking about the third person. And, and I don't even have so much pity for this third person because this third person survived and thrived in a way.   When I look at my story now, I see it in relation to what I see around me – the growing antisemitism, the stupidity of the West, the ignorance towards history, the indifference and almost embarrassment of some Jews who should be proud of who they are and what they achieved. You almost envy these people who never had the trauma that you have. Now, I feel almost privileged that I had that because I can understand more and see the danger of what can happen when people don't know history or whatever. MANYA: The Libyan Jewish community goes back thousands of years, to the Third Century before the Common Era, even before Roman times. Of course, it wasn't called Libya at the time. Over millennia, Jews lived in Cyrenaica, the region next to Egypt, and Tripolitania, the region bordering Tunisia. They lived under Roman, Ottoman, Italian, Spanish, British and, eventually, Libyan rule.   Who was in charge at the time determined Jews' comfort, their livelihood, and oftentimes their survival. Under some regimes, Jews were treated as a protected minority who paid special taxes and faced certain restrictions.  Under some, they held government positions. And yet under others, they feared for their lives. In fact, after the 18th Century, Jews in Tripoli– when there were still Jews in Tripoli– celebrated two additional Purims to mark their deliverance from two separate attempts to annihilate them. VIVIENNE ROUMAINI-DENN: Even in the best of times, they lived uneasily. On an individual basis there was that full trust. But at the same time, when there were pogroms, you just never knew when somebody would save you, or kill you. And both happened. You found Arabs who really risked their life to save you and you found others who actually just killed you.  MANYA: That's filmmaker Vivienne Roumani-Denn, the creator of “The Last Jews of Libya,” a documentary about how her family was forced out of their North African homeland. The documentary was inspired by a manuscript her mother left behind, which Vivienne discovered only after her death.  A librarian by training, Vivienne began conducting oral histories, interviewing dozens of Jewish refugees who once called Libya home. She also created the first website to curate stories and conversations in the Libyan Jewish community.  In 1999, she became the founding director of the Sephardic Library and Archives of the American Sephardi Federation at the Center for Jewish History in New York. She later served as the federation's executive director.  Meanwhile, her older brother Maurice Roumani, a professor of politics and international relations, wrote the seminal scholarly work on Libya's modern Jewish history titled, “The Jews of Libya.”  VIVIENNE: At the end of the Ottoman period, there was a thriving Jewish school. Many Jewish children learned Hebrew so well that they would speak it in the street. It's a nice little glimpse of the Ottoman rule in Libya, which was before anybody is currently living. MANYA: Indeed, Jewish life flourished in Libya for centuries. Shabbat tables featured chraime, fish simmered in a spicy tomato sauce, and mafrum, vegetables stuffed with meat. In Tripoli, by the 1940s, men could walk to one of 44 synagogues every Saturday morning. The beat of the goblet drum, or darbouka, signaled the impending nuptials of a bride and groom. And when the bride emerged on her wedding day with her hands and head exquisitely painted with henna, she was a sight to behold.  In 1911, the Italians conquered the Ottoman rulers and at first, Jews fared well.  VIVIENNE: Life under Italian rule was calm, and even when fascism first came about, it was almost like just another form of government. But a major change happened when Mussolini aligned himself with Hitler. MANYA: Benito Mussolini instituted racial laws in 1938 that required Jews to open their stores on Shabbat or face severe punishment. Eventually, Jews were barred from holding government positions. A sfollamento, or process of removing Libya's Jews, commenced. In 1940, the African campaign of the Second World War was unfolding in the eastern Libyan desert, adjacent to Egypt. The British captured Benghazi twice.  The first time, Jews welcomed them. But Germany pushed the British out. Shortly after, anti-Jewish riots destroyed homes and businesses. When the British were pushed back a second time, many Jews with British passports fled with the British soldiers. Those who stayed were rounded up and sent to detention camps in Italy.  VIVIENNE: Some were later sent to Bergen-Belsen. They all survived. But this is a little-known part of the Holocaust history. In 1942, Mussolini ordered the expulsion of all Jews in Cyrenaica because of their interaction with the British. Those with French or French protectorate passports were sent to Tunisia and Algeria.  Those without foreign passports, and a small number with Italian passports were sent to an Italian-run detention camp in Giado, in the mountains of Tripolitania. The conditions there were very harsh. Families required to live in cramped quarters, separated only by a sheet. They had lice-borne typhus everywhere. Food was very scarce. The interviewees told me how they had to carve out all these lice from a teeny piece of dried bread. And about one-fourth perished.  MANYA: Giulietta's father was a young man then and later told stories of time spent in a concentration camp. She believes it was Giado.  The Jews of Giado were liberated after the British conquered Tripolitania in 1943. But two years later, in 1945, brutal pogroms unfolded across Tripoli and other cities across Tripolitania, sparked by soccer fans coming from a stadium about one kilometer from the city's Jewish quarter. The British did not intervene for three days. VIVIENNE: The spread throughout Tripolitania was too rapid to have been coincidental. 129 Jews were killed. Some of the descriptions of the atrocities that I recorded in the oral histories are horrifying. I'll never forget one interview, when she opened the door to greet me, in tears. She said, ‘I've waited 50 years for you.' I've never met that woman before. And she said . . . she just unburdened herself of the most horrific memories.  MANYA: Another pogrom in 1948, a month after Israel declared independence, took fewer Jewish lives because the community was more prepared to defend itself. But both the pogroms in '45 and '48 became rallying cries for Israel. Between 1949 and 1951, 95% of Libyan Jews left when aliyah became possible. For those who stayed, like Giulietta's family, the situation continued to deteriorate. GIULIETTA: My family was in Libya for many, many years. I don't know how many generations my family was there. But we were there many years. MANYA: Giulietta was born in 1951, the same year Libya gained its independence. By then, a fierce nationalism expressed through anti-Israeli and anti-Jewish policies had swept the region. At that time, her family lived in Misrata, a coastal city in northwestern Libya where mass riots took place on the day of Libya's first-ever election.  Giulietta recalls that they were the only Jewish family left in Misrata at that time. The others had gone to Tripoli. The family lived in an apartment at the center of town. The Libyans' distaste and distrust for Jews was especially evident when King Idris came to visit Misrata. GIULIETTA: When the king will come, we have all these policemen in our house. And then the shades will be down. And we as children weren't allowed to see. And I never understood, I never asked my parents, ‘Were they there because we were the only Jewish family, and they didn't trust us? Or were the police there because that was a very good location to see if there were snipers or something against the king?' If I had to guess, I think because we were Jewish. MANYA: At the age of eight, Giulietta's family moved to Tripoli where her father worked in human resources for the Volkswagen corporation. Most of the schools in Libya were still Italian Catholic. Giulietta knew all the prayers, all the sacraments. By then, there were unspoken rules about being Jewish. You kept it quiet, even though people still knew. GIULIETTA: First of all, you have to realize that when you don't know any different, your abnormal becomes normal. And so, if you ask me about growing up, we went to schools. We went to the beach. Some people were able to travel. The whole family couldn't leave. You always have to leave somebody there. This kind of blackmail, because they were afraid that you will escape and go to Israel. So basically life was, let's say normal for us, because we didn't know. For example, you knew you don't advertise the fact that you're Jewish even though we had synagogues.  As an example, even though we went to Italian school with Italian books. Sometimes the books about geography, they will come late because they will arrive from Italy. And why they will arrive late? Because they will have to remove the page if there was a picture of Israel. If in the thing you see in the Middle East there was Egypt, Jordan, etc, Libya, they had to remove it. MANYA: When a new law in 1961 required a special permit to prove Libyan citizenship, most Jews were denied. Jews could not open businesses unless they had an Arab partner who owned more than half. Jews could not vote. GIULIETTA: You were a second-class citizen, but you didn't know better. You just knew not to do things. You knew that if somebody hits you in the street, you don't go to the police, because the police will take the side of the Arab.  You thought things were relatively normal, and then they will turn on a dime on you. They didn't care. You were just a Jew and a Zionist. You went to the movie, and you see the newsreel,  and you see they were completely brainwashed by Egypt. And the famous phrase was ‘aleaduu alsuhyuniu' [in Arabic: العدو الصهيوني] -- the Zionist enemy, the Zionist enemy, the Zionist enemy. We were there generations before them. We never went to Israel, but it was always, this is how they brainwashed you. Then in ‘67, during the Six Day War, that is where everything exploded, and we had to leave. MANYA: Tension started to build days before Egypt, Jordan, and Syria began battling Israel. Giulietta remembers young men on the side of the street drawing their hands across their throats when she and her sister walked by. Her school closed and her father started staying home from work.  GIULIETTA: We were on the phone with other Jewish families, and we could hear that things were burning. They killed . . . We didn't know. That's what helped us to keep our sanity. When we left, we knew – that they also killed people. MANYA: Then one night, the mob arrived at her family's house. Remember, her father worked in human resources. That detail spared their lives. GIULIETTA: I remember this group of people coming toward us, we had a garden. They could have been 500. Or they could have been 1,000. Or they could have been just 70. But in my eyes, there were so, so many. And they wanted to burn us alive. My mother, she knew them. She knew the mentality. So, she pushed my father away, and she went there and basically, she started pleading with them saying ‘What did we do to you? And it happened that the guy that worked for my father, and he was supposed to be fired, my father decided not to fire him. And he turned to them, and he said to them and said, ‘These are good Jews. Let's don't kill them.' Sorry if I laugh. So they took the, how do you say, the match. They put it back and they left.  But we knew we were not safe. The Arabs, the Muslims, these were our enemies. We're in their country. We are the Jews. They wanted us dead. I never want to think of what would have happened if they got hold of us. MANYA: The government set a curfew to curb the violence. Still, afraid for their lives, Giulietta's mother reached out to a Muslim family with whom they were close and asked for help. They agreed to hide the whole family – Giulietta's mother, father, and eight children.   GIULIETTA: This wonderful man. He sent us his driver, with this big car. And I remember we all dressed as Arabs. I think maybe even my father, he covered himself. And he took us all to that house. And we stayed there for about two weeks. MANYA: Men occupied one corner of the house, watching television, and listening to BBC, which was reporting on Israel's victories over the Egyptian Air Force and its capture of the Sinai Peninsula and Gaza Strip. The women lived in the other wing, listening to Arabic radio, which told a very different story. One day, Giulietta crossed over to the other side of the house to visit her father for a kosher lunch of boiled potatoes, eggs, and tuna, drizzled with olive oil.  GIULIETTA: I said to my father, ‘How are you doing on the other side?' I said, ‘We are OK. But mama is crying, crying, crying.' And he said, ‘Why? We are safe.' I said, ‘Because we're listening to the news, she had brothers in Israel, and the Arab news was saying that every Jew in Israel was killed. That they won the war, and everybody's dying. And he told me, ‘Go to your mother and whisper to her, that this is bullshit, that Israel was the biggest victor in the history, and the Egyptians are running in the desert without shoes.'  MANYA: But after two weeks, Giulietta's mother became suspicious of their hosts. She still trusted the adults in the family. But not necessarily their teenage sons.  Vivienne Roumani-Denn said older generations of Libyans tended to appreciate what Jews had contributed to society over the years and respect that. Younger Libyans were more easily swept up by the nationalistic and antisemitic fervor, regardless of the nation's Jewish heritage.  GIULIETTA: My mother told my father, ‘I feel it in my bones, his sons are going to sell us. So, let's go home. We'd rather die in our own home. It's also dangerous for them.' So, we went home. MANYA: Not long after, the King of Libya gave the Jews an impossible choice. They could go to an internment camp where they would supposedly be protected, or each person could pack a bag, take no more than 30 sterling, and abandon their homes, the lives that generations of their family had built in this country – forever.  There were too many tales of families and neighbors accepting so-called offers of protection from authorities, only to be led to their death. Giulietta's family and thousands of others packed their bags. An Italian airlift transported 6,000 Jews to safety. GIULIETTA: The reason why we went to Italy is because the Italian ambassador at that time in Libya decided that he had to help the Jews. And there was something for which we could all go to Italy. I just remember they took us in this kind of truck to the airport. And then from there, we went to Rome and the feeling of freedom when we arrived in Rome. But I heard stories of people who the police wouldn't take them, or they left them somewhere and they were saved by a miracle. So, you couldn't trust anybody. MANYA: The Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, or HIAS, encouraged them to go to the States. Her father wanted to go to Israel. Her mother wanted to stay in Italy. That's what they did.  GIULIETTA: Every country that took the Libyan Jews, and I can say that with a lot of pride, we just added to the country. We either opened businesses, or, you understand? We were never parasites. They accepted us, but we never relied on them. At the contrary, we added whatever it was to business to, to whatever. And we are always grateful. I mean, to me, Italy is one of my most favorite countries, I will always be grateful.  MANYA: With only a fourth-grade education, Giulietta's mother became an Arabic-Italian translator for hospitals and doctors across Rome. But her father struggled. Educated at Alliance Israel Francaise, French-run Jewish schools across the Middle East, he was erudite and ambitious.  GIULIETTA: My father basically, I never saw him as a worker. He was a man that was always reading and studying languages. He was a dreamer in a way.  When he got to Italy, he tried to find a job and he couldn't. It was terrible to see that. But it was not easy. My father was never able to become who he was basically. He always felt like a failure. He was an idealist. He loved, he wanted to go to Israel all his life. He always used to say ‘I'd rather die young in the land of Israel than old anywhere else' and he died old somewhere else. But you know, in life, you cannot always have what you … He's buried in Israel, yeah. MANYA: While her father dreamed of going to Israel, her mother dreamed of going back home to Libya. Even though she worked hard to settle the family and become part of the fabric of Italian society, Italy was only a temporary refuge.  In fact, Giulietta's parents did go back, in 1969, hoping to reclaim some of the possessions they had left behind. While they were there, King Idris was overthrown in a military coup led by Colonel Muammar Gaddafi. Giulietta's parents were prisoners in their former home for about a year before they could return to their new home in Rome. They recovered very little. Gaddafi confiscated all Jewish property. GIULIETTA: My mother thought eventually she'll go back to Libya. That was always her home. That was her country. That was her house.  Maybe in the last 10 years before she died, she realized there was no hope and she saw all the, forgive me, the bestiality, all the things of terrorism and she said ‘[I could] never go back there.' But she always dreamed of going back. MANYA: Instead, Libya has lived on in their everyday lives – their recipes, their superstitions, and their deepest memories. To this day, guests at Giulietta's Shabbat and holiday tables eat rice, couscous, chraime, mafrum, and a special dish of white beans called lubya. When Giulietta's sons or daughters-in-law send her photographs of grandchildren, she responds with the emojis of a fish and a hand, to ward off the evil eye. The hand, or hamsa, is a symbol originated by Muslims, but embraced and redefined by the Mizrahi Jews who once lived among them.  And when Giulietta's mother was in the final stage of Alzheimer's, that ruthless disease that strips one's memories, Giulietta would turn on Umm Kulthum, a popular Egyptian singer who, despite being a raging antisemite, was beloved by Arabs and Jews.  GIULIETTA: You will hardly meet any Arab, any Jew, from North Africa or the Middle East who doesn't know Umm Kulthum. The only thing that she would remember, and I would put on Umm Kulthum. And I will tell her, I pretend to say ‘Mama, I cannot understand Arabic. Can you translate it to me?' And she would translate the words, which were always: You are my life. You are my eyes, I love you. You know, the melodrama of songs. MANYA: Roumani-Denn said for Jews in Libya, the antisemitism, no matter how rabid, no matter how pervasive, did not steal the love and sense of belonging we all have, or long for in the place we call home.  VIVIENNE: You know, it's home. It's not home, you were never made to feel at home. But it was . . . there were some really good times. Every time I interviewed anybody, they said, ‘Life was good. They hated us.' And I said, ‘Isn't there a contradiction here?' And the thing is, you know, … life in Libya revolved around family and faith, and extended family and friends. So, there was all this warmth on the one hand. MANYA: Giulietta has no desire to return to the land she once called home. When she thinks about what she misses most, it's her childhood. She left that behind when she boarded the plane to Italy, and it would not be waiting for her if she went back. It's gone.  GIULIETTA: The country can go to hell. Sorry. I have no interest. No sympathy. Where can they give you back the money? The place is bankrupt. They don't even have . . . they're going to give it to the Jews? Some people are still fighting, ‘it's our money.' Some people left so much, so much. But that happened also to the Jews all over the world. MANYA: She also knows now what was missing from that childhood. Leaving Libya introduced her to liberties she never knew existed for Jews. And for women. She wouldn't want to return to a life without rights and freedom. Wherever they landed in Italy, the States, or Israel, she, her parents, and her seven siblings encountered new opportunities and seized them.  After two years of freedom in Rome, Giulietta's younger sister Liliana at the age of 16 moved to Israel to finish high school and become a lone soldier. A soldier in the Israel Defense Forces with no family in Israel to support them, only their comrades and their countrymen.  GIULIETTA: It was horrible to be kicked out, we lost all our money. And we all say it was the best thing that happened to us. It was the best thing that happened to us, being kicked out, because finally we have what we never had before.   MANYA: Landing in Italy when she did not only introduced her to unexpected freedoms. In 1975, her cousin introduced her to a co-worker at HIAS, an American son of Holocaust survivors who had landed in Rome after being expelled from the Soviet Union for helping persecuted Jews. He became Giulietta's husband and the CEO of AJC, David Harris. In 1979, they moved to the States where David became CEO 11 years later. In that role, he has expanded the organization's reach in the Arab world. Meanwhile, Giulietta taught Italian and raised their three sons in the kind of home she could not have growing up in Libya – one that was openly and proudly Jewish. Inspired by his wife's journey, David has sought justice for Jews around the world by urging nations to fight antisemitism with more than just words and ceremonies to remember the Holocaust. He has encouraged them to see the fuller picture of Jews after the Holocaust, including those forced from their homes in Arab nations and Iran, the crucial role Israel has played for thousands of refugees, and the hope it offers for millions of others, should the need ever arise. GUILIETTA: I feel blessed, because he understood. He understood. I mean, it's his job. He went to Russia. He went to Rome. He helped the Russian Jews to come. He studied our history.  And to be honest with you, a lot of American Jews, they live in a bubble. It's like if being born in freedom, and in a democracy, they cannot envision anything that is different than what they have. MANYA: They cannot envision a world where Jews had to celebrate life cycle events quietly, could not travel or pursue their dreams, or feared for their lives. They cannot envision a world without Israel, or worse, they can, and they believe the world would be better for it. They don't understand why Israel exists, what purpose it served for millions of Jews, thousands from across the Arab world, including Libya. But Giulietta knows why Israel exists.  GIULIETTA: When you come from this country, and things happen to you like [they] happened to me, to the Egyptian Jews, to the Iraqi Jews, even to the Russian Jews. We see something which is sad: that people who lived in freedom lost the ability to think rationally.  MANYA: There are no more Jews left in Libya. The Great Synagogue in Tripoli has been boarded up. When in 2011, a Libyan Jew returned from exile and broke through the boards to go inside, armed vigilantes surrounded the site. He was lucky to leave alive.  Giulietta remembers no matter how discreet Libyan Jews were about their Judaism, they never missed a High Holiday service at that synagogue and the men went there every Saturday morning. Bar mitzvahs were done quietly, unlike in the States where her three sons' bar mitzvahs weren't a concern. GIULIETTA: I see my oldest son, who is 42, who every now and then he says, ‘Mom, can you please tell me how it happened, what happened?' And it's funny they ask, because today, when I knew you were coming, I said, there are so many questions I didn't ask my parents. MANYA: I asked Giulietta why her family stayed in Libya after the pogroms of '45 and '48. Many of her aunts, uncles, cousins fled Tripoli for Israel before she was even born. Why did her parents move to Tripoli and try to stay?  GIULIETTA: I wouldn't know how to answer because you think they will always be alive, you think, and then they disappear, and you realize there are things you don't know. I never asked. I think, I think, they thought … I never asked. MANYA: Libyan Jews are just one of the many Jewish communities who in the last century left Arab countries to forge new lives for themselves and future generations. Join us next week as we share another untold story of The Forgotten Exodus. Many thanks to Giulietta for sharing her story. Does your family have roots in North Africa or the Middle East? One of the goals of this series is to make sure we gather these stories before they are lost. Too many times during my reporting, I encountered children and grandchildren who didn't have the answers to my questions because, like Giulietta, they never asked. That's why one of the goals of this project is to encourage you to find more of these stories.  Call The Forgotten Exodus hotline. Tell us where your family is from and something you'd like for our listeners to know such as how you've tried to keep the traditions alive and memories alive as well. Call 212.891-1336 and leave a message of 2 minutes or less. Be sure to leave your name and where you live now. You can also send an email to theforgottenexodus@ajc.org and we'll be in touch. Tune in every Friday for AJC's weekly podcast about global affairs through a Jewish lens, People of the Pod,brought to you by the same team behind The Forgotten Exodus.  Atara Lakritz is our producer, CucHuong Do is our production manager. T.K. Broderick is our sound engineer. Special thanks to Jon Schweitzer, Sean Savage, Ian Kaplan, and so many of our colleagues, too many to name really, for making this series possible. And extra special thanks to David Harris, who has been a constant champion for making sure these stories do not remain untold. You can follow The Forgotten Exodus on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or wherever you listen to podcasts, and you can sign up to receive updates at AJC.org/forgottenexodussignup. The views and opinions of our guests don't necessarily reflect the positions of AJC.  You can reach us at theforgottenexodus@ajc.org. If you've enjoyed the episode, please be sure to spread the word, and hop onto Apple Podcasts to rate us and write a review to help more listeners find us.