Podcasts about Dark Ages

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Latest podcast episodes about Dark Ages

Srijan Foundation Talks
Afghanistan back to Dark Ages - An Evaluation | Col. Ramakrishnan | #SangamTalks SrijanTalks

Srijan Foundation Talks

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 46:53


Afghanistan back to Dark Ages - An Evaluation | Col. Ramakrishnan | #SangamTalks SrijanTalks

The Because Fiction Podcast
Episode 174: A Chat with Christian Dystopian Author, Christian Cross

The Because Fiction Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 35:55


I seem to be on a dystopian kick.  It began with Jess Corban's Nede Rising duology but then a couple more were suggested to me just a couple of days after I chatted with Christian Cross about his book Extraction: A Song for Emma. Perhaps there's a reason, eh?  Listen in and discover where Christian got the idea for his book, how long it took him to decide to write it, and if a guy who claims not to like to read or write... is going to write more!   Note: links may be affiliate links that provide me with a small commission at no extra expense to you. Do You Think the Future Be Cool, Scary, Crazy, or What? Historically speaking, civilizations rise and fall.  I mean, think about the Roman Empire with plumbing and education, arts and legal systems that were pretty cool... until you then look at Europe during the Dark Ages. Based on choices the Modern Era has chosen, history points to an upcoming decline, and Christian Cross tackles one tough possibility in his debut novel, Extraction: A Song for Emma. When we talked, Christian described getting the picture of something chilling enough for him to go around campus in college and ask people what they thought of the idea. The result, all these years later, looks to be a trilogy beginning in Indiana. I don't know where it will lead from there (if anywhere), but they're definitely on the run in this one. Written in present tense, I wasn't sure I'd be able to get into it, but it only took a few paragraphs for me to wish I didn't have to stop and record the interview! It's definitely on my TBR. EEEP! While Christian says he didn't enjoy writing or reading, since finally saying, "Yes, Lord" to this project, he has learned to enjoy the process and has found audiobooks to help him enjoy reading more. he's even working on getting this series on audiobook. I'm sure he'd appreciate prayers for the right narrator and such on that one! Extraction: A Song for Emma by Christian Cross In the near future, Hannah (age 16), her younger brother Loghan (age 11), and her younger sister Emma (age 5) are on the run aided by a man named Shane. Hannah hears that Shane's a kidnapper on the news. Is he out to help or put them in more danger? A few months earlier, Hannah, Loghan, and Emma lived in one of the nicest suburban neighborhoods in Potsville, Indiana. Emma's health has been deteriorating for some time, but now they're noticing. After a doctor's diagnosis, Hannah and Loghan become suspicious that something sinister is going on. Before long, their lives are turned upside down as they try to determine what's going on and save their sister in this dystopian society. Time's running out for them to discover the truth. Will Hannah and Loghan be able to save their sister, and potentially themselves, in time? You can learn more about Christian Cross on his WEBSITE. Like to listen on the go? You can find Because Fiction Podcast at: Apple  Castbox  Google Play Libsyn  RSS Spotify Stitcher Amazon and more!

Making Footprints Not Blueprints
S05 #04 - The work of love, or how to resist in the dark ages - A thought for the day

Making Footprints Not Blueprints

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 9:15 Transcription Available


The full text of this podcast can be found in the transcript of this edition or at the following link:https://andrewjbrown.blogspot.com/2022/09/the-work-of-love-or-how-to-resist-in.htmlPlease feel to post any comments you have about this episode there.Music, "New Heaven", written by Andrew J. Brown and played by Chris Ingham (piano), Paul Higgs (trumpet), Russ Morgan (drums) and Andrew J. Brown (double bass)

Too True To Lie
Medieval Medicine

Too True To Lie

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 55:47


Unreal medical practices, primitive and of the Dark Ages.

21st Century Entrepreneurship
James Bayly: Escape the Data Dark Ages

21st Century Entrepreneurship

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 36:43


James Bayly, CEO of SubQuery, discusses the challenges of decentralizing data infrastructure and how his company is working to build a decentralized data network. Bayly explains that many of the core infrastructure solutions are still quite centralized and that decentralized data networks could offer more reliable and safe access to data. He also discusses how such a network would be structured and how users would be rewarded for participating. SubQuery allows you to index data off the chain and into a traditional database, making it possible to query and sort data in a way that isn't possible with blockchains alone. This makes for a better user experience and more intuitive applications.

Screaming in the Cloud
Azul and the Current State of the Java Ecosystem with Scott Sellers

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 36:35


About ScottWith more than 28 years of successful leadership in building high technology companies and delivering advanced products to market, Scott provides the overall strategic leadership and visionary direction for Azul Systems.Scott has a consistent proven track record of vision, leadership, and success in enterprise, consumer and scientific markets. Prior to co-founding Azul Systems, Scott founded 3dfx Interactive, a graphics processor company that pioneered the 3D graphics market for personal computers and game consoles. Scott served at 3dfx as Vice President of Engineering, CTO and as a member of the board of directors and delivered 7 award-winning products and developed 14 different graphics processors. After a successful initial public offering, 3dfx was later acquired by NVIDIA Corporation.Prior to 3dfx, Scott was a CPU systems architect at Pellucid, later acquired by MediaVision. Before Pellucid, Scott was a member of the technical staff at Silicon Graphics where he designed high-performance workstations.Scott graduated from Princeton University with a bachelor of science, earning magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa honors. Scott has been granted 8 patents in high performance graphics and computing and is a regularly invited keynote speaker at industry conferences.Links Referenced:Azul: https://www.azul.com/ TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: I come bearing ill tidings. Developers are responsible for more than ever these days. Not just the code that they write, but also the containers and the cloud infrastructure that their apps run on. Because serverless means it's still somebody's problem. And a big part of that responsibility is app security from code to cloud. And that's where our friend Snyk comes in. Snyk is a frictionless security platform that meets developers where they are - Finding and fixing vulnerabilities right from the CLI, IDEs, Repos, and Pipelines. Snyk integrates seamlessly with AWS offerings like code pipeline, EKS, ECR, and more! As well as things you're actually likely to be using. Deploy on AWS, secure with Snyk. Learn more at Snyk.co/scream That's S-N-Y-K.co/screamCorey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at AWS AppConfig. Engineers love to solve, and occasionally create, problems. But not when it's an on-call fire-drill at 4 in the morning. Software problems should drive innovation and collaboration, NOT stress, and sleeplessness, and threats of violence. That's why so many developers are realizing the value of AWS AppConfig Feature Flags. Feature Flags let developers push code to production, but hide that that feature from customers so that the developers can release their feature when it's ready. This practice allows for safe, fast, and convenient software development. You can seamlessly incorporate AppConfig Feature Flags into your AWS or cloud environment and ship your Features with excitement, not trepidation and fear. To get started, go to snark.cloud/appconfig. That's snark.cloud/appconfig.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest on this promoted episode today is Scott Sellers, CEO and co-founder of Azul. Scott, thank you for joining me.Scott: Thank you, Corey. I appreciate the opportunity in talking to you today.Corey: So, let's start with what you're doing these days. What is Azul? What do you folks do over there?Scott: Azul is an enterprise software and SaaS company that is focused on delivering more efficient Java solutions for our customers around the globe. We've been around for 20-plus years, and as an entrepreneur, we've really gone through various stages of different growth and different dynamics in the market. But at the end of the day, Azul is all about adding value for Java-based enterprises, Java-based applications, and really endearing ourselves to the Java community.Corey: This feels like the sort of space where there are an awful lot of great business cases to explore. When you look at what's needed in that market, there are a lot of things that pop up. The surprising part to me is that this is the direction that you personally went in. You started your career as a CPU architect, to my understanding. You were then one of the co-founders of 3dfx before it got acquired by Nvidia.You feel like you've spent your career more as a hardware guy than working on the SaaS side of the world. Is that a misunderstanding of your path, or have things changed, or is this just a new direction? Help me understand how you got here from where you were.Scott: I'm not exactly sure what the math would say because I continue to—can't figure out a way to stop time. But you're correct that my academic background, I was an electrical engineer at Princeton and started my career at Silicon Graphics. And that was when I did a lot of fantastic and fascinating work building workstations and high-end graphics systems, you know, back in the day when Silicon Graphics really was the who's who here in Silicon Valley. And so, a lot of my career began in the context of hardware. As you mentioned, I was one of the founders of graphics company called 3dfx that was one of, I think, arguably the pioneer in terms of bringing 3d graphics to the masses, if you will.And we had a great run of that. That was a really fun business to be a part of just because of what was going on in the 3d world. And we took that public and eventually sold that to Nvidia. And at that point, my itch, if you will, was really learning more about the enterprise segment. I'd been involved with professional graphics with SGI, I had been involved with consumer graphics with 3dfx.And I was fascinated just to learn about the enterprise segment. And met a couple people through a mutual friend around the 2001 timeframe, and they started talking about this thing called Java. And you know, I had of course heard about Java, but as a consumer graphics guy, didn't have a lot of knowledge about it or experience with it. And the more I learned about it, recognized that what was going on in the Java world—and credit to Sun for really creating, obviously, not only language, but building a community around Java—and recognized that new evolutions of developer paradigms really only come around once a decade if then, and was convinced and really got excited about the opportunity to ride the wave of Java and build a company around that.Corey: One of the blind spots that I have throughout the entire world of technology—and to be fair, I have many of them, but the one most relevant to this conversation, I suppose, is the Java ecosystem as a whole. I come from a background of being a grumpy Unix sysadmin—because I've never met a happy one of those in my entire career—and as a result, scripting languages is where everything that I worked with started off. And on the rare occasions, I worked in Java shops, it was, “Great. We're going to go—here's a WAR file. Go ahead and deploy this with Tomcat,” or whatever else people are going to use. But basically, “Don't worry your pretty little head about that.”At most, I have to worry about how to configure a heap or whatnot. But it's from the outside looking in, not having to deal with that entire ecosystem as a whole. And what I've seen from that particular perspective is that every time I start as a technologist, or even as a consumer trying to install some random software package in the depths of the internet, and I have to start thinking about Java, it always feels like I'm about to wind up in a confusing world. There are a number of software packages that I installed back in, I want to say the early-2010s or whatnot. “Oh, you need to have a Java runtime installed on your Mac,” for example.And okay, going through Oracle site, do I need the JRE? Do I need the JDK? Oh, there's OpenJDK, which kind of works, kind of doesn't. Amazon got into the space with Corretto, which because that sounds nothing whatsoever, like Java, but strange names coming from Amazon is basically par for the course for those folks. What is the current state of the Java ecosystem, for those of us who have—basically the closest we've ever gotten is JavaScript, which is nothing alike except for the name.Scott: And you know, frankly, given the protection around the name Java—and you know, that is a trademark that's owned by Oracle—it's amazing to me that JavaScript has been allowed to continue to be called JavaScript because as you point out, JavaScript has nothing to do with Java per se.Corey: Well, one thing they do have in common I found out somewhat recently is that Oracle also owns the trademark for JavaScript.Scott: Ah, there you go. Maybe that's why it continues.Corey: They're basically a law firm—three law firms in a trench coat, masquerading as a tech company some days.Scott: Right. But anyway, it is a confusing thing because you know, I think, arguably, JavaScript, by the numbers, probably has more programmers than any other language in the world, just given its popularity as a web language. But to your question about Java specifically, it's had an evolving life, and I think the state where it is today, I think it's in the most exciting place it's ever been. And I'll walk you through kind of why I believe that to be the case.But Java has evolved over time from its inception back in the days when it was called, I think it was Oak when it was originally conceived, and Sun had eventually branded it as Java. And at the time, it truly was owned by Sun, meaning it was proprietary code; it had to be licensed. And even though Sun gave it away, in most cases, it still at the end of the day, it was a commercially licensed product, if you will, and platform. And if you think about today's world, it would not be conceivable to create something that became so popular with programmers that was a commercially licensed product today. It almost would be mandated that it would be open-source to be able to really gain the type of traction that Java has gained.And so, even though Java was really garnering interest, you know, not only within the developer community, but also amongst commercial entities, right, everyone—and the era now I'm talking about is around the 2000 era—all of the major software vendors, whether it was obviously Sun, but then you had Oracle, you had IBM, companies like BEA, were really starting to blossom at that point. It was a—you know, you could almost not find a commercial software entity that was not backing Java. But it was still all controlled by Sun. And all that success ultimately led to a strong outcry from the community saying this has to be open-source; this is too important to be beholden to a single vendor. And that decision was made by Sun prior to the Oracle acquisition, they actually open-sourced the Java runtime code and they created an open-source project called OpenJDK.And to Oracle's credit, when they bought Sun—which I think at the time when you really look back, Oracle really did not have a lot of track record, if you will, of being involved with an open-source community—and I think when Oracle acquired Sun, there was a lot of skepticism as to what's going to happen to Java. Is Oracle going to make this thing, you know, back to the old days, proprietary Oracle, et cetera? And really—Corey: I was too busy being heartbroken over Solaris at that point to pay much attention to the Java stuff, but it felt like it was this—sort of the same pattern, repeated across multiple ecosystems.Scott: Absolutely. And even though Sun had also open-sourced Solaris, with the OpenSolaris project, that was one of the kinds of things that it was still developed very much in a closed environment, and then they would kind of throw some code out into the open world. And no one really ran OpenSolaris because it wasn't fully compatible with Solaris. And so, that was a faint attempt, if you will.But Java was quite different. It was truly all open-sourced, and the big difference that—and again, I give Oracle a lot of credit for this because this was a very important time in the evolution of Java—that Oracle, maintained Sun's commitment to not only continue to open-source Java but most importantly, develop it in the open community. And so, you know, again, back and this is the 2008, ‘09, ‘10 timeframe, the evolution of Java, the decisions, the standards, you know, what goes in the platform, what doesn't, decisions about updates and those types of things, that truly became a community-led world and all done in the open-source. And credit to Oracle for continuing to do that. And that really began the transition away from proprietary implementations of Java to one that, very similar to Linux, has really thrived because of the true open-source nature of what Java is today.And that's enabled more and more companies to get involved with the evolution of Java. If you go to the OpenJDK page, you'll see all of the not only, you know, incredibly talented individuals that are involved with the evolution of Java, but again, a who's who in pretty much every major commercial entities in the enterprise software world is also somehow involved in the OpenJDK community. And so, it really is a very vibrant, evolving standard. And some of the tactical things that have happened along the way in terms of changing how versions of Java are released still also very much in the context of maintaining compatibility and finding that careful balance of evolving the platform, but at the same time, recognizing that there is a lot of Java applications out there, so you can't just take a right-hand turn and forget about the compatibility side of things. But we as a community overall, I think, have addressed that very effectively, and the result has been now I think Java is more popular than ever and continues to—we liken it kind of to the mortar and the brick walls of the enterprise. It's a given that it's going to be used, certainly by most of the enterprises worldwide today.Corey: There's a certain subset of folk who are convinced the Java, “Oh, it's this a legacy programming language, and nothing modern or forward-looking is going to be built in it.” Yeah, those people generally don't know what the internal language stack looks like at places like oh, I don't know, AWS, Google, and a few others, it is very much everywhere. But it also feels, on some level, like, it's a bit below the surface-level of awareness for the modern full-stack developer in some respects, right up until suddenly it's very much not. How is Java evolving in a cloud these days?Scott: Well, what we see happening—you know, this is true for—you know, I'm a techie, so I can talk about other techies. I mean as techies, we all like the new thing, right? I mean, it's not that exciting to talk about a language that's been around for 20-plus years. But that doesn't take away from the fact that we still all use keyboards. I mean, no one really talks about what keyboard they use anymore—unless you're really into keyboards—but at the end of the day, it's still a fundamental tool that you use every single day.And Java is kind of in the same situation. The reason that Java continues to be so fundamental is that it really comes back to kind of reinventing the wheel problem. Are there are other languages that are more efficient to code in? Absolutely. Are there other languages that, you know, have some capabilities that the Java doesn't have? Absolutely.But if you have the ability to reinvent everything from scratch, sure, go for it. And you also don't have to worry about well, can I find enough programmers in this, you know, new hot language, okay, good luck with that. You might be able to find dozens, but when you need to really scale a company into thousands or tens of thousands of developers, good luck finding, you know, everyone that knows, whatever your favorite hot language of the day is.Corey: It requires six years experience in a four-year-old language. Yeah, it's hard to find that, sometimes.Scott: Right. And you know, the reality is, is that really no application ever is developed from scratch, right? Even when an application is, quote, new, immediately, what you're using is frameworks and other things that have written long ago and proven to be very successful.Corey: And disturbing amounts of code copied and pasted from Stack Overflow.Scott: Absolutely.Corey: But that's one of those impolite things we don't say out loud very often.Scott: That's exactly right. So, nothing really is created from scratch anymore. And so, it's all about building blocks. And this is really where this snowball of Java is difficult to stop because there is so much third-party code out there—and by that, I mean, you know, open-source, commercial code, et cetera—that is just so leveraged and so useful to very quickly be able to take advantage of and, you know, allow developers to focus on truly new things, not reinventing the wheel for the hundredth time. And that's what's kind of hard about all these other languages is catching up to Java with all of the things that are immediately available for developers to use freely, right, because most of its open-source. That's a pretty fundamental Catch-22 about when you start talking about the evolution of new languages.Corey: I'm with you so far. The counterpoint though is that so much of what we're talking about in the world of Java is open-source; it is freely available. The OpenJDK, for example, says that right on the tin. You have built a company and you've been in business for 20 years. I have to imagine that this is not one of those stories where, “Oh, all the things we do, we give away for free. But that's okay. We make it up in volume.” Even the venture capitalist mindset tends to run out of patience on those kinds of timescales. What is it you actually do as a business that clearly, obviously delivers value for customers but also results in, you know, being able to meet payroll every week?Scott: Right? Absolutely. And I think what time has shown is that, with one very notable exception and very successful example being Red Hat, there are very, very few pure open-source companies whose business is only selling support services for free software. Most successful businesses that are based on open-source are in one-way shape or form adding value-added elements. And that's our strategy as well.The heart of everything we do is based on free code from OpenJDK, and we have a tremendous amount of business that we are following the Red Hat business model where we are selling support and long-term access and a huge variety of different operating system configurations, older Java versions. Still all free software, though, right, but we're selling support services for that. And that is, in essence, the classic Red Hat business model. And that business for us is incredibly high growth, very fast-moving, a lot of that business is because enterprises are tired of paying the very high price to Oracle for Java support and they're looking for an open-source alternative that is exactly the same thing, but comes in pure open-source form and with a vendor that is as reputable as Oracle. So, a lot of our businesses based on that.However, on top of that, we also have value-added elements. And so, our product that is called Azul Platform Prime is rooted in OpenJDK—it is OpenJDK—but then we've added value-added elements to that. And what those value-added elements create is, in essence, a better Java platform. And better in this context means faster, quicker to warm up, elimination of some of the inconsistencies of the Java runtime in terms of this nasty problem called garbage collection which causes applications to kind of bounce around in terms of performance limitations. And so, creating a better Java is another way that we have monetized our company is value-added elements that are built on top of OpenJDK. And I'd say that part of the business is very typical for the majority of enterprise software companies that are rooted in open-source. They're typically adding value-added components on top of the open-source technology, and that's our similar strategy as well.And then the third evolution for us, which again is very tried-and-true, is evolving the business also to add SaaS offerings. So today, the majority of our customers, even though they deploy in the cloud, they're stuck customer-managed and so they're responsible for where do I want to put my Java runtime on building out my stack and cetera, et cetera. And of course, that could be on-prem, but like I mentioned, the majority are in the cloud. We're evolving our product offerings also to have truly SaaS-based solutions so that customers don't even need to manage those types of stacks on their own anymore.Corey: On some level, it feels like we're talking about two different things when we talk about cloud and when we talk about programming languages, but increasingly, I'm starting to see across almost the entire ecosystem that different languages and different cloud providers are in many ways converging. How do you see Java changing as cloud-native becomes the default rather than the new thing?Scott: Great question. And I think the thing to recognize about, really, most popular programming languages today—I can think of very few exceptions—these languages were created, envisioned, implemented if you will, in a day when cloud was not top-of-mind, and in many cases, certainly in the case of Java, cloud didn't even exist when Java was originally conceived, nor was that the case when you know, other languages, such as Python, or JavaScript, or on and on. So, rethinking how these languages should evolve in very much the context of a cloud-native mentality is a really important initiative that we certainly are doing and I think the Java community is doing overall. And how you architect not only the application, but even the Java runtime itself can be fundamentally different if you know that the application is going to be deployed in the cloud.And I'll give you an example. Specifically, in the world of any type of runtime-based language—and JavaScript is an example of that; Python is an example of that; Java is an example of that—in all of those runtime-based environments, what that basically means is that when the application is run, there's a piece of software that's called the runtime that actually is running that application code. And so, you can think about it as a middleware piece of software that sits between the operating system and the application itself. And so, that runtime layer is common across those languages and those platforms that I mentioned. That runtime layer is evolving, and it's evolving in a way that is becoming more and more cloud-native in it's thinking.The process itself of actually taking the application, compiling it into whatever underlying architecture it may be running on—it could be an x86 instance running on Amazon; it could be, you know, for example, an ARM64, which Amazon has compute instances now that are based on an ARM64 processor that they call Graviton, which is really also kind of altering the price-performance of the compute instances on the AWS platform—that runtime layer magically takes an application that doesn't have to be aware of the underlying hardware and transforms that into a way that can be run. And that's a very expensive process; it's called just-in-time compiling, and that just-in-time compilation, in today's world—which wasn't really based on cloud thinking—every instance, every compute instance that you deploy, that same JIT compilation process is happening over and over again. And even if you deploy 100 instances for scalability, every one of those 100 instances is doing that same work. And so, it's very inefficient and very redundant. Contrast that to a cloud-native thinking: that compilation process should be a service; that service should be done once.The application—you know, one instance of the application is actually run and there are the other ninety-nine should just reuse that compilation process. And that shared compiler service should be scalable and should be able to scale up when applications are launched and you need more compilation resources, and then scaled right back down when you're through the compilation process and the application is more moving into the—you know, to the runtime phase of the application lifecycle. And so, these types of things are areas that we and others are working on in terms of evolving the Java runtime specifically to be more cloud-native.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Sysdig. Sysdig secures your cloud from source to run. They believe, as do I, that DevOps and security are inextricably linked. If you wanna learn more about how they view this, check out their blog, it's definitely worth the read. To learn more about how they are absolutely getting it right from where I sit, visit Sysdig.com and tell them that I sent you. That's S Y S D I G.com. And my thanks to them for their continued support of this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: This feels like it gets even more critical when we're talking about things like serverless functions across basically all the cloud providers these days, where there's the whole setup, everything in the stack, get it running, get it listening, ready to go, to receive a single request and then shut itself down. It feels like there are a lot of operational efficiencies possible once you start optimizing from a starting point of yeah, this is what that environment looks like, rather than us big metal servers sitting in a rack 15 years ago.Scott: Yeah. I think the evolution of serverless appears to be headed more towards serverless containers as opposed to serverless functions. Serverless functions have a bunch of limitations in terms of when you think about it in the context of a complex, you know, microservices-based deployment framework. It's just not very efficient, to spin up and spin down instances of a function if that actually is being—it is any sort of performance or latency-sensitive type of applications. If you're doing something very rarely, sure, it's fine; it's efficient, it's elegant, et cetera.But any sort of thing that has real girth to it—and girth probably means that's what's driving your application infrastructure costs, that's what's driving your Amazon bill every month—those types of things typically are not going to be great for starting and stopping functional instances. And so, serverless is evolving more towards thinking about the container itself not having to worry about the underlying operating system or the instance on Amazon that it's running on. And that's where, you know, we see more and more of the evolution of serverless is thinking about it at a container-level as opposed to a functional level. And that appears to be a really healthy steady state, so it gets the benefits of not having to worry about all the underlying stuff, but at the same time, doesn't have the downside of trying to start and stop functional influences at a given point in time.Corey: It seems to me that there are really two ways of thinking about cloud. The first is what I think a lot of companies do their first outing when they're going into something like AWS. “Okay, we're going to get a bunch of virtual machines that they call instances in AWS, we're going to run things just like it's our data center except now data transfer to the internet is terrifyingly expensive.” The more quote-unquote, “Cloud-native” way of thinking about this is what you're alluding to where there's, “Here's some code that I wrote. I want to throw it to my cloud provider and just don't tell me about any of the infrastructure parts. Execute this code when these conditions are met and leave me alone.”Containers these days seem to be one of our best ways of getting there with a minimum of fuss and friction. What are you seeing in the enterprise space as far as adoption of those patterns go? Or are we seeing cloud repatriation showing up as a real thing and I'm just not in the right place to see it?Scott: Well, I think as a cloud journey evolves, there's no question that—and in fact it's even silly to say that cloud is here to stay because I think that became a reality many, many years ago. So really, the question is, what are the challenges now with cloud deployments? Cloud is absolutely a given. And I think you stated earlier, it's rare that, whether it's a new company or a new application, at least in most businesses that don't have specific regulatory requirements, that application is highly, highly likely to be envisioned to be initially and only deployed in the cloud. That's a great thing because you have so many advantages of not having to purchase infrastructure in advance, being able to tap into all of the various services that are available through the cloud providers. No one builds databases anymore; you're just tapping into the service that's provided by Azure or AWS, or what have you.And, you know, just that specific example is a huge amount of savings in terms of just overhead, and license costs, and those types of stuff, and there's countless examples of that. And so, the services that are available in the cloud are unquestioned. So, there's countless advantages of why you want to be in the cloud. The downside, however, the cloud that is, if at the end of the day, AWS, Microsoft with Azure, Google with GCP, they are making 30% margin on that cloud infrastructure. And in the days of hardware, when companies would actually buy their servers from Dell, or HP, et cetera, those businesses are 5% margin.And so, where's that 25% going? Well, the 25% is being paid for by the users of cloud, and as a result of that, when you look at it purely from an operational cost perspective, it is more expensive to run in the cloud than it is back in the legacy days, right? And that's not to say that the industry has made the wrong choice because there's so many advantages of being in cloud, there's no doubt about it. And there should be—you know, and the cloud providers deserve to take some amount of margin to provide the services that they provide; there's no doubt about that. The question is, how do you do the best of all worlds?And you know, there is a great blog by a couple of the partners in Andreessen Horowitz, they called this the Cloud Paradox. And the Cloud Paradox really talks about the challenges. It's really a Catch-22; how do you get all the benefits of cloud but do that in a way that is not overly taxing from a cost perspective? And a lot of it comes down to good practices and making sure that you have the right monitoring and culture within an enterprise to make sure that cloud cost is a primary thing that is discussed and metric, but then there's also technologies that can help so that you don't have to even think about what you really don't ever want to do: repatriating, which is about the concept of actually moving off the cloud back to the old way of doing things. So certainly, I don't believe repatriation is a practical solution for ongoing and increasing cloud costs. I believe technology is a solution to that.And there are technologies such as our product, Azul Platform Prime, that in essence, allows you to do more with less, right, get all the benefits of cloud, deploy in your Amazon environment, deploy in your Azure environment, et cetera, but imagine if instead of needing a hundred instances to handle your given workload, you could do that with 50 or 60. Tomorrow, that means that you can start savings and being able to do that simply by changing your JVM from a standard OpenJDK or Oracle JVM to something like Platform Prime, you can immediately start to start seeing the benefits from that. And so, a lot of our business now and our growth is coming from companies that are screaming under the ongoing cloud costs and trying to keep them in line, and using technology like Azul Platform Prime to help mitigate those costs.Corey: I think that there is a somewhat foolish approach that I'm seeing taken by a lot of folks where there are some companies that are existentially anti-cloud, if for no other reason than because if the cloud wins, then they don't really have a business anymore. The problem I see with that is that it seems that their solution across the board is to turn back the clock where if I'm going to build a startup, it's time for me to go buy some servers and a rack somewhere and start negotiating with bandwidth providers. I don't see that that is necessarily viable for almost anyone. We aren't living in 1995 anymore, despite how much some people like to pretend we are. It seems like if there are workloads—for which I agree, cloud is not necessarily an economic fit, first, I feel like the market will fix that in the fullness of time, but secondly, on an individual workload belonging in a certain place is radically different than, “Oh, none of our stuff should live on cloud. Everything belongs in a data center.” And I just think that companies lose all credibility when they start pretending that it's any other way.Scott: Right. I'd love to see the reaction of the venture capitalists' face when an entrepreneur walks in and talks about how their strategy for deploying their SaaS service is going to be buying hardware and renting some space in the local data center.Corey: Well, there is a good cost control method, if you think about it. I mean very few engineers are going to accidentally spin up an $8 million cluster in a data center a second time, just because there's no space left for it.Scott: And you're right; it does happen in the cloud as well. It's just, I agree with you completely that as part of the evolution of cloud, in general, is an ever-improving aspect of cost and awareness of cost and building in technologies that help mitigate that cost. So, I think that will continue to evolve. I think, you know, if you really think about the cloud journey, cost, I would say, is still in early phases of really technologies and practices and processes of allowing enterprises to really get their head around cost. I'd still say it's a fairly immature industry that is evolving quickly, just given the importance of it.And so, I think in the coming years, you're going to see a radical improvement in terms of cost awareness and technologies to help with costs, that again allows you to the best of all worlds. Because, you know, if you go back to the Dark Ages and you start thinking about buying servers and infrastructure, then you are really getting back to a mentality of, “I've got to deploy everything. I've got to buy software for my database. I've got to deploy it. What am I going to do about my authentication service? So, I got to buy this vendor's, you know, solution, et cetera.” And so, all that stuff just goes away in the world of cloud, so it's just not practical, in this day and age I think, to think about really building a business that's not cloud-native from the beginning.Corey: I really want to thank you for spending so much time talking to me about how you view the industry, the evolution we've seen in the Java ecosystem, and what you've been up to. If people want to learn more, where's the best place for them to find you?Scott: Well, there's a thing called a website that you may not have heard of, it's really cool.Corey: Can I build it in Java?Scott: W-W-dot—[laugh]. Yeah. Azul website obviously has an awful lot of information about that, Azul is spelled A-Z-U-L, and we sometimes get the question, “How in the world did you name a company—why did you name it Azul?”And it's kind of a funny story because back in the days of Azul when we thought about, hey, we want to be big and successful, and at the time, IBM was the gold standard in terms of success in the enterprise world. And you know, they were Big Blue, so we said, “Hey, we're going to be a little blue. Let's be Azul.” So, that's where we began. So obviously, go check out our site.We're very present, also, in the Java community. We're, you know, many developer conferences and talks. We sponsor and run many of what's called the Java User Groups, which are very popular 10-, 20-person meetups that happen around the globe on a regular basis. And so, you know, come check us out. And I appreciate everyone's time in listening to the podcast today.Corey: No, thank you very much for spending as much time with me as you have. It's appreciated.Scott: Thanks, Corey.Corey: Scott Sellers, CEO and co-founder of Azul. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an entire copy of the terms and conditions from Oracle's version of the JDK.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Low Mein's Asylum Show
Welcome Back to The Dark Ages!

Low Mein's Asylum Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2022 15:15


Welcome Back to The Dark Ages! by Low Mein

Daishi X Curiosity Daily
Dark Ages vs the Enlightenment, the gradual social and technological changes contrasted with the Industrial Revolution as an artificial

Daishi X Curiosity Daily

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 19, 2022 5:21


The Batsquatch Podcast.
Episode 141 - We are living in the past/Dark Ages, The Kali Yuga is Over.

The Batsquatch Podcast.

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2022 59:50


This episode goes through some crazy

The Code-X Station
Dark Ages Full Story

The Code-X Station

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 77:30


Dark Ages in its entirety! We are LIVE every Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday on Twitch for the Podcast, Breaking the Code, Code-X After Dark, and Code-X Gaming! Click the link below to join the fun! https://www.twitch.tv/thecodexstation

Boston Bros Show
Episode 52 | The Dark Ages

Boston Bros Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 80:53


The Bros are back is discuss whether the Patriots as a franchise have entered the Dark Ages, If the Celtics should sign Carmelo Anthony, Robert Sarver and much more. Enjoy!

The Code-X Station
Code-X Podcast Episode 45: "Giant Freakin' Robot" Dark Ages Review

The Code-X Station

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 64:12


Comic News: Oscar Isaac's "Head Wounds: Sparrow" Rumor/Jason Statham To Join MCU RIP George Perez Our Works SK's "For The Man Who Has Everything" Episode 3: The End Of The World - https://www.wattpad.com/1220275632-for-the-man-who-has-everything-episode-3-the-end Topic Of The Week: "Who In Your Opinion Is The Best New Character Introduced In The Last 10 Years?" Do You Know? Review: Dark Ages

Battle Royale: French Monarchs

Our seventh Louis, called Louis the Young, is overshadowed by practically everyone around him (his dad, his wife, his vassals, his friends, his enemies... the list goes on). But as times go, the middle of the 12th Century was certainly an interesting one. In this episode, once Louis VII gets back from his disastrous crusade and finally splits with Eleanor of Aquitaine, we witness the end of the English Anarchy in the north, the Rise of the Angevin Empire just to the west, and the looming presence of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa just to the east. How well can our pious, pliant and prudish donkey Louis hold onto his father's hard-won possessions in the face of such threats? Is the zealous Thomas Becket the key to bringing down those pesky Angevins? And what role will the ever-present Blois faction have in finally getting Louis the heir for whom he has prayed in vain?Find out this week!Visit our Wordpress for episode images, score summaries, contact details and more! Make sure you leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen!You can also support the show on:Ko-Fi, where you can buy us a coffee and contribute a small amount to the show. Patreon, where you can join the official Angry Mob and get access to our bonus content: movie reviews, deep dives and bonus judgements!

The Steve Gruber Show
Steve Gruber, Energy, it is front and center and it is at the heart of the battle for freedom around the world

The Steve Gruber Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 11:00


Live from the no panic zone—I'm Steve Gruber—I am America's Voice— I am a radical MAGA American extremist— AND I have heard enough! The radical Green New Dealers and those that think your gender is determined by the pants you wear or the color of your hair—are done here—we will prevail!   Here are three big things you need to know right now— ONE— Radical far left Oberlin College in Ohio is prepping to pay $36 Million in damages to a local family owned bakery—falsely accused of being racist in a shop-lifting incident— TWO— The funeral for Queen Elizabeth the Second is now just days away—and the nation is in mourning for the 96 year old Sovereign who died Friday—King Charles the Third is now head of The Royal Family— THREE— Energy—it is front and center and it is at the heart of the battle for freedom around the world—are we going to bend over and take it—are we going to allow governments around the world—including the American Government—to hide behind the smokescreen of regulations and use it as a weapon against your ability to drive a car—to own a boat—a snowmobile or anything else you fancy—   The U-K's new Prime Minister was the first to hit back hard against the fantasy—yes fantasy that somehow sending Western Civilization back to the Dark Ages by pulling the plug of Hydro-Carbons—that they love to call Fossil Fuels—is the only way to save us all from certain doom in just a few years—   Liz Truss on her first day as Prime Minister—ended the nations ban on Fracking—that will open up the flow of natural gas to address the energy crisis impacting all of Europe—   Other countries as we have been talking about—like Germany, France and numerous others are also rejecting the globalist attack on Freedom that was unleashed by trying to choke off reliable energy sources—including oil, natural gas and coal—   Germany and France are leading the way in re-opening or building brand new nuclear power plants to drive prices down by creating tremendous supply—and that is now spreading to America—   In fact something remarkable happened in Michigan that you may not have heard about—Governor Gretchen Whitmer who has been a leader in the war on domestic energy—has also reversed course and is now working to re-open the Pallisades Nuclear Power plant that was shut down a few weeks ago—years ahead of it needing to—   The political and scientific reality is even setting in for far left politicians in some very blue places—BUT—there seems to be a war going on—not just between Red and Blue—but inside the Democrat Party—over a host of the most radical policies—   But I don't think you should take one very sensible move by one far-left Governor as a sign that Bernie Sanders and the 4 Horsemen of the American Energy Apocalypse are going to dismount from the attack any time soon—because they are not—   They have drawn their swords and they are looking to take away your energy freedom—in the ongoing darkening of America—even as Europe begins to light the way to a better future—  

Let's be friends
The History of Magic with Jenny Mire

Let's be friends

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 9:48


The History of Magic with Jenny MireWelcome back to the Let's be friends podcast for our first bonus episode, The History of Magic, with fan favorite Jenny Mire.  Jenny is a warrior for God, a modern-day decretive unraveling his truth. She is also a wife, mother of 3, fitness and nutrition expert, and podcaster. She is the host of The Rooted Truth with Jenny Mire (of which I have been a guest). She talks about real life, God's daily grace, and following Jesus through it all.In this episode, we go through the historical timeline of magic and how it has taken over our world today. We discuss God's thoughts on magic, giving you a greater understanding of why he never wanted us to eat from the tree of knowledge, a tree full of magic and deception.  We discuss Egyptian Magic, Revelation 21:8, Noah and the flood, the danger of idolatry, Cup and Balls performance, Babylon Working, why there is no difference between white and black magic, the Dark Ages, Bullet Catch, Birth of Horus, RH negative blood types, Thelema's Æon of Horus, John Dee, The Occult Symbolism of Washington DC and so much more!Listen to this Bonus Episode by joining the Friendship Membership:Members get access to a fancy members-only websiteTons of behind-the-scenes videos of interviews and eventsTwo bonus episodes a monthMonthly friendship zoom hangoutAccess the Friendship library with exciting articles, episode notes, and all things censored  Sign up today and help keep the show running for only $8 a month!Become a member at www.letsbefriendspodcast.comFind guest Jenny Mire at www.jennymire.com

The Richard Syrett Show
The Richard Syrett Show - Sep 9, 2022 - "Dark Ages" Returning to Europe, Net-Zero Healthcare Slippery Slope, & "Something's Happening Here"

The Richard Syrett Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 9, 2022 80:27


Today on the Richard Syrett Show: Harry Hutchison senior counsel and director of policy for the American Center for Law and Justice talks about the fear surrounding the ‘dark ages' returning to Europe. Chris Geratano The Sofa Cinefile discusses the movie They Live & then the LimRiddler gives you this week's riddle. Host of “The Gunn Show”, Sheila Gunn Reid explains how the push for net-zero healthcare is a slippery slope. “Somethings Happening Here” with host of the Greg Carrasco Show, Greg Carrasco.

Jay Sekulow Live Radio Show
Energy Collapse: Dark Ages Ahead?

Jay Sekulow Live Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 50:58 Very Popular


America and Europe face a major energy crisis. European reliance on Russian oil backfired when Russia invaded Ukraine back in February. European leaders were faced with the decision to either continue buying energy from Russia and essentially funding Putin's war effort or to refuse the Kremlin's energy and allow their respective countries to face a major energy crisis. Meanwhile, the Biden Administration's insistence on hampering American energy production has put the United States in no position to help the desperate nations of Europe. In fact, the U.S. faces serious questions about how we'll sustain our own energy needs. Jay, Jordan, and the Sekulow team discuss this and more today on Sekulow.

Wine, Women and Words
"Dark Earth" with Rebecca Stott

Wine, Women and Words

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2022 31:00


Author Rebecca Stott joins us to discuss her latest novel, "Dark Eart" set during the Dark Ages in Londinium, the Roman settlement in Britain. We nerd out on research (of course) and archaeology, the brooch that inspired the novel, the meaning behind the title and much more.  Be sure to check out our shop on Bookshop.org to be able to help support independent bookstores and this podcast. You can find  "Dark Earth" under 'Featured Books' and our September title, "The Hidden Palace" by Helene Wecker in our 'Book of the Month' shop.

Destiny 2 - Myths and Ztories
Destiny 2 Myths and Ztories - A Man with No Name (Story of the Drifter Pt.1)

Destiny 2 - Myths and Ztories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 115:31


The first episode in our series about the Drifter and his time in the wild west of the Dark Ages.   References (In order of reading):   Heaven or Hell (A Man with No Name Lore Book) Dogma (A Man with No Name Lore Book) 21% Delirium (Legendary Weapon) Home Pt1 (A Man with No Name Lore Book) Home Pt2 (A Man with No Name Lore Book) Home Pt3 (A Man with No Name Lore Book) Home Pt4 (A Man with No Name Lore Book) Loose Ends Pt1 (A Man with No Name Lore Book) Loose Ends Pt2 (A Man with No Name Lore Book) Loose Ends Pt3 (A Man with No Name Lore Book) Sunbreak Mark (Legendary Armor) Synesthesia (Ecdysis Lore Book) Illicit Reaper Mark (Legendary Armor)   Follow us on Twitter @mythsandztories to get updates on new episodes!

Astro arXiv | all categories
How to Deploy a 10-km Interferometric Radio Telescope on the Moon with Just Four Tethered Robots

Astro arXiv | all categories

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 1:00


How to Deploy a 10-km Interferometric Radio Telescope on the Moon with Just Four Tethered Robots by Patrick McGarey et al. on Tuesday 06 September The Far-side Array for Radio Science Investigations of the Dark ages and Exoplanets (FARSIDE) is a proposed mission concept to the lunar far side that seeks to deploy and operate an array of 128 dual-polarization, dipole antennas over a region of 100 square kilometers. The resulting interferometric radio telescope would provide unprecedented radio images of distant star systems, allowing for the investigation of faint radio signatures of coronal mass ejections and energetic particle events and could also lead to the detection of magnetospheres around exoplanets within their parent star's habitable zone. Simultaneously, FARSIDE would also measure the "Dark Ages" of the early Universe at a global 21-cm signal across a range of red shifts (z approximately 50-100). Each discrete antenna node in the array is connected to a central hub (located at the lander) via a communication and power tether. Nodes are driven by cold=operable electronics that continuously monitor an extremely wide-band of frequencies (200 kHz to 40 MHz), which surpass the capabilities of Earth-based telescopes by two orders of magnitude. Achieving this ground-breaking capability requires a robust deployment strategy on the lunar surface, which is feasible with existing, high TRL technologies (demonstrated or under active development) and is capable of delivery to the surface on next-generation commercial landers, such as Blue Origin's Blue Moon Lander. This paper presents an antenna packaging, placement, and surface deployment trade study that leverages recent advances in tethered mobile robots under development at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which are used to deploy a flat, antenna-embedded, tape tether with optical communication and power transmission capabilities. arXiv: http://arxiv.org/abs/http://arxiv.org/abs/2209.02216v1

The Health Ranger Report
Situation Update, Sep 1, 2022 - The engineered TAKEDOWN of food, water and energy infrastructure will plunge entire nations into the Dark Ages

The Health Ranger Report

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 107:56 Very Popular


0:00 Intro 1:00 Zoo Story 15:35 Better News 17:20 Vaccinated Demons 41:30 Patrick Wood 1:14:50 Water Crisis 1:19:25 Energy Shortage 1:32:10 Food Takedowns 1:34:25 Mad Max Scenario For more updates, visit: http://www.brighteon.com/channel/hrreport NaturalNews videos would not be possible without you, as always we remain passionately dedicated to our mission of educating people all over the world on the subject of natural healing remedies and personal liberty (food freedom, medical freedom, the freedom of speech, etc.). Together, we're helping create a better world, with more honest food labeling, reduced chemical contamination, the avoidance of toxic heavy metals and vastly increased scientific transparency. ▶️ Every dollar you spend at the Health Ranger Store goes toward helping us achieve important science and content goals for humanity: https://www.healthrangerstore.com/ ▶️ Sign Up For Our Newsletter: https://www.naturalnews.com/Readerregistration.html ▶️ Brighteon: https://www.brighteon.com/channels/hrreport ▶️ Join Our Social Network: https://brighteon.social/@HealthRanger ▶️ Check In Stock Products at: https://PrepWithMike.com

Battle Royale: French Monarchs
34.5 - Eleanor of Aquitaine

Battle Royale: French Monarchs

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2022 124:27


Our most anticipated episode for some time has finally arrived! In this episode, we examine Eleanor's life outside of the English perspective through which she is too often seen. We mainly look at her relationship with her first husband Louis VII and her role as Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right.Is Eleanor truly great enough to sit among our VIPs to watch the final tournament? How many of our kings will she put to shame with her score?Visit our Wordpress for episode images, score summaries, contact details and more! Make sure you leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen! You can also support the show on: Ko-Fi, where you can buy us a coffee and contribute a small amount to the show. Patreon, where you can join the official Angry Mob and get access to our bonus content: movie reviews, deep dives and bonus judgements! 

Little Light Studios
08. Why You Need to Understand the Reformation

Little Light Studios

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 46:03


Martin Luther, Zwingli, the Waldenses; some of us are very familiar with the reformation that happened during the Dark Ages. Others don't have a clue about what we're talking about. But, it might well be of the most important events in Christian history. In today's episode Adam Ramdin, host of the YouTube show Lineage Journey, gives you an overview of the reformation, and what kind of an impact it has on your faith today.

Anything But a One! Adventures in Historical Miniature Wargaming

Welcome to Season 3! Today we discuss gaming  and research in periods where written records are hard to come by.Support the show

Sword in Hand-Bible Believing Preaching!
Preaching Revelation Chapter 2-The Dark Ages

Sword in Hand-Bible Believing Preaching!

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 44:47


Preached at Indian Gap Baptist Church-- Indian Gap, Texas www.indiangapbaptist.com Pastor Keegan Hall

StarTalk Radio
Things You Thought You Knew - Timeline of the Universe

StarTalk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 46:32 Very Popular


How far back in the universe's timeline can the JWST see? Neil deGrasse Tyson and co-hosts Chuck Nice and Gary O'Reilly explore the Coriolis Effect, hurricanes, the gridiron timeline of the universe, the physics of spinning objects, and much more!NOTE: StarTalk+ Patrons can watch or listen to this entire episode commercial-free here: https://startalkmedia.com/show/things-you-thought-you-knew-timeline-of-the-universe/Photo Credit: NASA/GSFC, MODIS Rapid Response Team, Jacques Descloitres, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Cult Connections
Britannia Maneira

Cult Connections

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 62:53


Ian is joined by his favourite Brazilian, Raphe Ximenes, to discuss her favourite British films. From the Dark Ages to Leith via Jane Austen country it's a voyage through the cultural landscape of the UK. Music is by Josh Wilson at Joshuawilsongnv.com

World of Dark Ages Podcast
State of the Clans

World of Dark Ages Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 19, 2022 22:14


What is the state of the 13 clans in the Dark Ages setting. * Link to The World of RPGs: https://letscast.fm/podcasts/the-world-of-rpgs-84187839/feed?fbclid=IwAR1vWliYqQK4BVS4n0WsakBPHyvRpIdhyrwwT7tRR7TLgipXdOFtixbk0jA * Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/WoDarkAges * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/725170861612795 * New Hero In Town by Kevin MacLeodLink: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5742-new-hero-in-townLicense: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

A Short Walk through Our Long History
Episode 30 - The Vikings!

A Short Walk through Our Long History

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2022 17:15


Last episode, we talked about the Charles the Hammer and his son Charlemagne, and the Carolingian renaissance in France and western Europe. After Charley and Charley were gone, though, Europe settled back into a period of relative darkness, without much central control. There wasn't really one dominant power in any part of Europe, and partly because of this, the Dark Ages was a time when a lot of different groups were moving to new places in Europe, conquering and being conquered. Some of these tribes, the sea-borne ones, were known as Vikings.

Battle Royale: French Monarchs

Louis the Fat was so much more than an unflattering nickname. He owes a lot to his chronicler and best bro Suger for building his reputation as the first truly great Capetian king. But is that a reputation he lives up to? Find out this episode...Visit our Wordpress for episode images, score summaries, contact details and more! Make sure you leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen!You can also support the show on:Ko-Fi, where you can buy us a coffee and contribute a small amount to the show. Patreon, where you can join the official Angry Mob and get access to our bonus content: movie reviews, deep dives and bonus judgements!

First Print - Podcast comics de référence
Dark Ages, Far Sector, November, Shadowman, Fantastic Four, Rorschach et Swamp Thing Infinite : les lectures VF de l'été ! [Back Issues VF]

First Print - Podcast comics de référence

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2022 79:00


Vous vous apprêtez à prendre un peu de repos ? Ou profiter tout simplement d'un weekend pour aller lire des comics ? A moins que vous ne sachiez pas quoi vous prendre dans un prochain passage en librairie ou bibliothèque ? Nous volons donc à votre secours avec cette nouvelle édition des Back Issues, pour vous faire un petit tour de quelques nouveautés comics VF sorties récemment ! En route !  Des comics VF pour accompagner votre été !  Au programme, quelques titres de super-héros façon "carte blanche d'auteur" pour Marvel avec Dark Ages ou Fantastic Four : l'Histoire d'une Vie chez Panini Comics, du polar cosmique (Far Sector) ou ancré dans l'univers de Watchmen (Rorschach), du pur polar indé (November), de l'horreur (Shadowman) avec une touche d'écologie (Swamp Thing) - de quoi vous faire passer quelques heures en générale bonne compagnie, avec le concours de nos éditeurs français qu'on aime bien. N'hésitez pas à nous dire si vous avez lu l'un ou l'autre de ces titres ou, au contraire, vers quoi se sont portés vos choix récents !   Si vous appréciez le travail que représente nos podcasts, alors vous pouvez le faire savoir très simplement, en partageant nos émissions sur les réseaux sociaux, afin de faire découvrir First Print, mais aussi tous les albums chroniqués (et donc participer à faire découvrir les équipes créatives qui se cachent derrière) ! Merci de votre écoute et à bientôt pour le prochain podcast !  Le Programme  Les liens vous renvoient chez notre partenaire Comics Zone. Une commande chez eux marquera votre soutien à un libraire indépendant, et nous filera aussi un petit coup de pouce !  Dark Ages - 01:30 Far Sector - 13:50 November Tome 1 - 27:20 Swamp Thing Infinite T1 - 37:05 Fantastic Four : l'Histoire d'une Vie - 44:00 Rorschach - 55:12 Shadowman T1 - 1:07:43  --  Soutenez First Print - Podcast Comics de Référence sur Tipeee

Overly Sarcastic Podcast
OSPod Episode 49: the Dark Ages, Trojan War, and Our Lord and Savior Iron Man (feat. Jenny Nicholson)

Overly Sarcastic Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 73:13 Very Popular


Special guest Jenny Nicholson joins the pod to chat Trojan War, The Dark Ages, and trick Red and Blue into revealing their fatal weaknesses! We decide on the overlooked Star Wars cameo and more in another thrilling installment of the Overly Sarcastic Podcast. Our podcast, like our videos, sometimes touches on the violence, assaults, and murders your English required reading list loves (also we curse sometimes). Treat us like a TV-14 show.Where to find Jenny: YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/c/JennyNicholsonOSP has new videos every Friday:https://www.youtube.com/c/OverlySarcasticProductionsChannelQuestion for the Podcast? Head to the #ask-ospod discord channel:https://discord.gg/OSPMerch:https://www.redbubble.com/people/ospyoutube/shopFollow Us:Patreon.com/OSPTwitter.com/OSPyoutubeTwitter.com/sophie_kay_ ★ Support this podcast on Patreon ★

Into the Darkness
205 Eseweald, version 1 - Call of Cthulhu RPG

Into the Darkness

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 6, 2022 149:36


The Secular Foxhole
Shouldn't You Really Know Better After All This Time?

The Secular Foxhole

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2022 39:19 Transcription Available


We will see who the anti-Aristotelians are and that they are anti-life and anti-happiness. Thus they are responsible for these tragedies across the past 2500 years. Do you want to be motivated by Love, or motivated by Fear. Listen and decide. Call-to-Action: After you have listened to this episode, add your $0.02 (two cents) to the conversation, by joining (for free) https://secular-foxhole.haaartland.com/ (The Secular Foxhole Town Hall). Feel free to introduce yourself to the other members, discuss the different episodes, give us constructive feedback, or check out the virtual room, Speakers' Corner, and step up on the digital soapbox. Welcome to our new place in cyberspace! Show notes with links to articles, blog posts, products and services: https://the-secular-foxhole.captivate.fm/episode/andy-clarkson-on-exalted-moments (Andy Clarkson on Exalted Moments) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeoGqmWTaRTKLitJAUA8sQA (The Six-Point Pattern Of The Anti-Aristotelians) https://www.amazon.com/Impact-Aristotle-Christian-Islamic-Cultures/dp/154123765X/ (The Impact Of Aristotle Upon Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Cultures) (book) https://www.facebook.com/groups/134367963254180 (The Impact Of Aristotle Upon Christian, Islamic, and Jewish Cultures )(Facebook) https://the-secular-foxhole.captivate.fm/episode/dont-bite-into-the-jordan-peterson-marshmallow (Don't Bite Into the Jordan Peterson Marshmallow) https://the-secular-foxhole.captivate.fm/episode/back-to-the-dark-ages-with-dennis-prager (Back to the Dark Ages with Dennis Prager) http://aynrandlexicon.com/lexicon/aristotle.html (Ayn Rand Lexicon: Aristotle) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Haskalah (Haskalah) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reform_Judaism (Reform Movement in Israel) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plymouth_Rock (Plymouth Rock) https://alexepstein.com/fossilfuture (Fossil Future by Alex Epstein) https://twitter.com/1JakeHider (Jake Hider) https://fountain.fm (Fountain app) https://fountain.fm/secularfoxhole (Blair on Fountain) https://fountain.fm/lyceum (Martin on Fountain) Episode 53 (39 minutes) was recorded at 10 PM CET, on July 30, 2022, with https://ringr.com/ego (Ringr app).. Editing and post-production was done with the https://alitu.com/?fp_ref=egonetcast (podcast maker, Alitu).  https://the-secular-foxhole.captivate.fm/listen (Easy listen to The Secular Foxhole podcast) in your https://podnews.net/podcast/i9d1q/all (podcast (podcatcher) app) of choice, e.g., https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/the-secular-foxhole/id1529242825 (Apple Podcasts), https://open.spotify.com/show/2OZNzkrzItT4zmDpc8TdqO (Spotify), https://podcasts.google.com/feed/aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5jYXB0aXZhdGUuZm0vdGhlLXNlY3VsYXItZm94aG9sZS8?sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwif28Kq4IjsAhVK0IUKHbQpAREQ4aUDegQIARAC&hl=sv (Google Podcasts), https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/36c65af3-3a05-48fc-90b2-a60bc245d918/the-secular-foxhole (Amazon Music), https://gaana.com/podcast/the-secular-foxhole-season-1 (Gaana), https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/the-secular-foxhole-blair-schofield-and-0AFTLgs42OW/ (Listen Notes), or one of the http://newpodcastapps.com/ (new podcast apps), onhttps://podcastindex.org/podcast/1064830 ( Podcast Index), supporting the https://medium.com/@everywheretrip/an-introduction-to-podcasting-2-0-3c4f61ea17f4 (Podcasting 2.0) initiative, and http://value4value.io/ (Value for Value) by streaming https://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/satoshi.asp (Satoshis) (Bitcoin payments). Oscar Merry is ahead of the game, with his https://podcastbusinessjournal.com/app-making-bitcoin-payments-easier/ (Fountain app). Make a https://www.fountain.fm/blog/how-to-top-up-your-fountain-wallet-with-bitcoin (micropayment transaction) with the new https://play.fountain.fm/show/tAMgIwWrYj20GkK7x48m (podcast app, Fountain). You could also listen to our podcast on our own...

Gone Medieval
When War Veterans Excavate the Anglo-Saxons

Gone Medieval

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 27:26 Very Popular


Archaeology has a lot to contribute to our knowledge and understanding of the so-called Dark Ages, and every now and then new sites are found in places where we previously knew nothing about the people who once lived there.In today's Gone Medieval, Dr. Cat Jarman goes to the Ministry of Defence land on Salisbury Plain to visit precisely one such site. There she meets Richard Osgood, senior archaeologist for the MoD who is excavating a seventh-century cemetery as part of Operation Nightingale which gives excavation opportunities to injured service personnel and veterans as part of their rehabilitation.The Senior Producer on this episode was Elena Guthrie. It was edited by Seyi AdaobI and produced by Rob Weinberg.For more Gone Medieval content, subscribe to our Medieval Mondays newsletter here.If you'd like to learn even more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts, and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download, go to Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Classic Audiobook Collection
Metaphysics by Aristotle ~ Full Audiobook

Classic Audiobook Collection

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 1023:22


Metaphysics by Aristotle audiobook. Metaphysics (Ancient Greek: ΜΕΤΑ ΤΑ ΦΥΣΙΚΑ; Latin: METAPHYSICA; English: After the Physics) discusses topics including substance, accident, causation and God. The text was lost in Western Europe during the Dark Ages.

Battle Royale: French Monarchs

King Philip the Amorous got his name for following his heart rather than his head, which of course got him into big trouble with the church. The chronicler monks (often from rival principalities) got carte-blanche to drag him through the mud more ruthlessly than Regina George could have dreamed of (Mean GIrls is required viewing for this podcast, by the way). But there was no stopping Philip, who kept France chugging along, out of the turmoil of the Dark Ages and towards brand new dangers: the Norman Conquest of England, the First Crusade and the ever-present threat of the Pope's righteous wrath.Visit our Wordpress for episode images, score summaries, contact details and more! Make sure you leave us a review on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen!You can also support the show on:Ko-Fi, where you can buy us a coffee and contribute a small amount to the show. Patreon, where you can join the official Angry Mob and get access to our bonus content: movie reviews, deep dives and bonus judgements!

Know Thyself History Podcast
HBH 36: The Greek Dark Ages, The Archaic Age, and Thales the Wise

Know Thyself History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2022 47:18


In this episode we begin a series on the beginnings of "Western" thought and science. We start with the catastrophy of the Mycenean Collapse, the Greek Dark Ages, and the Archaic Age, then continue with a discussion of Miletus and its most revered citizen, Thales. Thales has left his mark on the planet with his work. As a brilliant sage whose ideas were the beginnings of science, he helped set a trajectory for all future generations of philosophers and scientists.     

Tales To Terrify
Tales to Terrify 548 Christi Nogle & Taija Morgan

Tales To Terrify

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 50:56 Very Popular


Welcome to episode 548. We begin this week with the true story of a woman's enthralling thrift store discovery. Then, a dying man tries to prove that there is nothing he can't fix.COMING UPGood Evening: summer reads, submissions & thank yous: 00:01:06Christi Nogle's Threads Like Wire, Like Vine as read by Maurine McLean: 00:07:42Taija Morgan's Eat Your Rage as read by Alex Weinle: 00:26:40PERTINENT LINKSSupport us on Patreon! Spread the darkness.Shop Tales to Terrify MerchHowls from the Dark AgesHowls from the Dark Ages on AmazonLycan: Solomon's Odyssey | Hive Head StudiosSubmissionsChristi NogleChristi Nogle on Twitter (@christinogle)Original Score by Nebulus EntertainmentNebulus on FacebookNebulus on InstagramSPECIAL THANKS TOAmanda GottfriedKathy RobinsonSupport this show http://supporter.acast.com/talestoterrify. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

The backyardphilosophy’s Podcast
Society Collapsing Into The New Dark Ages

The backyardphilosophy’s Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2022 74:04


Out of the pan straight into the fire! It seems as of late that the world is coming to the end and apocalypses is upon us. Which begs the question how did the first dark ages start? And more importantly how did they get out of the dark ages? Join Mike and Nick as they discuss overlap between the dark ages and modern times, how Europe fell into darkness and how they made it out of one of the worst periods of time. And perhaps ways to prevent and leave a new dark medieval ages that may be coming.

Death Inc.
Season Finale // The Dark Ages

Death Inc.

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 13:48


The dramatic conclusion of season one. Guest musician: lone, the ghost. Starring: Evan Shwartz, Joy Ireland, and introducing Jason Williams as FAX. Narrated by Helena Reed. Want more dystopian ear candy? Check out M.P. Fitzgerald's audiobook-podcast "A Happy Bureaucracy" --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/deathinc/message

FUMS: Giving Multiple Sclerosis The Finger
FUMS 111 - The Owner's Manual for MS with Author Debbie Petrina

FUMS: Giving Multiple Sclerosis The Finger

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 30:45


I don't know about you, but when I was diagnosed with MS my medical care team couldn't answer all of my questions. Although, to be honest, the stress and cog fog meant that I forgot most of the questions I wanted to ask anyway. And the pamphlets that were forced on me just didn't cut it. What I really needed was an operator's manual. But that doesn't exist, right?Well…Over the past four decades, Debbie Petrina has lived with MS and spoken to thousands of people in the MS community - via social media, as a trained peer counselor, and as a participant in numerous MS-related events.She is the author of "Managing MS: A Roadmap to Navigate MS", a practical, easy-to-read handbook about understanding and managing MS. Informative and inspiring, it offers guidance and tips on a wide array of topics, including symptoms, people management, and long-term disability. The book is written for anyone who is interested in learning about MS and managing it effectively.With a newly-edited and expanded second edition, Debbie is here to talk about her MS journey, her long history of advocacy, and what is inside this amazing resource! Topics covered in this episode include:Debbie's experience of being diagnosed with MS in the "Dark Ages" of the 1980sHow peer counseling became Debbie's support network AND her jobWhy Debbie concentrates on lifestyle and wellness to manage her MSThe reasons why Debbie decided to write her book, "Managing MS: A Roadmap to Navigate Multiple Sclerosis"Full show notes and resources at https://fumsnow.com/fums111/See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Renegade Talk Radio
Episode 4239: TERRORISTS’ FORGOTTEN WOMEN & CHILDREN

Renegade Talk Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 47:13


Women and children in terrorist lands are ‘Prisoners of War'. In Syria, they've become a breeding ground, a ticking time bomb, and in Afghanistan, they are being forced back into the dark ages under the Taliban. First, we look at the refugee camps and prisons in Syria, where the children of ISIS brides are growing older every day. The brutal conditions and their moms, some ofwhom are still ‘wed' to ISIS ideology, are causing them to become radicalized. Indeed, some of these males have hadto be transferred to prisons for ISIS fighters because of how violent they have already become - further radicalizing them into ‘ISIS 2.0'.Next, you will hear the heart-wrenching story of YusufZahab, an Australian boy, whose elder brother, an ISIS recruiter, brought the family to the Middle East to become terrorists. Yusuf, only 11 years old when he was drafted, got separated from his mother and siblings, ending up in prison. When ISIS attacked the prison to free former members, Yusuf was injured and recently died. You will hear the messages he managed to get out to family left in Australia, begging for help, describing conditions in the prison and conveying his last words through tears. Lastly, we go to Afghanistan, where, though the Taliban had promised to treat women well, they broke their promise as soon as American troops were hastily pulled out in a debacle that continues to endanger - not only Afghans - but America. You will hear women's stories of how their life has drastically changed and forced them back into hijabs, burqas, child marriages and dank basements. 

The Museum Camp
#85 - Our Own Personal Boo Boxes (The Museum of Medieval Torture)

The Museum Camp

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2022 56:19


This episode is not for the faint of heart! Today Meghan takes us to St. Augustine, Florida where we step back into the Dark Ages at the Museum of Medieval Torture. ***Content warning: descriptions of a variety of methods of torture, take care when/if listening***

Battle Royale: French Monarchs
32.5 - Anne of Kyiv

Battle Royale: French Monarchs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2022 65:02


She may now be a symbol of friendship between France and Ukraine, but who was the real Anne of Kyiv?In 1060, the sophisticated and gentlehearted Anne of Kyiv finds herself a widowed queen in a strange land. She has a duty to rule in her son Philip's name, yet she is tempted into a potential scandal by the infamous Ralph of Crépy. Find out what becomes of this intriguing queen-regent, and what seating we give her in our final tournament.

The Holistic OBGYN Podcast
#72 - A (Brief-ish) History of Western Medicine, Witches, and Women Healers (Solo-Cast)

The Holistic OBGYN Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 15, 2022 132:45


If we aren't willing to study and learn from history, we are bound to repeat it…As far back as human written history can reflect, women have been in the healing professions. When our cosmologies reflected the dignity of the feminine, women healers may have even ruled the space. When men began to understand their role in procreation, these cosmologies shifted to a patriarchal, masculine worldview, which is intact today. This shift is cosmologies and growing interest in power by the State, created an environment in which women were progressively devalued. And their magick was trasnsmutated culturally from a source of healing to a source of perceived threat to the Church, State, and the ruling white, upper classes. This solo cast takes you on a journey from Ancient Sumer to our modern industrial complex. Spoiler: things are not going well in our society. As women and healers are devalued, societies decline. This is not speculation; it's written history. [00:07:00] - Early creation myths and ancient Sumer, Greece, and Rome [00:29:00] - Early Christianity and the Dark Ages [00:37:00] - Hildegard von Bingen [00:40:00] - The war against nature was a war against the feminine [00:47:00] - The Witch hunts [01:02:00] - 18th century and the Renaissance [01:15:15] - “Regular” doctors and the movement of healing to hospitals [01:19:15] - The Popular Health Movement [01:30:00] - Germ theory [01:35:00] - The birth of the nursing profession and the father of gynecology [02:02:00] - The AMA and the Flexner Report [02:13:00] - Current stats on US maternity care and practitioners References (just a sampling): Woman as Healer, by Jeanne Achterberg The Butchering Art: Joseph Lister's Quest to Transform the Grisly World of Victorian Medicine, by Lindsey Fitzharris Cesarean Section: An American History of Risk, Technology, and Consequence, by Jacqueline Wolf, PhD Witches, Midwives, and Nurses: A History of Women Healers, by Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English https://history-of-obgyn.com/uploads/3/5/4/8/35483599/1966-kobrin-american-midwife-controversy-rev-dec2015.pdf Find me on Instagram @nathanrileyobgyn and my practice at: www.BelovedHolistics.com Sponsored by: FullWell Fertility - Use code BELOVED10 for 10% off the best prenatal vitamin on the market (and check out their vitality and nerve support tonic!) Fit for Birth - With this link, you'll save 20% on personal prenatal exercise coaching (for individuals) or courses to improve your coaching practice (for coaches)! Music by: Labrinth and Preservation Hall Jazz Band --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/theholisticobgyn/message

Dan Snow's History Hit
The 'Dark Ages' with Michael Wood

Dan Snow's History Hit

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2022 26:08 Very Popular


Lasting 900 years, the ‘Dark Ages' were between the 5th and 14th centuries, falling between the fall of the Roman Empire and the Renaissance. Today's guest overturns preconceptions of the ‘Dark Ages' as a shadowy and brutal era, showing them to be a richly exciting and formative period in the history of Britain.For more than 40 years, historian and broadcaster Michael Wood has made compelling journeys into the past, which have brought history alive for a generation. Michael joins Dan on the podcast for the 40th anniversary of his ‘In Search of the Dark Ages' - an unrivalled exploration of the origins of English identity.Alongside portraits of Boadicea, King Arthur, Alfred the Great, Athelstan, and William the Conqueror, the story of England is expanded further to include new voices on fascinating characters such as Penda of Mercia, Aethelflaed Lady of the Mercians, Hadrian the African, Eadgyth of England, and Wynflaed.If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit - subscribe today! To download the History Hit app please go to the Android or Apple store. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Tara Brach
Navigating the Dark Ages

Tara Brach

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 7, 2022 43:43 Very Popular


Navigating the Dark Ages - How do we process and respond to increasing societal oppression and violence? What helps us transform the energies of fear, hatred and delusion? This talk offers ways we can draw on our spiritual path to steady our heart and engage with presence, wisdom and care.

TARABUSTER with Tara Devlin
TARABUSTER Weekday: From The New Gilded Age to the New Dark Ages (featuring Ron Placone)

TARABUSTER with Tara Devlin

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 173:41


Another day in the United States of Serfs and Lords. Neil Gorsuch 'Misconstrues The Facts' In School Prayer Case Both Big Tech and its opponents are focusing on Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer Lauren Boebert is "tired" of all this "separation of church and state stuff" Nancy Pelosi reads a poem - again Kinzinger hits back at Boebert's church and state remarks: ‘We must oppose the Christian Taliban' Comedian Ron Placone calls in to discuss the madness _________ Keep sane in these "interesting times" - check out Mark Ciociola's "A Radical You." https://aradicalyou.com/ Frustrated enough about government policy to want to do something about it? Join "Shaping Progress," the organization founded by Tarabuster's millennial corresponded Mark Middlestaedt. Check out Shaping Progress here: https://linktr.ee/shapingprogress Subscribe to Mark's Shaping Progress show: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfP4yRO4CNM _________ Join Rokfin to access exclusive tarabuster content as well as Ron Placone, Lee Camp, and more! https://rokfin.com/tarabuster BECOME A "TARABUSTER" PATRON: www.patreon.com/taradevlin Join the Tarabuster community on Discord too!! https://discord.gg/PRYDBx8 Buy some Resistance Merch and help support our progressive work! http://tarabustermerch.com/ Donate to Tarabuster: https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/taradacktyl We discuss the madness. __________

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com
Monday, June 27, 2022

The Briefing - AlbertMohler.com

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 23:22 Very Popular


This is The Briefing, a daily analysis of news and events from a Christian worldview.Part I (00:13 - 09:45) ‘Horrific,' ‘Appalling,' and ‘A Big Step Backwards': World Leaders Respond to the Overturning of Roe v. Wade — Hypocrisy, Contradiction, and Cosmopolitan Liberalism on Display US Allies Express Dismay at 'Appalling' Supreme Court Decision to Scrap Abortion Rights by CNN (Rob Picheta and Arnaud Siad)Part II (09:45 - 16:29) ‘The Court Sends Women Back to the Dark Ages?' Hyperbolic Fallout from the Left over the Dobbs DecisionThe Radical Reign of Clarence Thomas by New York Times (Maureen Dowd)Part III (16:29 - 20:51) The Appointment of Conservative Justices and the Correction of Judicial Progressivism: The Political Legacies of Donald Trump and Mitch McConnellFor the Fall of Roe v. Wade, Thank Donald Trump by Washington Post (Marc A. Thiessen)Part IV (20:51 - 23:22) How Did the Dobbs Decision Come to Be?: The Unsung Heroes of the Pro-Life MovementSign up to receive The Briefing in your inbox every weekday morning.Follow Dr. Mohler:Twitter | Instagram | Facebook | YouTubeFor more information on The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, go to sbts.edu.For more information on Boyce College, just go to BoyceCollege.com.To write Dr. Mohler or submit a question for The Mailbox, go here.