Podcasts about Central Asia

Region of the Asian continent

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Best podcasts about Central Asia

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Latest podcast episodes about Central Asia

Carnegie Connects
How Russia Handles Western Sanctions With Polina Ivanova

Carnegie Connects

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 52:00


Russia's war against Ukraine continues with no end in sight. Almost a year into the conflict, one of the most intriguing questions is how Russia's economy has managed to stave off a destabilizing economic crisis in the face of unprecedented economic sanctions. How has the Russian economy survived? What has the impact of sanctions been on the Russian public? And can Russia continue to thwart international pressure to choke off the oil revenues that fuel the war effort in Ukraine?Aaron is joined by the Financial Times' Polina Ivanova, an investigative journalist who covers Russia, Ukraine, and Central Asia and has focused on how Russia's economy has learned to adapt over the last year. Want to listen to Carnegie Connects live? Visit our website to sign up for invitations.

Russian Roulette
Sanctions and the Russian Economy

Russian Roulette

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 60:06


After a long hiatus, Russian Roulette is back! For our first episode after our time away, listen in to a conversation Max and Maria recently had at CSIS in Washington, DC.  Following Russia's February 2022 invasion of Ukraine, The US, EU, and their partners imposed severe sanctions on the Russian economy. Sanctions of this scale and scope are unprecedented in recent history, and have major potential implications not just for the course of the war in Ukraine, but also for Russia's broader geopolitical position.  Max and Maria hosted held a wide-ranging conversation on this topic, and they were joined by our CSIS colleague and global energy market expert, Ben Cahill. Additionally, we welcomed Dr. Sergey Aleksashenko, a Russian economist and Member of the Board of the Boris Nemtsov Foundation for Freedom, and the Board of the Free Russia Foundation.  This event and podcast episode was made possible through the generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. 

Stratfor Podcast
Applied Geopolitics Central Asia's Geopolitical Challenges

Stratfor Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 36:10


In this episode of Applied Geopolitics from RANE, host Rodger Baker speaks to Dr. Kamran Bokhari, Director of Analytical Development at the New Lines Institute, who has just returned from a trip to Central Asia. They discuss how Central Asia is re-emerging as a key region for trans-Eurasian trade. But the landlocked Central Asian “Stans” sit in a complicated neighborhood, with a new sort of Great Game being played quietly among Russia, China, and more recently Turkey, with political and security uncertainty in nearby Afghanistan, and with a growing desire for additional outside investment to build on recent economic and transportation gains. RANE (Risk Assistance Network + Exchange) is a global risk intelligence company that provides risk and security professionals with access to critical insights, analysis, and support, enabling them to better anticipate, monitor, and respond to emerging risks and threats. RANE clients benefit from improved situational awareness, more efficient access to relevant intelligence and expertise, and better risk management outcomes. Join the millions who are tapping into the collective wisdom of the world's largest community of risk and business professionals. For more information about RANE, visit www.ranenetwork.com.#geopolitics #Afghanistan #Pakistan #CentralAsia geopolitics #riskmanagement

VOMRadio
MISSIONS: Taking the Gospel to the 4-in-10

VOMRadio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 24:59


Brother Harold served 15 years as a gospel worker among Muslims in Central Asia—where persecution of new Christian believers is common. For the past five years he has worked in the US to recruit, train and mobilize more workers into the world's spiritual harvest fields. Harold reminds us that four out of every ten people around the world have never heard the name of Jesus. What are we, as Christians, doing to shrink that number? Harold reminds us that God's Word clearly states that followers of Jesus are to be involved in the spreading of the gospel. He challenges every listener: Are you sending laborers into the harvest? Praying for the gospel to go out? Are you going? Harold will share a recent story where God allowed him to see the fruit of his family's labor in Central Asia—but also reminds us that we won't always see the fruit of our work, especially in the early years of gospel planting. He'll also encourage listeners that they can reach unreached nations right here in the US through immigrant communities. He'll share how he and his family have been able to bless Central Asian immigrants in their city—and how that has led to gospel opportunities. He says when Muslims come to faith in the US, it is almost always the result of encountering Christ's love in His people. Listen as Harold suggests ways we can pray for more opportunities for the gospel, for our persecuted church family, and for current and future missionaries. In this conversation we refer to a previous episode on VOM Radio with Bob and Kasey, who were enjoying their retirement when God gave them a “holy discontent,” and called them to minister to the people of a very closed Muslim nation. Learn how you can specifically pray for persecuted Christians in 2023 by requesting a complimentary copy of VOM's 2023 Global Prayer Guide. Never miss an episode of VOM Radio! Subscribe to the podcast.

The Documentary Podcast
Yiddish glory: Jewish refugees in Central Asia

The Documentary Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2023 50:35


During World War Two, approximately 1.6 million Soviet, Polish and Romanian Jews survived by escaping to Soviet Central Asia and Siberia, avoiding imminent death in ghettos, firing squads and killing centres. Many of them wrote music about these horrors as the Holocaust unfolded. Singer Alice Zawadzski, whose own family found themselves on a similar journey to Central Asia, and historian Anna Shternshis of the University of Toronto, who led the project to bring these songs back to life, travel to Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan to retrace the journeys of those Jewish refugees who became music composers.

Bi-Polar Girl
Introducing Circular Faith + Circular Economy Coming to Anchor Spring 2023

Bi-Polar Girl

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 0:58


Stephen and Rebecca McDow will launch Circular Faith + Circular Economy (CFCE) spring 2023 on Anchor. CFCE explores the challenges and opportunities of upholding an equitable society for rural and urban communities in America and around the world and how faith is important to accomplishing equity. Faith is commanded to be a reflection of an equitable society not a hindrance! Many people feel faith is weaponized to oppress and marginalize communities and societies for profit. Empirical evidence suggests humans have used faith to kill civilizations, cultures, and economies. CFCE will discuss how those power dynamics exist and impact our local, national and international faith communities and economies. CFCE believes building a circular ecosystem is the ONLY solution for eliminating the poor outcomes the “linear take-make-waste system” has on communities and economies. The values and tenets of faith are critical and has a place in a circular ecosystem! If the faith community is not willing to discuss the failures of faith and equity, then faith has failed its people. As our friends at Faith & Prejudice expressed while discussing race, “There is a difference between being a multiracial church and multicultural.” And the same goes for all of society. If our society is not willing to think of our ecosystem as circular in that it is interconnected but detachable, then we are almost certain that communities in Appalachia to the Rockies; from the Amazon to Baja; from Sudan to the Sahara; from Leeds to Warsaw; from the Outback to Fiji; from Deli to Turkey; and from the Caucuses to Central Asia will remain cynical, angry, unhealthy and covetous! CFCE will also explore what a circular faith and economic ecosystem looks like and how interconnected all parts of our society is to our existence on Earth! God hasn't thrown us away or left us and we must shift our thinking from linear to circular! You will hear from advocates, faith leaders, parishioners, business leaders, laborers, and academics who care about how faith, business, and society can operate in a manner that is interconnected and not lose independence, freedom, or integrity while giving agency to be a co-equal part of a body - It's all about power dynamics! What is a circular economy? Learn more: https://www.sbs.ox.ac.uk/research/centres-and-initiatives/skoll-centre-social-entrepreneurship/social-impact-education/circular-economy-lab If you want to discuss how your faith can be or already is circular and how those principles can be applied to our entire ecosystem, please email Stephen and Rebecca at smcdow@stephenmcdow.com.

Russian Roulette
Russian Roulette is Back!

Russian Roulette

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 1:18


After a long hiatus, Russian Roulette is back! Hosted by Max Bergmann and Dr. Maria Snegovaya of the Europe, Russia, and Eurasia Program at CSIS, Russian Roulette explores the politics, history, and complex societies of Russia and Eurasia. Tune in for fascinating interviews and discussions on some of the biggest questions facing the broader post-Soviet space. Produced by Tina Dolbaia and Nick Fenton.

Armenian News Network - Groong: Week In Review Podcast
Indian-Armenian Relations and Friendship with Rananjay Anand | Ep 209 - January 18, 2023

Armenian News Network - Groong: Week In Review Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 40:34


Indian Armenian RelationsA Conversation with Rananjay AnandTopics:Indio-Armenian Friendship NGOState of the Indian Community in ArmeniaWhere India sees itself on the world stageDrivers for Indian-Armenian RelationsHow to improve economic and trade relationsThe Hope & Promise of Indian Armenian FriendshipGuest: Rananjay Anand is the Co-Founder & President of the Indo-Armenian Friendship NGO.Hosts:Asbed Bedrossian TW/@qubriqHovik Manucharyan TW/@HovikYerevanEpisode 209 | Recorded: January 16, 2023Subscribe and follow us everywhere you are: linktr.ee/groong

Sengoku Daimyo's Chronicles of Japan

This episode we look at some of the physical evidence from this period.  In particular, since we are talking about the sovereign known as Ankan Tenno, we will look at a glass bowl, said to have come from his tomb, which appears to have made its way all the way from Sassanid Persia to Japan between the 5th and 6th centuries CE.  Along the way we'll take a brief look at the route that such an item may have taken to travel across the Eurasian continent all the way to Japan. For more on this episode, check out https://sengokudaimyo.com/podcast/episode-79 Rough Transcript: Welcome to Sengoku Daimyo's Chronicles of Japan.  My name is Joshua, and this is Episode 79:  Ankan's Glass Bowl. We are currently in the early part of the 6th century.  Last episode was our New Year's wrapup, but just before that we talked about the reign of Magari no Ōye, aka Ohine, aka Ankan Tennō.   According to the Chronicles, he was the eldest son of Wohodo, aka Keitai Tennō, coming to the throne in 534.  For all of the various Miyake, or Royal Grannaries, that he granted, his reign only lasted about two years, coming to an unfortunate end in the 12th month of 535.  The Chronicles claim that Ohine was 70 years old when he died, which would seem to indicate he was born when his father, Wohodo, was only 13 years of age.  That seems rather young, but not impossibly so. It is said that Ankan Tennō was buried on the hill of Takaya, in the area of Furuichi.  And that is where my personal interest in him and his short reign might end, if not for a glass bowl that caught my eye in the Tokyo National Museum. Specifically, it was the Heiseikan, which is where the Tokyo National Museum hosts special exhibitions, but it also hosts a regular exhibition on Japanese archaeology.  In fact, if you ever get the chance, I highly recommend checking it out.  I mean, let's be honest, the Tokyo National Museum is one of my favorite places to visit when I'm in Tokyo.  I think there is always something new—or at least something old that I find I'm taking a second look at. The Japanese archaeology section of the Heiseikan covers from the earliest stone tools through the Jomon, Yayoi, Kofun, and up to about the Nara period.  They have originals or replicas of many items that we've talked about on the podcast, including the gold seal of King Na of Wa, the Suda Hachiman mirror, and the swords from Eta Funayama and Inariyama kofun, which mention Wakatakiru no Ōkimi, generally thought to be the sovereign known as Yuuryaku Tennō.  They also have one of the large iron tate, or shields, on loan from Isonokami Shrine, and lots of bronze mirrors and various types of haniwa. Amongst this treasure trove of archaeological artifacts, one thing caught my eye from early on.  It is a small, glass bowl, round in shape, impressed throughout with a series of round indentations, almost like a giant golf ball.  Dark brown streaks crisscross the bowl, where it has been broken and put back together at some point in the past.  According to the placard, this Juuyo Bunkazai, or Important Cultural Property, is dated to about the 6th century, was produced somewhere in West Asia, and it is said to have come from the tomb of none other than Ankan Tennō himself. This has always intrigued me.  First and foremost there is the question of provenance—while there are plenty of tombs that have been opened over the years, generally speaking the tombs of the imperial family, especially those identified as belonging to reigning sovereigns, have been off limits to most archaeological investigations.  So how is it that we have artifacts identified with the tomb of Ankan Tennō, if that is the case? The second question, which almost trumps the first, is just how did a glass bowl from west Asia make it all the way to Japan in the 6th century?  Of course, Japan and northeast Asia in general were not strangers to glassmaking—glass beads have a long history both on the Korean peninsula and in the archipelago, including the molds used to make them.  However, it is one thing to melt glass and pour it into molds, similar to working with cast bronze.  These bowls, however, appear to be something different.  They were definitely foreign, and, as we shall see, they had made quite the journey. So let's take a look and see if we can't answer both of these questions, and maybe learn a little bit more about the world of 6th century Japan along the way. To start with, let's look at the provenance of this glass bowl.  Provenance is important—there are numerous stories of famous “finds” that turned out to be fakes, or else items planted by someone who wanted to get their name out there.  Archaeology—and its close cousin, paleontology—can get extremely competitive, and if you don't believe me just look up the Bone Wars of the late 19th century.  Other names that come to mind:  The infamous Piltdown man, the Cardiff Giant, and someone we mentioned in one of our first episodes, Fujimura Shin'ichi, who was accused of salting digs to try to claim human habitation in Japan going back hundreds of thousands of years. This is further complicated by the fact that, in many cases, the situation behind a given find is not necessarily well documented.  There are Edo period examples of Jomon pottery, or haniwa, that were found, but whose actual origins have been lost to time.  Then there are things like the seal of King Na of Wa, which is said to have been discovered by a farmer, devoid of the context that would help to otherwise clear the questions that continue to surround such an object.  On top of this, there are plenty of tombs that have been worn down over the ages—where wind and water have eroded the soil, leaving only the giant stone bones, or perhaps washing burial goods into nearby fields or otherwise displacing them. So what is the story with the tomb of Ankan Tennō, and this glass bowl? To answer this, let's first look at the tomb attributed to Ankan Tennō.  The Nihon Shoki tells us in the 8th century that this tomb was located at Takaya, in the area of Furuichi.  This claim is later repeated by the Engi Shiki in the 10th century.  Theoretically, the compilers of both of these works had some idea of where this was, but in the hundreds of years since then, a lot has happened.  Japan has seen numerous governments, as well as war, famine, natural disaster, and more.  At one point, members of the royal household were selling off calligraphy just to pay for the upkeep of the court, and while the giant kofun no doubt continued to be prominent features for locals in the surrounding areas, the civilian and military governments of the intervening centuries had little to no budget to spare for their upkeep.  Records were lost, as were many details. Towards the end of the Edo period, and into the early Meiji, a resurgence in interest in the royal, or Imperial, family and their ancient mausoleums caused people to investigate the texts and attempt to identify mausoleums for each of the sovereigns, as well as other notable figures, in the Kojiki and the Nihon Shoki.  Given that many of those figures are likely fictional or legendary individuals, one can see how this may be problematic.  And yet, the list that eventually emerged has become the current list of kofun protected by the Imperial Household Agency as imperial mausolea. Based on what we know, today, some of these official associations seem obviously questionable.  Some of them, for instance, are not even keyhole shaped tombs—for instance, some are circular, or round tombs, where the claim is often made that the other parts of the tomb were eroded or washed away.  Still others engender their own controversy, such as who, exactly, is buried in Daisen-ryō, the largest kofun, claimed to be the resting place of Ōsazaki no Mikoto, aka Nintoku Tennō.  Some people, however, claim that it is actually the sovereign Woasatsuma Wakugo, aka Ingyō Tennō, who is buried there, instead.  What is the truth?  Well, without opening up the main tomb, who is to say, and even then it is possible that any evidence may have already been lost to the acidic soils of the archipelago, which are hardly kind to organic matter. By the way, quick divergence, here—if you look up information on Daisen-ryō, aka Daisen Kofun, you may notice that there are drawings of a grave, including a coffin, associated with it.  That might get you thinking, as I did at one point, that Daisen kofun had already been opened, but it turns out that was a grave on the slopes of the square end of the kofun, and not from the main, circular burial mound.  Theoretically this may have been an important consort, or perhaps offspring or close relative of the main individual interred in the kofun, but most likely it is not for the person for whom the giant mound was actually erected.  So, yes, Daisen kofun remains unopened, at least as far as we know. As for the kofun identified for Ankan Tennō, today that is the tomb known as Furuichi Tsukiyama Kofun, aka Takaya Tsukiyama Kofun.  While the connection to Ankan Tennō may be somewhat unclear, the kofun has had its own colorful history, in a way.  Now most of the reports I could find, from about '92 up to 2022, place this kofun, which is a keyhole shaped kofun, in the correct time period—about the early to mid-6th century, matching up nicely with a 534 to 535 date for the reign given to Ankan Tennō.  But what is fascinating is the history around the 15th to 16th centuries.  It was just after the Ounin War, in 1479, when Hatakeyama Yoshihiro decided to build a castle here, placing the honmaru, the main enclosure, around the kofun, apparently incorporating the kofun and its moats into the castle design.  The castle, known as Takaya Castle, would eventually fall to Oda Nobunaga's forces in 1575, and most of the surrounding area was burned down in the fighting, bringing the kofun's life as a castle to an end. Some of the old earthworks still exist, however, and excavations in the area have helped determine the shape of the old castle, though there still have not been any fulsome excavations of the mound that I have found.  This makes sense as the kofun is designated as belonging to a member of the imperial lineage. There are, however, other keyhole shaped kofun from around the early 6th century that are also found in the same area, which also could be considered royal mausolea, and would seem to fit the bill just as well as this particular tomb.  In addition, there are details in the Chronicles, such as the fact that Magari no Ohine, aka Ankan Tennō, was supposedly buried with his wife and his younger sister.  This is, however, contradicted by records like the 10th century Engi Shiki, where two tombs are identified, one for Ankan Tennō and one for his wife, Kasuga no Yamada, so either the Chronicles got it wrong, or there were already problems with tomb identification just two centuries later.  So we still aren't entirely sure that this is Ankan Tennō's tomb. But at least we know that the glass bowl came from a 6th century kingly tomb, even if that tomb was only later identified as belonging to Ankan Tennō, right? Well, not so fast. The provenance on the bowl is a bit more tricky than that.  You see, the bowl itself came to light in 1950, when a private individual in Fuse, Ōsaka invited visiting scholar Ishida Mosaku to take a look.  According to his report at the time, the bowl was in a black lacquered box and wrapped in a special cloth, with a written inscription that indicated that the bowl had been donated to a temple in Furuichi named Sairin-ji. There are documents from the late Edo period indicating that various items were donated to Sairin-ji temple between the 16th to the 18th centuries, including quote-unquote “utensils” said to have been washed out of the tomb believed to be that of Ankan Tennō.  Ishida Mosaku and other scholars immediately connected this glass bowl with one or more of those accounts.  They were encouraged by the fact that there is a similar bowl found in the Shōsōin, an 8th century repository at Tōdai-ji temple, in Nara, which houses numerous artifacts donated on behalf of Shōmu Tennō.  Despite the gulf of time between them—two hundred years between the 6th and 8th centuries—this was explained away in the same way that Han dynasty mirrors, made in about the 3rd century, continued to show up in burials for many hundreds of years afterwards, likewise passed down as familial heirlooms. Still, the method of its discovery, the paucity of direct evidence, and the lack of any direct connection with where it came from leaves us wondering—did this bowl really come from the tomb of Ankan Tennō?  Even moreso, did it come from a 6th century tomb at all?  Could it not have come from some other tomb? We could tie ourselves up in knots around this question, and I would note that if you look carefully at the Tokyo National Museum's own accounting of the object they do mention that it is quote-unquote “possibly” from the tomb of Ankan Tennō. What does seem clear, however, is that its manufacture was not in Japan.  Indeed, however it came to our small group of islands on the northeastern edge of the Eurasian continent, it had quite the journey, because it does appear to be genuinely from the Middle East—specifically from around the time of the Sassanian or Sassanid empire, the first Iranian empire, centered on the area of modern Iran. And it isn't the only one.  First off, of course, there is the 8th century bowl in the Shousoin I just mentioned, but there are also examples of broken glass found on Okinoshima, an island deep in the middle of the strait between Kyushu and the Korean peninsula, which has a long history as a sacred site, mentioned in the Nihon Shoki, and attached to the Munakata shrine in modern Fukuoka.  Both Okinoshima and the Shōsōin—at least as part of the larger Nara cultural area—are on the UNESCO register of World Heritage sites, along with the Mozu-Furuichi kofun group, of which the Takaya Tsukiyama kofun is one.. Okinoshima is a literal treasure trove for archaeologists. However, its location and status have made it difficult to fully explore.  The island is still an active sacred site, and so investigations are balanced with respect for local tradition.  The lone occupant of the island is a Shinto priest, one of about two dozen who rotate spending 10 days out at the island, tending the sacred site.  Women are still not allowed, and for centuries, one day a year they allowed up to 200 men on the island after they had purified themselves in the ocean around the island.  Since then, they have also opened up to researchers, as well as military and media, at least in some instances. The island is apparently littered with offerings.  Investigations have demonstrated that this island has been in use since at least the 4th century.  As a sacred site, guarding the strait between Kyushu and the Korean peninsula, fishermen and sailors of all kinds would make journeys to the island and leave offerings of one kind or another, and many of them are still there: clay vessels, swords, iron ingots, bronze mirrors, and more.  The island's location, which really is in the middle of the straits, and not truly convenient to any of the regular trading routes, means that it has never really been much of a strategic site, just a religious one, and one that had various religious taboos, so it hasn't undergone the centuries of farming and building that have occurred elsewhere. Offerings are scattered in various places, often scattered around or under boulders and large rocks that were perhaps seen as particularly worthy of devotion.  Since researchers have been allowed in, over 80,000 treasures have been found and catalogued.  Among those artifacts that have been brought back is glass, including glass from Sassanid Persia.  Pieces of broken glass bowls, like the one said to have come from Ankan's tomb, as well as what appear to be beads made from broken glass pieces, have been recovered over the years, once more indicating their presence in the trade routes to the mainland, although when, exactly, they came over can be a little more difficult to place. That might be helped by two other glass artifacts, also found in the archaeological exhibit of the Heiseikan in the Tokyo National Museum: a glass bowl and dish discovered at Niizawa Senzuka kofun Number 126, in Kashihara city, in Nara. This burial is believed to date to the latter half of the 5th century, and included an iron sword, numerous gold fittings and jewelry, and even an ancient clothes iron, which at the time looked like a small frying pan, where you could put hot coals or similar items in the pan and use the flat bottom to help iron out wrinkles in cloth.  Alongside all of this were also discovered two glass vessels.  One was a dark, cobalt-blue plate, with a stand and very shallow conical shape.  The other was a round glass bowl with an outwardly flared lip.  Around the smooth sides, the glass has been marked with three rows of circular dots that go all the way around, not dissimilar from the indentations in the Ankan and Shōsōin glass bowls. All of these, again, are believed to have come from Sassanid Persia, modern Iran, and regardless of the provenance of the Ankan bowl, it seems that we have clear evidence that Sassanian glassworks were making their way to Japan.  But how?  How did something like glass—hardly known for being the most robust of materials—make it all the way from Sassanid Persia to Yamato between the 5th and 8th centuries? To start with, let's look at Sassanid Persia and its glass. Sassanid Persia—aka Sassanid or Sassanian Iran—is the name given to the empire that replaced the Parthian empire, and is generally agreed to have been founded sometime in the early 3rd century.  The name “Sassanid” refers to the legendary dynastic founder, Sassan, though the first historical sovereign appears to be Ardeshir I, who helped put the empire on the map. Ardeshir I called his empire “Eran sahr”, and it is often known as an Iranian or Persian empire, based on their ties to Pars and the use of the Middle Persian, or Farsi, language.   For those not already well aware, Farsi is one of several Iranian languages, though over the years many of the various Iranian speaking peoples would often be classified as “Persian” in English literature.  That said, there is quite a diversity of Iranian languages and people who speak them, including Farsi, Pashto, Dari, Tajik, and the ancient Sogdian language, which I'm sure we'll touch on more given their importance in the ancient silk road trade.  Because of the ease with which historical “Iranian” ethnic groups can be conflated with the modern state, I am going to largely stick with the term Persian, here, but just be aware that the two words are often, though not always, interchangeable. The Sassanid dynasty claimed a link to the older Achaemenid dynasty, and over the subsequent five centuries of their rule they extended their borders, dominating the area between the Caspian Sea and the Persian Gulf, eastward to much of modern Afghanistan and Pakistan, running right up to the Hindu Kush and the Pamir mountains.  They held sway over much of Central Asia, including the area of Transoxiana.  With that they had access to both the sea routes, south of India and the overland routes through the Tianshan mountains and the northern and southern routes around the great Taklamakan desert – so, basically, any trade passing between Central and East Asia would pass through Sassanid territory. The Persian empire of the Sassanids was pre-Islamic—Islamic Arab armies would not arrive until about the 7th century, eventually bringing an end to the Sassanid dynasty.  Until that point, the Persian empire was largely Zoroastrian, an Iranian religion based around fire temples, restored after the defeat of the Parthians, where eternal flames were kept burning day and night as part of their ritual practice.  The Sassanids inherited a Persian culture in an area that had been dominated by the Parthians, and before that the Hellenistic Seleucids, and their western edge bordered with the Roman empire.  Rome's establishment in the first century BCE coincided with the invention of glassblowing techniques, and by the time of the Sassanid Empire these techniques seem to have been well established in the region. Sassanid glass decorated with patterns of ground, cut, and polished hollow facets—much like what we see in the examples known in the Japanese islands—comes from about the 5th century onward.  Prior to that, the Sassanian taste seems to have been for slightly less extravagant vessels, with straight or slightly rounded walls. Sassanid glass was dispersed in many different directions along their many trade routes across the Eurasian continent, and archaeologists have been able to identify glass from this region not just by its shape, but by the various physical properties based on the formulas and various raw materials used to make the glass. As for the trip to Japan, this was most likely through the overland routes.  And so the glass would have been sold to merchants who would take it up through Transoxiana, through passes between the Pamirs and the Tianshan mountains, and then through a series of oasis towns and city-states until it reached Dunhuang, on the edge of the ethnic Han sphere of influence. For a majority of this route, the glass was likely carried by Sogdians, another Iranian speaking people from the region of Transoxiana.  Often simply lumped in with the rest of the Iranian speaking world as “Persians”, Sogdians had their own cultural identity, and the area of Sogdia is known to have existed since at least the ancient Achaemenid dynasty.  From the 4th to the 8th century, Sogdian traders plied the sands of Central Eurasia, setting up a network of communities along what would come to be known as the Silk Road. It is along this route that the glassware, likely packed in straw or some other protective material, was carried on the backs of horses, camels, and people along a journey of several thousand kilometers, eventually coming to the fractious edge of the ethnic Han sphere.  Whether it was these same Sogdian traders that then made their way to the ocean and upon boats out to the Japanese islands is unknown, but it is not hard imagining crates being transferred from merchant to merchant, east, to the Korean Peninsula, and eventually across the sea. The overland route from Sogdia is one of the more well-known—and well-worn—routes on what we modernly know as the Silk Road, and it's very much worth taking the time here to give a brief history of how this conduit between Western Asia/Europe and Eastern Asia developed over the centuries.  One of the main crossroads of this area is the Tarim Basin, the area that, today, forms much of Western China, with the Tianshan mountains in the north and the Kunlun Mountains, on the edge of the Tibetan plateau, to the south.  In between is a large desert, the Taklamakan desert, which may have once been a vast inland sea.  Even by the Han dynasty, a vast saltwater body known as the Puchang Sea existed in its easternmost regions.  Comparable to some of the largest of the Great Lakes, and fed by glacial run-off, the lake eventually dwindled to become the salt-marshes around Lop Nur.  And yet, researchers still find prominent boat burials out in what otherwise seems to be the middle of the desert. Around the Tarim basin were various cultures, often centered on oases at the base of the mountains.  Runoff from melting ice and snow in the mountains meant a regular supply of water, and by following the mountains one could navigate from watering hole to watering hole, creating a natural roadway through the arid lands.  In the middle of the Basin, however, is the great Taklamakan desert, and even during the Han dynasty it was a formidable and almost unpassable wasteland.  One could wander the sands for days or weeks with no water and no indication of direction other than the punishing sun overhead.  It is hardly a nice place and remains largely unpopulated, even today. While there were various cultures and city-states around the oasis towns, the first major power that we know held sway, at least over the northern route, were the Xiongnu.  Based in the area of modern Mongolia, the Xiongnu swept down during the Qin and early Han dynasties, displacing or conquering various people. An early exploration of the Tarim basin and its surroundings was conducted by the Han dynasty diplomat, Zhang Qian.  Zhang Qian secretly entered Xiongnu territory with the goal of reaching the Yuezhi—a nomadic group that had been one of those displaced by the Xiongnu.  The Yuezhi had been kicked out of their lands in the Gansu region and moved all the way to the Ferghana valley, in modern Tajikistan, a part of the region known as Transoxiana.  Although Zhang Qian was captured and spent 10 years in service to the Xiongnu, he never forgot his mission and eventually made his way to the Yuezhi.  By that time, however, the Yuezhi had settled in to their new life, and they weren't looking for revenge. While Zhang Qian's news may have been somewhat disappointing for the Han court, what was perhaps more important was the intelligence he brought back concerning the routes through the Tarim basin, and the various people there, as well as lands beyond.  The Han dynasty continued to assert itself in the area they called the “Western Regions”, and General Ban Chao would eventually be sent to defeat the Xiongnu and loosen their hold in the region, opening up the area all the way to modern Kashgar.  Ban Chao would even send an emissary, Gan Ying, to try to make the journey all the way to the Roman empire, known to the Han court as “Daqin”, using the name of the former Qin dynasty as a sign of respect for what they had heard.  However, Gan Ying only made it as far as the land of Anxi—the name given to Parthia—where he was told that to make it to Rome, or Daqin, would require crossing the ocean on a voyage that could take months or even years.  Hearing this, Gan Ying decided to turn back and report on what he knew. Of course if he actually made it to the Persian Gulf—or even to the Black Sea, as some claim—Gan Ying would have been much closer to Rome than the accounts lead us to believe. It is generally thought that he was being deliberately mislead by Parthian merchants who felt they might be cut out if Rome and the Han Dynasty formed more direct relations.  Silks from East Asia, along with other products, were already a lucrative opportunity for middlemen across the trade routes, and nobody wanted to be cut out of that position if they could help it. That said, the Parthians and, following them the Sassanid Persians, continued to maintain relationships with dynasties at the other end of what we know as the Silk Road, at least when they could.  The Sassanid Persians, when they came to power, were known to the various northern and southern dynasties as Bosi—possibly pronounced something like Puasie, at the time, no doubt their attempt to render the term “Parsi”.  We know of numerous missions in both directions between various dynasties, and Sassanian coins are regularly found the south of modern China. And so we can see that even in the first and second centuries, Eurasia was much more connected than one might otherwise believe.  Goods would travel from oasis town to oasis town, and be sold in markets, where they might just be picked up by another merchant.  Starting in the fourth century, the Sogdian merchants began to really make their own presence known along these trade routes.  They would set up enclaves in various towns, and merchants would travel from Sogdian enclave to Sogdian enclave with letters of recommendation, as well as personal letters for members of the community, setting up their own early postal service.  This allowed the Sogdian traders to coordinate activities and kept them abreast of the latest news.     I'm not sure we have a clear indication how long this trip would take.  Theoretically, one could travel from Kashgar to Xi'an and back in well under a year, if one were properly motivated and provisioned—it is roughly 4,000 kilometers, and travel would have likely been broken up with long stays to rest and refresh at the various towns along the way. I've personally had the opportunity to travel from Kashgar to Turpan, though granted it was in the comfort of an air conditioned bus.  Still, having seen the modern conditions, the trip would be grueling, but not impossible back in the day, and if the profits were lucrative enough, then why not do it—it is not dissimilar to the adventurers from Europe in the 16th century who went out to sea to find their own fortunes.  And so the glass bowl likely made its way through the markets of the Tarim basin, to the markets of various capitals in the Yellow River or Yangzi regions—depending on who was in charge in any given year—and eventually made its way to the Korean peninsula and from there to a ship across the Korean strait. Of course, those ships weren't simply holding a single glass vessel.  Likely they were laden with a wide variety of goods.  Some things, such as fabric, incense, and other more biodegradable products would not be as likely to remain, and even glass breaks and oxidizes, and metal rusts away.  Furthermore, many of the goods had likely been picked over by the time any shipments arrived in the islands, making things such as these glass bowls even more rare and scarce. Still, this bowl, whether it belonged to Ankan or not, tells us a story.  It is the story of a much larger world, well beyond the Japanese archipelago, and one that will be encroaching more and more as we continue to explore this period.  Because it wasn't just physical goods that were being transported along the Silk Road.  The travelers also carried with them news and new ideas.  One of these ideas was a series of teachings that came out of India and arrived in China during the Han dynasty, known as Buddhism.  It would take until the 6th century, but Buddhism would eventually make its way to Japan, the end of the Silk Road. But that is for another episode.  For now, I think we'll close out our story of Ankan and his glass bowl.  I hope you've enjoyed this little diversion, and from here we'll continue on with our narrative as we edge closer and closer to the formal introduction of Buddhism and the era known as the Asuka Period. Until then, thank you for listening and for all of your support.  If you like what we are doing, tell your friends and feel free to rate us wherever you listen to podcasts.  If you feel the need to do more, and want to help us keep this going, we have information about how you can donate on Patreon or through our KoFi site, ko-fi.com/sengokudaimyo, or find the links over at our main website, SengokuDaimyo.com/Podcast, where we will have some more discussion on topics from this episode. Also, feel free to Tweet at us at @SengokuPodcast, or reach out to our Sengoku Daimyo Facebook page.  You can also email us at the.sengoku.daimyo@gmail.com.  And that's all for now.  Thank you again, and I'll see you next episode on Sengoku Daimyo's Chronicles of Japan.      

Podcast: Majlis - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty
The Terrible Rights Situation In Turkmenistan - January 15, 2023

Podcast: Majlis - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 41:25


Turkmenistan has long had a poor reputation for human rights. But recently, two activists whose cases received international attention were freed. This episode of the Majlis podcast looks at some of activists who have languished in Turkmen prisons and examines whether anything has changed since a new president took over in March 2022. Joining host Bruce Pannier to discuss these topics are Rachel Denber, deputy director of HRW's Europe and Central Asia division; Ivar Dale, senior policy adviser at the Norwegian Helsinki Committee; and Farruh Yusupov, director of RFE/RL's Turkmen service, known locally as Azatlyk.

The Journey On Podcast
Pete & Luisa Breidahl

The Journey On Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 122:11


Long-riders Pete & Luisa Breidahl have traveled over 13,000km (8,000 miles) on horseback throughout Europe, Central Asia, and Mongolia. After first meeting in 2019, they decided to live life on the back of a horse alongside their dog. Pete, an Australian, has lived multiple life paths before he ended up becoming a full-time adventurer and rider. Luisa, a German and vegan chef, met Pete in a park in Mongolia and soon after decided to ride horses across the world together.Pete & Luisa's Website: https://www.beprofessionallookcool.com/aboutBecome a Patreon Member today! Get access to podcast bonus segments, ask questions to podcast guests, and even suggest future podcast guests while supporting Warwick: https://www.patreon.com/journeyonpodcastWarwick has over 650 Online Training Videos that are designed to create a relaxed, connected, and skilled equine partner. Start your horse training journey today!https://videos.warwickschiller.com/Check us out on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WarwickschillerfanpageWatch hundreds of free Youtube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/warwickschillerFollow us on Instagram: @warwickschiller

Islamic History Podcast
8-2: Muslims and Mongols

Islamic History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 32:14


Genghis Khan leads his Mongol army into Central Asia. One of his first opponents, is the Muslim Khwarezm Shah Empire. This begins the long, bloody, and brutal Mongol invasion of the Muslim world.

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1083. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 7: Part 1 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 10:07


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 7: Part 1 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1084. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 7: Part 2 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 30:44


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 7: Part 2 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1085. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 7: Part 3-4 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 20:25


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 7: Part 3-4 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1081. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 6: Part 2 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 38:58


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 6: Part 2 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1082. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 6: Part 3 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 32:23


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 6: Part 3 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

Seismic Soundoff
173: Why you need the Gravity & Magnetic Encyclopedic Dictionary

Seismic Soundoff

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 22:04


Serguei Goussev discusses his new book, Gravity & Magnetic Encyclopedic Dictionary. This book contains more than 3,200 entries and presents a terminology-guided summary of the gravity and magnetic theory, measuring instruments, methods of data acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation for geophysical studies of the Earth and other planets. Terrestrial applications include engineering (karst and faults), geodesy, geothermal, groundwater, volcano, and global tectonic studies, CO2 sequestration, reservoir monitoring, exploration for oil and gas, rare earth elements, iron, gold, and other mineral resources. In this episode, Serguei shares his motivation for compiling this resource and the unique format he created for this dictionary. He also highlights a few of his favorite terms and what he hopes this book achieves. Across many disciplines, especially those interested in rare earth elements and mineral resources, this will serve as an essential and comprehensive resource. This useful and fun conversation highlights a valuable resource for the scientific community that will be on bookshelves for years to come. Listen to the full archive at https://seg.org/podcast. BUY THE BOOK * Print edition (https://seg.org/shop/products/detail/521558713) * E-book (https://library.seg.org/doi/10.1190/1.9781560803874) BIOGRAPHY Serguei Goussev graduated from Lomonosov Moscow State University, Russia, with a joint degree in geology and geophysics in 1974. From 1974 to 1995, he worked in acquiring, processing, and interpreting geophysical data in the Okhotsk Sea, South China Sea, northern Siberia, southern Yemen, and Central Asia. Since immigrating to Canada in 1995, he has been working on geophysical exploration projects across the globe. As a result, he has gained 40+ years of experience in gravity, magnetic, and seismic exploration for oil and gas, and mineral resources. Between 1997 and 2020, Serguei authored and co-authored 30 gravity and magnetic exploration studies published in geophysical journals and presented at international conferences and workshops. In addition, he designed the Goussev filter for high-resolution detection of low-amplitude gravity and magnetic gradient anomalies. He has been a member of SEG since 1997. CREDITS SEG produces Seismic Soundoff to benefit its members and the scientific community and to inform the public about the value of geophysics. Please leave a 5-star rating on Apple Podcasts and Spotify to show your support for the show. It takes less than five seconds to leave a 5-star rating and is the number one action you can take to show appreciation for this free resource. And follow the podcast on the app to be notified when each new episode is released. Original music created by Zach Bridges. Andrew Geary hosted, edited, and produced this episode at 51 features, LLC. Thank you to the SEG podcast team: Jennifer Cobb, Kathy Gamble, and Ally McGinnis.

Diplomatic Immunity
Understanding the African Union with Ambassador Jessica Lapenn

Diplomatic Immunity

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 24:34


Season 5, Episode 2: This season we are talking about multilateralism. What it is, what it's good for, and also what it's not. After looking at the big picture through the lens of the United Nations in episode one, this episode takes us to the regional level. U.S. Ambassador to the African Union Jessica Lapenn joined Dr. Kelly McFarland to explain how the African Union (AU) functions, why the U.S. was the first non-African nation to establish a permanent mission to the AU, how the AU tackles issues of peace and security differently than the UN, and where regional institutions and the United Nations can best work together.    Ambassador Lapenn was sworn-in as the U.S. Ambassador to the African Union and the U.S. Permanent Representative to the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa on August 27, 2019. She most recently served as the Chargé d'Affaires at the U.S. Mission in South Africa. Prior to this, she served as the Chief of Staff to the Under Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy and Human Rights at the Department of State in Washington, D.C. She was Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Kigali from 2012-2014. Ambassador Lapenn entered the U.S. Foreign Service in October 1994. Her overseas tours have included Jeddah, Riyadh, Paris, Tbilisi, Baghdad, and Jerusalem. In Jerusalem, she was the Chief of the Political Section at the U.S. Consulate General, and at the U.S. Embassy in Tbilisi, she was responsible for regional refugee assistance and policy in the South Caucuses and Central Asia.   Episode recorded: November 16, 2022 Produced by Daniel Henderson and Kelly McFarland.  Episode Image: African Union Headquarters in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Solen Feyissa on Unsplash Diplomatic Immunity: Frank and candid conversations about diplomacy and foreign affairs Diplomatic Immunity, a podcast from the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University, brings you frank and candid conversations with experts on the issues facing diplomats and national security decision-makers around the world.  Funding support from the Carnegie Corporation of New York.  For more, visit our website, and follow us on Twitter @GUDiplomacy. Send any feedback to diplomacy@georgetown.edu.    

New Books in Economic and Business History
Regine A. Spector, "Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Economic and Business History

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 39:43


Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia (Cornell UP, 2017) delves into the role of bazaars in the political economy and development of Central Asia. Bazaars are the economic bedrock for many throughout the region--they are the entrepreneurial hubs of Central Asia. However, they are often regarded as mafia-governed environments that are largely populated by the dispossessed. By immersing herself in the bazaars of Kyrgyzstan, Regine A. Spector learned that some are rather best characterized as islands of order in a chaotic national context. Spector draws on interviews, archival sources, and participant observation to show how traders, landowners, and municipal officials create order in the absence of a coherent government apparatus and bureaucratic state. Merchants have adapted Soviet institutions, including trade unions, and pre-Soviet practices, such as using village elders as the arbiters of disputes, to the urban bazaar by building and asserting their own authority. Spector's findings have relevance beyond the bazaars and borders of one small country; they teach us how economic development operates when the rule of law is weak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

New Books in Sociology
Regine A. Spector, "Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Sociology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 39:43


Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia (Cornell UP, 2017) delves into the role of bazaars in the political economy and development of Central Asia. Bazaars are the economic bedrock for many throughout the region--they are the entrepreneurial hubs of Central Asia. However, they are often regarded as mafia-governed environments that are largely populated by the dispossessed. By immersing herself in the bazaars of Kyrgyzstan, Regine A. Spector learned that some are rather best characterized as islands of order in a chaotic national context. Spector draws on interviews, archival sources, and participant observation to show how traders, landowners, and municipal officials create order in the absence of a coherent government apparatus and bureaucratic state. Merchants have adapted Soviet institutions, including trade unions, and pre-Soviet practices, such as using village elders as the arbiters of disputes, to the urban bazaar by building and asserting their own authority. Spector's findings have relevance beyond the bazaars and borders of one small country; they teach us how economic development operates when the rule of law is weak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/sociology

New Books in Political Science
Regine A. Spector, "Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Political Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 39:43


Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia (Cornell UP, 2017) delves into the role of bazaars in the political economy and development of Central Asia. Bazaars are the economic bedrock for many throughout the region--they are the entrepreneurial hubs of Central Asia. However, they are often regarded as mafia-governed environments that are largely populated by the dispossessed. By immersing herself in the bazaars of Kyrgyzstan, Regine A. Spector learned that some are rather best characterized as islands of order in a chaotic national context. Spector draws on interviews, archival sources, and participant observation to show how traders, landowners, and municipal officials create order in the absence of a coherent government apparatus and bureaucratic state. Merchants have adapted Soviet institutions, including trade unions, and pre-Soviet practices, such as using village elders as the arbiters of disputes, to the urban bazaar by building and asserting their own authority. Spector's findings have relevance beyond the bazaars and borders of one small country; they teach us how economic development operates when the rule of law is weak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/political-science

New Books in Economics
Regine A. Spector, "Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Economics

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 39:43


Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia (Cornell UP, 2017) delves into the role of bazaars in the political economy and development of Central Asia. Bazaars are the economic bedrock for many throughout the region--they are the entrepreneurial hubs of Central Asia. However, they are often regarded as mafia-governed environments that are largely populated by the dispossessed. By immersing herself in the bazaars of Kyrgyzstan, Regine A. Spector learned that some are rather best characterized as islands of order in a chaotic national context. Spector draws on interviews, archival sources, and participant observation to show how traders, landowners, and municipal officials create order in the absence of a coherent government apparatus and bureaucratic state. Merchants have adapted Soviet institutions, including trade unions, and pre-Soviet practices, such as using village elders as the arbiters of disputes, to the urban bazaar by building and asserting their own authority. Spector's findings have relevance beyond the bazaars and borders of one small country; they teach us how economic development operates when the rule of law is weak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/economics

New Books in Anthropology
Regine A. Spector, "Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Anthropology

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 39:43


Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia (Cornell UP, 2017) delves into the role of bazaars in the political economy and development of Central Asia. Bazaars are the economic bedrock for many throughout the region--they are the entrepreneurial hubs of Central Asia. However, they are often regarded as mafia-governed environments that are largely populated by the dispossessed. By immersing herself in the bazaars of Kyrgyzstan, Regine A. Spector learned that some are rather best characterized as islands of order in a chaotic national context. Spector draws on interviews, archival sources, and participant observation to show how traders, landowners, and municipal officials create order in the absence of a coherent government apparatus and bureaucratic state. Merchants have adapted Soviet institutions, including trade unions, and pre-Soviet practices, such as using village elders as the arbiters of disputes, to the urban bazaar by building and asserting their own authority. Spector's findings have relevance beyond the bazaars and borders of one small country; they teach us how economic development operates when the rule of law is weak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/anthropology

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Regine A. Spector, "Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 39:43


Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia (Cornell UP, 2017) delves into the role of bazaars in the political economy and development of Central Asia. Bazaars are the economic bedrock for many throughout the region--they are the entrepreneurial hubs of Central Asia. However, they are often regarded as mafia-governed environments that are largely populated by the dispossessed. By immersing herself in the bazaars of Kyrgyzstan, Regine A. Spector learned that some are rather best characterized as islands of order in a chaotic national context. Spector draws on interviews, archival sources, and participant observation to show how traders, landowners, and municipal officials create order in the absence of a coherent government apparatus and bureaucratic state. Merchants have adapted Soviet institutions, including trade unions, and pre-Soviet practices, such as using village elders as the arbiters of disputes, to the urban bazaar by building and asserting their own authority. Spector's findings have relevance beyond the bazaars and borders of one small country; they teach us how economic development operates when the rule of law is weak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

New Books in Central Asian Studies
Regine A. Spector, "Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books in Central Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 39:43


Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia (Cornell UP, 2017) delves into the role of bazaars in the political economy and development of Central Asia. Bazaars are the economic bedrock for many throughout the region--they are the entrepreneurial hubs of Central Asia. However, they are often regarded as mafia-governed environments that are largely populated by the dispossessed. By immersing herself in the bazaars of Kyrgyzstan, Regine A. Spector learned that some are rather best characterized as islands of order in a chaotic national context. Spector draws on interviews, archival sources, and participant observation to show how traders, landowners, and municipal officials create order in the absence of a coherent government apparatus and bureaucratic state. Merchants have adapted Soviet institutions, including trade unions, and pre-Soviet practices, such as using village elders as the arbiters of disputes, to the urban bazaar by building and asserting their own authority. Spector's findings have relevance beyond the bazaars and borders of one small country; they teach us how economic development operates when the rule of law is weak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/central-asian-studies

New Books Network
Regine A. Spector, "Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia" (Cornell UP, 2017)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 39:43


Order at the Bazaar: Power and Trade in Central Asia (Cornell UP, 2017) delves into the role of bazaars in the political economy and development of Central Asia. Bazaars are the economic bedrock for many throughout the region--they are the entrepreneurial hubs of Central Asia. However, they are often regarded as mafia-governed environments that are largely populated by the dispossessed. By immersing herself in the bazaars of Kyrgyzstan, Regine A. Spector learned that some are rather best characterized as islands of order in a chaotic national context. Spector draws on interviews, archival sources, and participant observation to show how traders, landowners, and municipal officials create order in the absence of a coherent government apparatus and bureaucratic state. Merchants have adapted Soviet institutions, including trade unions, and pre-Soviet practices, such as using village elders as the arbiters of disputes, to the urban bazaar by building and asserting their own authority. Spector's findings have relevance beyond the bazaars and borders of one small country; they teach us how economic development operates when the rule of law is weak. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1080. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 6: Part 1 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 14:30


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 6: Part 1 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1079. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 5: Part 4 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2023 7:51


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 5: Part 4 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

Islamic History Podcast
8-1: Chinese and Mongols

Islamic History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 30:13 Very Popular


In this episode, we discuss the rise of Genghis Khan, and how he united the Mongol tribes and began expanding into China and Central Asia.

Hidden Forces
Turkey-Syria & the New Geopolitics of the Greater Middle East | Joshua Landis

Hidden Forces

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 52:56


In Episode 291 of Hidden Forces, Demetri Kofinas speaks with Joshua Landis. Landis is the director of the Center for Middle East Studies at the University of Oklahoma and a widely recognized Syria expert. He was last on the podcast over three years ago to discuss the then-ongoing invasion of northern Syria by the Turkish military and the long-term withdrawal of American forces from the Middle East and Central Asia. The background for today's conversation are the ongoing negotiations between Turkey, Russia, and Syria and President Erdoğan's desire to expand Turkey's military presence in northern Syria. Erdoğan's stated aim is to create a larger buffer zone in which to transfer Syrian refugees and from which to defend Turkey from the threat posed by an independent Kurdish state aligned with elements of The Kurdistan Workers' Party (PKK). Ankara's jingoistic rhetoric may be in part responsible for bringing Russia and Syria to the table and we may be on the verge of a reset in Turkish-Syrian relations and a reproachment between President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and President Bashar al-Assad. The implications of such a reset would be profound for the Syrian people and is further evidence of Turkey's bid for strategic autonomy. It is also reflective of the emerging geopolitical complexities of the Middle East and Europe, which have only been exacerbated by the war in Ukraine. Joshua Landis and Demetri spend the first hour of their conversation focused mostly on the historical antecedents of the conflict in Syria and the larger American presence in the Middle East. They devote the second hour to assessing long-term prospects for Turkey as a regional power, the role of the EU and NATO as counterbalancing forces to Turkish aggression in the Aegean, and the prospects for normalization of relations between Turkey and Syria and what this means for the US and Europe long-term. You can subscribe to our premium content and gain access to our premium feed, episode transcripts, and Intelligence Reports at HiddenForces.io/subscribe. If you want to join in on the conversation and become a member of the Hidden Forces genius community, which includes Q&A calls with guests, access to special research and analysis, in-person events, and dinners, you can also do that on our subscriber page. If you still have questions, feel free to email info@hiddenforces.io, and Demetri or someone else from our team will get right back to you. If you enjoyed listening to today's episode of Hidden Forces you can help support the show by doing the following: Subscribe on Apple Podcasts | YouTube | Spotify | Stitcher | SoundCloud | CastBox | RSS Feed Write us a review on Apple Podcasts & Spotify Subscribe to our mailing list at https://hiddenforces.io/newsletter/ Producer & Host: Demetri Kofinas Editor & Engineer: Stylianos Nicolaou Subscribe & Support the Podcast at https://hiddenforces.io Join the conversation on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter at @hiddenforcespod Follow Demetri on Twitter at @Kofinas Episode Recorded on 12/29/2022

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1078. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 5: Part 3 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 32:20


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 5: Part 3 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

Podcast: Majlis - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty
2022: A Raucous Year For Central Asia - January 01, 2023

Podcast: Majlis - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 49:32


The Central Asian states have never experienced anything like the year 2022. There were protests that turned deadly in Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan; fighting between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan that left more than 100 people dead; political and economic fallout from Russia's war on Ukraine that affected all five Central Asian countries; presidential elections in Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan; and much more. Joining host Bruce Pannier to look back at a year that in many ways reshaped and redirected the course of Central Asia are Luca Anceschi, professor of Central Asian studies at Glasgow University; Catherine Putz, managing editor at The Diplomat magazine; and Temur Umarov, a fellow at Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and at the OSCE Academy.

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1074. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 4: Part 2 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 56:34


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 4: Part 2 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

Rugged 33 Podcast
Episode#26 The Holidays in Kyrgyzstan. New Experiences. Away from home.

Rugged 33 Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 63:14


Mario and Sunny talk: This episode is heart felt, real talk about adjusting to a new life in Central Asia. Russian Teachers, Police Experiences, Eating Horse.

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1077. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 5: Part 2 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 25:26


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 5: Part 2 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1076. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 5: Part 1 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 4:57


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 5: Part 1 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1075. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 4: Part 3 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022 14:02


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezenzinski: Chapter 4: Part 3 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1073. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezezinski: Chapter 4: Part 1 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 20:50


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezezinski: Chapter 2 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1072. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezezinski: Chapter 3: Part 3 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 8:47


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezezinski: Chapter 3: Part 3 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast
1071. The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezezinski: Chapter 3: Part 2 - John Lothe

The 'Stay Awake Media' Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 24:17


The Grand Chessboard By Zbigniew Brezezinski: Chapter 3: Part 2 - John Lothe https://johnlothe.wordpress.com/ www.youtube.com/user/JohnLothe The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy and Its Geostrategic Imperatives (1997) is one of the major works of Zbigniew Brzezinski. Brzezinski graduated with a PhD from Harvard University in 1953 and became Professor of American Foreign Policy at Johns Hopkins University. He was later the United States National Security Advisor from 1977 to 1981, under the administration of President Jimmy Carter. Regarding the landmass of Eurasia as the center of global power, Brzezinski sets out to formulate a Eurasian geostrategy for the United States. In particular, he writes that no Eurasian challenger should emerge that can dominate Eurasia and thus also challenge U.S. global pre-eminence. Much of Brzezinski's analysis is concerned with geostrategy in Central Asia, focusing on the exercise of power on the Eurasian landmass in a post-Soviet environment. In his chapter dedicated to what he refers to as the "Eurasian Balkans", he uses Halford J. Mackinder's Heartland Theory. The book was critically reviewed by The New York Times,[1] Kirkus Reviews,[2] Foreign Affairs,[3] and other publications. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Grand_Chessboard Audio taken from: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLu5tKfQq0iybAoqpQcrA2QDUGAGnigaCM Read Here: https://www.cia.gov/library/abbottabad-compound/BD/BD4CE651B07CCB8CB069F9999F0EADEE_Zbigniew_Brzezinski_-_The_Grand_ChessBoard.pdf

Midlife Love Out Loud podcast
174: Visioning for Manifesting Your Dream Partner with Mel Larsen

Midlife Love Out Loud podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 31:39


When you're out there in the dating world, seeking your ONE, you may tend to focus on what you don't want instead of what you do want. Guess what happens when you do that… you get more of what you don't want. So let's get clear on what you DO want and how to shift your focus on that so you can get what you want! Mel Larsen is an internationally in-demand business growth mentor with a proven track record of helping clients get valuable and measurable results such as attracting dream clients and doubling their income. She's coached thousands of entrepreneurs to finally trust their BIG vision and joyfully and strategically grow the business of their ultimate dreams.  Mel has delivered over 30 years of successful business coaching, consulting and marketing. Her work has taken her all across the globe including the USA, Russia, the Caribbean, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, Central Asia and across Europe. She's also the author of ‘Turn your Vision into Results' and ‘Small Business, BIG Dream' and ‘A Guide to Working with Arts Ambassadors'.  Mel and the Dream Project Coach community have raised over $15,000 over the last 3 years for UK food banks and for Kiva.org loans to help grow businesses in under-resourced parts of the world. She also founded 3 thriving community-led festivals in South London for which she received a Civic Award and she once did a Facebook live every day for a whole year. For more information about Mel's event Futureseed go to: https://www.dreamprojectcoach.com/futureseed/ And for Mel's Vision and Vibe audio go HERE Click here to access immediate download Futureseed Event - Grab your ticket here Want to stop going on sucky dates? Grab your MIDLIFE LOVE GUIDE TO SUCCESSFUL DATING and learn how you can call in Mr. Right, right now!  If you'd like some one-to-one coaching with Junie, grab your complimentary 30-minute Love Breakthrough Session today so she can support you on your love path. And don't forget to subscribe to Midlife Love Out Loud so that you don't miss a single episode. While you're at it, won't you take a moment to write a short review and rate our show? It would be greatly appreciated! To learn more about our previous guests, listen to past episodes, and get to know your host, go to https://midlifeloveoutloud.com/  and don't forget to join the FIND FABULOUS LOVE AFTER 40 group on Facebook here. 

The Jerusalem Post Podcast
Uzbekistan - Silk Road, Flying Carpets & Synagogues

The Jerusalem Post Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 52:36