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Roman Empire during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages

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Latest podcast episodes about byzantine

The Meaning of Catholic
The Error of Evolution with the Byzantine Scotist

The Meaning of Catholic

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022


Byzantine Scotist: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCECSNsNDjYNmnP8tRn1UiYA PATREON: https://www.patreon.com/byzcat Music: Axion Estin by St. George’s Ukrainian Catholic Church Choir of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=79QG-ZhMDDE&t=2977s ***CITATIONS*** The Structure of Scientific Revolutions by Thomas Kuhn The New Creationism by Paul Garner kabane52.tumblr.com/creationism The Edge of Evolution by Michael Behe Thomistic Evolution Home Four Views: YEC, OEC, TE, ID Darwin’s Cathedral, by […]

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Maximos Kavsokalybites (the Hut-burner) (1365)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 2:42


A native of Lampsacus on the Hellespont, he became a monk at the age of seventeen. When his spiritual Father died, he went on pilgrimage to Constantinople, where he took up the ascesis of folly for Christ, pretending madness in order to conceal his virtues and struggles from the world. He then went to the Great Lavra of St Athanasius on Mount Athos, where he lived as a simple monk in complete obedience. One day, he was told in a dream to go to the summit of Athos to receive (like Moses) the tablets of the spiritual law. He prayed continuously atop the Holy Mountain for three days, after which the Mother of God appeared to him surrounded by angels. She gave him a miraculous loaf for his sustenance and told him to live in solitude on the wild slopes of Mount Athos. Henceforth he lived apart, barefoot in all weather. He would build himself crude shelters of branches and brush; after living in one for a short time he would burn it and move to a new place. Thus he received the name Kavsokalybites "the Hut Burner" from the other monks, who dismissed him as a madman.   Saint Gregory the Sinaite (April 6), one of the great Hesychasts, heard of St Maximos, and hurried to meet him. When they met, St Maximos put aside his usual silence at St Gregory's pleading, and they discoursed together for many hours. Saint Gregory was astonished at the wonders that God had accomplished in St Maximos, at his depth of spiritual understanding and his eloquence. Returning to the nearby monks, he said "He is an angel and not a man!" He begged St Maximos to give up his nomadic life and his pretended madness, and to live among his fellow monks for their edification. This St Maximos did. He settled in one of his crude huts, living on bread miraculously provided from heaven and on sea-water, which was made sweet by his prayer. He received and counseled any monks who sought him out, and over the years was visited by two Emperors and by the Patriarch of Constantinople. In his last years he returned to a small cell in his Lavra, where he reposed in peace at the age of ninety- five. The monks of Mt Athos immediately venerated him as a Saint.

The Retrospectors
A Deadly Day At The Races

The Retrospectors

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 10:21


Chariot racing was a dangerous and violent sport at the best of times, but on 13th January, 532, a hooligan-led protest at the Hippodrome of Constantinople - known as ‘the Nika rebellion' - ultimately lead to over 30,000 deaths and the destruction of half the City. Upon hearing his wife urge him that ‘royalty is a good burial shroud', the Emperor Justinian reportedly decided to slaughter his own people to maintain his position of power. Yet, despite this, he was ultimately deemed to have earned his epithet: ‘The Great'. In this episode, Arion, Rebecca and Olly unearth the tradition of ‘curse tablets'; explain why Empress Theodora switched allegiances from the ‘greens' to the ‘blues'; and reveal how a eunuch wielding gold coins helped to stabilise the Byzantine empire…Further Reading:‘Overview of the Nika Revolt' (ThoughtCo, 2019): https://www.thoughtco.com/the-nika-revolt-1788557Deadly Moments in History - The Nika Riots (Invicta, 2018): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dm9mscL2qHU‘12 Historic Little Known Rebellions with Tragic and Bloody Ends' (History Collection, 2017): https://historycollection.com/12-historic-little-known-rebellions-tragic-bloody-ends/9/For bonus material and to support the show, visit Patreon.com/RetrospectorsWe'll be back tomorrow! Follow us wherever you get your podcasts: podfollow.com/RetrospectorsThe Retrospectors are Olly Mann, Rebecca Messina & Arion McNicoll, with Matt Hill.Theme Music: Pass The Peas. Announcer: Bob Ravelli. Graphic Design: Terry Saunders. Edit Producer: Emma Corsham.Copyright: Rethink Audio / Olly Mann 2021. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Saint of the Day
Venerable Benedict Biscop, Abbot of Wearmouth (689-690)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 1:19


He came from a noble Northumbrian family in Britain, and was tonsured a monk in 653 at Lerins in Gaul. In 669 he was made Abbot of the Monastery of Saints Peter and Paul in Canterbury. He traveled to Rome in 671 to be instructed in monastic practice according to the Rule of Saint Benedict (of Nursia). Returning to Northumbria he established two new monasteries, the first to follow St Benedict's Rule in the British Isles. He went to Rome once again in 678-679, this time bringing back the archcantor of St Peter's, who taught the monks of St Benedict's monasteries the chant and liturgical practices used in Rome.   Under the holy abbot's guidance, these monasteries became flourishing centers of Christian worship, scholarship and art. The Venerable Bede (May 26) was one of his disciples. Saint Benedict reposed in peace in 689 or 690, having greatly strengthened the Church and the Christian faith in Britain.

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Theodosius the Cenobiarch (519)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 1:20


This Saint had Cappadocia as his homeland. He lived during the years of Leo of Thrace, who reigned from 457 to 474. The Saint established in the Holy Land a great communal monastery wherein he was the shepherd of many monks. While Saint Sabbas was the head of the hermits of Palestine, Saint Theodosius was governor of those living the cenobitic life, for which reason he is called the Cenobiarch. Together with Saint Sabbas, towards whom he cherished a deep brotherly love in Christ, he defended the whole land of Palestine from the heresy of the Monophysites, which was championed by the Emperor Anastasius and might very well have triumphed in the Holy Land without the opposition of these two great monastic fathers and their zealous defence of the holy Council of Chalcedon. Having lived for 103 years, he reposed in peace." (Great Horologion)

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Theophan the Recluse (1894)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 3:55


This modern-day Church Father was born in Chernavsk in central Russia. The son of a priest, he entered seminary at a young age, then completed the four-year course in theology at the Academy of Kiev. Though he distinguished himself as a student, his heart turned increasingly toward the monastic life, and he was tonsured a monk and ordained a priest upon completion of his studies. During his time at the Academy he often visited the Lavra of the Caves, and there became a spiritual child of Father Parthenius (March 25).   His desire for monastic life was not fulfilled immediately, for the Church felt need of his intellectual gifts. He served as a professor at the Theological Academy in St Petersburg, then worked for seven years in the Russian Mission to the Near East, mostly in Palestine. During this time he gained a perfect mastery of Greek and studied the works of the Church Fathers in the original languages. Returning to Russia, he was soon consecrated a bishop; but after seven years of episcopal service, he at last achieved his heart's desire, resigning as bishop and retiring to a small monastery at Yvschen, where he spent the rest of his days.   After taking full part in the liturgical and communal life of the monastery for several years, he took up the life of a recluse in 1872. He lived in two small rooms, subsisting almost entirely on bread and tea, visited only by his confessor and the abbot of the monastery. He celebrated the Divine Liturgy every day in his cell. All of his time not taken up by inner prayer was devoted to translating the works of the Fathers into Russian and, increasingly, to writings of his own. Most importantly, he prepared a Russian-language edition of the Philokalia which had a deep impact upon Russian spiritual life.   Though he received no visitors, St Theophan entered into correspondence with many earnest Christians who sought his counsel, and so in time became the spiritual father of many believers throughout Russia. He reposed in peace in 1894.   In addition to the Philokalia, St Theophan produced (among other works): a Spiritual Psalter of selections from St Ephraim the Syrian; The Path to Salvation, an exposition of Orthodox Spirituality written in clear, plain language for those living in the world; collections of his letters to spiritual children; and Unseen Warfare, a treatise on prayer and the ascetical life. This last has an unusual history. In its original form it was written by Lorenzo Scupoli, an Italian Roman Catholic priest. St Nikodemos of the Holy Mountain, recognizing the book's merit, produced a Greek edition in which he corrected various deviations from Orthodoxy in the original. St Theophan in turn revised the Greek edition extensively, removing some material and adding passages of his own; so that the Italian, Greek and Russian versions are in fact three substantially different books. Many of St Theophan's works (including Unseen Warfare) are available in good English translations. They are almost unique in presenting the undiluted hesychastic spirituality of the Orthodox Church in plain, straightforward language accessible to most people.

History of the World podcast
Vol 4 Ep 10 - BATTLE - The Battle of Kleidion ( 1014 )

History of the World podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 56:40


1014 - The tensions between the Bulgarians and the Byzantines reaches the point of no return when two great military monarchs called Samuel and Basil meet in battle, and a strategical match plays out which results in the ultimate destruction of one nation.

Saint of the Day
Holy Martyr Polyeuctus (~250)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 1:58


Polyeuctus and Nearchus were fellow-officers and close friends, serving in the Roman army at Miletene in Armenia. Nearchus was a Christian. Polyeuctus, though abundant in virtues, was still imprisoned in idol- worship. When the Emperor Decius' persecution broke out (239-251), an edict was issued requiring all soldiers to show their loyalty by making public sacrifice to the gods. Nearchus sadly told Polyeuctus that because of the decree they would soon be parted. But Polyeuctus, who had learned about the Christian faith from his friend, answered that Christ had appeared to him in a vision, exchanging his military uniform for a shining garment and giving him a winged horse. Polyeuctus took the vision as a sign that he was to embrace the Faith, and that he, with Nearchus, would soon be lifted up to heaven. Almost immediately, he first tore down the Emperor's edict in front of a startled crowd, then smashed the idols being carried in a pagan procession. He was quickly arrested and subjected to beating and scourging for sacrilege, but he only proclaimed more forcefully that he was a Christian. When the persecutors saw that Polyeuctus' patient endurance was bringing other idolaters to the faith, they condemned him to death.   Polyeuctus walked to the place of execution with the expression of a slave walking toward freedom, calling encouragement to the Christians who accompanied him. Fearlessly extending his neck to receive the sword, he received baptism in his own blood and received the martyr's crown.

Saint of the Day
Our Venerable Mother Domnica (Domnina) (~474)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 2:06


She was born in Rome and reared in the love of Christ. She secretly left her parents' house and traveled by ship to Alexandria, where she found lodging with four virtuous pagan maidens. By her example and counsel these four were in time led to abandon idolatry and embrace Domnica's faith. The five then sailed to Constantinople, where it is said that the Patriarch Nectarius (October 11) was notified of their coming by an angel and met them at the dock. The Patriarch baptized the four maidens himself, giving them the names Dorothea, Evanthia, Nonna and Timothea, then settled them and Domnica in a monastery.   Soon the fame of Domnica's pure life, wise teaching, and wondrous healings spread throughout the city, and even the Emperor Theodosius, with the Empress and his court, came to see her. Soon the crowds made it impossible for her and her sisters to live the heavenly life for which they had entered the monastery; so they relocated the monastery to a remote, demon-haunted location where executions had once commonly been performed, since everyone avoided the area. Here a new monastery was built by order of the Emperor, and the sisters found peace.   Saint Domnica's fame continued, and she became not only a healer but an oracle for the city of Constantinople, prophesying the death of the Emperor Theodosius and the unrest which followed it. She reposed in peace, having first entrusted the care of the monastery to Dorothea. At the moment of her death, the whole monastery was shaken, and those present saw Saint Domnica dressed as a bride, being borne heavenward escorted by a company of white-clad monks and nuns.

Saint of the Day
New Martyr Athanasius of Attalia (1700)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 1:04


A native of Attalia, he lived in Smyrna. Once he unguardedly spoke the opening words of the Muslim confession of faith, "There is no god but God." Hearing this, some Turks immediately surrounded him and took him to the court, claiming that he had embraced Islam. This he vehemently denied, assuring them that he was a Christian and that the words he had spoken would be unremarkable to any Christian. He was thrown into prison as an apostate and, after a sham trial, beheaded. His body was thrown to the dogs, but the usually voracious animals refused to touch his body, and it was removed by some pious Christians and given honorable burial.

Byzantium & Friends
62. Byzantine dress and fashion, with Jennifer Ball and Elizabeth Dospěl Williams

Byzantium & Friends

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 58:22


A conversation with Jen Ball (City University of New York) and Betsy Williams (Dumbarton Oaks, also episode 47) on the study of Byzantine dress and fashion. How do we know what people wore? Was clothing gendered? Why are dress and jewelry studied separately? And can we talk about fashion in Byzantium, or was fashion, as some believe, a modern development? For an excellent introduction to these problems, see Jen's book Byzantine Dress: Representations of Secular Dress in Eighth- to Twelfth-Century Painting (New York: Palgrave 2005).

Saint of the Day
The Holy Theophany of our Lord, God and Savior Jesus Christ

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 2:51


'About the beginning of our Lord's thirtieth year, John the Forerunner, who was some six months older than our Saviour according to the flesh, and had lived in the wilderness since his childhood, received a command from God and came into the parts of the Jordan, preaching the baptism of repentance unto the remission of sins. Then our Saviour also came from Galilee to the Jordan, and sought and received baptism though He was the Master and John was but a servant. Whereupon, there came to pass those marvellous deeds, great and beyond nature: the Heavens were opened, the Spirit descended in the form of a dove upon Him that was being baptized, and the voice was heard from the Heavens bearing witness that this was the beloved Son of God, now baptized as a man (Matt. 3:13 17; Mark 1:9 11; Luke 3:1 22). From these events the Divinity of the Lord Jesus Chist and the great mystery of the Trinity were demonstrated. It is also from this that the present feast is called "Theophany," that is, the divine manifestation, God's appearance among men. On this venerable day the sacred mystery of Christian baptism was inaugurated; henceforth also began the saving preaching of the Kingdom of Heaven.' (Great Horologion)   When Thou was baptized in the Jordan, O Lord, the worship of the Trinity was made manifest; for the voice of the Father bare witness to Thee, calling Thee His beloved Son. And the Spirit in the form of a dove confirmed the certainty of the word. O Christ our God, Who hast appeared and hast enlightened the world, glory be to Thee. — Troparion of Theophany   'But Christ's descent into the river has also a further significance. When Christ went down into the waters, not only did he carry us down with Him and make us clean, but He also made clean the nature of the waters themselves... The feast of Theophany has thus a cosmic aspect. The fall of the angelic orders, and after it the fall of man, involved the whole universe. All God's creation was thereby warped and disfigured: to use the symbolism of the liturgical texts, the waters were made a "lair of dragons". Christ came on earth to redeem not only man but through man the entire material creation. When He entered the water, besides effecting by anticipation our rebirth in the font, he likewise effected the cleansing of the waters, their transfiguration into an organ of healing and grace.' Bishop Kallistos, "Background and meaning of the Feasts" in the Festal Menaion.   The western feast of Epiphany, also on this day, commemorates not Christ's baptism but the adoration of the Magi.

Saint of the Day
Our Venerable Mother Syncletike (4th c.)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 2:39


She was the daughter of wealthy and devout parents in Alexandria. Though much desired as a bride for her great beauty, intelligence and wealth, she showed no interest in any worldly attraction and, when her parents died, gave away all of her large fortune. She then fled with her blind sister to the desert, where she became the foundress of monastic life for women in the Egyptian desert, just as St Anthony had for men. At first she attempted to struggle in solitude, hiding her ascetic labors from all and keeping strict silence before all people. But in time her holiness became known, and a company of young women formed around her, seeking to emulate and share in her way of life. At first she kept her silence even with them, but at last was forced out of love to give way to their pleas and reveal to them the wisdom that had been implanted in her. A settled monastic community grew around her, and she became known to all as Amma, the feminine form of the title Abba.   At the age of eighty-five, she was stricken with an agonizing cancer that slowly destroyed and putrefied her body. She bore these heavy trials with patience and thanksgiving, and told her disciples: "If illness strikes us, let us not be distressed as though physical exhaustion could prevent us from singing God's praises; for all these things are for our good and for the purification of our desires. Fasting and ascesis are enjoined on us only because of our appetites; so if illness has blunted their edge, there is no longer any need for ascetic labors. To endure illness patiently and to send up thanksgiving to God is the greatest ascesis of all."   Eventually her illness deprived her even of the power of speech, but it was said that the sight of her joyful and serene countenance amid her sufferings was better than any other teaching, and the faithful continued to flock to her to receive a blessing. After a three-month martyrdom, she departed this life, having predicted the day of her death.   It is said that St Syncletike was the virgin who sheltered St Athanasius the Great when he was driven into hiding for more than a year by the Arians. Her biography, which the Synaxarion calls "one of the basic texts of Orthodox spirituality," is attributed to St Athanasius.

Saint of the Day
Synaxis of the Seventy Apostles

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 0:47


In addition to the Twelve Apostles, our Lord appointed seventy disciples to go forth and bring the Good News to the world (see Luke ch. 10). Others were later added to this company by the Holy Apostles, so that their number in fact exceeds seventy, though all are still referred to as "of the Seventy."   On this day we also commemorate the company of those who have been sent forth by the Holy Spirit through the centuries to proclaim the joyous Gospel of Christ.

Saint of the Day
Holy Martyr Gordius of Caesarea (4th c.)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 1:34


"The Martyr Gordius, who was from Caesarea of Cappadocia, was a centurion by rank. Unable to bear the impiety of the heathen, he withdrew to the wilderness to purify himself through prayer and fasting. After he perceived that his ascetical training had prepared him sufficiently, he came down from the mountains when a certain pagan festival was held in Caesarea, attended by all, and presented himself to the multitude. Although the spectacles of the festival continued, no one paid them any heed, but all eyes were turned upon him. From his sojourn in the mountains, his look was wild, his beard was long, his raiment squalid, his body like a skeleton; yet a certain grace shone round about him. He was recognized, and a loud shout and tumult was made, as his fellow Christians rejoiced, and the enemies of the truth cried out for his death. He boldly professed his faith before the Governor, and after torments was beheaded, in the reign of Licinius in the year 314. Saint Basil the Great delivered a homily on Saint Gordius, mentioning that some of those in his audience had been present at the Saint's martyrdom." (Great Horologion)

Saint of the Day
St Seraphim of Sarov (1833)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2022 3:32


"Saint Seraphim was born in the town of Kursk in 1759. From tender childhood he was under the protection of the most holy Mother of God, who, when he was nine years old, appeared to him in a vision, and through her icon of Kursk, healed him from a grave sickness from which he had not been expected to recover. At the age of nineteen he entered the monastery of Sarov, where he amazed all with his obedience, his lofty asceticism, and his great humility. In 1780 the Saint was stricken with a sickness which he manfully endured for three years, until our Lady the Theotokos healed him, appearing to him with the Apostles Peter and John. He was tonsured a monk in 1786, being named for the holy Hieromartyr Seraphim, Bishop of Phanarion (Dec. 4), and was ordained deacon a year later. In his unquenchable love for God, he continually added labours to labours, increasing in virtue and prayer with titan strides. Once, during the Divine Liturgy of Holy and Great Thursday he was counted worthy of a vision of our Lord Jesus Christ, Who appeared encompassed by the heavenly hosts. After this dread vision, he gave himself over to greater labours.   "In 1794, Saint Seraphim took up the solitary life in a cell in the forest. This period of extreme asceticism lasted some fifteen years, until 1810. It was at this time that he took upon himself one of the greatest feats of his life. Assailed with despondency and a storm of contrary thoughts raised by the enemy of our salvation, the Saint passed a thousand nights on a rock, continuing in prayer until God gave him complete victory over the enemy. On another occasion, he was assaulted by robbers, who broke his chest and his head with their blows, leaving him almost dead. Here again, he began to recover after an appearance of the most Holy Theotokos, who came to him with the Apostles Peter and John, and pointing to Saint Seraphim, uttered these awesome words, 'This is one of my kind.'   "In 1810, at the age of fifty, weakened by his more than human struggles, Saint Seraphim returned to the monastery for the third part of his ascetical labours, in which he lived as a recluse, until 1825. For the first five years of his reclusion, he spoke to no one at all, and little is known of this period. After five years, he began receiving visitors little by little, giving counsel and consolation to ailing souls. In 1825, the most holy Theotokos appeared to the Saint and revealed to him that it was pleasing to God that he fully end his reclusion; from this time the number of people who came to see him grew daily. It was also at the command of the holy Virgin that he undertook the spiritual direction of the Diveyevo Convent. He healed bodily ailments, foretold things to come, brought hardened sinners to repentance, and saw clearly the secrets of the heart of those who came to him. Through his utter humility and childlike simplicity, his unrivalled ascetical travails, and his angel-like love for God, he ascended to the holiness and greatness of the ancient God-bearing Fathers and became, like Anthony for Egypt, the physician for the whole Russian land. In all, the most holy Theotokos appeared to him twelve times in his life. The last was on Annunciation, 1831, to announce to him that he would soon enter into his rest. She appeared to him accompanied by twelve virgins martyrs and monastic saints with Saint John the Baptist and Saint John the Theologian. With a body ailing and broken from innumerable hardships, and an unspotted soul shining with the light of Heaven, the Saint lived less than two years after this, falling asleep in peace on January 2, 1833, chanting Paschal hymns. On the night of his repose, the righteous Philaret of the Glinsk Hermitage beheld his soul ascending to Heaven in light. Because of the universal testimony to the singular holiness of his life, and the seas of miracles that he performed both in life and after death, his veneration quickly spread beyond the boundaries of the Russian Empire to every corner of the earth. See also July 19." (Great Horologion)   July 19 is the commemoration of the uncovering of St Seraphim's holy relics, which was attended by Tsar Nicholas II.   Saint Seraphim's life became a perpetual celebration of Pascha: in his later years he dressed in a white garment, greeted everyone, regardless of the season, with "Christ is Risen!" and chanted the Pascha service every day of the year.

Saint of the Day
The Circumcision of Our Lord Jesus Christ

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2022 0:45


In keeping with the Law of Moses, the Savior's parents had Him circumcised eight days after His birth (see Luke ch. 2). On this day, following Jewish custom, he received the name Jesus (Yeshua, a form of Joshua), meaning "God saves." Thus, on this day, the Covenant of Moses was fulfilled and brought to an end, and the Salvation of God's people was proclaimed to the world.

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Mother Melania the Younger of Rome (439)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 3:23


She was born in 383 in Rome, to a very wealthy family with large estates in Italy, Africa, Spain and even Britain. She was the grand- daughter of St Melania the Elder (June 8) and a pious disciple of Christ from a young age. She was married against her will at the age of fourteen, to a relative named Apinianus. They had two children, both of whom died in early childhood. Henceforth Melania and her husband dedicated themselves entirely to God. They had both dreamed of a high wall that they would have to climb before they could pass through the narrow gate that leads to life, and soon began to take measures to dispose of their wealth. This aroused opposition from some of the Senate, who were concerned that the selling off of such huge holdings would disrupt the economy of the State itself.   With the support of the Empress, though, Melania was able to free 8000 of her slaves and give each a gift of three gold pieces to begin life as freedmen. She employed agents to help fund the establishment of churches and monasteries throughout the Empire, donated many estates to the Church, and sold many more, giving the proceeds as alms. When Rome fell to the Goths under Alaric in 410, Melania and Apinianus moved to Sicily, then to Africa, where they completed the sale of their propery, donating the proceeds to monasteries and to aiding victims of the barbarians.   In Africa Melania, now aged about thirty, took up a life of the strictest asceticism: she kept a total fast on weekdays, only eating on Saturday and Sunday; she slept two hours a night, giving the rest of the night to vigil and prayer. Her days were spent in charitable works, using the remainder of her wealth to relieve the poor and benefit the Church. After seven years in Africa, Melania, her mother and her husband left on pilgrimage to the Holy Land. There they founded a monastery on the Mount of Olives, which grew to a community of ninety nuns. Melania's mother died in 431, then her husband and spiritual brother Apinianus ; she buried them side by side.   Save for one visit to Constantinople, Melania continued to live in reclusion in a small cave on the Mount of Olives; she became an advisor to the Empress Eudocia, who sought her expert counsel on her gifts to churches and monasteries.   Melania fell ill keeping the Vigil of Nativity in 439, and fell asleep in the Lord six days later; her last words were 'As it has pleased the Lord, so it has come to pass.' Her monastery was destroyed in 614 by the Persians, but her cave hermitage on the Mount of Olives is still a place of pilgrimage and veneration.

Saint of the Day
Holy Virgin and Martyr Anysia (298)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 1:50


She was born to a pious, noble and very wealthy family in Thessalonica. When both her parents died while she was an adolescent, Anysia consecrated herself to Christ, the heavenly Bridegroom. She cast off all her jewels and fine clothing, dressing herself as a commoner. She freed all her many slaves, giving each of them a generous sum of money to establish themselves. She gave away all of her inheritance, which included large estates. Thenceforth she spent her days visiting the sick, helping widows and orphans, and, especially, aiding Christians suffering under persecution. She would visit those in prison, bringing them food and water and tending their wounds. All the time not devoted to aiding the poor or oppressed she spent in prayer in a small cell. One of her prayers was that she, like those that she helped, would be granted the crown of martyrdom.   One day, while she was walking to church, an imperial soldier accosted her and roughly questioned her. When she plainly declared herself a Christian, the soldier seized her and dragged her to a temple of the idols, where he commanded her to make sacrifice. In response, she only spat in his face. The enraged soldier drew his sword and thrust it into her side, slaying her. Some pious Christians took her body and buried it outside the city. When the persecutions had ended, a church was built in her honor at the place of her burial.

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina
54—Maximus the Confessor: Where East and West Meet

Way of the Fathers with Mike Aquilina

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 17:42


  By the seventh century, Christian thinkers of East and West were settling into scholastic methods, synthesizing and systematizing the thought of their Greek or Latin forebears. Maximus represents the best mind (by far) in this movement. Greek by origin, he spent decades living in Latin lands. His writing reflected the beauty and brilliance of piety and theology on both sides of the Mediterranean. In Maximus (to steal a phrase from Pope John Paul II) the Church breathed with both lungs. He marshaled all the resources of East and West to oppose the emerging Monothelite heresy. The emperor, meanwhile, pinned his hopes on the heresy to unite the empire against rising Islam—and Maximus suffered brutal torture and exile. LINKS Anthony Marco, doctoral dissertation, Consecrate the World to God: Maximus the Confessor on the “Secular” and Vatican II's Theology of the Laity https://dsc.duq.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2987&context=etd Andrew J. Summerson, Audio: Exegesis of the Human Heart: Narrating the Emotional Life of Christians with Maximus the Confessor https://sheptytskyinstitute.ca/exegesis-of-the-human-heart-narrating-the-emotional-life-of-christians-with-maximus-the-confessor/ Maximus the Confessor, On the Cosmic Mystery of Jesus Christ (an anthology of his works) https://www.amazon.com/Cosmic-Mystery-Jesus-Christ/dp/088141249X/ Maximus the Confessor: Selected Writings https://www.amazon.com/Maximus-Confessor-Selected-Writings-Spirituality/dp/0809126591/ Mike Aquilina's website https://fathersofthechurch.com Mike Aquilina's books https://catholicbooksdirect.com/writer/mike-aquilina/ Theme music: Gaudeamus (Introit for the Feast of All Saints), sung by Jeff Ostrowski. Courtesy of Corpus Christi Watershed http://www.ccwatershed.org Donate today! https://www.catholicculture.org/users/donate/audio

Saint of the Day
The Holy Infants Killed for Christ's Sake in Bethlehem

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 1:07


See Matthew ch. 2. Their number is sometimes put at fourteen thousand. In our own day, the icon of "Rachel weeping for her children" (Matthew 2:18) has come to commemorate also the tens of millions of children who have died through abortion.

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Simon the Outpourer of Myrrh, Founder of Simonopetra Monastery, Mt Athos (1287)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 2:49


He lived during the years when Constantinople was held in captivity by the Crusaders, and the Imperial government was in exile in Nicaea. Simon fled the world at a young age and traveled to the Holy Mountain, where he submitted himself to a strict but wise Elder for many years. In time, seeking greater seclusion, he moved to a small cave on the western side of Mt Athos, near a cliff that towered a thousand feet above the sea. One night, a few days before the Feast of the Nativity, he saw a star move across the sky and come to rest above the cliff near his cave. Taking this as a demonic delusion, he ignored it; but on the Eve of Nativity, the star once again took its place above the cliff, and Simon heard a voice from heaven saying 'Be in no doubt, Simon, faithful servant of my Son! See this sign, and do not leave this spot in search of greater solitude as you have in mind, for it is here that I want you to establish your monastery, for the salvation of many souls.' Soon afterward, three young monks from wealthy Macedonian families, who had heard of the Saint's holiness, came and laid their wealth at his feet, asking that he accept them as disciples. Simon sent for builders and ordered them to construct a monastery on the very edge of the precipitous cliff. The builders at first refused, saying the work was much too dangerous; but, persuaded by a miracle worked through the Saint's prayers, they were convinced. As soon as the building was finished, the monastic community began to grow rapidly.   In his own lifetime St Simon was the source of many miracles, prophecies and healings. Once the monastery was attacked by Saracen pirates. Simon went to meet them with gifts, hoping to dissuade them from attacking. When the pirates attacked him, they were blinded, and the arm of one of them was paralyzed when he attempted to strike the Saint. All of them were healed when the holy man prayed for them, and at this wonder they all repented, received Baptism and became monks.   Saint Simon reposed in peace. A fragrant, healing balm afterwards flowed from his tomb in great quantities, so that he came to be called Myroblytis, 'Myrrh-gusher' or 'Outpourer of Myrrh.' In subsequent years, the monastery was destroyed and rebuilt more than once, and no trace now remains of the tomb.

Saint of the Day
Holy First Martyr and Archdeacon Stephen

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 1:47


A kinsman of the Apostle Paul, the Holy Stephen was one of the seven deacons (with Philip, Prochorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas and Nicolas) first appointed by the Church to minister to the people; and it pleased God to receive him as the Church's first Martyr for Christ. Read the long, beautiful and edifying account of his witness in the Acts of the Apostles, chapters 6-8. When Stephen, "full of faith and power, did great wonders and miracles among the people," (Acts 6:8), some members of a synagogue in Jerusalem came to dispute with him and, enraged by his proclamation of Christ, stoned him to death. In his death St Stephen revealed Christ's erasure of the boundary between heaven and earth, and the new communion between man and God: his face shone with the light of the Transfiguration, and he was granted a vision of Christ enthroned at the Father's right hand. His dying words were "Lord, lay not this sin to their charge" (Acts 7:60).   According to holy tradition, the martyrdom of St Stephen occurred exactly a year after the descent of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. His body was taken and secretly buried by Gamaliel, a member of the Sanhendrin and secretly a Christian.   Saint Stephen's relics were discovered by the priest Lucian in 415 following a vision. They were translated to the church built for them in Jerusalem by the Empress Eudocia, and later taken to Constantinople.   The Saint's missionary speech before his death (like that of the deacon St Philip to the Ethiopian eunuch) reminds us that those appointed to serve the Church materially are not barred, or even excused, from proclaiming the glorious Gospel of Christ.

History of the World podcast
Vol 4 Ep 8 - The Byzantine Empire, Part Three

History of the World podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 54:18


718 - 976 - This period represents a reestablishment of the Byzantine Empire in a new world of Christian competition, and emerging nations looking to challenge Byzantine dominance and ideology.

Saint of the Day
The Flight into Egypt of the Holy Family

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 1:25


See Matthew ch. 2. Though St Matthew's account may leave the impression that the flight into Egypt was almost immediate, it would have been at least forty days after Christ's birth, following His Presentation in the Temple (Luke ch. 2). Christ, his holy Mother and his adoptive father St Joseph probably remained in Egypt for several years, until the death of Herod the Great.   St Nikolai Velimirovic (in the Prologue) relates the following tale: the holy family, fleeing into Egypt, were accosted by robbers, one of whom, seeing the Christ Child, was amazed at his supernatural beauty and said 'If God were to take human flesh Himself, He would not be more beautiful than this child!'. The robber told his companions to take nothing from the family. In gratitude the Mother of God told him 'This Child will reward you richly for having

Global Greek Influence
Being and becoming outlooks

Global Greek Influence

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 24:16


What we choose to keep moving to the future and how we become from being: · the roles of prioritising and open-mindedness in "A Good Beginning is More than Half of the Whole", · the necessity of a shared vision and empathy to transition from being to becoming, · the synthesis that makes the continuum between the past and the future. Giving a distinct dimension through featuring Global Greek Influence podcast episodes: “The hybrid innovation”, "The internationalisation of the Pontic Greeks' genocide", "We will always have Chaos" and "The past defines us: The end of philosophy and the beginning of the middle ages- The Byzantines". Music: "Fortitude" by Lance Conrad Source: Storyblocks --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/panagiota-pimenidou/message

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture
Matthew Milliner / A Womb More Spacious Than Stars: How Mary's Beauty and Presence Upends the Patriarchy and Stabilizes Christian Spirituality

For the Life of the World / Yale Center for Faith & Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 62:53


"Don't dare think that somehow your conversation with Mary and your interest in her is in competition with your relationship with Christ. ... You are flirting with heresy if you do not have a doctrine of Mary as mother of God." —Matthew MillinerWhat is the role of the Virgin Mary in Christian spiritual formation? Art historian Matthew Milliner (Wheaton College) joins Evan Rosa for a conversation about beauty of Mary in Christian spirituality—particularly for Protestants, for whom the abuses of the past have alienated them from a core component of creedal Christianity, Mary as "Theotokos," the Mother of God. They discuss the history of iconoclasm against Mary, the struggle of contemporary Christianity with art and aesthetics, unpacking the "Woman Clothed with the Sun" from Revelation 12, the feminist objection to Mary, and how the Virgin Mary upends an ancient pagan goddess culture invented to maintain patriarchy. They close with an appreciation of Mother Maria Skobtsova, who's life and witness in the Ravensbruck death camp during the Holocaust exemplifies how the example and presence of Mary Theotokos today might inform the pursuit of a life worth living.Show Notes"La Corona" by John Donne"Don't dare think that somehow your conversation with Mary and your interest in her is in competition with your relationship with Christ." —Matthew Milliner, from the interviewMatthew Milliner's forthcoming book, Mother of the LambHow sacred "art" must support presence"A large family album"Iconoclasm against the Virgin Mary"The institutionalized art world has done such a wonderful job of alienating so many people.""Where has this been all my life?"Madonna Della Misericordia: "The train of her robe is very wide."Contemporary Christianity's struggle with aesthetics"The idea that the Christianity is somehow aesthetically impoverished itself seems to me a fictitious assertion. One that can be fueled with select examples, but I just think there's so much out there that that has been undiscovered. And Mary is often at the heart of it all, like in some senses, whether or not Mary—her presence—[is] in a church in one way or another might be an indicator of whether or not it's going to be beautiful."Revelation 12: "A Woman Clothed with the Sun""She's the new arc of the covenant, in which the presence of God resides."Four-fold reading of scripture: "the literal and the allegorical and the anagogical and the tropical logical are all functioning at the same time."Reading Revelation 12 adventurously: The Woman and the Dragon"Don't dare think that somehow your conversation with Mary and your interest in her is in competition with your relationship with Christ.""It only will enhance your relationship with Christ to develop these other resonances.""Do you realize we're actually in a deep deficit of Catholic Mariology right now?"Vatican II decimated Catholic Mariology"You are flirting with heresy if you do not have a doctrine of Mary as mother of God."What is the role of Mary in Christian spiritual formation?Intersession and prayerJohn Henry Newman on the correlation of Marian piety with cultures that hang on to Christianity.The essential nature of art in Marian Christian piety.Icon: "Virgin of the Sign"—"A womb more spacious than the stars"Sonogram/Ultrasound Mary—conveying all powerful Deity humbled into human formJohn Donne's "La Corona": "Thy Maker's maker, thy Father's mother."Feminist objection to Mariology: "Any time Mary is uplifted, other women are left out.""Alone of all her sex"Rosemary Radford Ruther, Goddesses and the Divine FeminineGoddess cultureThe virgin Mary upends a goddess culture invented to maintain patriarchySarah Jane Boss, Mary: New Century TheologyCharlene Spretnak, Missing Mary: The ReEmergence of the Queen of Heaven in the Modern ChurchMariology and GenderThreatened masculinityPagan phallocentric  religionCourtney Hall Lee, Black Madonna: A Womanist Look at Mary of Nazareth"Christ has a female body too, and a black body too, and a white body, two and not just the Jewish body that he has. An Indian body too, and in Chinese body too, because of his dimension as the ecclesia, which also has a Marian resonance. So welcome to Christianity. You stay long enough, your mind's going to be blown again. ... Nicene orthodoxy is where you get all this stuff."On the Apostle Paul and Marian Piety: "I am grieving until Christ is formed in you. The birth pangs that Paul goes through. And we're all intended to nurse Christ, to give birth to Christ in a metaphorical manner in our lives. And that goes for men as well. So men also can be Marian. In fact, we must be marrying if we're going to be Orthodox Christians."Barth, Von Balthasar, Bulgakov"Theology is better communicated through images because the missteps are harder to make."The equivalent of the hymn is the icon: a tested image that's been around for hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of years, and that has been refined. And that people over time said, 'You know, there's something right about this one in particular.'"Find icons and prints online at Skete.comAnalysis of the classic Nativity icon"The Nativity icon is what God wants to do in your soul.""Icons are the brake tapping on the entire hyper visual world that we're in. We do not need to be dazzled the way Leonardo dazzled the people of his day. We need to be restrained. And that's what these icons are providing."The beam of light that crashes through the immanent frame.Navigating the depths of interior prayer through art history.Rowan Williams's Looking East in Winter: research on Mother Maria Skobtsova, the Russian Orthodox female parallel to Dietrich Bonhoeffer, who died in the Ravensbrück concentration camp."Mary functioned for her [Mother Maria] as the epiphany, as the illustration, of selfless love."Rowan Williams (from Looking East in Winter): "The Marian sense of being overwhelmed from outside by the presence of the others. Is one of the things that displaces the ego and self oriented projects, including the self-oriented project of doing good or serving the neighbor.""She kept saying, 'My monastery has no walls. My monastery is wherever the poor are.'""There's the great line that the Christians of the 20th century will be either mystics or they won't be Christians at all."About Matthew MillinerMatthew Milliner is Associate Professor of Art History at Wheaton College. He holds an M.A. & Ph.D. in art history from Princeton University, and an M.Div from Princeton Theological Seminary. His scholarly specialization is Byzantine and medieval art, with a focus on how such images inform contemporary visual culture. He teaches across the range of art history with an eye for the prospects and pitfalls of visual theology. He is a five-time appointee to the Curatorial Advisory Board of the United States Senate, and a winner of Redeemer University's Emerging Public Intellectual Award. He has written for publications ranging from The New York Times to First Things. He recently delivered the Wade Center's Hansen lecture series on Native American Art, and was awarded a Commonwealth fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Culture at the University of Virginia to complete his forthcoming book, Mother of the Lamb (Fortress Press). Follow @Millinerd on TwitterProduction NotesThis podcast featured art historian Matthew MillinerEdited and Produced by Evan RosaHosted by Evan RosaProduction Assistance by Martin Chan, Nathan Jowers,  and Logan LedmanA Production of the Yale Center for Faith & Culture at Yale Divinity School https://faith.yale.edu/aboutSupport For the Life of the World podcast by giving to the Yale Center for Faith & Culture: https://faith.yale.edu/give

Saint of the Day
The Nativity according to the Flesh of our Lord, God and Savior Jesus Christ

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 2:43


The Synaxarion's account includes this tradition from the Protoevangelium of James: "When Joseph had found a place for Mary in Bethlehem, he went out to look for a midwife. On his way, he noticed that the whole of nature had suddenly become utterly still as though seized with astonishment: the birds hung motionless in mid-air, men and beasts stopped in their tracks, and the waters ceased flowing. The continuous movement that leads everything from birth to death and imprisons it in vanity (cf Pss. 38:6-7; 102:15. Eccles. 1) was suspended, for at that moment the Eternal entered within the heart of time. The pre-eternal God became a newborn child. Time and history now took on a new dimension."

Saint of the Day
Holy Virgin and Martyr Eugenia and her companions

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 2:02


"This Martyr was the daughter of most distinguished and noble parents named Philip and Claudia. Philip, a Prefect of Rome, moved to Alexandria with his family. In Alexandria, Eugenia had the occasion to learn the Christian Faith, in particular when she encountered the Epistles of Saint Paul, the reading of which filled her with compunction and showed her clearly the vanity of the world. Secretly taking two of her servants, Protas and Hyacinth, she departed from Alexandria by night. Disguised as a man, she called herself Eugene [Eugenios -ed.] while pretending to be a eunuch, and departed with her servants and took up the monastic life in a monastery of men. Her parents mourned for her, but could not find her. After Saint Eugenia had laboured for some time in the monastic life, a certain woman named Melanthia, thinking Eugene to be a monk, conceived lust and constrained Eugenia to comply with her desire; when Eugenia refused, Melanthia slandered Eugenia to the Prefect as having done insult to her honour. Eugenia was brought before the Prefect, her own father Philip, and revealed to him both that she was innocent of the accusations, and that she was his own daughter. Through this, Philip became a Christian; he was afterwards beheaded at Alexandria. Eugenia was taken back to Rome with Protas and Hyacinth. All three of them ended their life in martyrdom in the years of Commodus, who reigned from 180 to 192." (Great Horologion)

Screaming in the Cloud
Into the Great Wide Open Source with Julia Ferraioli

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 40:19


About JuliaJulia Ferraioli calls herself an Open Source Archaeologist, focusing on sustainability, tooling, and research. Her background includes research in machine learning, robotics, HCI, and accessibility. Julia finds energy in developing creative demos, creating beautiful documents, and rainbow sprinkles. She's also a fierce supporter of LaTeX, the Oxford comma, and small pull requests.Links:Open Source Stories: https://www.opensourcestories.org TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: It seems like there is a new security breach every day. Are you confident that an old SSH key, or a shared admin account, isn't going to come back and bite you? If not, check out Teleport. Teleport is the easiest, most secure way to access all of your infrastructure. The open source Teleport Access Plane consolidates everything you need for secure access to your Linux and Windows servers—and I assure you there is no third option there. Kubernetes clusters, databases, and internal applications like AWS Management Console, Yankins, GitLab, Grafana, Jupyter Notebooks, and more. Teleport's unique approach is not only more secure, it also improves developer productivity. To learn more visit: goteleport.com. And not, that is not me telling you to go away, it is: goteleport.com. Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. My guest today is someone I have been very politely badgering to come on the show for a while, ever since I saw her speak a couple years ago in the Before Times, at Monktoberfest. As I've said before, anytime the RedMonk folks are involved in something, it is something you probably want to be involved in. That is my new guiding star philosophy when it comes to conferences, Twitter threads, opinions, breakfast cereals, you name it. Please welcome Julia Ferraioli, the co-founder of Open Source Stories, Julia, thank you for joining me today.Julia: Thank you for having me. And I definitely agree on the RedMonk side of things. They are fantastic folk.Corey: They're a small company, which is sort of interesting to me from a perspective of just how outsized their impact on this entire industry is. But it's, I've had as many of them as they will let me have on the show. They are welcome to come back whatever they want, just because they—every single one of them, though they're very different from one another, make everyone around them better with their presence. And that's just a hard thing to see. I didn't mean to turn this into a love letter to RedMonk, but here we are.Julia: I don't mind it. They have the ability to amplify the goodness that they see, anything from their survey designs to just how they interact online. It's wonderful to see.Corey: Speaking of amplifications, you are the co-founder of Open Source Stories, the idea of telling the—to my understanding—the stories behind open source. Like this is sort of like—what is it, Behind the Music, only in this case it's Behind the Code? I mean, how do you envision this?Julia: Oh, I like that framing. So, Open Source Stories is a project that myself and Amanda Casari founded not that terribly long ago because when we were doing research about how to model open source and open source ecosystems, we realized that a lot of the research papers that have been published about open source are pulled mostly from GitHub Archive, which is this repository of GitHub data. It could be the actual Git commit history as well as the activity streams from GitHub as well, but that doesn't capture a lot of the nuances behind open source, things like the narratives, how communities interact, where communication is happening, et cetera. All of these things can happen outside of the hosting platform. So, we launched this project to help tell these stories of the people and events and scenarios behind the open source projects that really power our industry.Corey: I'm going to get letters for this one, I'm sure of it, but I've been involved in the open source ecosystem for a while and I've noticed that there's been a recurring theme among various projects, particularly the more passionate folks working on them, where they talk an awful lot but they aren't very good at telling stories at the same time. And nowhere is this more evident than when we look at what passes for a lot of these projects' documentation. One of the transformative talks that I went to was Jordan Sissel's years and years ago, at the Southern California Linux Expo. And it was a talk about LogStash, which doesn't actually matter because the part that he'd said that really resonated with me, that his whole theme of his talk was around, was if a new user has a bad time, it's a bug. And the idea that, “Oh, you didn't read the documentation properly.”When about I started working with Linux, in some IRC chat rooms, the standard response to someone asked for help was to assume that they're an idiot, begin immediately accosting them with RTFM, for Read the Frickin' Manual, and then look for ways that you could turn this back around on them and make it their fault. And I looked at this and at the time, it's like, “Wow, these are people that are mean to other people,” and I was a small, angry teenager; it's like, “This is my jam. Here I am.” And yeah, many decades later, I'm looking at this and I feel a sense of shame because that's not the energy I want to put into the world. A lot of those communities have evolved and grown and what used to be the area and arena for hobbyists is now powering trillion-dollar companies.Julia: Absolutely. I like the whole, “If the user has a bad experience, that's a bug,” because it absolutely is. And I feel like a lot of these projects haven't invested nearly as much into the user experience as they have into polishing the code. And the attitude that that kind of perpetuates throughout the project about how you treat your users, it's pervasive and it really sets up the types of features that you develop, the contributors that you encouraged to commit to the project, and it just creates a—to put it minorly—less than welcoming environment for users, contributors, maintainers alike. And we don't really need that sort of hostility, especially when we're talking about projects that underpin the foundations, in some cases, of the internet.Corey: When we look at what open source is, I mean, I shortcut to thinking in terms of the context through which I've always approached it, which was generally code, or in my sad, particular story, back in the olden days on good freenode, when that was where a lot of this discourse happened, I was network staff and helping a bunch of different communities get channels set up through a Byzantine process. Because of course there was a Byzantine process; it was an open source community, and if there's one thing we love in open source, it is pretending to be lawyers when we're not. And we're sort of cargo-culting what we think process and procedure often look like. So yeah, there was a bunch of nonsensical paperwork happening there, but it was mostly about helping folks collaborate and communicate. But I've first and foremost, think in terms of code and in terms of community. What is open source to you?Julia: Well, I entered open source in the Sourceforge days, when all you had to do was go and download some code from the internet and hit the right download button, make sure not to hit one of the extraneous ones. And all you need for that is for the code to be under the right license. And to an extent that's what's true today for open source. At the heart of it, this minimum criteria for what constitutes open source is, “Okay, does it comply with the open source definition that the Open Source Initiative puts forth?” Now, I understand that not everybody necessarily agrees with the Open Source definition, but it's useful as a shortcut for how we think about the basic requirements. But what I find when people are talking about open source online is that they have these very different models. You'll hear from people that, “Okay, well, if it doesn't have a standard governance model, it's not really open source.”Corey: The ‘No True Scotsman' argument.Julia: Yeah. So, I find that we've got these different expectations for what open source is, and that leads to us talking past each other or discounting different types of open source when what we really need to do is come up with better language, a better vocabulary, for how to talk about these things. So, for example, I used to work in developer relations, and in developer relations one of the big things that you do is release sample code. Now, oftentimes, I'm not looking for that sample code to be picked up by a bunch of different developers and incorporated as a library into their project—Corey: [laugh]. Well, that's your error in that case because congratulations, that's running in production at a bank somewhere, now.Julia: Oh, I know. And that has definitely happened with my code, and I'm ashamed to say that. [laugh]. But generally speaking, you're not looking to build a huge community around sample code, right?Corey: You say that, but that again, Stack Overflow, it was—Julia: Okay.Corey: —[unintelligible 00:09:22] done rather well. So, there's that.Julia: Well yes, that is true, but when you release code on Stack Overflow, or GitHub, or in a Jest, or just on your blog, the thing that allows the bank to come in and incorporate that into their own application, or to even just learn from it, is the fact that it is open source. Now, it doesn't have a lot of the things that a community like Python or Kubernetes has, but it is still open source; it just has a different purpose than those communities and those ecosystems.Corey: So, I think it is challenging right now to talk about open source as if it were the same type of thing that it was back in the '90s, and the naughts—and even the teens—where it's a bunch of, more or less either hobbyists or people are perceived to be hobbyists. Sure, an awful lot of them are making commits from their redhat.com email address, but okay. And some of these people are increasingly being paid to work places, but then you see almost—I don't necessarily agree with the framing of The New York Times article by Daisuke Wakabayashi—who's a previous guest on the show—of Amazon strip-mining open source, but they definitely are in there—and other companies as well—are sort of appropriating it, or subverting it, or turning it into something that it was not previously, for lack of a better term. What's your take on that?Julia: Oh, that's a hard one. From a fundamentals perspective, that is absolutely within their rights under the definition of open source, and in some cases, the spirit of open source as well.Corey: Oh, and I would argue with someone who said that they should be constrained from doing this as far as a matter of legalities, or rights, or ridiculous Looney Tunes license changes.Julia: Well, there are definitely folks who are trying to make that the case.Corey: Yeah. Oh, yeah. I'm on the position of, they're within their rights to do it, but it's time for a good old fashioned public shunning as a result.Julia: I'm not sure I agree. I think that it is a natural consequence of how open source has gained in popularity and, in some cases, it's a testament to open source's success. Now, does it pose some serious challenges for the open source community and open source ecosystem? Absolutely because this is a new way of using open source that was unanticipated, and in fact, could be characterized as a Black Swan event in [open source-ware 00:12:18].Corey: The fundamental attribution error that I see, back at the very beginning, was that what we wrote the software, therefore, we are the best in the world at running it, therefore, if there's going to be a managed service, clearly ours will be the best. Amazon's core strength has apparently been operational excellence as they like to call it; my position on that is a little bit less of tying into the mystery, a little bit more of they're really fast and getting paged and fixing things in a hurry before customers notice. So okay, great, but it's column A, column B, whatever. The bigger concern I have with Amazon as its product strategy is, “Yes.” If it were just a way to run EC2 instances or virtual machines, then sure, that's great.And every open source project should, on some level, see some validation of its market through a lens of, “Oh, we're getting some competition. That's great.” The challenge I see is that in the line of competitors, Amazon is at or near the front all the time on basically everything. And it's if they would pick a lane to stay in, great.Google is a good example of this. There are things that Google very strongly considers in its wheelhouse, but for other things, they partner with the open source-based company in question to create a managed service partner offering and that's great. Amazon pulls a, “Nope. We're just going to build this out as first-party. The end.”And they compete with everyone, including themselves on almost every axis. And that's where it just gets into a, “Leave some oxygen for the rest of us.” I mean, it feels like they lie awake at night worrying that someone who isn't them somehow making money somewhere. That is, I think, on some level, more of the Black Swan event than someone else deciding that they can host a particular open source project more effectively. But that's where I stand. And again, this is just me as an enthusiastic and obnoxious observer. You're operating in this space. What do you think? That's the important part of the story.Julia: Well, I mean, you definitely have a point, Amazon—or AWS, maybe not necessarily Amazon—takes on different technologies far and wide, so they're not limiting themselves to a space. But that said, I think it comes down less to what is possible with open source and what is okay under the guise of open source, and what is good for the open source ecosystem. And when you fork a project, you do have to understand that you are bifurcating the open source ecosystem. And that can lead to sustainability problems down the road. So, I think the jury is still out on whether forking a project, running it as a managed service—as Amazon is doing with some of the open source projects—if that's going to come back to bite them just from a developer community standpoint because you're going to have people committing to one or the other, but possibly not both.Corey: I think this is why Amazon—I know, they're very annoyed by their perception in the open source ecosystem, but you take a look at other large tech companies, and almost all of them have a few notable open source projects that started life there. For example, we have—I think Cassandra came out of Facebook, but don't quote me on that; Kubernetes came out of Google, a fact for which they steadfastly refused to apologize, so far; and so on, and so forth. But Amazon's open source initiatives have been, “We've open sourced this thing that is basically only used at Amazon.” Or, my personal favorite, we've put all of our documentation up on GitHub so that you can write a corrections to it yourself from the community, which I'm hearing as, “Please, volunteer for a $1.6 trillion company so that they don't have to improve their documentation by hiring expensive people internally.”You can sort of guess my position on that. It seems like they have not launched anything that has a deep heart within Amazon that is broadly adopted outside of their walls. My question for you is, do you believe that having that level of adoption externally is required for a healthy open source project?Julia: Again, I think it goes back to the goals of why you're open-sourcing something. I don't believe that it's necessarily required for the open source project to be quality and be usable, but if your goal is adoption or if your goal is to get ideas and best practices out there, then yeah, you do need that engagement by the broader community, you do need the contributors. But there are a lot of cases where open-sourcing technology is more for the validation, rather than the adoption of the tech. So, it really depends.Corey: I'd say the most cynical reason I've seen to open source things comes from Netflix, where they have a recurring pattern of open-sourcing something, there are two or three commits, and then it basically sits there unattended. What I firmly believe is happening is that a senior engineer at Netflix is working on the thing and they're about to change jobs, so they open source the project so that they can change jobs and then pick up where they left off with an internal fork, I view it as a game of, basically, they're passing themselves a football as they run across the street. And people laugh when I say that, but I've also had people over drinks say, “You are closer than you might think, sometimes.” Which on some level is terrifying. Feels like life is imitating art, but here we go.Julia: That definitely happens, and I have seen it [laugh] as well. People want to essentially use open source to exfiltrate IP.Corey: Yeah. Only doing it legitimate way as opposed to the, “Please don't—hope they don't find that USB stick I've hidden in my sock on my last day.”Julia: Yes. And this is why open source offices have a challenging job in helping facilitate the release of open source software. So, it is hard to ascertain when that is happening.Corey: Yeah, no company is ever going to have a big statement that is going to be anything other than, honestly, marketing speak when it comes time to explain why they're doing a certain thing. It's, “Oh, yeah, we're open-sourcing this so we don't get sued in three years by this other company that might prove to be a competitive threat.” Or, “We're open-sourcing this as a hiring and recruiting technique.” I mean, I would argue, it wasn't open source, but one of the best approaches that I've seen from that perspective came out of Google, I'm firmly convinced to this day that App Engine was run not by their SRE team, but by their recruiting arm, “Because if you can build a great app on App Engine, well, this is, kind of like, how we think about things inside of Google; come and work here,” either via acqui-hiring or a just outright interview funnel. Maybe that's too cynical, too, but again, that leads to the question of is it really open source when it has these deep ties to specific platforms?Here's an open source tool that presumes you're running on top of AWS. Well, great, sure it's built by the community and anyone can access these things, but without paying per second to a cloud provider, probably the referenced cloud provider they're developing this against, it's not going to get very far. So, it's a nuanced argument, and there are shades of that nuance to every aspect of it. And if there's one thing that Twitter is terrible at is capturing nuance in 280 characters. And even in the, “All right, this is my nuanced take on open source in this thread, I will tweet, one of 5,712.” Great. That's not really the forum for that either. And people lose sight of nuance. It's a sticky, delicate thing, and it feels like a lot of the open source community has been enthusiastically agreeing with each other—sometimes violently so—but they're not sharing a common language in which to do it.Julia: Yeah. And in terms of the purposes of open source projects, it is okay for them to have different ones as long as they're telegraphing those purposes to their users and the people who are looking at the projects for their own use. But whether it's open source? I think it's okay for that to be the baseline and then build out the vocabulary of the types of projects that you want from there, based on those expectations. Yes, this particular technology only works with this cloud provider. That's open source that facilitates and accelerates development with that cloud provider.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: I always try and stay away from explicit value judgments on a lot of these things because it's nuanced, and no one who doesn't work at Facebook wakes up expecting to do terrible things today. We're all trying to do the best we can with the constraints are operating within. The challenge is that when you're at a company like an AWS, or a Google, or a Microsoft, or one of these giant companies, the same pressures that the rest of the quote-unquote “mere mortals” in ecosystem have to contend with are very different. But talking to people who work at these big companies, they have meetings and review processes that here at my twelve-person company, I don't even have to consider.Easy example of that: Never once have I put something out into the world and had a single discussion about is this going to get us in trouble with respect to antitrust? That has never been on my radar as far as things I have to care about. Even at my previous job at a highly regulated financial company, where you could argue that they are approaching monopoly status in some areas of the market organically, with passive investing being what it is, great, their open source discussions were always much more aligned with what licenses are we willing to accept legal risk for using internally? Because there are things that are—like IP is why we have a business in many respects, so anything that touches that theoretically means we'd have to disclose how the entire system, how the rest of it works, is not allowed to be used here. And there are reviews and processes and compliance requirements for that.I get that concern, and at a certain point of scale, you're negligent if you don't have a function that looks at it through that lens. But I look back to the early days of just puttering around with, “I want to do a thing and I found this project somewhere that people are excited about,” in the pre-GitHub days, I can download it off as Sourceforge or whatnot and I can make it work. And but it doesn't do this one thing I want to do, “Hey, the code's available. Can I fix it myself? Absolutely not. I'm crap at writing code. But I can talk to people and piece it together from wisdom that they offer.” And it turns into something awful until finally it gets enough traction that someone who knows what they're doing looks at it and refactors and it makes it good.And that's the open source community I recognize and that I see from my early developmental period. I don't recognize what we see in ecosystem today through that same lens of, “Okay, go online. Be nice to people”—well, that's new—“See how this thing works. And oh, if I'm having a problem, I'm probably not the only person who's having a problem like this.” You have to get really good at using Google more than you do at writing code in some respects. But at that point, it's almost entirely a copy-and-paste, except that's not technical enough for the open source world. So instead, we have to learn the 500 arcane subcommands to Git in order to get it out there. But it works. Ish.Julia: I think that community is still out there. I really do. I think that it is harder to find and it's not necessarily where you might tend to look, but those projects are still there. They're still running. They might be a little less high-profile than a lot of the ones that are getting a lot of attention right now, but they are still there.Corey: On some level, it feels like the blame for this lies—at least partially—at the feat of Slack and its success because it used to be that you had IRC, that was how folks communicated. And I remember the early days of that and things like Jabber or internal servers, grea—or internal IRC servers at companies—great, you'd have engineering all talking on that, and oh, you want to have someone in finance or marketing join that thing? Yeah, the short answer is, that won't be happening. But you can try and delude yourself and set it up with a special client and the rest.Slack removed all of that friction, but it's balkanized to the point where every once in a while, I have to go through and remove a bunch of Slack channels slash workspaces slash whatever we're calling them this week from my desktop client because it's basically eating all the RAM like it's trying to be Google Chrome. And then it's great, but there's no universal federated thing the way that there was with IRC where I just pop in a different channel for a different project. And IRC is still there and it comes back to life whenever Slack takes an outage. And then Slack gets fixed, it sort of bleeds off again. But I don't want to be in 500 different Slack workspaces, one for every open source project that I'm using, and there's no coherent sense of identity and community anymore the way there once was. And I feel like I'm old man yelling at the passing of time at this. But you're right, open source to me was always much more about community than it was about code.Julia: Yeah, and I think that we do not talk about the impact of tools for open source that we use. Because you're right; with IRC, it was unified. You could pretty much guarantee that projects of a certain size were present there. And with Slack, you have to sign up for yet another account, not quite yet sure why I can't find the right channels that I need to join in Slack. So, there's a lot of navigation and a lot of prerequisite knowledge that you need to have in order to be productive.And then you've got other tools being used for communication by other communities like, I believe Gitter is a major one as well. Then you have to make sure that you're up-to-date with all of these different interfaces, Discord, everything. And the sociological implication of that shouldn't be underestimated. What are you going to do if you find a project that uses a communication tool that you just really don't want to use or don't want to sign up for yet another account? Maybe you pass on by and you find one that works within your existing set of tools. There aren't a lack of open source projects to join right now. You can be choosy. And we don't yet know what the impact is of that.Corey: It's challenging. There's no good answer that I found that solves all of these things. It's become so balkanized, on some level, that every project out there that I see—and there are some small ones that are incredibly foundational to, basically, civilization as we know it, but it's not working right because it's you have to figure out where they are and what the community norms are because they change from project to project, and there are so many different things. And, like, you can go into NPM and install some relatively trivial thing that does command-line string processing, or whatnot, and it installs 40 different dependencies. And there's a problem and you want to figure out exactly how that works, and et cetera, et cetera, et cetera.Julia: Absolutely. With NPM specifically, or Node specifically, it is interesting that the development model kind of encourages this obscurity, an obfuscation of a functionality. So, it is hard to go in, debug an issue, go to the specific community, understand how they work, contribute a patch, just to fix something that is, you know, five levels up. It gets confusing for developers. It can contribute to longer-term bugs that we see propagate throughout the system. It is not an easy problem to solve, and I have a lot of sympathy for newcomers to the open source ecosystem because it is so hard to navigate. And I think that's an as yet unsolved problem that we need to address.Corey: So, what was it that inspired you to create Open Source Stories? I mean, I love the direction you're taking this in; I love the way you're thinking about [audio break 00:29:38]. Where did it come from? What started this?Julia: Well, when Amanda and I were going back and doing research around—you know, aside from the code for an open source project, where are the different entry points? Where are the different interaction points between projects, ecosystems, and the industry? And we did a couple of interviews, just very organic interviews, with some subject matter experts in Node, in Python, in Go. And there was a point where we stopped—or at least I stopped taking notes because I was just so fascinated by the narrative that our interviewee was putting forth and was talking about. And what we wanted was for it to not just be this meeting between a few people, we wanted to be able to share that with anyone. And so one of the things that really inspired us was StoryCorps, which allows you to record, much like we're doing today, 40 minutes worth of interactions between one to three people.Corey: Oh, we're going to cut it down to five minutes at most. Like, one question; one answer. Boom, we're done.Julia: [laugh].Corey: I kid, I kid.Julia: But it's really about facilitating the sharing of knowledge and sharing of these oral histories. Because as you're doing research into interactions in specific open source communities, you'll get articles, you'll get changelogs, all of that good stuff, but you won't get the nuance that we've been talking about over the course of this podcast. You lose the story behind the story, right? How are decisions made? How are people thinking about the interactions with their users? What are the turning points for a project? What are those conversations between the maintainers that changed the entire game?Those are the sorts of stories that we're hoping to capture because they're important for history, for knowledge sharing, for learning from our past, and making decisions for the future. And so that's really what we wanted to capture. And we wanted to capture the narratives behind the people that don't necessarily show up in the codebase, too: Talking about the designers, the product managers, the marketers behind open source that make it successful. Because there's so much more than code.Corey: Oh, my God, yes. It's… how do I put this politely without getting letters? Well, I guess I'll take a stab at it and see how it plays out. I look at so much of the brilliant code that has been written, and the documentation is abhorrent, and the design of the site, and the icon, and the interface, it looks like a joke that I put on Twitter trying to be funny. It's, the code is important, don't get me wrong, but there's so much more to it than that.And we see this in the industry, too, where companies have gone out of business, trying to get their codebase just right. It's, yeah, you can launch code that is really, really bad, but if you have product-market fit, it is survivable. I've heard stories in the early days of Twitter that we saw the fail whale all the time because it was an abhorrent monstrosity, to the point it became a running joke. But it turns out, when you hit product-market fit, you can afford really good engineers to come in and fix a lot of that stuff. That stuff is more important than the quality of the code, and that is something that I think that we have a collective industry-wide delusion about. And it's a blind spot for us.Julia: Yeah. I think we get wrapped up in the cleverness of the tech, and I've fallen prey to this, too. I get so involved in how I'm solving the problem and forget about the actual problem that I'm trying to solve, right? It's not necessarily about the how, but about the what. And without your fantastic tech writers, designers, usability experts, your open source project is going to be your open source project. It's not going to necessarily get that wide adoption, if that is indeed your goal for the technology that you're releasing.So, it really is about making sure that as we're launching and working on these open source projects and ecosystems, that we are inviting people to the table that have these other unique skills that goes beyond that code and speaks to what makes the project different and unique.Corey: I really want to say how much I appreciate your taking the time to talk to me about this. If people want to get involved themselves, how do they do that? Because I have a hard time accepting that you're doing something called Open Source Stories that eschews community involvement.Julia: Yeah. So, we absolutely would love more folks to get involved. I have been primarily the person working on the site, so we can always use contributors to the site itself, but we also want more storytellers and facilitators. And so if you go to opensourcestories.org, we've got a page specifically designed to facilitate contributions. So, check that out, and we look forward to hearing from anyone who wants to participate.Corey: And we will, of course, include links to that in the show notes. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. I really appreciate it.Julia: Thanks for having me.Corey: Julia Ferraioli, co-founder of Open Source Stories. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment, calling me a fool because I did not bother to RTFM first.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Atheist Nomads
438 War on Christmas 2021

Atheist Nomads

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 42:37


It's time for this year's War on Christmas episode! Keeping with the new format, it starts with a memo from the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem and opens a can of historical worms. The feedback form is at atheistnomads.com/contact Leave us voice message at atheistnomads.com/speakpipe Support the show at atheistnomads.com/donate Subscribe at atheistnomads.com/subscribe Join our Discord server at atheistnomads.com/discord Christmas in Jerusalem Story of the current crisis Christianity in the Levant Early church Jewish Roman Wars Chalcedonian Schism: Patriarch of Jerusalem created in 451 Malkite Orthodox Syriac Orthodox Conquests Persians conquer Palestine in 614 Orthodox Christians retain Greek language and culture Battle of Yarmuk 636 - Syria and Palestine removed from Byzantine control Syrian Malkite's adopt Arab language and culture Great Schism and Crusades 1054 Great Schism 1099 Crusaders conquer Jerusalem - Exile Greek Patriarch, appoint Latin Patriarch 1187 Arabs retake Jerusalem - Latin Patriarch flees to Rome, Greek Patriarch returns 1847 Ottomans allow Latin Patriarch to Return Malkite Orthodox Schism Modern Christianity in Israel Greek Orthodox Patriarch controversy Sources Religion News Service - Patriarch of Jerusalem's Christmas Edict Wikipedia - Christianity in Israel Wikipedia - Greek Orthodox Church of Jerusalem Wikipedia - Melkite Greek Catholic Church Other News Trump takes credit for people saying Merry Christmas This episode is brought to you by: Henry K Danielle Pat Acks from the Humanists of Idaho SoJo Big Easy Blasphemy Darryl G Arthur K Samuel C Beatriz A Levi C Richard G Balázs Steve F Brad R And by our $1 patrons and those who want no reward. Contact information, show notes, and links to Social Media and the like can be found at https://atheistnomads.com Theme music is provided by Sturdy Fred. Full shownotes can always be found at https://atheistnomads.com/438 Download episode

Saint of the Day
Our Venerable Father Paul, Archbishop of Neocaesarea (4th c.)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 1:17


This holy bishop was so revered that he was summoned by the Emperor Licinius himself, who attempted to turn him from the Faith. When this failed, the Emperor ordered that molten metal be poured on the bishop's hands, which left them paralyzed and horribly disfigured. Years went by, Christianity was legalized by Constantine the Great and, when the Council of Nicaea was summoned, St Paul was among those bishops who were called to attend. Many of the bishops who attended bore in their bodies the marks of the Lord Jesus (Gal. 6:17): noses, ears or eyes lost, scars and burns from their trials for Christ. At the Council, the Emperor Constantine knelt before St Paul and kissed his hands as holy relics, saying 'I will never tire of kissing these hands which have lost their life for the sake of my Christ.' After the Council, the holy bishop served in Neocaesarea for several more years, then reposed in peace.

Wonders of the World
089 - The Kremlin of Moscow

Wonders of the World

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 54:39


The once and future political center of Russia, the brick-walled Kremlin dates from the Middle Ages, but received its boost when a Byzantine refugee princess married an ambitious Muscovite prince, and together they created a fortress that would one day serve a superpower. Dr Charles Ward, professor emeritus of Foreign Languages and Literatue at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee shares his thoughts of the rise of Moscow under Ivan III and Sofiya Palaeologina and the construction of the Kremlin we see today, while listener Geoff Kozen discusses visiting Moscow, from the Kremlin to the subway stations. Plus borscht! Perfect for a cold winter night when you're craving beets. Sources: Merridale, Catherine. Red Fortress: History and Illusion in the KremlinPlokhy, Serhii . Lost Kingdom: The Quest for Empire and the Making of the Russian Nation, from 1470 to the PresentSixsmith, Martin. Russia: A 1,000-year Chronicle of the Wild EastVoorhees, Mara. Lonely Planet Moscow Photograph cc:4.0 by wikipedia user Ludvig14

Saint of the Day
Holy Great Martyr Anastasia the Widow, the Deliverer from Potions (290)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 2:49


She was born in Rome to a wealthy and prominent family. Though her father Pretexatus was a pagan, her mother Fausta instructed her in the things of God. Her father married her against her will to Publius, a prodigal and impious man lacking in Christian or pagan virtue. Anastasia was in the custom of dressing herself as a poor working woman and going out by night to visit and comfort the many Christians in prison (this was the time of Diocletian's persecution). When Publius discovered this, he was furious that his wife was demeaning herself by consorting with the despised Christians, and had his wife locked in the house with so little food that she came close to death by starvation. She was able to get a letter to her spiritual father Chrysogonus, who was also in prison, and their correspondence helped to sustain her through her ordeal. After three months her husband died in a shipwreck and she regained her freedom. Immediately she redoubled her work for the suffering Christians and their families, devoting all her time and wealth to their comfort and care.   One day Diocletian declared that all Christians in his prisons should be slain, and his command was carried out in one night. The next day Anastasia came to visit her beloved companions and, learning that all were dead, fell sobbing by the gate, no longer caring to conceal her Christian faith from anyone. Almost immediately she was arrested and brought before the authorities, who subjected her to every form of abuse. One prefect offered to marry her if she would bow to the idols, but to have her tortured to death if she would not. When she was unmoved, he attempted to rape her, but was struck blind and died miserably. She then briefly escaped to Nicaea and found refuge with the pious St Theodota, but was seized again along with Theodota and her children. After further trials and torments Anastasia, Theodota and her children, and others who had been converted to Christ through Anastasia's example, were executed.   Saint Anastasia's relics were taken to Rome, where a church was built in her honor. The relics were later translated to Constantinople and placed in another church bearing her name, where they worked many miracles. Because she has healed many through her prayers from the effects of poisons and potions, she is called Pharmocolytria, "Deliverer from Potions."

Islamic History Podcast
7-4: Byzantines and Ottomans

Islamic History Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 36:44


The Byzantine Empire (what's left of it, anyway) has been a thorn in the Ottoman's side for too long. Sultan Mehmed II prepares to conquer Constantinople.

Saint of the Day
Holy Martyr Juliana of Nicomedia and those with her (304)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 1:57


She was the daughter of a prominent family in Nicomedia during the reign of the persecutor Maximian (286-305). Her parents betrothed her to a nobleman named Eleusius, but without his knowledge, or that of her parents, she had already committed her life to Christ, and consecrated her virginity to him. To put off her suitor, she told him that she would not marry him until he became Prefect. Eleusius went to work using his fortune to bribe and influence those in power, and succeeded in being appointed Prefect of Nicomedia. When he went to Juliana to claim her as his wife, she was forced to confess herself a Christian, saying that she would never marry him unless he gave up the worship of idols and embraced the faith of Christ. For her confession, she was arrested and taken before the Prefect: Eleusius, her once-ardent suitor. He was now filled with an ardent rage toward her and, when she would not renounce her faith, had her subjected to the most sadistic tortures imaginable. Miraculously, she endured these without harm. Witnessing this wonder, 500 men and 130 women from among the pagans confessed Christ. The enraged Prefect had all of them beheaded immediately, followed by Juliana herself. She was eighteen years old when she won the Martyr's crown.

Dialogues with Richard Reeves
Roland Betancourt on queer Byzantines

Dialogues with Richard Reeves

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 82:17


“I am less interested in showing that the Medieval world was modern, than in showing how Medieval, in many ways, the modern world is.” That's Roland Betancourt, my guest today and a truly fascinating scholar of history, art, theology, sex and gender, liturgy and much more. We discuss his book Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender, and Race in the Middle Ages, including the history of the later Roman Empire, the “slut shaming” of Empress Theodora, the importance, today as much as 1,500 year ago of the Hagia Sophia, the fascinating lives and deaths of trans monks, the significance of Mary's consent to be the Mother of Christ, the messiness and ambiguity of human life, frailty and identity. (Note that there's inevitably some pretty adult content in this episode). Dialogues will be back on Jan 10th, Merry Christmas to those who celebrate, Happy Holidays to all.  Roland Betancourt  Roland Betancourt is Professor of Art History at the University of California, Irvine. In the 2016-2017 academic year, he was the Elizabeth and J. Richardson Dilworth Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. See his faculty page here. We mostly discuss his book Byzantine Intersectionality: Sexuality, Gender, and Race in the Middle Ages) (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2020)  More Betancourt Performing the Gospels in Byzantium: Sight, Sound, and Space in the Divine Liturgy (Cambridge University Press, 2021) See his edited volume Byzantium/Modernism: The Byzantine as Method in Modernity (Leiden: Brill, 2015). Also Sight, Touch, and Imagination in Byzantium (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018) "Why Sight Is Not Touch: Reconsidering the Tactility of Vision in Byzantium," Dumbarton Oaks Papers 70 (December 2016): 1-23. "Faltering Images: Failure and Error in Byzantine Lectionaries," Word & Image 32:1 (2016): 1-20. The Dialogues Team  Creator: Richard Reeves Artwork: George Vaughan Thomas Tech Support: Cameron Hauver-Reeves Music: "Remember" by Bencoolen (thanks for the permission, guys!)

HORSE
Ep. 91: The Big Short(stop) w/ Alex Bazeley & Bobby Wagner

HORSE

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 66:12


Full Court Press: NBA Covid Issues, Trade Deadline Talk & Steph Curry's Record Breaking Three (bang) An Interview With: Alex Bazeley and Bobby Wagner of Tipping Pitches And Also: Frankincense And Myrrh, Vaccination Hesitation, Boosty Boosts, The Impossible Vaccine, Sad Bird Noises, Very Special Boys, CBA ABC's, Succession War Rooms, The Larry Bird Exception, Byzantine, Conglomerates, Salary Floor, No Cap, Lefty Baseball Twitter   Sponsor: The Recount:  Sticking to just sports in 2021 is impossible. Sports don't just affect our culture but drive our culture, which is why LZ Granderson & Will Leitch bring you a brand new, not just any old sports podcast: “The Long Game with LZ & Leitch.” “The Long Game with LZ & Leitch" dives into the most important topics that are at the intersection of sports, business, politics, and culture. New episodes are out every Wednesday!   Find Us Online - website: horsehoops.com - patreon: patreon.com/horsehoops - twitter: twitter.com/horse_hoops - instagram: instagram.com/horsehoops - facebook: facebook.com/horsehoops - multitude: multitude.productions   HORSE is hosted by Mike Schubert and Adam Mamawala. Created by Eric Silver and Mike Schubert. Edited by Mischa Stanton. Theme song by Bettina Campomanes. Art by Allyson Wakeman. Website by Kelly Schubert.   About Us On HORSE, we don't analyze wins and losses. We talk beefs, dig into Internet drama, and have fun. The NBA is now a 365-day league and it's never been more present in pop culture. From Kevin Durant's burner accounts to LeBron taking his talents anywhere to trusting the Process, the NBA is becoming a pop culture requirement. At the same time, sports can have gatekeepers that make it insular and frustrating for people who aren't die hard fans. We're here to prove that basketball is entertaining to follow for all fans, whether you're actively watching the games or not. Recently featured in The New York Times!

Saint of the Day
Holy Hieromartyr Ignatius the God-bearer, Bishop of Antioch (107)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 3:36


There is a tradition that it was the young boy Ignatius whom Christ took upon his knee to explain to His followers that they must become as children to enter the Kingdom. He knew the holy Apostles personally and, with St Polycarp (February 25) was a disciple of St John the Evangelist. He succeeded Evodus as second Bishop of Antioch, the capital of Syria and at that time one of the largest cities in the world. Here, during the persecutions of Domitian, he strengthened the faithful, brought many pagans to Christ, and prayed that he himself would be granted the crown of martyrdom. His flock called him the Godbearer, a title that he did not refuse, for he said that all Christians after their Baptism are truly Bearers of Christ, clothed in the Holy Spirit.   When peace was restored to the Church for awhile, the holy Bishop devoted himself to organizing the young Church on strong foundations at a time when the last of the Apostles had only recently passed away. He established the principle that the Grace imparted to the Apostles at Pentecost was handed down to the bishops appointed by them, and so on through the generations: the Apostolic Succession.   The Emperor Trajan, passing through Syria to make war in Armenia, spent some time in Antioch and initiated a persecution of Christians. Rejoicing that the time of martyrdom had at last arrived, Ignatius presented himself before the Emperor and eloquently declared his faith in Christ.   "So you are a disciple of the one crucified under Pontius Pilate?" asked the Emperor.   "I am the disciple of Him who has nailed my sin to the Cross, and has trodden the Devil and his devices underfoot."   "Why do you call yourself the Godbearer?"   "Because I carry the living Christ within me!"   "Therefore, let the bearer of the Crucified One be taken in chains to Rome, there to be fed to the lions for the amusement of the people."   And so it was. During the long and difficult journey to Rome, cruelly mistreated by his guards, the Saint wrote a series of letters to the young churches which remain one of the treasures of the Church. In Smyrna, he was able to meet with his fellow-disciple Polycarp and entrust to him the care of the churches whose shepherd he had been. As Trajan had ordered, In Rome he was taken to the amphitheater and, as the Synaxarion says, "entered the arena as though approaching the holy altar to serve his last Liturgy in the presence of the faithful, who were crowded among pagans on the steps of the amphitheatre." In a few moments he was completely devoured by the lions, save for a few bones. These were gathered by the faithful and returned to Antioch.   In his Letter to the Romans, the holy Bishop wrote to some who wished to rescue him from his martyrdom: "I am the wheat of God, and am ground by the teeth of the wild beasts, that I may be found to be the pure bread of God."

History of the World podcast
Vol 4 Ep 7 - The Byzantine Empire, Part Two

History of the World podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 49:18


628 - 718 - The emergence of the Arabs and the Bulgars on the fringes of Byzantine lands had a profound effect on the legacy of the Heraclian dynasty of Byzantine rulers. The empire dramatically decreased in size and had to become familiar with a new style of existence.

Saint of the Day
Holy Martyr Boniface (290)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 2:52


He lived in Rome during the reign of Diocletian. He was slave to Aglais, the daughter of a Senator, and served as steward of her household and her large fortune. He also lived in fornication with her, and was addicted to drink. Despite these sins, he was kind, hospitable to strangers, and generous toward the needy.   In time, Aglais became troubled in her conscience over her way of life, and began to think of the account that she would have to give to God for her sins. Some Christians told her of the holy Martyrs and, moved by their accounts, she ordered Boniface to travel to Tarsus and bring back relics of these holy ones. Boniface, still deaf and blind to the things of God, said jokingly, "And will you honor me as a Saint if I bring back my own body to you as a relic?"   Boniface traveled to Tarsus with a large escort, well supplied with gold. He went straightaway to the Amphitheater, where he beheld a number of Martyrs being subjected to awful torments for the pleasure of the crowd, but bearing them all with patience and serenity. At the sight, the dissolute steward was touched by grace and felt his heart melt within him. He ran to the Martyrs, fell at their feet and kissed their chains, and loudly declared that he too was a disciple of Christ. So he too was put in chains, subjected to frightful tortures, and finally beheaded, rejoicing and praising God.   Boniface's escort, mystified by his long absence, made inquiries and were astonished to discover that their godless and sinful companion had met a Martyr's death the day before. They paid fifty pounds in gold for his body and brought it back to Rome, thus fulfilling Boniface's own unwitting prophecy.   An angel of the Lord appeared to Aglais and said, "Arise and go to meet him who was once your servant and companion in sin, but has now become our brother. Receive him as your master for, thanks to him, all your sins are to be forgiven." Rejoicing, Aglais received her former lover's holy relics and built a church in his honor, where many miracles were wrought. Aglais gave away her fortune, devoted herself to ascesis and prayer, and was herself granted the grace to work miracles. She reposed in peace thirteen years later, assured that the sins of her past had been effaced through the intercessions of the holy Boniface.

Saint of the Day
Holy Martyr Sebastian and those with him (287)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 18, 2021 3:07


He grew up in Milan and became an army officer, where he distinguished himself so well that the Emperor Diocletian made him captain of the Praetorian Guard not suspecting that Sebastian was a Christian. In Rome, while fulfilling the duties of a courtier, he used his position to comfort and encourage his imprisoned fellow-Christians. By his labors and example he brought many to faith in Christ, including Chromatius, the Prefect in charge of persecuting the Roman Christians.   Sebastian had upheld two brothers, Mark and Marcellinus, who were awaiting execution for their faith. When the day of execution came, their father Tranquillinus, who had been a pagan but through Sebastian's example had converted, presented himself to Chromatius and announced that he too was a Christian. His testimony was so powerful that the hard heart of the Prefect was melted, and he himself resolved to become a Christian.   Caius, Bishop of Rome, gathered the new brethren (both men and women — not all of Sebastian's converts have been mentioned here) to embrace them and baptize them, but also to warn them of their coming Martyrdom. He instructed some to flee the city and others, headed by Sebastian, to remain in Rome, devoting their days to fasting, prayer and thanksgiving as they awaited their death. As the "company of Martyrs" did this, many came to them and were healed of ailments, and many joined them in confessing Christ.   When the time of martyrdom came, each member of the company was subjected to imaginatively cruel tortures before his execution. Sebastian himself was made to witness the deaths of all his companions, then to endure his own trial. He serenely confessed his unshaken faith before Diocletian himself before being taken to the place of execution. There he was tied to a post and made the target of a band of archers until his body bristled with arrows like the quills of a porcupine. He was left for dead, but when Irene, widow of St Castulus, came to bury him, she found him alive and tended his wounds. Amazingly, he recovered, and presented himself once again to the Emperor. Astonished and outraged, the tyrant ordered that Sebastian be beaten to death with clubs and thrown into the city's sewer. That evening, a pious Christian woman was told in a vision to retrieve his body and bury it in the catacombs. After St Constantine brought peace to the Church, Pope Damasus built a church over the site in the Saint's honor. For hundreds of years, many miracles were worked there through St Sebastian's intercessions.

Saint of the Day
Our Holy Father Dionysius the New of Zakinthos (1624)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 2:24


He was born to pious and wealthy parents on the island of Zakinthos. Early in life he renounced his wealth and worldly honors to enter monastic life. His virtue became so well known that he was appointed Archbishop of Aegina, where he served for many years. In time, in order to retire to a life of solitude and struggle, he resigned and returned to his homeland where he entered a monastery in the mountains. Here he received the grace of performing miracles, and worked many healing and saving wonders among the people of Zakinthos.   A story from the Synaxarion reveals his character as one truly united to Christ: "He excelled above all in love of neighbour and in meekness. One day the murderer of the Saint's own brother, fleeing the law and the members of his victim's family, arrived at the monastery and begged Dionysius for asylum, little knowing to whom he was speaking. On gathering the reason for his flight and that his own brother was the victim, the man of God resisted with all his strength his natural grief and the temptation to avenge the crime. Imitating Christ, who pardoned his enemies and prayed for his persecutors, he received the fugitive with compassion, comforted him, exhorted him to repent and hid him in an out-of-the-way cell. When his pursuing kinsmen reached the monastery with the dreadful news, the Saint did not reveal that he knew it already, but did his best with words of peace to allay the wrath of his relatives and their desire for vengeance. As soon as they moved off, he let out the murderer (who was amazed and terror-struck before such superhuman goodness) and having provided him with victuals and money for his journey, he sent him away to work freely at the salvation of his soul."   The holy bishop reposed in 1622 after a long and painful illness. He has continued to work signs and miracles and to appear from time to time to the people of Zakinthos, who venerate him as their protector and patron.

Catholic Answers Live
#10412 Open Forum - Jimmy Akin

Catholic Answers Live

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


Questions Covered: 03:40 – What do Ch 65 and 66 mean in terms of a new heaven and new earth? Does sabbath rest on Saturday night and Sunday night still apply?  14:00 – If you are getting someone the sacraments in an extraordinary matter and you have doubts if they know of the necessary truths, is it ok to share those truths with that person? How can someone validly receive last rites if they're not Catholic?  18:25 – Is it possible for humans to communicate with animals telepathically other than just speaking?  28:50 – I'm seriously considering joining the Catholic Church but I have problems with how Catholicism changes what the bible says. For example, where it says “Eat the bread and drink the wine,” however, I have yet to go to a Catholic church that serves the wine.  35:10 – I haven't gone through confirmation yet but I want to change rites, from the Latin rite to Byzantine rite. How can I go about that?  39:25 – In your opinion, what's a cool story in the Old Testament to do for a bible study?  43:10 – Is there a difference between dogma and doctrine?  46:30 – I’ve seen a few Catholics that use a red ribbon or red thread kind of like a bracelet to keep away bad spirits. Is this allowed? Could it also be used so that you yourself don't pass along evil to others?  51:00 – Why do people think that John the Baptist was Jesus? …

Saint of the Day
Holy Prophet Haggai (~520 BC)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 1:07


He was born in Babylon, of the priestly tribe of Levi, during the captivity of the Jews. After their return to Jerusalem, the Jews began to rebuild the Temple and to worship there according to the Law, but were discouraged by opposition from the local population (many of them Jews who had not gone into captivity). So God raised up the holy Prophets Haggai and Zechariah (February 8) to stir the people to complete their sacred work. Haggai's prophecies reveal that the drought that the Hebrews were suffering was brought about by their failure to complete the rebuilding of Jerusalem, and would only end when they rededicated themselves to their work. He is ranked tenth among the minor Prophets.

Saint of the Day
Holy Hieromartyr Eleutherius, Bishop of Illyria, and those with him (126)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 2:31


His name is a form of the Greek word for "freedom." He was a native of Rome whose father died at a young age, leaving him to be brought up by his mother Anthia, a Christian who reared him in the fear of God and the love of holiness. His virtue and ability were so evident that he was ordained a priest at the age of seventeen and at twenty was made Bishop of Illyria, a large see roughly comprising modern-day Serbia.   The young bishop's pastoral and evangelistic work was so successful that many pagans were converted to the Faith through him. His growing reputation drew the attention of the Emperor Hadrian, who sent one of his senior officers named Felix to arrest the holy bishop. But when Felix saw and heard Eleutherius, he was captivated by his teaching, believed in Christ, and was baptized. He and the St Eleutherius returned and presented themselves together before the Emperor, fearlessly confessing their faith.   Eleutherius was subjected to brutal torture, during which the city prefect Coremonus, who had suggested some of the tortures, was enlightened through the Saint's prayers for his enemies, and proclaimed Christ. He was baptized by Eleutherius and later beheaded. After a time, when it became clear that fire and torture would not move the holy bishop, he was taken to the amphitheater and beheaded. At the moment of his death, his mother Anthia rushed forward and took his body in her arms. There she also was beheaded by the executioners.   Pregnant women call on St Eleutherius that they may have a safe delivery.

Saint of the Day
Holy Martyrs Thyrsus, Leucis and Callinicus (250)

Saint of the Day

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 0:41


These martyrs contested in Asia Minor during the reign of Decius. Thyrsus and Leucis were executed after horrible torture for confessing themselves as Christians and rebuking the Governor for his slaughter of their brethren. Callinicus was a pagan priest, converted by witnessing the martyrdom and miracles of St Thyrsus; he was beheaded.

History Unplugged Podcast
What the Middle Ages Can Teach Us About Pandemics, Mass Migration, and Tech Disruption

History Unplugged Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 54:43


The medieval world – for all its plagues, papal indulgences, castles, and inquisition trials – has much in common with ours. People living the Middle Ages dealt with deadly pandemics, climate change, mass migration, and controversial technological changes, just as we do now in 2021. Today's guest, Dan Jones, author of POWERS AND THRONES: A New History of the Middle Ages looks at these common features through a cast of characters that includes pious monks and Byzantine emperors, chivalric knights and Renaissance artists. This sweep of the medieval world begins with the fall of the Roman empire and ends with the first contact between the Old World and the New. Along the way, Jones provides a front row seat to the forces that shaped the Western world as we know it. This is the thousand years in which our basic Western systems of law, commerce, and governance were codified; when the Christian Churches matured as both powerful institutions and the regulators of Western public morality; and when art, architecture, philosophical inquiry and scientific invention went through periods of seismic change. We discuss: • The height of the Roman empire and its influential rulers, as well as the various reasons it fell, including climate change pushing the Huns and so-called “barbarian” tribes to the empire's borders. • The development of Christianity and Islam, as well as the power struggles and conflict ignited in the name of religion, chivalric orders such as the Knights Templar, and the rise of monasteries as major political players in the West. • The intimate stories of many influential characters of the Middle Ages, such as Constantine I, Justinian, the Prophet Muhammad, Attila the Hun, Charlemagne, El Cid, Leonardo Da Vinci, Genghis Khan, Marco Polo, Martin Luther, and many more. • The development of global trade routes and commerce across Europe, Asia, and Africa and the expanding map during the Age of Exploration. • The Black Death, which decimated up to sixty percent of the local population in the fourteenth century and led to widespread social unrest and the little Ice Age, the period between 1300-1850 triggered by volcanic activity that created a climate so regularly and bitterly cold that it contributed to the Great Famine of 1315-21.

The Dirt Podcast
From The Vault: Portrait of a Podcaster on Fire - Ep 167

The Dirt Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 58:35


This week, we bring you another episode from behind the Patreon paywall. Sure, the title is a stretch, but it's hard coming up with a topical joke about portraiture! This month we dive into some early examples of representing individuals in ancient art from several times and places. Amber inexplicably takes umbrage with the entirety of Byzantine art, and both hosts question what is a face and what is a couple of lines that sorta look like a face. Links The oldest known portrait of a human—usually interpreted as a woman—sculpted from mammoth ivory (via ResearchGate) 26,000 years of capturing the human face (Inspiring Ancestry - Genealogy & DNA) The woman from the Dolní Věstonice 3 burial: a new view of the face using modern technologies (Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences) Archaeologists Discover an Ancient Portrait of Young Jesus in an Abandoned Israeli Church (Artnet) The Oldest Modernist Paintings (Smithsonian) Scientists Analyze Faiyum Portrait Pigment (Archaeology) Ancient Faces: Mummy Portraits From Roman Egypt (The Met) Egyptian Mummy Portrait Mysteries Solved (Artsy) Old Masters (The Guardian) The diagnosis of art: facial nerve palsy in ancient Rome (Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine) Contact Email the Dirt Podcast: thedirtpodcast@gmail.com ArchPodNet APN Website: https://www.archpodnet.com APN on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/archpodnet APN on Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/archpodnet APN on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archpodnet Tee Public Store Affiliates Wildnote TeePublic Timeular

History of the World podcast
Vol 4 Ep 6 - The Byzantine Empire, Part One

History of the World podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 52:11


395 - 628 - How did Eastern Rome and Western Rome drift apart, and how did the fall of Western Rome impact Eastern Rome? We meet Justinian, Belisarius and Heraclius and explore the Byzantine relationship with the Sasanian Persians, the Avars, the Ostrogoths and the Lombards.