Podcasts about Electrical engineering

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Field of engineering that deals with electricity, electromagnetism, and electronics

  • 1,055PODCASTS
  • 1,604EPISODES
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  • 1DAILY NEW EPISODE
  • Jan 18, 2022LATEST
Electrical engineering

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Best podcasts about Electrical engineering

Show all podcasts related to electrical engineering

Latest podcast episodes about Electrical engineering

Callaghan's Corner
CCV3: Chapter Fourteen: John Stimplf discusses past and present political trends, America's possible future, Critical Race Theory, the end of Covid, and much more!

Callaghan's Corner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 96:04


John Stimplf is someone I knew as an acquittance in High School. John graduated this past fall in Electrical Engineering from the University of Illinois. John is very interested in politics and it's overall impact on the past, present, and future. Today John gives me his opinions on the current division in America, trends of violence in the US, Critical Race Theory, trends in Covid and it's possible end, and much more! This episode was a lot of fun for me to do and it was great to hear John's takes on the current political environment. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/danny-callaghan/support

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Basil Darwish, Managing Director at Wells Fargo Strategic Capital-Promoting Fintech Growth Via CVC

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 26:10


In today's episode, Anirudh Singh sits down with Basil Darwish, Managing Director and Fintech & Enterprise Tech lead at Wells Fargo Strategic Capital. Basil joined as the team's first hire in March 2016, coming over from Citi Ventures. In this episode, they discuss a range of topics, including Basil's winding path towards venture investing, the pros and cons of different corporate venture capital models, a deep dive into three of Wells Fargo's investments: Trovata, H20.ai, and Arkose Labs, and much more! Basil Darwish: Basil Darwish is a Managing Director at Wells Fargo Strategic Capital and leads the group's focus on Fintech and Enterprise Software. His investments range from early-stage to growth capital investments in companies that are strategically aligned with Wells Fargo. One of his goals is to bring technology-based innovation into the Bank. Basil's investment focus areas include B2B/B2C Fintech, RegTech, AI & Machine Learning, Big Data Analytics, and Cyber Security. Basil has been in the domain of venture investing for the past 12 years, across Silicon Valley, New York, and Southeast Asia. Prior to joining Wells Fargo in 2016, Basil was with Citi for 8 years most recently as Senior Vice President at Citi's growth ventures and innovation group (Citi Ventures), where he focused on venture investments and innovation initiatives across the US and Asia, in the domains of Payments, Big Data Analytics, and Information Security. Prior to moving into financial services, Basil spent several years in the technology industry in various roles across the value chain, from semiconductor product engineering and system-level product development at Analog Devices Inc, as well as digital design engineering at Chinook Communications, a technology startup that emerged out of MIT in 1999 developing spectrum enhancement technologies. Basil currently serves as a board director of Trovata, H2O.ai, OpenFin, and Droit. He also serves as a board observer of Arkose Labs, Socure, Volante Technologies, Elliptic and Atscale. Basil holds an MBA from the Wharton School of Business with a double major in finance and entrepreneurial management, a Master of Science Degree in Electrical Engineering from Tufts University with a focus on semiconductor design, and a B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Jordan. Basil lives in the San Francisco Bay Area with his wife and two daughters.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
The Very Strong Correlation Between The Rise In Glyphosate Usage On Core Crops And Autism - Stephanie Seneff, PhD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 10:12


The Very Strong Correlation Between The Rise In Glyphosate Usage On Core Crops And Autism -  Stephanie Seneff, PhDStephanie Seneff, Ph.D. • https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/• Book - The Glyphosate Effect: How the World's Most Common Herbicide Is Undermining Your Health and What You Can Do About It Stephanie Seneff is a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She received the B.S. degree in Biophysics in 1968, the M.S. and E.E. degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1980, and the Ph.D degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1985, all from MIT. For over three decades, her research interests have always been at the intersection of biology and computation: developing a computational model for the human auditory system, understanding human language so as to develop algorithms and systems for human computer interactions, as well as applying natural language processing (NLP) techniques to gene predictions. She has published over 170 refereed articles on these subjects, and has been invited to give keynote speeches at several international conferences. She has also supervised numerous Master's and PhD theses at MIT. In 2012, Dr. Seneff was elected Fellow of the International Speech and Communication Association (ISCA).In recent years, Dr. Seneff has focused her research interests back towards biology. She is concentrating mainly on the relationship between nutrition and health. Since 2011, she has published over two dozen papers in various medical and health-related journals on topics such as modern day diseases (e.g., Alzheimer, autism, cardiovascular diseases), analysis and search of databases of drug side effects using NLP techniques, and the impact of nutritional deficiencies and environmental toxins on human health.# StephanieSeneff #GMOs #GeneticallyModifiedFood #GMCrops #FoodSafety#TheRealTruthAboutHealth  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims.  

Wharton FinTech Podcast
Raghu Yarlagadda, CEO of FalconX -- Delivering the Crypto Industry's Best Point-in-Time Execution

Wharton FinTech Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 36:08


Gabriela Ariana Campoverde sits down with Raghu Yarlagadda, CEO and Co-Founder of FalconX. The company is a digital assets brokerage that provides a single account connected to global crypto liquidity pools. Asset managers can execute trades at prices routed across liquidity sources, and settle with a single counterparty. Raghu and Prabhakar Reddy launched the company just four years ago, and today it is valued at $3.75 Billion dollars. In this episode you will hear about: - How FalconX works with institutional clients - What it's like to run a start-up which is live 24/7 - Innovation for cryptocurrency retail investors - Raghu's career and his commitment to education - And much more! About Raghu Yarlagadda Raghu Yarlagadda co-founded FalconX in 2018. Prior to FalconX, Raghu worked at Google and Motorola Mobility and in 2014 launched Sarada Educational Institution which leverages edtech to improve education for its students across India. He is also a graduate of Harvard Business School and the University of Texas at Dallas, where he studied Electrical Engineering. About FalconX FalconX is a blockchain, cryptocurrency, and fintech-focused cryptocurrency brokerage and digital asset trading platform. For additional information on FalconX, please visit FalconX.io. For more FinTech insights, follow us below: Medium: medium.com/wharton-fintech WFT Twitter: twitter.com/whartonfintech Gabriela's Twitter: twitter.com/byGabyC Gabriela's LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/gcampoverde

The Healthcare QualityCast
The Future of Prescription Decision Support with Carm Huntress

The Healthcare QualityCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 42:58


Introducing today's guest, Carm Huntress, Chief Innovation Officer and founder of RxRevu. With a Degree in Electrical Engineering, Carm started out working in early-stage technology companies focusing on product and technology. In this episode, Carm expounds on the deficiency in information regarding the cost of medical treatment both on the side of the medical professionals and the patients. He describes his passion for his work, which involves bridging this gap to create room for transparency and measurement, as the ultimate steps to healthcare improvement. Top Takeaways [00:44] It's easy to tell be people what to do but it's very hard to get people to want to do what must be done. [04:44] RxRevu provides real-time cost transparency. What healthcare lacks today, both for providers and patients is an understanding of the cost of any product or service. RxRevu helps to bring real-time drug costs to doctors when they are prescribing at the point of care. [07:32] Probably the most important thing for early-stage startups to understand is that "Timing is everything"; about half of your success is about timing. Startups need to have the best when it comes to disciplined people, disciplined thoughts, and disciplined actions. [11:35] Critical concepts for healthcare leaders: Transparency especially with information for decision making. The second is Right place, Right time. The third issue is about fitting into the value chain of healthcare in the right way. [14:28] The biggest success is what the company has achieved today. Carm shares his past failure to work more collaboratively and this affected the team but he continues to work on it. [19:18] The biggest challenge and opportunity in healthcare today: The biggest challenge is what to do as we come out of Covid; do we go back to the way things were, or will Covid-19 be a trigger for a major change? [25:02] For Carm, inspiring others comes from discussing the mission, to let workers feel the emotional connection of what the mission means to them. His inspiration comes from the time spent discussing with healthcare leaders to share the benefits of his company's work. [27:56] Best career advice: it's not about your career, it's about your calling. What you need to find is your personal brand or the thing you're better at than any other person. [29:31] 3 attributes of a data-driven healthcare leader: Measure everything; so many times, we have assumptions but data will show something different. [32:22] A professional society recommendation: The College of Healthcare Information Management Executives (CHIME). A conference Carm recommends is "The Health Evolution Summit". [35:04] Book recommendation: " No Rules Rules" by Reed Hastings, and "The Growth Handbook" by Elad Gil. [37:35] Carm hopes to continue to expand cost transparency nationally offering services beyond just pharmacy. He also hopes to be a better leader. Key Quotes: "Leadership is about getting people to want to do what must be done" "If you're a leader and you look behind you, and nobody's behind you, then you're not a leader" "Someday, all providers, all patients are going to have access to real-time costs for the services and products we buy in healthcare" "People tend to follow their emotions, not their thoughts" "Find the thing that you love to do that keeps growing your unique knowledge and pursue that wholeheartedly" "Measure every part of your business" Connect: Find | Carm Huntress LinkedIn – Carm Huntress Twitter - Carm Huntress Website – www.rxrevu.com --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/healthcarequalitycast/message

Japan's Top Business Interviews Podcast By Dale Carnegie Training Tokyo, Japan
84: Tomo Hasegawa, President, Japan at Medline Industries

Japan's Top Business Interviews Podcast By Dale Carnegie Training Tokyo, Japan

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 65:21


Tomo Hasegawa is a second-generation Japanese-American with extensive leadership experience in the global medical and pharmaceutical industry. After he graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology with an Electrical Engineering degree, Mr. Hasegawa joined Hewlett Packard (HP) as a Project Manager and Engineer where he helped design ultrasound devices that HP was creating at the time. When HP was struggling to survive the competitive market in Japan, Mr. Hasegawa was assigned from the US to work for HP Japan Medical (later became Agilent) to help turn around the business. He was originally hired to assist with marketing and sales of roughly 50+ people. Eventually, Agilent was acquired by Phillips and Mr. Hasegawa became the General Manager of the cardiac ultrasound business in Japan. After three years, Mr. Hasegawa was headhunted by Sonosite Japan, a company specializing in portable ultrasound devices. Mr. Hasegawa then began working at Sandoz Japan, a multi-national pharmaceutical company, and most recently, joined Medline Industries Japan office as their president.   Mr. Hasegawa says HP's people-centric approach in business was what made the company so successful, and he has taken on this leadership approach throughout his career. He explains: “[As leaders] we were told to just do two things...first, set the direction and second, get things out of the way for your people.” During the early 2000s, a rival company had headhunted many of the leadership staff from HP, which caused many challenges. Mr. Hasegawa initially struggled with the challenge of leading an organization with a strong competitor, on top of the fact that he had no experience in doing business in Japan in Japanese. Yet he eventually came to realize that the customers care much more about the product and wanted to hear about the technical details, which Mr. Hasegawa as an engineer had thorough knowledge of. Within his team, Mr. Hasegawa's knowledge and active listening skills helped him build trust and credibility.   At Sonosite Japan, Mr. Hasegawa joined just as the company had set up a subsidy from Olympus, which grew to 15 people within a year. Mr. Hasegawa helped take the company from a distribution model to a direct sales model and exceeded set targets. After a successful four years at Sonosite, Mr. Hasegawa was offered a position at Toshiba in the US to lead their ultrasound business. There, Mr. Hasegawa was tasked with bringing an ultrasound device to the commercial side. Mr. Hasegawa's felt Toshiba had “made it” in the US when he was approached by salespeople from General Electric (GE) who joined Toshiba, and are still with the company.   Mr. Hasegawa then joined Sandoz Japan after completing an MBA at the University of Washington – Michael G. Foster School Of Business. This was Mr. Hasegawa's first experience in the pharmaceutical industry, leading an organization of approximately 300+ people. Mr. Hasegawa found it challenging to be in a competitive market trying to sell a product that was similar to many other rival companies. He explains that because the company was trying to make a cultural transition yet at the same time not agreeing on how to make the change, maintaining transparent communication was a challenge. Mr. Hasegawa recalls his years at Sandoz as a challenge but also a time of tremendous growth and learning. He explains: “I remember my boss telling me I don't care about your opinion and it's like, okay, great. So, what do you care about? And he explained to me it's facts, insight, and then action. That's what we pay you for…not the, this is what my gut is telling me…Right, the insight is why we are human beings running a business. Otherwise, you can have a computer run the business for you.”   Finally, Mr. Hasegawa joined Medline, a medical product manufacturing and distribution company, which he calls the biggest company people have never heard of. The secret of Medline is, according to Mr. Hasegawa, despite its grand scale, it is run like a start-up – the organization is agile, bureaucracy-free, and focused on the genba (field). Mr. Hasegawa led the Japan branch of 400 people. At Medline too, Mr. Hasegawa practiced the leadership approach he developed at HP by setting the direction and leading by example. From customizing products to suit Japanese customers to building a warehouse in Japan, Mr. Hasegawa says such leadership activities allowed him to build trust from his team as well as customers who felt listened to. Mr. Hasegawa has built a yattemiyo (let's just do it) spirit within the company culture, which he believes has given the organization more innovation.

The Athletic Fitness & Nutrition podcast
Timmy Håman - cold thermogenesis doesn't have to be as cold as you think - episode 183

The Athletic Fitness & Nutrition podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 47:41


Timmy Håman is a Swedish engineer who is here with us today to talk about the benefits of cold treatments. He has a master's in Electrical Engineering and also in Management and Economics of Innovation from Chalmers University of Technology. After being very athletic as a youngster he moved into the gym and began to look at optimising his performance. This led to an understanding of the benefits of cold exposure and has founded a company called Prime Science where they show people the benefits that they can get from using cold as a tool. * Increased calorie and fat burn – cold thermogenesis favours fat to glucose increasing fat burn * Supports overall weight loss * Improved mental clarity, mood, decreased stress levels and improved overall mental health * Increases in brown fat increasing overall calorie burn even at rest * Support muscle building and retention * Strengthen the immune system leading to less sick days * Improves insulin sensitivity * Increases longevity http://primescience.co.uk If you have been suffering with any health issue and cannot get to the solution you want then book a call at the link in my bio and let's see if I can shed some light on it. As always, it's not just one thing that will change your life, it's a combination of lifestyle factors that relate to you and your particular circumstances- get them right, however, and you can really live a better life. Book your free call below: https://calendly.com/paul-burgess/complimentary-30-minute-consult https://www.paulburgess.uk

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA
Interview with Andy McDowell Life, Leadership, Small Business Coach & Founder of Generate Your Value

Influential Entrepreneurs with Mike Saunders, MBA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 6, 2022 22:31


Andy is an engineer by trade and a creative by nature. He spent 22 years with the Boeing Company, where he always felt more like a life coach than a boss. In 2002, he began his journey into entrepreneurship within a Corporation when he was asked to develop an Airspace Design Consulting business from scratch that would serve the global government market. Andy has a Bachelor's Degree from Georgia Tech in Electrical Engineering and a Master's Degree in Computer Information Systems from Georgia State. Naturally, his aviation work took him around the world and enabled him to work on high-profile projects – such as preparing the Beijing and Sochi Airports for their respective Olympic Games.Learn More: https://www.generateyourvalue.com/Influential Influencers with Mike Saundershttps://businessinnovatorsradio.com/influential-entrepreneurs-with-mike-saunders/Source: https://businessinnovatorsradio.com/interview-with-andy-mcdowell-life-leadership-small-business-coach-founder-of-generate-your-value

Wealth Matters By Alpesh Parmar
202: A New Kind of Blockchain Business with Eric Majors

Wealth Matters By Alpesh Parmar

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 33:28


Eric is an expert in international financial market analysis and algorithms, with a Bachelors of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Colorado. Eric was a U.S. Registered Investment Adviser and business owner who worked with the CIA. He has served as an officer and director of a number of publicly traded companies and as a principal of an international investment banking firm. He is an expert on global currencies and was the principal inventor of Trade Series Management Theory and the associated TSM financial market software systems. Mr. Majors is the author of “Financial Markets And Technical Analysis” (2005), “Dot Money” (2014), “Dot Money the Global Currency Reserve, Questions and Answers” (2015) as well as “Dealing with Loss for Believers and Everyone” (2015). In 2018 Mr. Majors worked for Ammbr.com to build a private crypto currency exchange accessing liquidity pools for B2B business projects. Eric Majors is currently a lead project manager for Rx SeedCoin, and is involved with launch it's Crypto Currency known as the "Currency of Compassion," as well as using Blockchain technology to provide solutions to meet the growing problem of hunger, homelessness, health, provision of clean energy solutions as well as disaster relief and temporary emergency housing. (00:00 - 2:40) Opening Segment - Introduction of the host into the show - Alpesh introduces the guest of the show, Eric - Eric shares something interesting about himself (2:40 - 29:57) A New Kind of Blockchain Business - When did Eric start in Crypto? - How did Eric land in Cryptoland? - What is RX Seedcoin? - What does RX Seedcoin do? - How do you make money? - How would RX Seedcoin be traded? - Where can you buy the RX Seedcoin? - Coin Hacking (29:57 - 32:37) Fire Round - Will Eric change the business strategy after Coronavirus? - Eric's favorite real estate, finance, or other related books - Tools or website Eric recommends - Eric's advice to beginner investors - How does Eric give back? - How can Wealth Matters Podcast listeners reach out to Eric? (32:37 - 33:11) Closing Segment - If you want to learn more about the discussion, you can watch the podcast on Wealth Matter's YouTube channel and you can reach out to Alpesh using this link. Check us out at Facebook: @wealthmatrs IG: @wealthmatrs.ig Tiktok: @wealthmatrs

College Matters. Alma Matters.
What is Renewable Energy? With Prof. Mads Almassalkhi, University of Vermont.

College Matters. Alma Matters.

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 55:05


Episode summary introduction: The goal of this series is to serve as a Primer for High Schoolers about a Major, through our conversations with Faculty Experts in the various US Colleges and Universities. We continue this series with Renewable Energy, with Mads Almassalkhi, Associate Professor in Electrical Engineering and the Director of the Control and Optimization Renewable Energy (CORE) Systems Lab at the University of Vermont. In particular, we discuss the following with him: What is Renewable Energy? A Brief History of Renewable Energy? Renewable Energy Technologies Skills Needed to Study Renewable Energy Opportunities in Renewable Energy Topics discussed in this episode: Introducing Prof. Mads Almassalkhi, University of Vermont [] What is Renewable Energy? [] History of Renewable Energy [] Importance of Renewable Energy [] Renewable Energy Technologies [] Hot Developments [] Skills Needed to Pursue Renewable Energy [] Selecting Renewable Energy in College [] Career Opportunities [] Path for Non-STEM Students [] Prof Almassalkhi's Renewable Energy Journey [] Our Guest: Mads Almassalkhi is the Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and BioMedical Engineering at the University of Vermont. Prof. Almassalkhi is the head of the CORE Lab at UVM. Prof. Almassalkhi is also a co-founder of a startup, Packetized Energy. Memorable Quote: “...if you're good at communicating, if you're good at math and physics, if you're good at software algorithms, or if you just have a knack for tinkering, you can solve many problems with any of these four skills.” Prof. Almassalkhi to High Schoolers. Episode Transcript: Please visit Episode's Transcript. Suggestions for you: STEM Podcasts. Calls-to-action: Subscribe to our Weekly Podcast Digest. To Ask the Guest a question, or to comment on this episode, email podcast@almamatters.io. Subscribe or Follow our podcasts at any of these locations:, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, RadioPublic, Breaker, Anchor. For Transcripts of all our podcasts, visit almamatters.io/podcasts.

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. MARK CARLOTTO - Before Atlantis

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:05


Mark Carlotto is an aerospace engineer with over thirty years of experience in satellite imaging, remote sensing, signal and image processing, pattern recognition, and app development. Carlotto received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1981 and has published over one hundred technical articles and written six books. In Before Atlantis, Carlotto draws from his unique background and experience to propose new answers to basic questions concerning human origins, ancient technology, and archaeological enigmas. - www.beforeatlantis.com Before Atlantis is available at Amazon.com ****************************************************************** To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. MARK CARLOTTO - Before Atlantis

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:05


Mark Carlotto is an aerospace engineer with over thirty years of experience in satellite imaging, remote sensing, signal and image processing, pattern recognition, and app development. Carlotto received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1981 and has published over one hundred technical articles and written six books. In Before Atlantis, Carlotto draws from his unique background and experience to propose new answers to basic questions concerning human origins, ancient technology, and archaeological enigmas. - www.beforeatlantis.com Before Atlantis is available at Amazon.com ****************************************************************** To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. MARK CARLOTTO - Before Atlantis

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:05


Mark Carlotto is an aerospace engineer with over thirty years of experience in satellite imaging, remote sensing, signal and image processing, pattern recognition, and app development. Carlotto received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1981 and has published over one hundred technical articles and written six books. In Before Atlantis, Carlotto draws from his unique background and experience to propose new answers to basic questions concerning human origins, ancient technology, and archaeological enigmas. - www.beforeatlantis.com Before Atlantis is available at Amazon.com ****************************************************************** To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - DR. MARK CARLOTTO - Before Atlantis

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 47:06


Mark Carlotto is an aerospace engineer with over thirty years of experience in satellite imaging, remote sensing, signal and image processing, pattern recognition, and app development. Carlotto received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Carnegie-Mellon University in 1981 and has published over one hundred technical articles and written six books. In Before Atlantis, Carlotto draws from his unique background and experience to propose new answers to basic questions concerning human origins, ancient technology, and archaeological enigmas. - www.beforeatlantis.com Before Atlantis is available at Amazon.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewpaper.com

Alpha Hippie Podcast
AH260: Perry Marshall

Alpha Hippie Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 55:45


Perry Marshall is one of the most expensive business strategists in the world. He is endorsed in FORBES and INC Magazine and has worked with clients such as FanDuel, InfusionSoft, and LoanBuilder.He founded the $10 million Evolution 2.0 Prize, with judges from Harvard, Oxford and MIT. Launched at the Royal Society in London, it's the world's largest science research award. He is a published scientist.NASA's Jet Propulsion Labs uses his 80/20 Curve as a productivity tool. His reinvention of the Pareto Principle is published in Harvard Business Review.His Google book laid the foundations for the $100 billion Pay Per Click industry, and Ultimate Guide to Google Ads is the world's best selling book on internet advertising.Marketing maverick Dan Kennedy says, “If you don't know who Perry Marshall is — unforgivable. Perry's an honest man in a field rife with charlatans.”He's consulted in over 300 industries. He has a degree in Electrical Engineering and lives in Chicago.Connect with Perry:Email | perry@perrymarshall.comWebsiteFREE ResourcesFREE QUIZ: Discover Why You're Stuck!Connect with Angelo & Alpha Hippie:Apply to work with Alpha HippieWebsiteInstagramFacebookFree Facebook Group

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
The Main Toxic Effects Of Glyphosate - Stephanie Seneff, PhD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 21:59


The Main Toxic Effects Of Glyphosate -  Stephanie Seneff, PhDStephanie Seneff, Ph.D. • https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/• Book - The Glyphosate Effect: How the World's Most Common Herbicide Is Undermining Your Health and What You Can Do About It Stephanie Seneff is a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She received the B.S. degree in Biophysics in 1968, the M.S. and E.E. degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1980, and the Ph.D degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1985, all from MIT. For over three decades, her research interests have always been at the intersection of biology and computation: developing a computational model for the human auditory system, understanding human language so as to develop algorithms and systems for human computer interactions, as well as applying natural language processing (NLP) techniques to gene predictions. She has published over 170 refereed articles on these subjects, and has been invited to give keynote speeches at several international conferences. She has also supervised numerous Master's and PhD theses at MIT. In 2012, Dr. Seneff was elected Fellow of the International Speech and Communication Association (ISCA).In recent years, Dr. Seneff has focused her research interests back towards biology. She is concentrating mainly on the relationship between nutrition and health. Since 2011, she has published over two dozen papers in various medical and health-related journals on topics such as modern day diseases (e.g., Alzheimer, autism, cardiovascular diseases), analysis and search of databases of drug side effects using NLP techniques, and the impact of nutritional deficiencies and environmental toxins on human health.# StephanieSeneff #GMOs #GeneticallyModifiedFood #GMCrops #FoodSafety#TheRealTruthAboutHealth  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ 

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - THOMAS RAZZETO - Did Extraterrestrials Possibly Create the Maya Calendar

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 46:36


Thomas Razzeto has a degree in Electrical Engineering with an emphasis in computer programming. This education also provided a solid background in science including physics and chemistry. About 3 years ago, Thomas became interested in 2012 after attending a public lecture about science and myth. As part of the lecture, the topic of 2012 was presented but not in a very clear way. He started to do his own research and quickly found the work of John Major Jenkins and the galactic alignment. But this galactic alignment already happened in 1998 so Thomas spent months digging and search for the real reason that the Maya picked the exact day of the winter solstice of 2012. After 2 years of research and contemplation, Thomas wrote a book titled: Mystical 2012: Did the Maya Shamans Discover a Mystical View of Reality? www.2012essays.com and www.mystical2012.com. *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - THOMAS RAZZETO - Did Extraterrestrials Possibly Create the Maya Calendar

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 46:36


Thomas Razzeto has a degree in Electrical Engineering with an emphasis in computer programming. This education also provided a solid background in science including physics and chemistry. About 3 years ago, Thomas became interested in 2012 after attending a public lecture about science and myth. As part of the lecture, the topic of 2012 was presented but not in a very clear way. He started to do his own research and quickly found the work of John Major Jenkins and the galactic alignment. But this galactic alignment already happened in 1998 so Thomas spent months digging and search for the real reason that the Maya picked the exact day of the winter solstice of 2012. After 2 years of research and contemplation, Thomas wrote a book titled: Mystical 2012: Did the Maya Shamans Discover a Mystical View of Reality? www.2012essays.com and www.mystical2012.com. *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - THOMAS RAZZETO - Did Extraterrestrials Possibly Create the Maya Calendar

The 'X' Zone Broadcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 46:36


Thomas Razzeto has a degree in Electrical Engineering with an emphasis in computer programming. This education also provided a solid background in science including physics and chemistry. About 3 years ago, Thomas became interested in 2012 after attending a public lecture about science and myth. As part of the lecture, the topic of 2012 was presented but not in a very clear way. He started to do his own research and quickly found the work of John Major Jenkins and the galactic alignment. But this galactic alignment already happened in 1998 so Thomas spent months digging and search for the real reason that the Maya picked the exact day of the winter solstice of 2012. After 2 years of research and contemplation, Thomas wrote a book titled: Mystical 2012: Did the Maya Shamans Discover a Mystical View of Reality? www.2012essays.com and www.mystical2012.com. *** AND NOW *** The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.com The ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free) To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
XZTV - Rob McConnell Interviews - THOMAS RAZZETO - Did Extraterrestrials Possibly Create the Maya Calendar

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2021 46:37


Thomas Razzeto has a degree in Electrical Engineering with an emphasis in computer programming. This education also provided a solid background in science including physics and chemistry. About 3 years ago, Thomas became interested in 2012 after attending a public lecture about science and myth. As part of the lecture, the topic of 2012 was presented but not in a very clear way. He started to do his own research and quickly found the work of John Major Jenkins and the galactic alignment. But this galactic alignment already happened in 1998 so Thomas spent months digging and search for the real reason that the Maya picked the exact day of the winter solstice of 2012. After 2 years of research and contemplation, Thomas wrote a book titled: Mystical 2012: Did the Maya Shamans Discover a Mystical View of Reality? www.2012essays.com and www.mystical2012.com. *** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Zone TV Channel Radio Feed (Free - No Subscription Required) - https://www.spreaker.com/show/xztv-the-x-zone-tv-show-audio The ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com (Free)To contact Rob McConnell - misterx@xzoneradiotv.com

Myers Detox
The Shocking Benefits of RIFE Devices with John White

Myers Detox

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2021 49:26


John White joins the show to talk about the shocking benefits of RIFE devices, and the different frequency programs you can use with his RIFE machine to revolutionize your health regiment. We discuss the different types of health issues it can help address, how the RIFE machine works, testimonials from his RIFE community, and how I personally use this amazing technology. On today's podcast, you will learn: 1. How do Spooky 2 Rife devices work? 2. How Spooky 2 uses frequencies to aid in healing. 3. What sets the Spooky 2 apart from other rife devices? 4. Some of the incredible ways I've used the Spooky 2. 5. Different rife products Spooky 2 offers. Some are cheap! 6. Quantum entanglement and plasma technology John uses in his products. 7. John's amazing mission to help you take control of your health! John White's Bio: John White is a Rife researcher and inventor from New Zealand, now living in Nanjing, China. With a background in Electrical Engineering, Physics, and Computer Sciences, he has been researching and developing solutions to serious diseases since 2008.  John specializes in Energy and Scalar Resonance Healing, Biofeedback and PEMF Therapy. With an insatiable desire for truth and knowledge, John has collaborated with other research groups to discover answers to health issues. At the beginning of John's career, the death of John's grandparents influenced him greatly. He felt the helplessness of being unable to extend the lives of those he loves. The subsequent death of Peter Garbett, his teacher and mentor, brought focus to his determination to find a solution to illness. He believes that sickness should not be a business, and restoration of health should be our primary objective. His vision was to provide people with all they need to take control over their own health. You can learn more about John and his Rife products at Also check out Spooky 2's Holiday Sale!  

EUVATION: Spotlight on European Innovation
REINDEER (2) H2020 Project: A closer look at RadioWeaves Technology and how it might be used

EUVATION: Spotlight on European Innovation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 15:11


In this Episode, we will speak with Erik Larsson, Professor and Head of the Division for Communication Systems in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Linköping University, about how the REINDEER H2020 Project can help facilitate the idea of embedded antennas by using RadioWeaves technology. The REINDEER project has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 101013425. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Future of Mobility
#81 – Oren Rosenzweig | Innoviz - LiDAR and Making Assisted & Automated Driving Safer

Future of Mobility

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 55:33


Oren Rosenzweig is the CBO, co-founder and board member at Innoviz Technologies, a global leader in LiDAR technology, working towards a future with safe autonomous vehicles on the world's roads. Key topics in this conversation include Innoviz's planned launch in BMW's Level 3 system Functional safety for automated driving Why Innoviz is initially targeting Level 2-4 private use vehicle applications Why different applications need perception to occur in different locations The potential for LiDAR in non-automotive applications Links Show notes: http://brandonbartneck.com/futureofmobility/orenrosenweig Oren's LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/orenrosenzweig/?originalSubdomain=il Oren's Twitter: https://mobile.twitter.com/theorenzweig Innoviz YouTube: Innoviz Technologies - YouTube Innoviz Website: https://innoviz.tech/ Oren's Bio: Oren Rosenzweig is the CBO, co-founder and board member at Innoviz Technologies. He has spent over 17 years in development, management and advisory roles in the technology field. Oren spent seven years in the elite technological unit of the Intelligence Corps of the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF), where he developed cutting-edge communications systems and led several large scale projects. His roles included leading the development of mobile memory products at Anobit (acquired by Apple), and while at The Boston Consulting Group (BCG), advising Fortune 100 Tech companies on topics such as Strategy, Pricing and Growth. Oren holds a BSc in Electrical Engineering from the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, and an MBA in Finance from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business. About Innoviz: Innoviz Technologies is a global leader in LiDAR technology, working towards a future with safe autonomous vehicles on the world's roads. Innoviz's LiDAR and perception software “see” better than a human driver and reduce the possibility of error, meeting the automotive industry's strictest expectations for performance and safety. Operating across the U.S., Europe, and Asia, Innoviz has been elected both by an internationally-recognized premium car brand for use in consumer vehicles as well as by other commercial and industrial leaders for a wide range of use cases. For more information, visit www.innoviz.tech. Future of Mobility: The Future of Mobility podcast is focused on the development and implementation of safe, sustainable, and equitable mobility solutions, with a spotlight on the people and technology advancing these fields. linkedin.com/in/brandonbartneck/ brandonbartneck.com/futureofmobility/ Music credit: Slow Burn Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast
S29E15 - The Impact Creativity Has on Creating Value, with Andrew McDowell

Human Capital Innovations (HCI) Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021 24:46


In this HCI Podcast episode, Dr. Jonathan H. Westover (https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonathanhwestover/) talks with Andrew McDowell about The Impact Creativity Has on Value. See the video here: https://youtu.be/5ilW0mJXzzA. Andy (linkedin.com/generate-your-value-llc/) is an engineer by trade and a creative by nature. He spent 22 years with the Boeing Company, where he always felt more like a life coach than a boss. In 2002, he began his journey into entrepreneurship within a Corporation when he was asked to develop an Airspace Design Consulting business from scratch that would serve the global government market. Andy has a Bachelor's Degree from Georgia Tech in Electrical Engineering and a Master's Degree in Computer Information Systems from Georgia State. Naturally, his aviation work took him around the world and enabled him to work on high-profile projects - such as preparing the Beijing and Sochi Airports for their respective Olympic Games.  Check out Dr. Westover's new book, 'Bluer than Indigo' Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/bluerthanindigo. Check out Dr. Westover's book, The Alchemy of Truly Remarkable Leadership, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/leadershipalchemy. Check out the latest issue of the Human Capital Leadership magazine, here: https://www.innovativehumancapital.com/hci-magazine. Ranked #6 Performance Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/performance_management_podcasts/  Ranked #6 Workplace Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/workplace_podcasts/  Ranked #7 HR Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/hr_podcasts/  Ranked #12 Talent Management Podcast: https://blog.feedspot.com/talent_management_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 20 Personal Development and Self-Improvement Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/personal_development_podcasts/  Ranked in the Top 30 Leadership Podcasts: https://blog.feedspot.com/leadership_podcasts/ --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/hcipodcast/support

Disruptive CEO Nation
EP 123: Zak Holdsworth, Co-founder Hint Health

Disruptive CEO Nation

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2021 30:13


Show Notes Disruptive CEO Nation Podcast with Allison K. Summers Episode 123 Zak Holdsworth, Co-founder Hint Health In both technology and vision, Zak Holdsworth's story is inspirational on how he went from a small farming community in New Zealand to fulfilling his dream of making it in Silicon Valley. Today he is working on democratizing the world of primary care physicians to free them from the complex world of US insurance carriers. Zak is a change maker, helping physicians cut out the insurance process by going direct to consumers and using the new model for direct primary called subscription as a service.  Prior to co-founding Hint, Zak was VP Business Development at WellnessFX, the first direct-to-consumer clinical diagnostics/telemed company in the US, a startup he invested in during his time at Voyager Capital. Zak holds a BE (Honors) in Electrical Engineering from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand and an MBA from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.  Highlights of our conversation include:  Complexities of disrupting any existing system, especially one with a trillion-dollar risk.  How transformation requires support from the communities of people on the path of change with you. Challenges facing physicians who choose to  step outside of the status quo and take the leap of faith to restart their practice from scratch under the new model. The relationship Zak has with his co-founder - how they went from professionals who butted heads to synchronized collaboration and trust. How the Hint platform provides a total business solution and integrations for physicians wanting a one-to-one relationship with their clients. How a mission-based sales process and providing an annual Hint Summit builds relationships with physicians that results in referrals and retention. Enjoy the show! Connect with Zak: Website: www.hint.com Website: www.summit.hint.com   LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/company/hint-health/ LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/zakholdsworth/ Twitter: www.twitter.com/HintHealth Connect with Allison: Website: allisonksummers.com #CEO #business #businessstrategy #growthstrategy #entreprenuer #entrepreneurship #entreprenuerlife #tech #technology #startups #startupstory #AI #machinelearning #founder #femalefounder   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Catch with John Fischer
A Catch Conversation with Lambert Dolphin

The Catch with John Fischer

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 33:00


Lambert Dolphin received an AB degree with high honors in physics and distinction in mathematics from San Diego State University in June 1954. After two years of graduate study in Physics and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, (1954-1956), he joined the staff of SRI International (formerly Stanford Research Institute), in Menlo Park, California where he remained almost continuously for the next 30 years. He left his position at SRI as a Senior Research Physicist in 1987 to pursue small-scale independent geophysical consulting services, and to devote the bulk of his time to Bible teaching, writing and Christian counseling.

Discussions of Truth
Mary Todd for Congress - MT Dist 2

Discussions of Truth

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 36:53


Patriot Mary Todd brings a thunderous attack to the communist invasion that is infiltrating America. Listen to her voice immediately.  Mother of 4.  The story of her now diseased son, Shane, has captivated the hearts of many Americans....  "After earning his doctorate in Electrical Engineering, Shane sought adventure and took a job with a telecommunications firm in Singapore. In the months leading up to his death, Shane expressed concern about the work his employer was having him do with a Chinese company, later revealed to be Huawei. Eventually convinced that his work was violating U.S. export laws and security interests, Shane resigned and found a new job at a research firm back in the U.S. Shortly after tendering his resignation, Shane told his family he felt his life was being threatened. On his last day of work, Shane was found garroted to death in his Singapore apartment."   Mary is working, now, to make sure American politicians are not only captivated by her story, as many in America have been but, that they do something about it.  She will see to it first hand, that this happens.   Vote Mary Todd.  Her site: https://www.marytoddformt.com/meet-mary --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/iantrottier/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/iantrottier/support

Amplify Good
S2: Ep 32: Living a Life with Dignity

Amplify Good

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2021 38:14


Ahlia is the founder of Little Black Buddha, (LBB) which offers women help in making career transitions and figuring out their next move in their lives and careers. LBB also creates the space to honestly look at the entire picture of one's life by incorporating a life design ethos into the work and programming, advocating wholeness, wellness and a complete sense of self. She is a RYT 200 certified yoga instructor. Little Black Buddha is currently developing LBB Pathways, which is an App that helps people figure (a) what their transferable skills are and (b) what industries those skills can be used in. Ahlia has navigated 5 successful career transitions over a fifteen-year period. Prior to starting Little Black Buddha, she was a Lead Engineer at a Fortune 500 company for 10+ years. Additionally, she is an adjunct professor at Monroe Community College. She has a BS in Electrical Engineering (2001) from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an MA in Math Education (2009) from the City College of New York. Ahlia is married to a wonderful and supportive partner and most importantly, she is a mother of three beautiful and bright children (4, 9 & 12 years old).   Links:  Little Black Buddha: https://littleblackbuddha.com/ Middle Skills Gap: https://www.the74million.org/article/the-middle-skills-gap-half-of-americas-jobs-require-more-than-high-school-diplomas-but-less-than-4-year-degrees-so-why-are-they-under-so-many-students-radars/   Keywords: Black-owned Business, Career Transitions, Middle Skills, Parenting, Self-determination, Legacy, Advocacy, Dignity, Communication, Self-discovery

Space Explr
Everything You Need to Know About The Space Agriculture - DAVI SOUZA | EP.134

Space Explr

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 13, 2021 44:56


Davi Souza is an Electrical Engineering student at the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), co-founder of the Brazilian aerospace startup EP.SpaceBr - Science, Space and Technology, a researcher in space agriculture, analog astronaut at Habitat Marte space analog station, the first one in the South Hemisphere, and currently an engineering intern at Pink Farms, the first urban and vertical farming in Latin America. With the goal to become a greenhouse specialist, Davi has been integrating engineering and sustainability solutions through the use of sensors and automation focused on agriculture in a controlled environment. Thus, his focus is on applications of support technologies to overcome challenges in water-food-energy nexus on Earth and in Space. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/spaceexplr/support

On the Matterr: Motivation for Goal-Getters, Entrepreneurs and Anyone Ready to Level all the way Up!
Service to Humanity (From Nollywood to the U.S. Army w. Emeka Odenigbo)

On the Matterr: Motivation for Goal-Getters, Entrepreneurs and Anyone Ready to Level all the way Up!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 12, 2021 47:47


On the pod, this week is Emeka Odenigbo.Emeka was born in Benin City, Edo State. After graduating with a bachelor's in Electrical Engineering, he went on a quest to stand out. This quest led him to sets of Nollywood movies as an actor and then ultimately to the U.S. Army in Service to Country.In the conversation, Emeka shares growing up, his parents' influence on his life choices, and how powerful the mind is over every matterr. Enjoy!Origin Story - 3:08Family - 4:00Nollywood - 7:33Joining the U.S. Army - 17:04His OTM - 45:13Support the show (https://www.instagram.com/onthematterr/)

Mastering Nutrition
Stephanie Seneff

Mastering Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 129:05


In this episode, I interview Stephanie Seneff, PhD, on her hypothesis about glyphosate, deuterium, and the C-word. Stephanie Seneff is a senior research scientist at MIT, where she has had continuous affiliation for more than five decades. After receiving four degrees from MIT (B.S.. in Biophysics, M.S., E.E., and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science), she has conducted research in packet-switched networks, computational modeling of the human auditory system, natural language processing, spoken dialogue systems, and second language learning. Currently a Senior Research Scientist (MIT's highest research rank) at the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, she has supervised 21 Master's and 14 Ph.D. students. For over a decade, since 2008, she has directed her attention towards the role of nutrition and environmental toxicants on human disease, with a special emphasis on the herbicide glyphosate and the mineral sulfur. Here are the slides for the presentation she gave on this topic: https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/2021/WAPF_2021_Part1.pdf https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/2021/WAPF_2021_Part2.pdf Here is her book: https://stephanieseneff.net/book/ Here is her web site: https://stephanieseneff.net/ Here is how to access the uncensored version, the transcript, and where to find this on YouTube or on social: https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/covid-19/2021/12/10/stephanie-seneff During this critical time where our freedom of health and freedom of speech is in imminent danger, and where tens of thousands of people are facing imminent job losses as the result of medical mandates, I am devoting my analytical skills full time toward the battle for health freedom. This includes working directly with lawyers in lawsuits over mandates, lockdowns, and the current standard of care, scientifically analyzing the safety, efficacy, and risks of mandated medical treatments and their alternatives as well as ways to mitigate their harms, publishing my findings in scientific journals and sharing them with you. It is my firm conviction that this is the most important gift I can offer the world right now, and I view this as a needed public service. I would be extremely grateful if you could support me during this time. At https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/support, you can purchase one of my information products in amounts ranging from $3 to $30, or take advantage of my consulting services for more. You can also make a purchase using one of my affiliate links to buy something you would have bought anyway at no extra cost to you. Finally, at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/donate, you can make a donation in any amount. In a world increasingly dominated by censorship, we may have censored certain words in this video in order to protect the show and keep our community connected. For the uncensored version, please see the link in the description. For uncensored material in general, head to chrismasterjohnphd.com/uncensored. To make sure we stay together as a community, please join my newsletter at chrismasterjohnphd.com/newsletter, where I can guarantee that I'll never deplatform myself. This interview was recorded during a Live Zoom recording, where members of the CMJ Masterpass sat in and submitted comments and questions in the live chat. If you would like to sit in on future interviews I conduct with the chance to contribute questions, sign up for the Masterpass at https://chrismasterjohnphd.com/masterpass and use the code INTERVIEW for 10% off the membership fee for as long as you remain a member. Don't forget to like, share, and subscribe as well. Thank you for your support! 00:00:31 Stephanie's bio 00:03:51 Her hypothesis in brief 00:08:25 Her path from virology to computer science and back to virology 00:14:20 Our common interest in educational video games 00:20:29 Evidence linking glyphosate to the C-word 00:21:37 Glyphosate and biofuels 00:26:47 Evidence that glyphosate substitutes for glycine in protein synthesis and industry's argument against this 00:40:37 The specific role of glyphosate in the C-word, interfering with lung surfactants 00:47:58 Selenomethionine as an example of non-toxic irregular amino acids that substitute for regular amino acids in protein synthesis 00:53:41 Vaping 00:57:14 NAD derivatives and the cells' deuterium depletion machines 00:58:02 G6PDH as the primary deuterium depletion machine 00:59:41 Glutathione, mucus fluidity, nitrosoglutathione, bronchodilation 01:03:26 Surfactants, hyaluronic acid gels, lipoxygenase, and the virus as deuterium depletion agents; deuterium and viral stabilization 01:14:54 Prion proteins 01:19:44 The spike protein as a prion protein 01:21:47 Spike protein toxicity depends on location and context, and may depend on glyphosate 01:27:42 Clotting, and platelets as deuterium-depletion and mitochondria-providing agents 01:32:40 C-word harms may depend on glyphosate status 01:34:15 Practical strategy around deuterium depletion and glyphosate avoidance for protection 01:37:09 Her position on the juice 01:37:46 Commiecron 01:43:41 The juice suppresses type 1 interferon and stimulates interferon-gamma 01:49:55 The virus vs the juice 01:51:06 Where did the virus come from? 01:58:09 Surveillance state and digital passports

Future of Mobility
Student Spotlight – Abhilash Arora | Wireless Charging, Motor Control & Finding a Fit in Mobility

Future of Mobility

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2021 17:28


Abhilash Arora is a MS in Electrical Engineering candidate at NC State University, he has an experience of 3 years in System Development for High Voltage Vehicle Electrification at Mahindra EV Technology Centre, India. Abhilash is also a Graduate Student Researcher with FREEDM Systems Centre, at NC State. His research interests are in Electrification of Automotive and Aerospace spanning Wireless Charging and its application, electric machine topology and motor controls development for vehicle electrification. Show notes: brandonbartneck.com/futureofmobility/abhilasharora Future of Mobility: The Future of Mobility podcast is focused on the development and implementation of safe, sustainable, and equitable mobility solutions, with a spotlight on the people and technology advancing these fields. linkedin.com/in/brandonbartneck/ brandonbartneck.com/futureofmobility/ Music credit: Slow Burn Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

Real Talk With Rob Tavi
Women in Manufacturing Engineering the Future | Real Talk With Rob Tavi ft. Angela Thurman | Episode 47

Real Talk With Rob Tavi

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 61:07


With an aptitude for engineering and a drive to succeed, women in manufacturing are engineering a brighter future. Tune in to this episode of Real Talk with Rob Tavi Ft. Angela Thurman, Principal Managing Director at Thurman Co. LLC and discover her journey to become an electrical engineer working with companies like NASA and Collins Aerospace leading to the launch of her own company that aims to add the personal touch to Project, Contract, and Supplier Management based in Houston, Texas. Angela holds a BS, in Electrical Engineering working as an analytical, process-oriented program and contract manager as well as a Mensa Society Member. Her background includes experience working in the aerospace, defense, telecom, and power sectors. Anglea is a proven leader dedicated to creating an environment where teamwork, organization, efficiency, and client satisfaction are core values. For more information about Thurman Co, or to connect with Angela, visit: https://thurmanco.com/

Teach the Geek Podcast
EP. 182 - Jill Tietjen: Electrical Engineering Making an Impact

Teach the Geek Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 30:18


Jill Tietjen - Electrical Engineering Making an Impact Jill Tietjen is an electrical engineer who worked for decades in the electric utility industry, even serving as an expert witness before public utility commissions and other government agencies. She now heads Technically Speaking, consulting with utility companies, serving on boards, and speaking on a variety of topics, one of which is engineers' impact on the future. We spoke about her schooling, her work in the utilities industry, and her move to being self-employed. To learn more about Jill, visit https://techspeakinginc.com/. __ TEACH THE GEEK teachthegeek.com anchor.fm/teachthegeek youtube.teachthegeek.com @teachthegeek (FB, Twitter) @_teachthegeek_ (IG, TikTok) --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

Screaming in the Cloud
Building a User-Friendly Product with Aparna Sinha

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 42:53


About AparnaAparna Sinha is Director of Product for Kubernetes and Anthos at Google Cloud. Her teams are focused on transforming the way we work through innovation in platforms. Before Anthos and Kubernetes, Aparna worked on the Android platform. She joined Google from NetApp where she was Director of Product for storage automation and private cloud. Prior to NetApp, Aparna was a leader in McKinsey and Company's business transformation office working with CXOs on IT strategy, pricing, and M&A. Aparna holds a PhD in Electrical Engineering from Stanford and has authored several technical publications. She serves on the Governing Board of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF).Links: DevOps Research Report: https://www.devops-research.com/research.html Twitter: https://twitter.com/apbhatnagar TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. Set up a meeting with a Redis expert during re:Invent, and you'll not only learn how you can become a Redis hero, but also have a chance to win some fun and exciting prizes. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: You know how Git works right?Announcer: Sorta, kinda, not really. Please ask someone else.Corey: That's all of us. Git is how we build things, and Netlify is one of the best ways I've found to build those things quickly for the web. Netlify's Git-based workflows mean you don't have to play slap-and-tickle with integrating arcane nonsense and web hooks, which are themselves about as well understood as Git. Give them a try and see what folks ranging from my fake Twitter for Pets startup, to global Fortune 2000 companies are raving about. If you end up talking to them—because you don't have to; they get why self-service is important—but if you do, be sure to tell them that I sent you and watch all of the blood drain from their faces instantly. You can find them in the AWS marketplace or at www.netlify.com. N-E-T-L-I-F-Y dot com.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. We have a bunch of conversations on this show covering a wide gamut of different topics, things that I find personally interesting, usually, and also things I'm noticing in the industry. Fresh on the heels of Google Next, we get to ideally have conversations about both of those things. Today, I'm speaking with the Director of Product Management at Google Cloud, Aparna Sinha. Aparna, thank you so much for joining me today. I appreciate it.Aparna: Thank you, Corey. It's a pleasure to be here.Corey: So, Director of Product Management is one of those interesting titles. We've had a repeat guest here, Director of Outbound Product Management Richard Seroter, which is great. I assume—as I told him—outbound products are the ones that are about to be discontinued. He's been there a year and somehow has failed the discontinue a single thing, so okay, I'm sure that's going to show up on his review. What do you do? The products aren't outbound; they're just products, and you're managing them, but that doesn't tell me much. Titles are always strange.Aparna: Yeah, sure. Richard is one of my favorite people, by the way. I work closely with him. I am the Director of Product for Developer Platform. That's Google Cloud's developer platform.It includes many different products—actually, 30-Plus products—but the primary pieces are usually when a developer comes to Google Cloud, the pieces that they interact with, like our command-line interface, like our Cloud Shell, and all of the SDK pieces that go behind it, and then also our DevOps tooling. So, as you're writing the application in the IDE and as you're deploying it into production, that's all part of the developer platform. And then I also run our serverless platform, which is one of the most developer-friendly capabilities from a compute perspective. It's also integrated into many different services within GCP. So, behind the title, that's really what I work on.Corey: Okay, so you're, I guess, in part responsible for well, I guess, a disappointment of mine a few years ago. I have a habit on Twitter—because I'm a terrible person—of periodically spinning up a new account on various cloud providers and kicking the tires and then live-tweeting the experience, and I was really set to dunk on Google Cloud; I turned this into a whole blog post. And I came away impressed, where the developer experience was pretty close to seamless for getting up and running. It was head and shoulders above what I've seen from other cloud providers, and on the one hand, I want to congratulate you and on the other, it doesn't seem like that's that high of a bar, to be perfectly honest with you because it seems that companies get stuck in their own ways and presuppose that everyone using the product is the same as the people building the product. Google Cloud has been and remains a shining example of great developer experience across the board.If I were starting something net new and did not have deep experience with an existing cloud provider—which let's face it, the most valuable thing about the cloud is knowing how it's going to break because everything breaks—I would be hard-pressed to not pick GCP, if not as the choice, at least a strong number two. So, how did that come to be? I take a look at a lot of Google's consumer apps and, “This is a great user experience,” isn't really something I find myself saying all that often. Google Cloud is sort of its own universe. What happened?Aparna: Well, thank you, first of all, for the praise. We are very humble about it, actually. I think that we're grateful if our developers find the experience to be seamless. It is something that we measure all the time. That may be one of the reasons why you found it to be better than other places. We are continuously trying to improve the time to value for developers, how long it takes them to perform certain actions. And so what you measure is what you improve, right? If you don't measure it, you don't improve it. That's one of our SRE principles.Corey: I wish. I've been measuring certain things for years, and they don't seem to be improving at all. It's like, “Wow, my code is still terrible, but I'm counting the bugs and the number isn't getting smaller.” Turns out there might be additional steps required.Aparna: Yes, you know, we measure it, we look at it, we take active OKRs to improve these things, especially usability. Usability is extremely important for certainly the developer platform, for my group; that's something that's extremely important. I would say, stepping back, you said it's not that common to find a good user experience in the cloud, I think in general—you know, and I've spent the majority of my career, if not all of my career, working on enterprise software. Enterprise software is not always designed in the most user-friendly way; it's not something that people always think about. Some of the enterprise software I've used has been really pretty… pretty bad. Just a list of things.Corey: Oh, yeah. And it seems like their entire philosophy—I did a bit of a dive into this, and I think it was Stripe's Patrick McKenzie who wound up pointing this out originally, though; but the internet is big and people always share and reshare ideas—the actual customer for enterprise software is very often procurement or a business unit that is very organizationally distant from the person who's using it. And I think in a world of a cloud platform, that is no longer true. Yeah, there's a strategic decision of what Cloud do we use, but let's be serious, that decision often comes into play long after there's already been a shadow IT slash groundswell uprising. The sales process starts to look an awful lot less like, “Pick our cloud,” and a lot more like, “You've already picked our cloud. How about we formalize the relationship?”And developer experience with platforms is incredibly important and I'm glad to see that this is a—well, it's bittersweet to me. I am glad to see that this is something that Google is focusing on, and I'm disappointed to admit that it's a differentiator.Aparna: It is a differentiator. It is extremely important. At Google, there are a couple of reasons why this is part of our DNA, and it is actually related to the fact that we are also a consumer products company. We have a very strong user experience team, a very strong measurements-oriented—they measure everything, and they design everything, and they run focus groups. So, we have an extraordinary usability team, and it's actually one of the groups that—just like every other group—is fungible; you can move between consumer and cloud. There's no difference in terms of your training and skill set.And so, I know you said that you're not super impressed with our consumer products, but I think that the practice behind treating the user as king, treating the user as the most important part of your development, is something that we bring over into cloud. And it's just a part of how we do development, and I think that's part of the reason why our products are usable. Again, I shy away from taking any really high credit on these things because I think I always have a very high bar. I want them to be delightful, super delightful, but we do have good usability scores on some of the pieces. I think our command line, I think, is quite good. I think—there's always improvements, by the way, Corey—but I think that there are certain things that are delightful.And a lot of thought goes into it and a lot of multi-functional—meaning across product—user experience and engineering. We have end-developer relations. We have, sort of this four-way communication about—you know, with friction logs and with lots of trials and lots of discussion and measurements, is how we improve the user experience. And I would love to see that in more enterprise software. I think that my experience in the industry is that the user is becoming more important, generally, even in enterprise software, probably because of the migration to cloud.You can't ignore the user anymore. This shouldn't be all about procurement. Anybody can procure a cloud service. It's really about how easily and how quickly can they get to what they want to do as a user, which I think also the definition of what a developer is changing and I think that's one of the most exciting things about our work is that the developer can be anybody; it can be my kids, and it can be anyone across the world. And our goal is to reach those people and to make it easy for them.Corey: If I had to bet on a company not understanding that distinction, on some level, Google's reputation lends itself to that where, oh, great. It's like, I'm a little old to go back to school and join a fraternity and be hazed there, so the second option was, oh, I'll get an interview to be an SRE at Google where, “Oh, great, you've done interesting things, but can you invert a binary tree on a whiteboard?” “No, I cannot. Let's save time and admit that.” So, the concern that I would have had—you just directly contradicted—was the idea that you see at some companies where there's the expectation that all developers are like their developers.Google, for better or worse, has a high technical bar for hiring. A number of companies do not have a similar bar along similar axes, and they're looking for different skill sets to achieve different outcomes, and that's fine. To be clear, I am not saying that, oh, the engineers at Google are all excellent and the engineers all at a bank are all crap. Far from it.That is not true in either direction, but there are differences as far as how they concern themselves with software development, how they frame a lot of these things. And I am surprised that Google is not automatically assuming that developers are the type of developers that you have at Google. Where did that mindset shift come from?Aparna: Oh, absolutely not. I think we would be in trouble if we did that. I studied electrical engineering in school. This would be like assuming that the top of the class is kind of like the kind of people that we want to reach, and it's just absolutely not. Like I said, I want to reach total beginners, I want to reach people who are non-developers with our developer platform.That's our explicit goal, and so we view developers as individuals with a range of superpowers that they've gained throughout their lives, professionally and personally, and people who are always on a path to learn new things, and we want to make it easy for them. We don't treat them as bodies in an employment relationship with some organization, or people with certain minimum bar degrees, or whatever it is. As far as interviewing goes, Corey, in product management, which is the practice that I'm part of, we actually look for, in the interview, that the candidate is not thinking about themselves; they're not imposing themselves on the user base.So, can you think outside of yourself? Can you think of the user base? And are you inquisitive? Are you curious? Do you observe? And how well do you observe differences and diversity, and how well are you able to grasp what might be needed by a particular segment? How well are you able to segment the user base?That's what we look for, certainly in product management, and I'm quite sure also in user experience. You're right, on engineering, of course, we're looking for technical skills, and so on, but that's not how we design our products, that's not how we design the usability of our products.Corey: “If you people were just a little bit smarter slash more like me, then this would work a lot better,” is a common trope. Which brings us, of course, to the current state of serverless. I tend to view serverless as largely a failed initiative so far. And to be clear, I'm viewing this from an AWS-centric lens; that is the… we'll be charitable and call it pool in which I swim. And they announced Lambda in 2015; that's great. “The only code you will ever write in the future is business logic.” Yeah, I might have heard that one before about 15 other technologies dating back to the 60s, but okay.And the expectation was that it was going to take off and set the world on fire. You just needed to learn the constraints of how this worked. And there were a bunch of them, and they were obnoxious, and it didn't have a learning curve so much as a learning cliff. And nowadays, we do see it everywhere, but it's also in small doses. It's mostly used as digital spackle to plaster over the gaps between various AWS services.What I'm not seeing across the board is a radical mindset shift in the way that developers are engaging with cloud platforms that would be heralded by widespread adoption of serverless principles. That said, we are on the heels here of Google Cloud Next, and that you had a bunch of serverless announcements, I'm going to go out on a limb and guess you might not agree with my dismal take on the serverless side of the world?Aparna: Well, I think this is a great question because despite the fact that I like not to be wishy-washy about anything, I actually both agree and disagree [laugh] with what you said. And that's funny.Corey: Well, that's why we're talking about this here instead of on Twitter where two contradictory things can't possibly both be true. Wow, imagine that; nuance, it doesn't fit 280 characters. Please, continue.Aparna: So, what I agree with is that—I agree with you that the former definition of serverless and the constrained way that we are conditioned thinking about serverless is not as expansive as originally hoped, from an adoption perspective. And I think that at Google, serverless is just no longer about only event-driven programming or microservices; it's about running complex workloads at scale while still preserving the delightful developer experience. And this is where the connection to the developer experience comes in. Because the developer experience, in my mind, it's about time to value. How quickly can I achieve the outcome that I need for my business?And what are the things that get in the way of that? Well, setting up infrastructure gets in the way of that, having to scale infrastructure gets in the way of that, having to debug pieces that aren't actually related to the outcome that you're trying to get to gets in the way of that. And the beauty of serverless, it's all in how you define serverless: what does this name actually mean? If serverless only means functions and event-driven applications, then yes, actually, it has a better developer experience, but it is not expansive, and then it is limited, and it's trapped in its skin the way that you mentioned it. [laugh].Corey: And it doesn't lend itself very well to legacy applications—legacy, of course, being condescending engineering-speak for ‘it makes money.' But yeah, that's the stuff that powers the world. We're not going to be redoing all those things as serverless-powered microservices anytime soon, in most cases.Aparna: At Google Cloud, we are redefining serverless. And so what we are taking from Serverless is the delightful user experience and the fact that you don't have to manage the infrastructure, and what we're putting in the serverless is essentially serverless containers. And this is the big revolution in serverless, is that serverless—at least a Google Cloud with serverless containers and our Cloud Run offering—is able to run much bigger varieties of applications and we are seeing large enterprises running legacy applications, like you say, on Cloud Run, which is serverless from a developer experience perspective. There's no cluster, there is no server, there's no VM, there's nothing for you to set up from a scaling perspective. And it essentially scales infinitely.And it is very developer-focused; it's meant for the developer, not for the operator or the infrastructure admin. In reality in enterprise, there is very much a segmentation of roles. And even in smaller companies, there's a segmentation of roles even within the same person. Like, they may have to do some infrastructure work and they may do some development work. And what serverless—at least in the context of Google Cloud—does, is it removes the infrastructure work and maximizes the development work so that you can focus on your application and you can get to that end result, that business value that you're trying to achieve.And with Cloud Run, what we've done is we've preserved that—and I would say, actually, arguably improved that because we've done usability studies that show that we're 22 points above every other serverless offering from a usability perspective. So, it's super important to me that anybody can use this service. Anybody. Maybe even not a developer can use this service. And that's where our focus is.And then what we've done underneath is we've removed many of the restrictions that are traditionally associated with serverless. So, it doesn't have to be event-driven, it is not only a particular set of languages or a particular set of runtimes. It is not only stateless applications, and it's not only request-based billing, it's not only short-running jobs. These are the kinds of things that we have removed and I think we've just redefined serverless.Corey: [unintelligible 00:17:05], on some level, the idea of short-lived functions with a maximum cap feels like a lazy answer to one of the hard problems in computer science, the halting problem. For those not familiar, my layman's understanding of it is, “Okay, you have a program that's running in a loop. How do you deterministically say that it is done executing?” And the functional answer to that is, “Oh, after 15 minutes, it's done. We're killing it.” Which I guess is an answer, but probably not one that's going to get anyone a PhD.It becomes very prescriptive and it leads to really weird patterns trying to work around some of those limitations. And historically, yeah, by working within the constraints of the platform, it works super well. What interests me about Cloud Run is that it doesn't seem to have many of those constraints in quite the same way. It's, “Can you shove whatever monstrosity you've got into a container? You can't? Well, okay, there are ways to get there.”Full disclosure, I was very anti-container; the industry has yet again proven to me that I cannot predict the future. Here we are. “Great, can you shove a container in and hand it to some other place to run it where”—spoiler, people will argue with me on this and they are wrong—“Google engineers are better at running infrastructure to run containers than you are.” Full stop. That is the truism of how this works; economies of scale.I love the idea of being able to take something, throw it over a wall, and not have to think about the rest of it. But everything that I'm thinking about in this context looks certain ways and it's the type of application that I'm working on or that I'm looking at most recently. What are you seeing in Cloud Run as far as interesting customer use cases? What are people doing with it that you didn't expect them to?Aparna: Yeah, I think this is a great time to ask that question because with the pandemic last year—I guess we're still in the pandemic, but with the pandemic, we had developers all over the world become much more important and much more empowered, just because there wasn't really much of an operations team, there wasn't really as much coordination even possible. And so we saw a lot of customers, a lot of developers moving to cloud, and they were looking for the easiest thing that they could use to build their applications. And as a result, serverless and Cloud Run in particular, became extremely popular; I would say hockey stick in terms of usage.And we're seeing everything under the sun. ecobee—this is a home automation company that makes smart thermostats—they're using Cloud Run to launch a new camera product with multi-factor authentication and security built-in, and they had a very tight launch timeline. They were able to very quickly meet that need. Another company—and you talk about, you know, sort of brick and mortar—IKEA, which you and I all like to shop [laugh] at, particularly doing the—Corey: Oh, I love building something from 500 spare parts, badly. It's like basically bringing my AWS architecture experience into my living room. It's great. Please continue.Aparna: Yeah, it's like, yeah—Corey: The Swedish puzzle manufacturer.Aparna: Yes. They're a great company, and I think it just in the downturn and the lockdown, it was actually a very dicey time, very tricky time, particularly for retailers. Of course, everybody was refurbishing their home or [laugh], you know, improving their home environment and their furniture. And IKEA started using serverless containers along with serverless analytics—so with BigQuery, and Cloud Run, and Cloud Functions—and one of the things they did is that they were able to cut their inventory refresh rate from more than three hours to less than three minutes. This meant that when you were going to drive up and do some curbside pickup, you know the order that you placed was actually in stock, which was fantastic for CSAT and everything.But that's the technical piece that they were able to do. When I spoke with them, the other thing that they were able to do with the Cloud Run and Cloud Functions is that they were able to improve the work-life balance of their engineers, which I thought was maybe the biggest accomplishment. Because the platform, they said, was so easy for them to use and so easy for them to accomplish what they needed to accomplish, that they had a better [laugh] better life. And I think that's very meaningful.In other companies, MediaMarktSaturn, we've talked about them before; I don't know if I've spoken to you about them, but we've certainly talked about them publicly. They're a retailer in EMEA, and because of their use of Cloud Run, and they were able to combine the speed of serverless with the flexibility of containers, and their development team was able to go eight times faster while handling 145% increase in digital channel traffic. Again, there are a lot more digital channel traffic during COVID. And perhaps my favorite example is the COVID-19 exposure notifications work that we did with Apple.Corey: An unfortunate example, but a useful one. I—Aparna: Yes.Corey: —we all—I think we all wish it wasn't necessary, but here's the world in which we live. Please, tell me more.Aparna: I have so many friends in engineering and mathematics and these technical fields, and they're always looking at ways that technology can solve these problems. And I think especially something like the pandemic which is so difficult to track, so difficult with the time that it takes for this virus to incubate and so on, so difficult to track these exposures, using the smartphone, using Bluetooth, to have a record of who has it and who they've been in contact with, I think really interesting engineering problem, really interesting human problem. So, we were able to work on that, and of course, when you need a platform that's going to be easy to use, that's going to be something that you can put into production quickly, you're going to use Cloud Run. So, they used Cloud Run, and they also used Cloud Run for Anthos, which is the more hybrid version, for the on-prem piece. And so both of those were used in conjunction to back all of the services that were used in the notifications work.So, those are some of the examples. I think net-net, it's that I think usability, especially in enterprise software is extremely important, and I think that's the direction in which software development is going.Corey: Are you building cloud applications with a distributed team? Check out Teleport, an open source identity-aware access proxy for cloud resources. Teleport provides secure access to anything running somewhere behind NAT: SSH servers, Kubernetes clusters, internal web apps and databases. Teleport gives engineers superpowers! Get access to everything via single sign-on with multi-factor. List and see all SSH servers, kubernetes clusters or databases available to you. Get instant access to them all using tools you already have. Teleport ensures best security practices like role-based access, preventing data exfiltration, providing visibility and ensuring compliance. And best of all, Teleport is open source and a pleasure to use.Download Teleport at https://goteleport.com. That's goteleport.com.Corey: It's easy for me to watch folks—like you—in keynotes at events—like Cloud Next—talk about things and say, “This is how the world is building things, and this is what the future looks like.” And I can sit there and pick to pieces all day, every day. It basically what I do because of deep-seated personality problems with me. It's very different to say that about a customer who has then taken that thing and built it into something that is transformative and solves a very real problem that they have. I may not relate to that problem that they have, but I do not believe that customers are going to have certain problems, find solutions like this and fix them, and the wrong in how they're approaching these things.No one sees the constraints that shape things; no one shows up in the morning hoping to do a crap job today unless you know you're the VP of Integrity at Facebook or something. But there's a very real sense of companies have a bunch of different drivers, and having a tool or a service or a platform that solves it for them, you'd better be very sure before you step up and start saying, “No, you're doing it wrong.” In earlier years, I did not see a whole lot of customer involvement with Cloud Next. It was always a, “Well, a bunch of Googlers are going to tell me how this stuff works, and they'll talk about theoretical things.”That's not the case anymore. You have a whole bunch of highly respectable reference customers out there doing a whole lot of really interesting things. And more to the point, they're willing to go on record talking about this. And I'm not talking about fun startups that are, “Great, it's Twitter, only for pets.” Great. I'm talking banks, companies where mistakes are going to show and leave a mark. It's really hard to reconcile what I'm seeing with Google Cloud in 2021 than what I was seeing in, let's say, five or six years ago. What drove that change?Aparna: Yes, Corey, I think you're definitely correct about that. There's no doubt about it that we have a number of really tremendous customers, we really tremendous enterprise references and so on. I run the Google Cloud Developer Platform, and for me, the developers that I work with and the developers that this platform serves are the inspiration for what we do. And in the last six or seven years that I've worked in Google Cloud, that has always been the case. So, nothing has changed from my perspective, in that regard.If anything, what has changed is that we have far more users, we have been growing exponentially, and we have many more large enterprise customers, but in terms of my journey, I started with the Kubernetes open-source project, I was one of the very early people on that, and I was working with a lot of developers, in that case, in the open-source community, a lot of them became GKE customers, and it just grew. And now we have so many [laugh] customers and so many developers, and we have developed this platform with them. We are very much—it's been a matter of co-innovation, especially on Kubernetes. It has been very much, “Okay, you tell us,” and it's a need-based relationship, you know? Something is not working, we are there and we fix it.Going back to 2017 or whenever it was that Pokemon Go was running on GKE, that was a moment when we realized, “Oh, this platform needs to scale. Okay, let's get at it.” And that's where, Corey, it really helps to have great engineers. For all the pros and cons, I think that's where you want those super-sharp, super-driven, super-intelligent folks because they can make things like that happen, they can make it happen in less than a week, so that—they can make it happen over a Saturday so that Pokemon Go can go live in Japan and everybody can be playing that game. And that's what inspires me.And that's a game, but we have a lot of customers that are running health applications. We have a customer that's running ambulances on the platform. And so this is life-threatening stuff; we have to take that very seriously, and we have to be listening to them and working with them. But I'm inspired, and I think that our roadmap, and the products, and the features that we build are inspired by what they are building on the platform. And they're combining all kinds of different things. They're taking our machine learning capabilities, they're taking our analytics capabilities, they're taking our Maps API, and they're combining it with Cloud Run, they're combining it with GKE. Often they're using both of those.And they're running new services. We've got a customer in Indonesia that's running in a food delivery service; I've got customers that are analyzing the cornfields in the middle of the country to improve crop yield. So, that's the kind of inspiring work, and each of those core, each of those users are coming back to us and saying, “Oh, you know, I need a different type of”—it's very detailed, like, “I need a different type of file system that gives me greater speed or better performance.” We just had a gaming company that was running on GKE that we really won out over a different cloud in terms of performance improvements that we were able to provide on the container startup times. It was just a significant performance improvement. We'll probably publish it in the coming few months.That's the kind of thing that drives it, and I'm very glad that I have a strong engineering team in Google Cloud, and I'm very glad that we have these amazing customers that are trying to do these amazing things, and that they're directly engaging with us and telling us what they need from us because that's what we're here for.Corey: To that end, one more area I want to go into before we call this a show, you've had Cloud Build for a little while, and that's great. Now, at—hot off the presses, you wound up effectively taking that one step further with Cloud Deploy. And I am still mostly someone with terrible build and release practices that people would be ashamed of, struggle to understand the differentiation between what I would do with Cloud Build and what I would do with Cloud Deploy. I understand they're both serverless. I understand that they are things that large companies care about. What is the story there?Aparna: Yeah, it's a journey. As you start to use containers—and these days, like you said, Corey, containers, a lot of people are using them—then you start to have a lot of microservices, and one of the benefits of container usage is that it's really quick to release new versions. You can have different versions of your application, you can test them out, you can roll them out. And so these DevOps practices, they become much more attainable, much more reachable. And we just put out the, I think, the seventh version of the DevOps Research Report—the DORA report—that shows that customers that follow best practices, they achieve their results two times better in terms of business outcomes, and so on.And there's many metrics that show that this kind of thing is important. But I think the most important thing I learned during the pandemic, as we were coming out of the pandemic, is a lot of—and you mentioned enterprises—large banks, large companies' CIOs and CEOs who basically were not prepared for the lockdown, not prepared for the fact that people aren't going to be going into branches, they came to Google Cloud and they said that, “I wish that I had implemented DevOps practices. I wish that I had implemented the capability to roll out changes frequently because I need that now. I need to be able to experiment with a new banking application that's mobile-only. I need to be able to experiment with curbside delivery. And I'm much more dependent on the software than I used to be. And I wish that I had put those DevOps practices.”And so the beginning of 2021, all our conversations were with customers, especially those, you know you said ‘legacy,' I don't think that's the right word, but the traditional companies that have been around for hundreds of years, all of them, they said, “Software is much more important. Yes, if I'm not a software company, at least a large division of my group is now a software group, and I want to put the DevOps practices into play because I know that I need that and that's a better way of working.”By the way, there's a security aspect to that I'd like to come back to because it's really important—especially in banking, financial services, and public sector—as you move to a more agile DevOps workflow, to have security built into that. So, let me come back to that. But with regard to Cloud Build and Cloud Deploy is something I've been wanting to bring into market for a couple of years. And we've been talking about it, we've been working on it actively for more than a year on my team. And I'm very, very excited about this service because what it does is it allows you to essentially put this practice, this DevOps practice into play whereas your artifacts are built and stored in the artifact repository, they can then automatically be deployed into your runtime—which is GKE Cloud Run—in the future, you can deploy them, and you can set how you want to deploy them.Do you want to deploy them to a particular environment that you want to designate the test environment, the environment to which your developers have access in a certain way? Like, it's a test environment, so they can make a lot of changes. And then when do you want to graduate from test to staging, and when do you want to graduate to production and do that gradual rollout? Those are some of the things that Cloud Deploy does.And I think it's high time because how do you manage microservices at scale? How do you really take advantage of container-based development is through this type of tooling. And that's what Cloud Deploy does. It's just the beginning of that, but it's a delightful product. I've been playing around with it; I love it, and we've seen just tremendous reception from our users.Corey: I'm looking forward to kicking the tires on it myself. I want to circle back to talk about the security aspect of it. Increasingly, I'm spending more of my attention looking at cloud security because everyone else has, too, and some of us have jobs that don't include the word security but need to care about it. That's why I have a Thursday edition of my newsletter, now, talking specifically about that. What is the story around security these days from your perspective?And again, it's a huge overall topic, and let's be clear here, I'm not asking, “What does Google Cloud think about security?” That would fill an encyclopedia. What is your take on it? And where do you want to talk about this in the context of Cloud Deploy?Aparna: Yeah, so I think about security from the perspective of the Google Cloud Developer Platform, and specifically from the perspective of the developer. And like you said, security is not often in the title of anybody in the developer organization, so how do we make it seamless? How do we make it such that security is something that is not going to catch you as you're doing your development? That's the critical piece. And at the same time, one of the things we saw during 2020 and 2021 is just the number of cyberattacks just went through the roof. I think there was a 400 to 600% increase in the number of software supply chain attacks. These are attacks where some malicious hacker has come in and inserted some malicious code into your software. [laugh]. Your software, Corey. You know, you the unsuspecting developer is—Corey: Well, it used to be my software; now there's some debate about that.Aparna: Right. That's true because most software is using open-source dependencies; and these open-source dependencies, they have a pretty intricate web of dependencies that they are themselves using. So, it's a transitive problem where you're using a language like Python, or whatever language you're using. And there's a number of—Corey: Crappy bash by default. But yes.Aparna: Well, it was actually a bash script vulnerability, I think, in the Codecov breach that happened, I think it was, in earlier this year, where a malicious bash script was injected into the build system, in fact, of Codecov. And there are all these new attack vectors that are specifically targeting developers. And whether it's nation-states or whoever it is that's causing some of these attacks, it's a problem that is of national and international magnitude. And so I'm really excited that we have the expertise in Google Cloud and beyond Google Cloud.Google, it's a very security-conscious company. This company is a very security-conscious company. [laugh]. And we have built a lot of tooling internally to avoid those kinds of attacks, so what we've done with Cloud Build, and what we're going to do with Cloud Deploy, we're building in the capability for code to be signed, for artifacts to be signed with cryptographic keys, and for that signing, that attestation—we call it an attestation—that attestation to be checked at various points along the software supply chain. So, as you're writing code, as you're submitting the code, as you're building the containers, as you're storing the containers, and then finally as you're deploying them into whatever environment you're deploying them, we check these keys, and we make sure that the software that is going through the system is actually what you intended and that there isn't this malicious code injection that's taking place.And also, we scan the software, we scan the code, we scan the artifacts to check for vulnerabilities, known vulnerabilities as well as unknown vulnerabilities. Known vulnerabilities from a Google perspective; so Google's always a little bit ahead, I would say, in terms of knowing what the vulnerabilities are out there because we do work so much on software across operating systems and programming languages, just across the full gamut of software in the industry, we work on it, and we are constantly securing software. So, we check for those vulnerabilities, we alert you, we help to remediate those vulnerabilities.Those are the type of things that we're doing. And it's all in service of certainly keeping enterprise developers secure, but also just longtail an average, everybody, helping them to be secure so that they don't get hacked and their companies don't get hacked.Corey: It's nice to see people talking about this stuff, who is not directly a security vendor. But by which I mean, you're not using this as the fear, uncertainty, and doubt angle to sell a given service that, “We have to talk about this exploit because otherwise, no one will ever buy this.” Something like Cloud Deploy is very much aligned with a best practices approach to release engineering. It's not, strictly speaking, a security product, but being able to wrap things that are very security-centric around it is valuable.Now, sponsors are always going to do interesting things at various expo halls, and oh, yeah, saw the same product warmed over. This is very much not that, and I don't interpret anything you're saying is trying to sell something via the fear, uncertainty, and doubt model. There are a lot of different areas that I will be skeptical hearing about from different companies; I do take security words from Google extremely seriously because, let's be clear, in the past 20 however many years it has been, you have established a clear track record for caring about these things.Aparna: Yeah. And I have to go back to my initial mission statement, which is to help developers accelerate time to value. And one of the things that will certainly get in the way of accelerating time to value is security breaches, by the nature of them. If you are not running a supply chain that is secure, then it is very difficult for you to empower your developers to do those releases frequently and to update the software frequently because what if the update has an issue? What if the update has a security vulnerability?That's why it's really important to have a toolchain that prevents against that, that checks for those things, that logs those things so that there's an audit trail available, and that has the capability for your security team to set policies to avoid those kinds of things. I think that's how you get speed. You get with security built in, and that's extremely important to developers and especially cloud developers.Corey: I want to thank you for taking the time to speak to me about all the things that you've been working on and how you view this industry unfolding. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, and how you think about these things, where can they find you?Aparna: Well, Corey, I'm available on Twitter, and that may be one of the best ways to reach me. I'm also available at various customer events that we are having, most of them are online now. And so I'll provide you more details on that and I can be reached that way.Corey: Excellent. I will, of course, include links to that in the [show notes 00:38:43]. Thank you so much for being so generous with your time. I appreciate it.Aparna: Thank you so much. I greatly enjoyed speaking with you.Corey: Aparna Sinha, Director of Product Management at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. And that sentence needed the word ‘cloud' about four more times in it. And if you've enjoyed this episode, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a loud angry comment telling me that I just don't understand serverless well enough.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

20 Minute Leaders
Ep667: Adam de la Zerda | CEO, Visby Medical

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 7, 2021 22:46


Adam is CEO of Visby Medical (formerly Click Diagnostics), which he founded in 2012 to develop easy-use diagnostic tests. In March 2020, the company pivoted from work on a sexual health test to tackle the coronavirus, and in July received FDA emergency authorization approval for its portable COVID-19 test. He is also an associate professor in the Departments of Structural Biology and Electrical Engineering at Stanford University School of Medicine, with research interests spanning a broad field of molecular imaging. His lab is developing new optical imaging tools with applications to cancer and ophthalmic diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration.

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
Glyphosate Is An Insidious And Cummulative "Slow Kill" - Stephanie Seneff, PhD

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 5, 2021 10:35


Glyphosate Is An Insidious And Cummulative "Slow Kill" -  Stephanie Seneff, PhDStephanie Seneff, Ph.D. • https://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/• Book - The Glyphosate Effect: How the World's Most Common Herbicide Is Undermining Your Health and What You Can Do About It Stephanie Seneff is a Senior Research Scientist at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory. She received the B.S. degree in Biophysics in 1968, the M.S. and E.E. degrees in Electrical Engineering in 1980, and the Ph.D degree in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 1985, all from MIT. For over three decades, her research interests have always been at the intersection of biology and computation: developing a computational model for the human auditory system, understanding human language so as to develop algorithms and systems for human computer interactions, as well as applying natural language processing (NLP) techniques to gene predictions. She has published over 170 refereed articles on these subjects, and has been invited to give keynote speeches at several international conferences. She has also supervised numerous Master's and PhD theses at MIT. In 2012, Dr. Seneff was elected Fellow of the International Speech and Communication Association (ISCA).In recent years, Dr. Seneff has focused her research interests back towards biology. She is concentrating mainly on the relationship between nutrition and health. Since 2011, she has published over two dozen papers in various medical and health-related journals on topics such as modern day diseases (e.g., Alzheimer, autism, cardiovascular diseases), analysis and search of databases of drug side effects using NLP techniques, and the impact of nutritional deficiencies and environmental toxins on human health.# StephanieSeneff #GMOs #GeneticallyModifiedFood #GMCrops #FoodSafety#TheRealTruthAboutHealth  CLICK HERE - To Checkout Our MEMBERSHIP CLUB: http://www.realtruthtalks.com Social Media ChannelsFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConferenceInstagram : https://www.instagram.com/therealtruthabouthealth/Twitter: https://twitter.com/RTAHealthLinkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/the-real-truth-about-health-conference/ Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealth    Check out our Podcasts  Visit us on Apple Podcast and Itunes search:  The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast Amazon: https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/23a037be-99dd-4099-b9e0-1cad50774b5a/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastSpotify: https://open.spotify.com/show/0RZbS2BafJIEzHYyThm83JGoogle:https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9mZWVkcy5zaW1wbGVjYXN0LmNvbS8yM0ZqRWNTMg%3D%3DStitcher: https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastAudacy: https://go.audacy.com/partner-podcast-listen-real-truth-about-health-live-online-conference-podcastiHeartRadio: https://www.iheart.com/podcast/269-real-truth-about-health-li-85932821/Deezer: https://www.deezer.com/us/show/2867272 Other Video ChannelsYoutube:  https://www.youtube.com/c/TheRealTruthAboutHealthVimeo:  https://vimeo.com/channels/1733189Rumble:   https://rumble.com/c/c-1111513Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/TRTAHConference/videos/?ref=page_internalDailyMotion: https://www.dailymotion.com/TheRealTruthAboutHealthBitChute:  https://www.bitchute.com/channel/JQryXTPDOMih/ 

Market Hunt
Creating innovation standards

Market Hunt

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 57:45


Episode SummaryWhat are innovation standards? How can you measure and manage innovation in organizations? What are keys to cultivating an innovative culture? Find out more in this episode.Episode NotesInterview Guest: Dr. Sorin Cohn, SO56008 Project Leader for Innovation Measurements at ISO - International Organization for StandardizationCheck out the Ie-Knowledge Hub Video Case Studies on the International Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub.Questions or feedback on our episode? Get in touch with show host Thierry Harris: thierry.harris@cartouchemedia.comEpisode Research Questions:What are the three fundamental innovation strategies and give us examples of how these are applied in real world settings?What are some characteristics of an innovative culture in organizations?What are the key projects of the ISO 56000 Innovation Management Standards?Write to us at solutions@ie-knowledgehub.ca and we'll post some of your answers on our website page.Guest bio:  Dr. Sorin CohnDr.  Sorin Cohn leads the International Standards Organization world team developing the  ISO56008 standard on innovation operation measurements and metrics. He is Founder & CEO of Competitive Innovation Management & Entrepreneurship (c-IM&E) – a company providing innovation management tools and consulting services. Dr. Cohn was the Chair of the Board of Startup Canada and several other companies. Sorin has led the research on innovation metrics and management for the Center for Business Innovation at the Conference Board of Canada. Dr. Cohn was awarded the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal for services to Canada. Sorin has 40+ years international business & technology experience having been involved in most facets of “innovation management”: from idea to research and lab prototype, from technology to product, new business units, and then to market success on the global stage.  He was the Managing Director for Europe, Middle East and Africa for a California optical access company. Early 2000's, as co-founder and President Global Portfolio of the OrbitIQ global business accelerator, Sorin has been working with technology companies in North America, Israel and Europe to build their market strengths. Prior to 2000, Sorin held executive positions with Nortel Networks and was Director for Exploratory Programs at BNR. He has developed new technologies, created R&D laboratories, started new product lines and initiated/managed new business units. Sorin has several essential patents and over 100 publications and presentations. Dr. Cohn received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering, an M.Sc. in Physics and an M.Eng. in Engineering Physics. He is providing innovation management workshops and lectures at Canadian, US, European and SE Asian Universities on business management and entrepreneurial innovation.EPISODE LINKS Dr. Sorin CohnCompetitive Innovation Management & Entrepreneurship (c-IM&E)Startup CanadaConference Board of CanadaInternational Organization for StandardizationISO 56000 Innovation standardISO 56008 Innovation Management - tools and methods for innovation operation measurementsISO Technical CommitteesISO Standard development methodISO Screw Thread StandardISO Circular Economy StandardISO Technical Committee 279ISO Innovation Standard Project ListISO 56 002 Innovation Management Systems - GuidanceISO 56 003 - Tools and methods for innovation partnershipsISO 56 006 - Tools and methods for strategic intelligence managementISO 56 005 - Tools and methods for intellectual property managementISO 56 007 - Tools and methods for idea managementISO 56 0004 - Innovation Management AssessmentISO 56 001 - Innovation Management System - RequirementsISO 9000 family - Quality ManagementBritish Columbia's Acuitas Therapeutics - BioNTech Pfizer VaccineChina IP patents vs U.S. China Engineers vs U.S.Sony Transistor commercializationNational Research Council of Canada (NRC)Nortel NetworksMitelNewbridge NetworksStartup statistics in Canada2011 Booz & Company paper on Innovation Global Innovation Index rankingsInnovation management systems further reading (from HBR) Promotional Links:IE-Knowledge HubIE-Knowledge Hub Case Study Directory IE-Knowledge Hub B-Con Case Study B-Con EngineeringBrian CreberThierry HarrisSHOW CREDITSMarket Hunt is produced by Cartouche Media in collaboration with Seratone Studios in Montreal and Popup Podcasting in Ottawa. Market Hunt is part of the International Entrepreneurship Knowledge Hub network.  Funding for this program comes from the Social Sciences and Humanities Resource Council of Canada.Executive Producers: Hamid Etemad, McGill University Desautels Faculty of Management and Hamed Motaghi, Université du Québec en Outaouais. Associate Producer, Jose Orlando Montes, Université du Québec à Montréal.Technical Producers Simon Petraki, Seratone Studio and Lisa Querido, Pop up Podcasting. Show consultant, JP Davidson. Artwork by Melissa Gendron. Voiceover: Katie Harrington.You can check out the ie-Knowledge Hub Case studies  at ie-knowledgehub.ca.

Tech Leader Talk
Robotic systems won't replace people – Ginny Foster

Tech Leader Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 2, 2021 32:59


On this episode, Ginny Foster and I discuss robotics, industrial automation, and safety issues related to robots. Ginny is an Electrical Engineer who helps people scale manufacturing operations with robotics.   She serves as Market Development Manager at Neff Power, an industrial automation distributor and robotics partner with locations across the United States. Ginny has a degree in Electrical Engineering from Saint Louis University and a degree in Spanish from Washington University in Saint Louis. She is a certified Project Management Professional, and is passionate about developing relationships and solving problems. “Robots do not replace people. Robots replace tasks.” – Ginny Foster Today on the Tech Leader Talk podcast: - How companies can start implementing robotic systems - Will robots replace people - The four Ds of robotics (tasks that are best for robots) - The future of robotics and artificial intelligence Resources Mentioned: Book: Mindset by Carol Dweck YouTube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/c/Neffpowermissouri Connect with Ginny Foster: LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ginny-foster-0047a09/ Website: https://www.neffpower.com/ Thanks for listening! Be sure to get your free copy of Steve's latest book, Cracking the Patent Code, and discover his proven system for identifying and protecting your most valuable inventions. Get the book at https://stevesponseller.com/book.

Interviews
That Bangladesh Mask Study!

Interviews

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021


Our guest is Ben Recht, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley, who recently got hold of and analyzed the raw data from the Bangladesh cluster randomized control trial of masking which made headlines in September. SHOW NOTES​ Ben Recht: Twitter and webpageBen Recht's recent blog post: Revisiting the Bangladesh Mask RCTMichel Accad Why N-of-1 is EnoughEp. 97 with Peter Klein on “Evidence-Based Economics: What the Doctor Ordered?“Watch the episode on the Accad & Koka Report YouTube channel

Mises Media
That Bangladesh Mask Study!

Mises Media

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 1, 2021


Our guest is Ben Recht, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley, who recently got hold of and analyzed the raw data from the Bangladesh cluster randomized control trial of masking which made headlines in September. SHOW NOTES​ Ben Recht: Twitter and webpageBen Recht's recent blog post: Revisiting the Bangladesh Mask RCTMichel Accad Why N-of-1 is EnoughEp. 97 with Peter Klein on “Evidence-Based Economics: What the Doctor Ordered?“Watch the episode on the Accad & Koka Report YouTube channel

Diverse Engineering
S2, E7: Rising Tides Raise All Ships

Diverse Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 29, 2021 43:21


Chevonne Anderson, B.S. Biomedical Engineering '17; Nicole Lee, Electrical Engineering '17; and Tayler LeGrair B.S. Electrical Engineering '18 talk about sisterhood and the power of lifting other women up.

The Accad and Koka Report
Ep. 187 That Bangladesh Mask Study!

The Accad and Koka Report

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2021 53:15


Our guest is Ben Recht, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley, who recently got hold of and analyzed the raw data from the Bangladesh cluster randomized control trial of masking which made headlines in September. GUEST: Ben Recht: https://twitter.com/beenwrekt (Twitter) and https://people.eecs.berkeley.edu/~brecht/?_ga=2.137066873.835125709.1638047158-1360907758.1638047158 (webpage) LINKS: Ben Recht's recent blog post: http://www.argmin.net/2021/11/23/mask-rct-revisited/ (Revisiting the Bangladesh Mask RCT) Michel Accad http://alertandoriented.com/why-n-of-1-is-enough/ (Why N-of-1 is Enough) Ep. 97 with Peter Klein on "https://accadandkoka.com/episode97/ (Evidence-Based Economics: What the Doctor Ordered?)" WATCH ON YOUTUBE: https://youtu.be/5P8aVDqEY6Q (Watch the episode) on our YouTube channel Support this podcast

What Fuels You
S13E5: Jeremy Fain

What Fuels You

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 50:30


Jeremy Fain is the CEO and Co-Founder of Cognitiv. With over 20 years of interactive experience across agency, publisher, and ad tech management, Jeremy led North American Accounts for Rubicon Project before founding Cognitiv. At Rubicon Project, Jeremy was responsible for global market success of over 400 media companies and 500 demand partners through Real-Time-Bidding, new product development, and other revenue strategies, ensuring interactive buyers and sellers could take full advantage of automated transactions. Prior to Rubicon Project, Jeremy served as Director of Network Solutions for CBS Interactive. With oversight of a $30 million+ P&L, Jeremy was responsible for development, execution and management of data-driven solutions across CBS Interactive's network of branded sites, including audience targeting, private exchange, and custom audience solutions. Prior to CBS, Jeremy served as Vice President of Industry Services for the IAB, where he shaped interactive industry policy, standards, and best practices, such as the first VAST standard and the Tc&Cs 3.0, by working on a daily basis with all the major media companies as well as all the agency holding companies. Jeremy Fain attended Yale University where he graduated with a BS in Electrical Engineering and Columbia Business School where he received his MBA. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

AR Show with Jason McDowall
Alon Grinshpoon (echo3D) on Building the AWS for 3D and Founder-Market Fit

AR Show with Jason McDowall

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 52:11


Alon Grinshpoon is the Co-founder and CEO of echo3D, a 3D-ready cloud platform that helps manage & deliver 3D, AR, and VR content to apps & devices everywhere. echo3D recently closed a $4M round of funding to feed continued growth after seeing a tremendous amount of momentum over the past year.Alon started his career in the Isrealli Intelligence Service, working on encryption and cloud technologies. After earning a B.S. in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering from Tel Aviv University, he spent several years as a software engineer working on improving the performance of cloud-based and client-server computer systems.Alon went on to receive his M.S. in Computer Science from Columbia University with a focus on computer graphics, virtual and augmented reality, and human-computer interaction.In this conversation, we discuss how Alon's background made him a good fit for solving the unique set of challenges for developing an AWS or Akamai for 3D. Alon is a passionate entrepreneur with great advice for early-stage startups, and we talk about his perspective on the concept of founder-market fit. [quote]Alon goes on to discuss founder-investor fit, and the importance of pragmatically de-risking a startup as you go along. He also shares his funding and growth journey through the RLab and Techstars accelerators, and subsequent rounds of VC funding.You can find all of the show notes at thearshow.com.

Unprofessional Engineering
What Is Control Systems Engineering - Episode 274

Unprofessional Engineering

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 17, 2021 32:03


If you're thinking about getting into engineering, finding a new job in your field, or curious how much you should be getting paid, you don't want to miss this series on different fields of engineering. This time, we are focused on "What is Control Systems Engineering." Or Controls Engineering. Or Systems Engineering.... OK, you get the point. We've reviewed the top US and global universities for a Control Systems Engineering degree, the classes that you take (warning, there is a lot of Electrical Engineering and Comp Sci going on here), who likes to hire your, how much you'll get paid, and so much more!

The Tim Ferriss Show
#547: Balaji Srinivasan on Bitcoin, The Great Awokening, Wolf Warrior Diplomacy, Open-Source Ecology, Reputational Civil War, Creating New Cities, and Options for Becoming a Sane but Sovereign Individual

The Tim Ferriss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 273:09


Balaji Srinivasan on Bitcoin, The Great Awokening, Wolf Warrior Diplomacy, Open-Source Ecology, Reputational Civil War, Creating New Cities, and Options for Becoming a Sane but Sovereign Individual | Brought to you by Wealthfront automated investing, Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover sleeping solution for dynamic cooling and heating, and BlockFi crypto platform. More on all three below.“The monopoly of truth is upstream of the monopoly of violence.” — Balaji SrinivasanBalaji S. Srinivasan (@balajis) is an angel investor and entrepreneur. Formerly the CTO of Coinbase and general partner at Andreessen Horowitz, he was also the co-founder of Earn.com (acquired by Coinbase), Counsyl (acquired by Myriad), Teleport (acquired by Topia), and Coin Center.He was named to the MIT Technology Review's “Innovators Under 35,” won a Wall Street Journal Innovation Award, and holds a BS/MS/PhD in Electrical Engineering and an MS in Chemical Engineering, all from Stanford University. Balaji also teaches the occasional class at Stanford, including an online MOOC in 2013, which reached 250,000+ students worldwide.To learn more about Balaji's most recent project, sign up at 1729.com, a newsletter that pays you. They're giving out BTC each day for completing tasks and tutorials. Subscribers also receive chapters from Balaji's free book, The Network State.Please enjoy!This episode is brought to you by Wealthfront! Wealthfront pioneered the automated investing movement, sometimes referred to as ‘robo-advising,' and they currently oversee $20 billion of assets for their clients. It takes about three minutes to sign up, and then Wealthfront will build you a globally diversified portfolio of ETFs based on your risk appetite and manage it for you at an incredibly low cost. Smart investing should not feel like a rollercoaster ride. Let the professionals do the work for you. Go to Wealthfront.com/Tim and open a Wealthfront account today, and you'll get your first $5,000 managed for free, for life. Wealthfront will automate your investments for the long term. Get started today at Wealthfront.com/Tim.*This episode is also brought to you by BlockFi! BlockFi is building a bridge between cryptocurrencies and traditional financial and wealth-management products. I became excited enough about this company that I ended up becoming an investor.Their BlockFi Rewards Visa® Signature Credit Card provides an easy way to earn more Bitcoin because you can earn 3.5% in Bitcoin back on all purchases in your first 3 months and 1.5% forever after, with no annual fee. BlockFi also lets you easily buy or sell cryptocurrencies. For a limited time, you can earn a crypto bonus of $15–$250 in value when you open a new account. Get started today at BlockFi.com/Tim and use code TIM at sign up.*This episode is also brought to you by Eight Sleep! Eight Sleep's Pod Pro Cover is the easiest and fastest way to sleep at the perfect temperature. It pairs dynamic cooling and heating with biometric tracking to offer the most advanced (and user-friendly) solution on the market. Simply add the Pod Pro Cover to your current mattress and start sleeping as cool as 55°F or as hot as 110°F. It also splits your bed in half, so your partner can choose a totally different temperature.And now, my dear listeners—that's you—can get $250 off the Pod Pro Cover. Simply go to EightSleep.com/Tim or use code TIM. *For show notes and past guests, please visit tim.blog/podcast.Sign up for Tim's email newsletter (“5-Bullet Friday”) at tim.blog/friday.For transcripts of episodes, go to tim.blog/transcripts.Discover Tim's books: tim.blog/books.Follow Tim:Twitter: twitter.com/tferriss Instagram: instagram.com/timferrissFacebook: facebook.com/timferriss YouTube: youtube.com/timferrissPast guests on The Tim Ferriss Show include Jerry Seinfeld, Hugh Jackman, Dr. Jane Goodall, LeBron James, Kevin Hart, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Jamie Foxx, Matthew McConaughey, Esther Perel, Elizabeth Gilbert, Terry Crews, Sia, Yuval Noah Harari, Malcolm Gladwell, Madeleine Albright, Cheryl Strayed, Jim Collins, Mary Karr, Maria Popova, Sam Harris, Michael Phelps, Bob Iger, Edward Norton, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Neil Strauss, Ken Burns, Maria Sharapova, Marc Andreessen, Neil Gaiman, Neil de Grasse Tyson, Jocko Willink, Daniel Ek, Kelly Slater, Dr. Peter Attia, Seth Godin, Howard Marks, Dr. Brené Brown, Eric Schmidt, Michael Lewis, Joe Gebbia, Michael Pollan, Dr. Jordan Peterson, Vince Vaughn, Brian Koppelman, Ramit Sethi, Dax Shepard, Tony Robbins, Jim Dethmer, Dan Harris, Ray Dalio, Naval Ravikant, Vitalik Buterin, Elizabeth Lesser, Amanda Palmer, Katie Haun, Sir Richard Branson, Chuck Palahniuk, Arianna Huffington, Reid Hoffman, Bill Burr, Whitney Cummings, Rick Rubin, Dr. Vivek Murthy, Darren Aronofsky, and many more.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

KunstlerCast - Suburban Sprawl: A Tragic Comedy

Steve Kirsch is a Silicon Valley philanthropist and founder of the COVID-19 Early Treatment Fund (CETF) – the only organization in the world focused on finding the most promising drugs and treatments that, when given sufficiently early, can reduce hospitalization and death rates. As a tech entrepreneur, he is the inventor of the optical mouse and one of the first Internet search engines, Infoseek. He started 7 high tech companies, two with billion dollar market caps. He has a BS/MS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT. He blogs regularly at https://stevekirsch.substack.com The KunstlerCast theme music is the beautiful Two Rivers Waltz written and performed by Larry Unger.

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.
7 Signs You Need A Health Makeover

The Doctor's Farmacy with Mark Hyman, M.D.

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 154:13


This episode is sponsored by Rupa Health and InsideTracker. So many of us are just managing to get by day-to-day. Maybe you're super sluggish, your digestion is off, you can't think clearly, you have brain fog, or just feel run down. Unfortunately, there is no magic bullet solution. There is, however, a systems-based approach—a way to tackle the multiple root factors that contribute to feeling this way. In this episode, my guests and I dive into this topic and explain the importance of what you put at the end of your fork, improving your sleep, how the gut can affect your health, and so much more. Lewis Howes is a New York Times Bestselling author of the hit book, The School of Greatness. He is a lifestyle entrepreneur, high-performance business coach, and keynote speaker. A former professional football player and two-sport All-American, he is a current USA Men's National Handball Team athlete. Shawn Stevenson is the author of the international bestselling book Sleep Smarter and creator of The Model Health Show, featured as the number #1 health podcast in the U.S. with millions of listener downloads each year. Shawn has been featured in Forbes, Fast Company, The New York Times, Muscle & Fitness, ESPN, and many other major media outlets. Dr. Jay Lombard is an internationally acclaimed neurologist, author, and keynote speaker specializing in neuroimmunological conditions and medical mysteries. He was Chief of Neurology at both Westchester Square Medical Center and Bronx Lebanon Hospital and clinical assistant professor at New York Presbyterian Hospital and Albert Einstein College of Medicine.Stephanie Seneff is a Senior Research Scientist at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She has a bachelor's degree from MIT in Biology with a minor in Food and Nutrition Science, and a master's degree, an engineer's degree, and a PhD degree, all from MIT, in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. She is the author of a new book on glyphosate titled Toxic Legacy: How the Weedkiller Glyphosate is Destroying Our Health and the Environment.Dr. Elizabeth Boham is a physician and nutritionist who practices Functional Medicine at The UltraWellness Center in Lenox, MA. Dr. Boham has contributed to many articles and wrote the latest chapter on Obesity for the Rankel Textbook of Family Medicine. She is part of the faculty of the Institute for Functional Medicine and has been featured in a variety of publications and media. Dr. Cindy Geyer received her bachelor of science and her doctor of medicine degrees, with honors, from the Ohio State University. She completed residency in internal medicine at Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester, N.Y. and is triple board certified in internal medicine, integrative medicine and lifestyle medicine.This episode is sponsored by Rupa Health and InsideTracker.Rupa Health is a place for Functional Medicine practitioners to access more than 2,000 specialty lab tests from over 20 labs like DUTCH, Vibrant America, Genova, Great Plains, and more. Check out a free live demo with a Q&A or create an account here. If you're curious about getting your own health program dialed-in to your unique needs, check out InsideTracker and get 25% off here. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Health Freedom for Humanity Podcast
Breaking Down the Data with Steve Kirsch

Health Freedom for Humanity Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 63:37


In this episode, Alec and Dr. Stanton chat with Steve Kirsch, who recently gave an amazing presentation to both the FDA and CDC regarding the apparent lack of vaccine safety, efficacy, and oversight. Steve Kirsch is a Silicon Valley philanthropist. He is the inventor of the optical mouse and one of the first Internet search engines, Infoseek. He started 7 high tech companies, two with billion dollar market caps. He has a BS/MS in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT. Most recently, Steve founded the COVID-19 Early Treatment Fund which raises awareness on issues surrounding vaccine safety as well as the many early treatments available for COVID-19.   To donate Health Freedom for Humanity please visit healthfreedomforhumanity.org/donate