Podcasts about Anticipating

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Share on LinkedIn
Copy link to clipboard
  • 1,306PODCASTS
  • 1,620EPISODES
  • 36mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Aug 8, 2022LATEST
Anticipating

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about Anticipating

Show all podcasts related to anticipating

Latest podcast episodes about Anticipating

Faithfulness on SermonAudio
Anticipating Christ's Return

Faithfulness on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 29:00


A new MP3 sermon from Chester ARP Church is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Anticipating Christ's Return Subtitle: Gospel and Church: 1 Thess Speaker: Clint Davis Broadcaster: Chester ARP Church Event: Sunday Service Date: 8/8/2022 Bible: 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11 Length: 29 min.

Joy on SermonAudio
Anticipating Christ's Return

Joy on SermonAudio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 8, 2022 29:00


A new MP3 sermon from Chester ARP Church is now available on SermonAudio with the following details: Title: Anticipating Christ's Return Subtitle: Gospel and Church: 1 Thess Speaker: Clint Davis Broadcaster: Chester ARP Church Event: Sunday Service Date: 8/8/2022 Bible: 1 Thessalonians 5:1-11 Length: 29 min.

Product-Led Podcast
6 Steps To Launch A PLG Motion

Product-Led Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022 54:31


Hila Qu is the director of growth at GitLab, a developer platform. GitLab offers a powerful platform that enables developers, engineers, and teams to build, release, and deploy very efficiently. The company started as an open-source product, but it became a PLG business as it has the criteria to be one. Due to its large free user base, GitLab was able to launch a PLG motion. Data on how users utilize the platform also allowed them to understand which features they use and what behaviors indicate that they are likely to convert to potential PQ. Hila provides details on how she created all these from scratch to grow GitLab and gives the six steps to launch a PLG motion. Show Notes [00:47] What GitLab is and how they started the PLG motion [08:44] How existing sales motion works before getting into the PLG side of things [17:18] Aligning on the customer journey and funnel design [31:00] Organize the right teams the right way [36:07] Recommendations for infrastructure and tool stack dependent on company size [40:45] How to identify the highest ROI focus area for PLG efforts [46:28] Anticipating common challenges and building the PLG culture [49:56] Hila's advice for starting a PLG motion  About Hila Qu Hila is a uniquely talented growth leader. Prior to her current role at GitLab, Hila worked at Acorns, a financial technology, and services company that specializes in micro-investing and robo-investing. At Acorns, she founded and developed the growth team into a 20+ member team, drove the customer base from 1M to over 4M, and launched two new product lines. Now at GitLab, she leads their growth product team that has since generated over $1.5M incremental ARR from growth product initiatives & experiments in just the first six months. Needless to say, Hila lives every day in the world of growth, retention, analytics, and products (some nights too). Link GitLab Profile Hila's Linkedin

The Toastmasters Podcast
Anticipating the 2022 Hybrid International Convention in Nashville, TN - Don Bittick

The Toastmasters Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 1, 2022


[20:05] Don Bittick, Host District Chair shares about the first hybrid 2022 Toastmasters International Convention in Nashville, Tennessee.

Anticipating The Unintended
#179 The Flesh is Willing but the Mind is Weak

Anticipating The Unintended

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2022 23:45


Global Policy Watch: Energy Is Flagging Insights on burning policy issues from an Indian lens— RSJWho do you think has a better long-term view of the world? An administration struggling to control inflation and rising oil prices, one that’s facing midterm elections with the lowest approval ratings, or large institutional investors projected to own about 20 per cent of all US listed companies by 2028? I don’t know. I mean, it is conventional wisdom that all that the likes of Blackrock, Vanguard and State Street care about is making profits on their investments. On the other hand, the government is expected to take long-term decisions in the interest of society. But when you own 20 per cent of everything, I would suspect you will conclude there’s no other way to maximise profits except trying to do good for everyone. I mean, there won’t be a lot of arbitrage left anymore in choosing specific industries or sectors. You will have to do ‘sabka saath, sabka vikaas’. No wonder ESG (Environment, Social and Governance) investing has been important for these large institutional investors. That ESG is now a critical agenda tracked by the board of every company because of these investors' efforts. All good. Now, let’s look at the incentives of political parties. It is to win elections. Everything else follows only after you have the keys to power. And elections in democracies are a permanent affair. There’s a key election of some kind happening every other year. Will a political party craft a policy that’s painful in the short run but good in the long run? They do, but it requires a combination of inspiring leadership or ideology, a looming crisis and a powerful communication strategy to walk on this difficult path. That’s rare. Instead, what you have is parties taking the easy, opportunistic way out while hoping it will somehow make sense in the long run. Two Roads DivergedHere are two news items from last week for you.#1: Democrats may be on the verge of passing historic climate legislation after all.The $369 billion of climate spending in the Inflation Reduction Act that Sen. Joe Manchin (D-WV) announced on Wednesday includes funding for clean energy and electric vehicle tax breaks, domestic manufacturing of batteries and solar panels, and pollution reduction.If the bill’s policies work as intended, it would push American consumers and industry away from reliance on fossil fuels, penalize fossil fuel companies for excess emissions of methane, and inject needed funds into pollution cleanup.The bill would use tax credits to incentivize consumers to buy electric cars, electric HVAC systems, and other forms of cleaner technology that would lead to less emissions from cars and electricity generation, and includes incentives for companies to manufacture that technology in the United States. It also includes money for a host of other climate priorities, like investing in forest and coastal restoration and in resilient agriculture.#2: Blackrock warns it will vote against more climate change resolutionsBlackRock (BLK.N) said on Tuesday it expected to support fewer shareholder resolutions on issues such as climate change in the current season of annual general meetings, as many proposals were too prescriptive.While BlackRock said its view on the importance of managing climate risk remained unchanged and it continued to engage with companies over their efforts, a number of resolutions put forward at recent AGMs were too constraining on boards.Among such resolutions that it said it could oppose were those requiring management to stop providing finance to traditional energy companies, or those requiring alignment of bank business models to a specific climate scenario.Among votes that BlackRock has already opposed was an April 13 call for Canadian lender Bank of Montreal to adopt a policy to link financing with the International Energy Agency's Net Zero Emissions by 2050 Scenario.While the US administration is going down the path of spending more on tackling climate change, Blackrock seems to be signalling a u-turn. What Led Them HereSo, back to the question with which we started. Who do you trust is taking a long-term view here?Some context here will help. These moves have come on the back of an energy crisis facing the world today. Most of the commentary on this has attributed this to the Ukraine war and the sanction on Russia that followed. The general view is that this crisis will disappear once the war ends. How true is this? Not very if you look closely. Over the past many years, the energy inventory has been declining because the supply has held flat or gone down while the demand continues to be robust (except for the pandemic blip). The green sources of energy haven’t been able to fill the gap on the supply side. As we have come out of the pandemic, the global demand has gone up (though still below 2019 levels) while the supply isn’t keeping pace. This was even before the Russian invasion. The reasons for this aren’t hard to locate. Conventional energy companies have found it hard to fund new projects because ESG investing norms have made the availability of capital difficult. The so-called ‘extractive industries’ are orphans in capital and debt markets. Most of the growth in energy supplies in the last decade has come from shales. A lot of money was put to work to increase the efficiency of pumping out oil from shales. The three big shale fields in the Permian, the Bakken and the Eagle Ford pumped out enough oil to not have anyone worry about supply shortages anytime in the last decade. But like all good things, we have depleted these fields at rates faster than predicted. There’s been hardly any capacity developed that has backfilled these fields elsewhere. And it is unlikely we will get a second-time lucky so soon in finding rich fields like them. If the market were efficient, we would have seen capital find its way into funding newer sources. But the ESG overdrive led by the Big 3 index funds put up a barrier to that flow. And the energy companies that are making big profits now because of the high prices aren’t themselves putting money into conventional extraction. That would be seen as a negative in the market. So, even they are being constrained by the ESG norms. Into this decadal low in investment in production came the Ukraine war. Things have gone further south since. Europe needs Russian gas, and Putin is enjoying the gradual choking of the supply that will make things worse during the oncoming winter. Only last week, Russia’s Gazprom told its customers in Europe it cannot guarantee gas supplies because of ‘extraordinary’ circumstances. Heh!Gazprom said stopping another turbine at the Nord Stream 1 pipeline would cut daily gas production to 20%, halving the current level of supply. It is likely to make it more difficult for EU countries to replenish their stores of gas before winter.The Nord Stream 1 pipeline, which pumps gas from Russia to Germany, has been running well below capacity for weeks, and was completely shut down for a 10-day maintenance break earlier this month.The European Commission has urged countries to cut gas use by 15% over the next seven months after Russia warned it could curb or halt supplies altogether. Under the proposals, the voluntary target could become mandatory in an emergency. On Tuesday energy ministers will meet in Brussels in an attempt to sign off the plans.But numerous opt-outs are expected amid resistance from some member states.To this, add that the US has been depleting its SPR (Special Petroleum Reserves) to boost supply and keep prices under control. Last week it announced another 20 million barrels were released from SPR. But this isn’t sustainable, and it is likely this is the last of it.I don’t know about you, but I think the supply situation looks to worsen in the future. Evaluating the ResponsesNow, look at the two news articles that we started with. After a decade of not adding real capacity to boost energy supply, starving investments in conventional energy, stupidly shutting down nuclear plants and going for investments in wind and solar that are by themselves energy and capital intensive to set up, we are here with two kinds of response.  One is from the US government. Instead of finding ways to invest in the sector to solve this crisis is going the other way. Releasing special reserves, cutting taxes on gasoline, placing more restrictions on the conventional energy sector and planning to deficit fund more investments in green energy without a clear answer on how it will help with supply. These will only increase demand in the short term without any corresponding increase in supply to address it.The other is from the face of greedy capitalism, Blackrock, who thinks we might have overdone the ESG investment thesis without fully appreciating the unintended consequences of starving the oil and gas sector of investments. Maybe the rhetoric against conventional energy has gone overboard without an immediate answer to the supply shortfall. So, some calibration is needed now. Else, there will be significant pain ahead with misallocation of investments and a deepening energy crisis. The poor and the developing nations are most affected by higher oil prices. And poverty is worse for climate change. More than fossil fuels.  Those then are the two narratives. As London and NYC sweat in an unprecedented heat wave this summer, you know who will win the narrative battle. The war will be lost though. Thanks for reading Anticipating the Unintended! Subscribe for free to receive new posts and support our work.A Framework A Week: Building Models Tools to help think about public policy— RSJLast week I came across this piece on ‘Models as mediating instruments’ by Margaret Morrison and Mary S. Morgan. You should read the full chapter. The authors lay out the importance of model building in helping us learn about theories and how they might operate in the world:Models are one of the critical instruments of modern science. We know that models function in a variety of different ways within the sciences to help us to learn not only about theories but also about the world. So far, however, there seems to be no systematic account of how they operate in both of these domains.And then, they proceed to outline how we should think about developing models that function as autonomous agents and as instruments of investigation of the world. Here’s a short extract from their introduction to model building:In order to make good our claim, we need to raise and answer a number of questions about models. We outline the important questions here before going on to provide detailed answers. These questions cover four basic elements in our account of models, namely how they are constructed, how they function, what they represent and how we learn from them.Construction What gives models their autonomy? Part of the answer lies in their construction. It is common to think that models can be derived entirely from theory or from data. However, if we look closely at the way models are constructed we can begin to see the sources of their independence. It is because they are neither one thing nor the other, neither just theory nor data, but typically involve some of both (and often additional ‘outside’ elements), that they can mediate between theory and the world. In addressing these issues we need to isolate the nature of this partial independence and determine why it is more useful than full independence or full dependence. Functioning What does it mean for a model to function autonomously? Here we explore the various tasks for which models can be used. We claim that what it means for a model to function autonomously is to function like a tool or instrument. Instruments come in a variety of forms and fulfil many different functions. By its nature, an instrument or tool is independent of the thing it operates on, but it connects with it in some way. Although a hammer is separate from both the nail and the wall, it is designed to fulfil the task of connecting the nail to the wall. So too with models. They function as tools or instruments and are independent of, but mediate between things; and like tools, can often be used for many different tasks. Representing Why can we learn about the world and about theories from using models as instruments? To answer this we need to know what a model consists of. More specifically, we must distinguish between instruments which can be used in a purely instrumental way to effect something and instruments which can also be used as investigative devices for learning something. We do not learn much from the hammer. But other sorts of tools (perhaps just more sophisticated ones) can help us learn things. The thermometer is an instrument of investigation: it is physically independent of a saucepan of jam, but it can be placed into the boiling jam to tell us its temperature. Scientific models work like these kinds of investigative instruments – but how? The critical difference between a simple tool, and a tool of investigation is that the latter involves some form of representation: models typically represent either some aspect of the world, or some aspect of our theories about the world, or both at once. Hence the model’s representative power allows it to function not just instrumentally, but to teach us something about the thing it represents. LearningAlthough we have isolated representation as the mechanism that enables us to learn from models we still need to know how this learning takes place and we need to know what else is involved in a model functioning as a mediating instrument. Part of the answer comes from seeing how models are used in scientific practice. We do not learn much from looking at a model – we learn more from building the model and from manipulating it. Just as one needs to use or observe the use of a hammer in order to really understand its function, similarly, models have to be used before they will give up their secrets. In this sense, they have the quality of a technology – the power of the model only becomes apparent in the context of its use. Models function not just as a means of intervention, but also as a means of representation. It is when we manipulate the model that these combined features enable us to learn how and why our interventions work.The whole chapter and Mary Morgan’s book (The World in the Model: How Economists Work and Think) is a great tool for building models.  India Policy Watch: Hoping Against HopeInsights on burning policy issues in India - Pranay KotasthaneEarlier this week, the union cabinet approved a revival package for the ever-embattled Bharat Sanchar Nigam Limited (BSNL) worth ₹1.64 lakh crores. Let’s analyse this decision ground-up Let’s look at the two stated aims. The first argument is that the presence of BSNL in the telecom market acts as a market balancer; it plays a significant role in providing services to rural areas and during natural disasters. The second argument is that the telecom sector is strategic; hence, BSNL will become the vehicle for the government to “promote indigenous 4G technology development”. In other words, BSNL will have to commission an atmanirbhar 4G technology that Tata Consultancy Services and C-DOT are developing. A part of the bailout—₹22,471 crores—is allocated for capital expenditure on this deployment.For a moment, assume that both objectives are desirable. The question is, are there alternative methods to achieve the two stated objectives?Given the positive externalities of network infrastructure today, government intervention in rural connectivity makes sense. But the instrument required to achieve this objective doesn’t require the government to produce this service by itself through a public sector unit. The same objective could be achieved by a government procurement contract which finances private sector players for capital expenditure on network infrastructure in low-density areas. Think of a non-coercive version of the Regional Air Travel Connectivity Scheme - UDAN, but for mobile connectivity. This method would likely be far cheaper than attempting to revive a government-run company that incurs losses despite playing a game in which the umpire also belongs to the same team. This would be beneficial for the people living in far-flung areas too. Why condemn them to slow 3G services of BSNL when the government can finance private players to provide 4G services instead?Next, consider the strategic necessity argument. 4G was introduced in India a full decade ago. When the world (and India) is commissioning 5G connectivity, an Indian consortium has now done trials for home-grown 4G technology. Granted, that 4G is not going away anytime soon, but why should it now be shoved down BSNL’s throat? To me, it seems like a classic error—a violation of the Tinbergen Rule, which we had discussed in edition #135. The rule says: use one policy instrument for just one target (or as few as possible). Burdening one instrument with several objectives often results in a system that fulfils none. In the current case, it means that BSNL can either be an instrument to connect remote areas or it can be a testbed for indigenous technologies, but not both. To expect it to do both would make things tougher for an already troubled entity. More important, it would be a waste of taxpayers’ hard-earned money.Since allowing adversaries to manage your core networks is a strategic vulnerability, a better alternative would be to give domestic players a target for eliminating Huawei from their 4G networks over time. If the indigenous solution is any good, some players will consider opting for it. The second option is to support the indigenous 4G’s go-to-market programmes in other countries. Either way, the objective can be achieved without hoping against the BSNL hope.Finally, a reminder. The cost to society for one rupee raised by governments in India is ₹3 (Marginal Cost of Public Funds). So, Indians will be incurring nearly ₹5 lakh crores. For comparison, that is nearly 10 per cent of RBI’s foreign exchange reserves in equivalent rupees. Is protecting BSNL really worth this kind of expenditure?Course Advertisement: Admissions for the Sept 2022 cohort of Takshashila’s Graduate Certificate in Public Policy programme are now open! Visit this link to apply.PolicyWTF: Playing with Fire AgainThis section looks at egregious public policies. Policies that make you go: WTF, Did that really happen? - Pranay KotasthaneA couple of weeks ago, a film poster depicting Kaali Maa began an outrage cycle. As it happens with frightening regularity nowadays, it culminated in a couple of FIRs being filed against the director. Forget the fact that the movie was released in Canada by an Indian citizen from Tamil Nadu; the FIRs were nevertheless registered in Delhi and UP. It’s not worth spending time and energy on these Whack-A-Mole outrages. What concerns me more is the Indian High Commission in Ottawa’s press release. It read:We have received complaints from leaders of the Hindu community in Canada about disrespectful depiction of Hindu Gods on the poster of a film showcased as part of the 'Under the Tent' project at the Aga Khan Museum, Toronto.Our Consulate General in Toronto has conveyed these concerns to the organizers of the event.We are also informed that several Hindu groups have approached authorities in Canada to take action.We urge the Canadian authorities and the event organizers to withdraw all such provocative material. In the past, the official Indian position would have been to play the matter down and leave the issue to the host country. It is unusual and disappointing for an Indian embassy to act as a messenger for religious groups in other countries. Canadian citizens of the Hindu faith aren’t Indians. This admonishment by an Indian government entity is out of place.I say that the government is playing with fire here because acting on behalf of citizens of other countries—for whatever reason—is a slippery slope. There’s a reason that Indian immigrants are welcomed in many countries. Contrast that with China. The aggressive opposition by some Chinese immigrants against criticisms of the Chinese Communist Party in their host country ends up being detrimental to all Chinese immigrants. It’s in India’s interest that emigrants become trustworthy members of their host community. We shouldn’t go down the path China has.HomeWorkReading and listening recommendations on public policy matters[Article] In the last edition, we had written about the Enforcement Directorate’s zeal to slap charges of money laundering. This week, the Supreme Court upheld its powers under the Prevention of Money Laundering Act (PMLA). In his latest column, Pratap Bhanu Mehta explains why this implies, “Rather than being the guardian of rights, the Supreme Court is now a significant threat to it”.[Podcast] In the latest Puliyabaazi, we take a long hard look at the consequences of emigration on India. [Article] How can the government intervene to reduce dependence on Chinese pharma APIs? Bambawale et al. explain.[Paper] Jonathan Haidt has helpfully combined all the latest research on social media’s impact on society in this one master document. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit publicpolicy.substack.com

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball
Anticipating Deadline Deals in Search of Late-Season Opportunities & Value Changes

Rates & Barrels: A show about fantasy baseball

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 61:39 Very Popular


Eno and DVR comb through several rosters ahead of the Trade Deadline in search of current backups and upper level minor leaguers with paths to more playing time in the near future. Plus, they consider the implications of Mike Trout's injury on the Angels in the future, and the importance of the A's hitting on the likely trades of Frankie Montas, Sean Murphy and Ramón Laureano.  Rundown 0:00 It Starts (Intro Music) 1:47 Andrew Benintendi to the Yankees 4:23 PT for Kyle Isbel, Edward Olivares (Once Healthy)? 8:59 Finding Replacement in Chicago 14:36 Will Jose Barrero & Jake Fraley Play More for the Reds? 19:04 Who Moves in Baltimore, Who Steps Into Larger Roles? 24:06 Still Interested in Jack Suwinski? 31:13 Cheap Stolen Bases Coming from D.C.? 42:04 The Mike Trout Situation 52:33 Uncharted Territory in Oakland? Follow Eno on Twitter: @enosarris Follow DVR on Twitter: @DerekVanRiper e-mail: ratesandbarrels@theathletic.com Subscribe to The Athletic at $1/month for the first six months: theathletic.com/ratesandbarrels Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

The Valenti Show
The Valenti Show w/Rico Beard - Are you anticipating more from Williams or Hutchinson?

The Valenti Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 14:02


Are you more excited for Jameson Williams or Aidan Hutchinson?

The Chris Voss Show
The Chris Voss Show Podcast – Lethal Tides: Mary Sears and the Marine Scientists Who Helped Win World War II by Catherine Musemeche

The Chris Voss Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2022 27:44


Lethal Tides: Mary Sears and the Marine Scientists Who Helped Win World War II by Catherine Musemeche "Magnificently researched, brilliantly written, Lethal Tides is immensely entertaining and reads like an action novel. Catherine Musemeche has brought to life the incredible work of the scientists and researchers who made such a remarkable contribution to America's war effort in the Pacific theater during WWII.” —Admiral William H. McRaven (U.S. Navy, Ret.), #1 New York Times bestselling author of Make Your Bed and The Hero Code Lethal Tides tells the story of the virtually unknown Mary Sears, “the first oceanographer of the Navy,” whose groundbreaking oceanographic research led the U.S. to victory in the Pacific theater during World War II. In Lethal Tides, Catherine Musemeche weaves together science, biography, and military history in the compelling story of an unsung woman who had a dramatic effect on the U.S. Navy's success against Japan in WWII, creating an intelligence-gathering juggernaut based on the new science of oceanography. When World War II began, the U.S. Navy was unprepared to enact its island-hopping strategy to reach Japan. Anticipating tides, planning for coral reefs, and preparing for enemy fire was new ground for them, and with lives at stake it was ground that had to be covered quickly. Mary Sears, a marine biologist, was the untapped talent they turned to, and she along with a team of quirky marine scientists were instrumental in turning the tide of the war in the United States' favor. The Sears team analyzed ocean currents, made wave and tide predictions, identified zones of bioluminescence, mapped deep-water levels where submarines could hide and gathered information about the topography and surf conditions surrounding the Pacific islands and Japan. Sears was frequently called upon to make middle-of-the-night calculations for last-minute top-secret landing destinations and boldly predicted optimal landing times and locations for amphibious invasions. In supplying these crucial details, Sears and her team played a major role in averting catastrophes that plagued earlier amphibious landings, like the disastrous Tarawa, and cleared a path to Okinawa, the last major battle of World War II.

Huikala Baptist Church - Honolulu, Hawaii
Practical Christianity - Longsuffering While Anticipating Jesus

Huikala Baptist Church - Honolulu, Hawaii

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2022 56:08


"Be patient therefore, brethren, unto the coming of the Lord. Behold, the husbandman waiteth for the precious fruit of the earth, and hath long patience for it, until he receive the early and latter rain. Be ye also patient; stablish your hearts: for the coming of the Lord draweth nigh. Grudge not one against another, brethren, lest ye be condemned: behold, the judge standeth before the door. Take, my brethren, the prophets, who have spoken in the name of the Lord, for an example of suffering affliction, and of patience. Behold, we count them happy which endure. Ye have heard of the patience of Job, and have seen the end of the Lord; that the Lord is very pitiful, and of tender mercy." James 5:7-11

Time's Ours: A show about the Kansas City Chiefs
Orlando Brown Jr. declines the Chiefs' offer & anticipating Clyde Edwards-Helaire's 3rd season

Time's Ours: A show about the Kansas City Chiefs

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 75:12 Very Popular


Orlando Brown Jr. has declined his contract offer from the Chiefs and is continuing his holdout as training camp is set to begin. How will this situation affect things? The whole crew of Nate, Joshua and Seth are here to discuss before anticipating Edwards-Helaire's third year & more Chiefs talk. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Catholic Momcast
Celebrating Anniversaries Joyfully #198

Catholic Momcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 22, 2022 27:18


Anticipating upcoming wedding anniversaries and remembering precious past celebrations, Catholic Mom founder Lisa Hendey and Hispanic Editor Maria Morera Johnson discuss how we celebrate anniversaries—our own, and our loved ones-- with joy. 

A New Beginning with Greg Laurie
Things to Do Before the End of the World | Anticipating the Return of Christ

A New Beginning with Greg Laurie

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 28:09


What do you do while you're on-hold? Do you hum along with that on-hold music? Do you tap your pencil, or daydream a little? Few of us enjoy waiting. But we're all in a waiting mode right now as we anticipate the return of Christ. But today on A NEW BEGINNING, Pastor Greg Laurie points out the Lord doesn't want us to kill time, He wants us to bring light and life to those around us. Maybe we're not waiting on God. Maybe He's waiting for us to invite more into the Kingdom. Listen on harvest.org --- Learn more and subscribe to Harvest updates at harvest.org. A New Beginning is the daily half-hour program hosted by Greg Laurie, pastor of Harvest Christian Fellowship in Southern California. For over 30 years, Pastor Greg and Harvest Ministries have endeavored to know God and make Him known through media and large-scale evangelism. This podcast is supported by the generosity of our Harvest Partners. Support the show: https://harvest.org/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Harvest: Greg Laurie Audio
Things to Do Before the End of the World | Anticipating the Return of Christ

Harvest: Greg Laurie Audio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 21, 2022 28:09


What do you do while you're on-hold? Do you hum along with that on-hold music? Do you tap your pencil, or daydream a little? Few of us enjoy waiting. But we're all in a waiting mode right now as we anticipate the return of Christ. But today on A NEW BEGINNING, Pastor Greg Laurie points out the Lord doesn't want us to kill time, He wants us to bring light and life to those around us. Maybe we're not waiting on God. Maybe He's waiting for us to invite more into the Kingdom. Listen on harvest.org --- Learn more and subscribe to Harvest updates at harvest.org. A New Beginning is the daily half-hour program hosted by Greg Laurie, pastor of Harvest Christian Fellowship in Southern California. For over 30 years, Pastor Greg and Harvest Ministries have endeavored to know God and make Him known through media and large-scale evangelism. This podcast is supported by the generosity of our Harvest Partners. Support the show: https://harvest.org/support See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

RealAgriculture's Podcasts
RealAg Radio, July 20: Supply chain urgencies, some strings attached, and anticipating the FPT meetings

RealAgriculture's Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 54:39


Today’s edition of RealAg Radio is brought to you by Lallemand Plant Care. On today's episode of the show, you'll hear from: John Barlow, Conservative shadow minister for agriculture on the federal-provincial-territorial meetings this week; Nicolas Watters, of Lallemand Plant Care, with a product spotlight; Kevin Auch, of Pulse Canada, on supply chain issues needing... Read More

RealAg Radio
RealAg Radio, July 20: Supply chain urgencies, some strings attached, and anticipating the FPT meetings

RealAg Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2022 54:39


Today’s edition of RealAg Radio is brought to you by Lallemand Plant Care. On today's episode of the show, you'll hear from: John Barlow, Conservative shadow minister for agriculture on the federal-provincial-territorial meetings this week; Nicolas Watters, of Lallemand Plant Care, with a product spotlight; Kevin Auch, of Pulse Canada, on supply chain issues needing... Read More

GraceJax (Sunday Morning)
Anticipating Glory - Philippians 3:17-21

GraceJax (Sunday Morning)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022


Anticipating Glory - Philippians 3:17-21

Gold Country Baptist Church
Fear: Anticipating the Future

Gold Country Baptist Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 17, 2022 43:00


Financial Sense(R) Newshour
Ari Wald: Stocks in Process of Bottoming, Market Anticipating Peak in Rates and Inflation

Financial Sense(R) Newshour

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 16, 2022 68:57


Jul 15 – After this week's wrap-up, Oppenheimer's Ari Wald joins Financial Sense Newshour to provide his technical take on the stock market. Next, Ryan Sweet, head of real-time economics at Moody's... Subscribe to our premium weekday podcasts: https://www.financialsense.com/subscribe

Anticipating The Unintended
#176 Of East Asian Transformations

Anticipating The Unintended

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 21:57


Global Policy Watch #1: The Road Not Taken Insights on policy issues making news around the world— Pranay KotasthaneEast Asian economic success is one of India’s favourite public policy discussion themes. Regardless of the facts, we have strengthened our own beliefs based on that transformation. For instance, many Indians are convinced that South Korea, Taiwan, and Japan became powerhouses through well-executed industrial policies in which governments threw their full weight behind specific domestic sectors and companies. East Asian examples are often used to justify India’s protectionist trade measures, a business environment that places higher compliance requirements on foreign companies, and generous pro-business subsidies. In this debate, we forget the role of two other crucial factors. One, the role of geopolitics. As Arthur Kroeber’s notes in China’s Economy, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan were part of the US alliance structure and benefited immensely from programs of technical assistance, educational exchanges, and access to the American market.Two, what’s more significant is that South Korea’s transformation as an export powerhouse predates industrial policy measures. Like India, South Korea too had a scarce foreign exchange reserves problem. Like India, it too opted initially for trade and monetary policies ostensibly aimed at preserving these reserves. But starting 1964-65, South Korean leaders—nudged by the US—were able to reimagine a future in which their foreign exchange problem was to be ameliorated not by import controls but by increasing exports.To explain the freakish similarities and differences between the paths India and South Korea chose, read these excerpts from an excellent NBER paper From Hermit Kingdom to Miracle on the Han: Policy Decisions that Transformed South Korea into an Export Powerhouse by Douglas A. Irwin. The economic problems of the 1950s South Korea were uncannily similar to India:Korea’s economic policy in the 1950s was built around “the three lows”—low grain prices, low interest rates, and a low price of foreign exchange—and the controls needed to maintain them. Although the controls led to perpetual shortages of grain, capital, and foreign currency, each had a rationale. The government sought low grain prices to keep the cost of living down, relying on grain imports from the United States made available through PL 480 (food assistance) grants. The government maintained interest rate ceilings, ostensibly to help borrowers and promote investment, but negative real interest rates meant there was little incentive to save, diminishing investment and financial development. The government kept the price of foreign exchange artificially low to make imported goods, particularly capital goods, cheaper than they otherwise would have been.The shortage of foreign exchange led the government to introduce import controls to conserve foreign exchange reserves. Import licensing was introduced in 1946 to impede the purchase of nonessential foreign goods. In 1949, the Ministry of Finance began preparing a quarterly foreign exchange budget to determine how export earnings and aid inflows should be allocated in purchasing imports.The overvalued currency had a devastating effect on the country’s merchandise exports, which declined from $40 million in 1953 to just $16 million in 1958, a year in which imports were $370 million.South Korea too had an aborted devaluation attempt in the 1960s. The government devalued the won in two steps… The February 1961 devaluation was made in conjunction with a major reform of the foreign exchange system. The government rationalized the complicated multiple exchange rate system and began to relax import controls, paving the way for a fully unified exchange rate in June of that year.The devaluation increased exports significantly, but caused pain in the short term.In the first two months of 1961, prices rose 15 percent, and industrial production, which depended on cheap imported intermediate goods, fell.21 The devaluation hurt the political fortunes of the deeply divided government, which went through several major cabinet reshuffles during its short period in power and never enjoyed strong public support. The government was widely seen as inept, and public dissatisfaction with the country’s situation led to protests. After renewed political unrest and street demonstrations by students, a military coup overthrew the nine-month-old government on May 16, 1961.Changing tack, the incoming military rulers opted for atmanirbharta:The government envisioned state investment to build up heavy and chemical industries to increase national security and end the country’s dependence on US aid and foreign sources of supply. Given Korea’s enormous trade deficit and tiny export base, the government thought it easier to replace imports by expanding domestic production of those goods rather than to try to make up the gap by exporting more. The plan was to make the country self-reliant in its ability to pay for its imports, but the plans were formulated “without due consideration of Korea’s short supply of capital and technology,”This plan failed as each of these required more foreign exchange, which was the limiting condition. Then came a food crisis.The US also withheld economic aid from Korea, including PL480 food assistance at a time when food was in desperately short supply. In April 1963, Korea agreed to a new stabilization program to reduce the budget deficit, in the hope of bringing inflation under control. The government also agreed to dismantle trade controls and eventually adopt a floating exchange rate. Aid was released, but by July it was clear the government was not living up to the agreement.Things begin to change after elections in 1963. Eventually, the government went ahead with another devaluation, and a slew of decisive policy reforms in 1964-65.In essence, Kim believed that the government would have to get rid of “the three lows”—the low exchange rate, the low-interest rate, and low grain prices—as well as reform the foreign exchange system. The devaluation had already raised the exchange rate; getting rid of low interest rates and low grain prices would be deeply unpopular. Said one leader: "“Eventually, the entire business world will protest the policies. Plus, the National Assemblymen will join them and intelligent media editorialists will criticize the policies . . . it will be very difficult.”The government began promoting slogans such as “exports alone promise a way to economic self-reliance” and “exports as the yardstick to measure the sum of our national strength”The economy started reaping the rewards even before the industrial policy kicked in:“The export success of the 1960s and 1970s was basically due to the removal of impediments to trade, namely, the complicated foreign exchange system and the negative effects on export of the protectionist import policy,” “Once the impediments were removed, the economy began realizing its huge export potential, which had been left unexploited until then."So next time someone sings paeans about South Korea’s industrial policy success, do tell them aap chronology samajhiye.Thank you for reading Anticipating the Unintended. This post is public so feel free to share it.The global outpouring of respect and admiration for Shinzō Abe is proof of his outsized impact on Japan and the world. To put his economic contributions in perspective, here’s an edited version of RSJ’s essay on Abenomics from edition #69.Global Policy Watch #2: Abe Yaar! Lessons From 'Japanification' (From our Archives) Insights on policy issues making news around the world—RSJShinzō Abe, the longest-serving Japanese PM ever, stepped down from office last week. His second term which began in late 2012 was marked by his prescription for reviving the Japanese economy. The world called it Abenomics.Through a mix of unconventional monetary policy, robust fiscal stimulus, and structural reforms to boost growth, Abenomics was seen as a marked departure from the timid response that characterised the previous regimes. Abe was determined to jolt Japan out of the economic morass it had dug itself in for over a quarter-century since 1990. We will discuss Abenomics and what lessons it holds for us in more detail later. But let’s go back to the lost decades of Japan that gave us the pejorative term ‘Japanification’ and understand what happened during that time.Bubble, Bust And No RecoveryJapan was the miracle economy following WW2, benefitting from U.S. largesse in infrastructure spending, government investments in technology and research, a rise in entrepreneurship and an increase in factor productivity for over three decades. Low-interest rates and all-round prosperity in the 80s led to an asset bubble. The stock market and real estate valuations went through the roof on the back of speculations and easy credit policy. There’s an urban legend (or truth?) of three sq. mts. of land near the royal palace being sold at US$ 60,000. That meant the appraisal value of the palace was more than the state of California then. In little over 25 years from 1960, the land value went up by 5000 per cent in Tokyo and other major cities. By the end of 1989, the Nikkei index was at its historic high of 39,000. This was a bubble and like all bubbles, it popped in 1990.Japan hasn’t recovered since. The obvious reasons were discerned immediately. The policy response to the bubble was to increase interest rates and quell speculation. But as the equity market and real estate prices crashed, borrowers who had overleveraged themselves were trapped. A debt crisis soon followed with widespread loan defaults. The contagion now engulfed Japanese banks which were staring at a huge pile of NPAs. The credit dried up, investments fell, and the growth slowed dramatically. The sentiment turned negative and the consumers cut down on spending. This began a deflationary cycle.The Bank of Japan (BoJ) was slow to respond and the deflation spiral set in. Why would you spend today when you know the prices would be lower in future? BoJ began cutting interest rates and brought it below 1 per cent by the mid-90s to spur investment. But these actions weren’t coordinated with a fiscal response. The hike in consumption tax in 1996 meant the further dampening of consumption sentiments. The loan default crisis led to the collapse of three banks in the mid-90s. By 1997, as BoJ and the government were getting their act together, the Asian financial crisis dealt a crippling blow to the economy. This set it back for another three years.What Went Wrong?Krugman in 1998 argued the lost decade of the 90s was because of monetary policy failure. His view was the BoJ should have publicly taken a high inflation target that would have avoided deflation and prevented interest rates from going down to zero. Of course, this is supported by theory. A higher inflation target anchors inflation expectation at a higher number and this increased expectation, in turn, leads to higher inflation because of the forward-looking aspect of the aggregate supply equation. Further, the increase in inflation expectation would reduce the real interest rate because it takes time for the nominal interest rate to reach its long-term level. In the short term, this reduced real interest rate stimulates growth which in turn increases inflation. A kind of a virtuous cycle sets in.Anyway, this wasn’t done by BoJ. The other option was to reduce the interest rate to zero quickly and provide substantial monetary stimulus quickly to check loss in output. A combination of a high inflation target (as suggested by Krugman) and monetary easing policy could have possibly worked.Between 2001-06, the BoJ went on a quantitative easing overdrive purchasing long-term Japanese government bonds. After the global financial crisis of 2008-09, the BoJ extended this programme to purchase private-sector financial assets including corporate bonds, ETFs (therefore equity in private companies), CPs and invest in real estate investment trusts (REITs). This had an impact on financial markets with stock markets rising, a fall in bond yields and an increase in corporate bond issuances. But this expansionary policy came at a cost. The debt to GDP ratio which was around 60 per cent in the 90s went up to 240 per cent by 2012. However, all of these measures didn’t move the needle on inflation. It is possible a higher purchase of private risky assets like corporate bonds and commercial paper instead of government bond would have spurred growth and raised inflation expectations. But that was not to be.Separately, the lack of coordination between monetary and fiscal policies hurt the economy. There were multiple increases in taxes to balance the budget while the monetary policy was working to increase consumption sentiments. Lastly, there was a lack of clear communication to manage expectations among the public about long-term inflation, interest rates or growth. Forward-looking guidance by the central bank on these parameters provides assurance to market participants more so when the financial system is weakened by high NPAs and general risk aversion. A recent example of this was seen when the US Fed indicated it will purchase corporate bonds as part of its stimulus during the pandemic. The planned purchase announcement itself did the trick in raising bond prices before the Fed actually bought a single one of them.Abenomics In PlayShinzo Abe and BoJ Chairman Haruhiko Kuroda assimilated the learnings from the lost quarter-century to formulate the ‘three arrows’ of Abenomics in 2013. The three arrows were:A monetary policy based on a qualitative and quantitative easing (QQE) framework with a 2 per cent inflation target, significant purchase of long-duration government securities and private risky assets, expansion of BoJ balance sheet and upfront guidance on these numbers. BoJ promised to double its monetary base to 54 per cent of the GDP by 2014.  A robust fiscal policy that increases absolute government spending on areas like public infrastructure, welfare for its ageing population and servicing the debt. This was to be done in close coordination with the monetary policy actions.Structural reforms to spur growth and private investment. This includes lower corporate tax, increase in participation of women in the labour force, more immigration and acceptance of high-skilled foreign workers, more inbound tourism to Japan and championing of free trade (TTP), lower FDI barriers and global liberal order to counter China.You couldn’t fault their prescription based on what they learned from their past. Abenomics wasn’t a radically new construct but bringing the three arrows together, setting targets for them and then communicating it clearly, indicated Abe meant business. Japan needed to be jolted into a path of recovery and this was the way to do it. The salience of Abenomics grew as more economies, including US and EU, followed the path of QE to stimulate growth and manage financial stability.Did It work?Well, it is a mixed bag. The primary objective of the 3 arrows was to ‘warm up’ the economy to an extent that spurs demand and get the investment cycle going. On that count, it is a mixed bag. It has seen limited success in increasing women's labour force participation, more immigration and in keeping debt to GDP at a near-constant level of 240 per cent (pre-Covid) despite the increase in the monetary base. It’s not an unqualified success. The counterfactual, of course, can be asked. Could Japan be worse off today if not for Abenomics?I think it would.Lessons From AbenomicsSo, what are the lessons learnt from 7 years of Abenomics in Japan? Robin Harding writing for the Financial Times has six lessons from Abenomics for the world struggling with ‘Japanification’. I am paraphrasing below:   Monetary policy through the massive purchase of government securities and private assets works. The ‘bazooka’ of 2013 had a positive impact on the Japanese economy – stock markets boomed, credit uptake went up and unemployment fell.Despite the promise of coordinated monetary and fiscal actions, Abe couldn’t keep fiscal hawks down. The rise in consumption tax from 5 to 8 per cent in 2014 worked counter to the efforts in increasing consumption. The economy went into a recession. Another increase last year to 10 per cent had the same impact.         Communication and future guidance on targets didn’t materialise. The promised inflation target of 2 per cent was never met and the consumption tax hikes meant the premise of raising expectations and letting it do the heavy lifting in raising inflation didn’t work.Expectations management works if you meet the expectations. Beyond a point, you need to intervene directly to meet your targets. The key commitments of Abenomics were never kept and soon the market stopped responding to the BoJ plans of further easing.Stimulus doesn’t cause an increase in public debt to GDP ratio going up. We have discussed this already. It remained range-bound at 240 per cent.Structural reforms didn’t cut to the key issues confronting Japanese society – an ageing population leading to a fall in total factor productivity, a disappointed younger generation carrying the burden through levies and taxes on income, a strong hierarchical working style stymieing innovation and a reluctance to embrace large scale immigration to get out of this rut (an advantage so far for the US).Course Advertisement: Admissions for the Sept 2022 cohort of Takshashila’s Graduate Certificate in Public Policy programme are now open! Apply by 23rd July for a 10% early bird scholarship. Visit this link to apply.Global Policy Watch #3: How Social Media Expands our Reference Networks Global policy issues relevant to India— Pranay KotasthaneIn edition #173, I argued there are three meta-mechanisms that make social media a powerful instrument: reference network expansion, Overton Window Expansion, and disproportional rewards for extreme content due to information overload.This article generated an interesting conversation on social media (where else!). One of the discussion points was: what are the precise ways through which reference networks expand? Here’s an initial answer.To rewind a bit, our reference network comprises “people whose beliefs and behaviour matter for our behaviour”. Social media expands our reference networks as people worldwide can now instantly and repeatedly influence our perceptions. It’s common to misinterpret reference network expansion as echo chamber-isation. However, there’s something much deeper going on.A reference network expands when an individual associates herself with a new set of individuals. This association could be of two types: comparative and preferential. In the first type, we compare ourselves with others who we imagine to be similar to us. Social media expands the number of people who we can compare ourselves with. In the second, the focal point is our preferences. Our behaviour is determined by the likes and dislikes of others we encounter on social media.In the framework above, I have mapped these associations with likely impacts on our behaviours. It explains to a large extent how even domestic issues have global resonance, and why people are willing to support or hate people they’ve never met outside their social media apps.From this perspective, echo chambers span two kinds of preferential associations (“others like what I like”, and “others hate what I hate”). There are four other mechanisms through which reference network expansion takes place.Are there other ways you have seen reference network expansions happening on social media? Do leave a comment.HomeWorkReading and listening recommendations on public policy matters[Report] State of Discrimination Report by Bhuvana Anand and Sarvnipun Kaur analyses all the state-level legal barriers to women's employment in India. [Book] For those interested in community building, Peter Block’s Community: The Structure of Belonging has excellent insights. The portal abundantcommunity.com too has some handy resources. This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit publicpolicy.substack.com

Talk to Me
E67: He Was the #1 Salesperson at Xerox By Age 22! Hal Becker Shares Selling Nuggets

Talk to Me

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 10, 2022 53:37


Here are #selling #tips from a guy who was the #1 salesperson at Xerox at age 22. Meet Hal Becker, role-model salesperson, drummer and cancer survivor. Sales coach, Michael Angelo Caruso, interviews, Hal Becker on the "Talk to Me" #podcast. Talking points include: 1:00 Hal and Michael met through Wally Reyes, Jr.,* drummer for the Chicago band 7:00 How persuasion works (kindness, fear) 8:15 Question-based selling (Dale Carnegie's book on how to win friends**) 9:30 Putting the customer first (even before the sale itself) 10:00 Fear-based selling or "selling in the shadows" 12:30 Great salespeople start with (questions about) the past 13:00 Great sellers don't have to close -- it happens naturally 14:30 Sell s-l-o-w-e-r (in golf, the tip is "swing slower") 16:30 Hal doesn't believe in referral selling 17:15 Why selling is like standup comedy (Jerry Seinfeld, George Carlin, Kathy Griffin) 19:00 Two questions to ask yourself before every sales call 20:15 The illusion of control in the sales meeting 21:00 No problem = No sale (find the "conversational rhythm") 23:00 Ask questions to control the sales call 24:15 The salesperson as a shepherd 25:30 The more the PROSPECT talks, the more they like the seller 26:15 How Hal became #1 salesperson at Xerox 29:15 More rejection makes you more money; double your sales calls 31:15 The value of consistent discipline 33:30 Focus on what you can control 34:14 Overcoming stage 3 testicular cancer with 42 tumors 37:00 Which interviewers are the best listeners? (Rogan, Stern, Jobs) 42:00 Snow White and the 6 objections 45:15 Anticipating the objection is like playing chess 47:00 Role of the sales manager 47:30 FIGJAM lol 49:00 Exclusive experiences as conversation fish bait 50:15 3 traits of strong sellers (rapport, talk show host, psychologist) *Watch Michael's interview with Wally at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smZNa... ** Dale Carnegie's book is titled, "How to Win Friends and Influence People"  Like/Comment as you prefer.  Michael Angelo Caruso teaches presentation skills that will help you command the room, get noticed and advance your career. If you're a leader or salesperson, Michael will help you become a better presenter for the rest of your life. The most important business skill for leaders and salespeople is the ability to effectively communicate with groups of people. Look into leadership and sales training so you can keep teams interested, motivated and successful. Use Michael to pump up your next conference or industry event. He's one of the top keynote speakers in America and he's spoken on five continents and in 49 of the 50 states. And his reputation is expanding in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, Asia and South America. Choose from the menu of popular keynote topics on his website which cover the important topics of communication, selling, leadership, motivation speaking skills and change. Check out Michael's blog (on his website) for interesting educational articles about speaking, writing, leadership and marketing. He also shares writes about his unique experiences on the speaking circuit, so there are lots of great stories that take place all over the world.  #humor #wit Information Products Michael is the author of many books, including Work Hacks: 300+ Cool Ideas to Speed Career Success, which is available as a print book and as an e-book. Also check out Michael's booklet titled, Hmmm…Little Ideas With BIG Results. All products are available on Amazon. Presentation Training More on Michael at his website. Join his Present Like a Pro Group on Facebook for ongoing speaking tips. Michael's online Present Like a Pro class is the best speaker training of its kind. Learn how to be an elite speaker in only six weeks! Michael teaches how to: • Ask 5 questions to pre-qualify the customer • Distinguish your offer from the competition • Build trust quickly • Handle the “nibbler” and deal with “the flinch” • Sell to the 4 buying personalities • Double your referrals • Work any room like a pro • Read people better and faster • Deal with price objections like swatting flies • Always talk about price last • Be a consultant, not a salesperson • Increase sales by 10% by asking one question • Sell more online • Use “trial closes” to save time, increase closing ratios • Saves scads of time by pre-selling your products and services • Sell more by “story-selling” • Use up to 22 different sales closes-- because no single close works every time • Speed up the selling cycle

The Bougie Show
Avery Jane Interview Anticipating 3 Penises In The Butthole! Male Friends Becoming Fan Boys! Dating?

The Bougie Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 9, 2022 37:13


Adult Entertainer/ Porn Star Avery Jane Joined The Bougie Show At Exxxotica Chicago. Avery Talks About Her First Exxxotica At The Bad Dragon Booth. People Joining The Adult Film Industry To Explore Their Sexuality? Male Friends Becoming Fan Boys Since She Started Porn And So Much More. Make Sure To Subscribe To The Page And Get Notifications On All New Releases.

Life Morsels
Anticipating Needs - The Little Things.

Life Morsels

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 6:05


There's huge value added in doing the little things in life. Today's is about anticipating needs- whether your a boss, employee, spouse, or family member, you can get huge return on investment by anticipating the needs of others and yes, even anticipating your own needs as well!

The Old Paths Christian Church
Anticipating Heaven as Our Home

The Old Paths Christian Church

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 21:00


Cruciform Ministries
Anticipating Heaven as Our Home

Cruciform Ministries

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 2, 2022 21:00


Lindamood-Bell Radio
Robert and Lorinda, Lindamood-Bell Learning Center Student and Spouse - Testimonial

Lindamood-Bell Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 32:50


Robert struggled with literacy and comprehension his entire life. For years, he relied on his wife Lorinda whenever a task required reading or writing. Everything was about to change when 60-year-old Robert was presented with an inspiring volunteer opportunity. It would require training, including the successful completion of a college-level course. Anticipating the challenge, Robert enrolled at a Lindamood-Bell to improve his learning ability and prepare.  Lorinda and Robert describe his life-changing experience—how Visualizing and Verbalizing instruction "opened up his mind," and improved his communication skills and his ability to make decisions.

Mornings with Eric and Brigitte
What Would a "Post-Roe" World Look Like?

Mornings with Eric and Brigitte

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 16:05


Anticipating an announcement of the Supreme Court's Roe v Wade decision, Bernie Diaz, missionary and Director of Donor Care for Love Life South FL, is joining us on Monday Monday's Mornings with Eric and Brigitte to talk about what a "Post-Roe" world would look like. The ministry of Love Life South Florida strives to engage and mobilize the local church and business community, to create a culture of love and life that would result in the end of the abortion and adoption crisis in our greater community.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

5 Minutes with Pastor Lutzer Podcast
Are We Ready For Heaven's Wedding? | The King Is Coming #14

5 Minutes with Pastor Lutzer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 7:16


Anticipating the coming kingdom transforms how we live today. Pastor Lutzer paints a picture of heaven's wedding so we can center on what it's all about. As the redeemed, we await Christ's return. Are we being faithful to our True Lover?

The Corona Diaries
Chapter 111. I was anticipating a slap-up birthday lunch, and I ended up with a sausage.

The Corona Diaries

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 57:25


Just for once lets start with the apologies... Ant would like to apologise to the Flaming Lips, and/or possibly the Welsh people, and/or possibly all Americans - depending on your point of view. I would like to apologise to the Czech promoter who did in fact pay us in Prague, but not the other promoters (Czech or otherwise) over the years that didn't (or at least haven't so far). Right now we have got that out of the way, this weeks chapter is one of our infrequent Q&A episodes. Whilst these are a regular for those that support The Corona Diaries on Patreon, we only occasionally incorporate them into the general release - but we have had so many good (and brave) questions of late, it would have been rude not to share a few. Love'n'Linda McCartney h x

A view on
Episode 8: Colors of Capsules

A view on

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 24:30


Capsule Manufacturing: It's Not Only What's Inside That Counts The recent EU ban on Titanium Dioxide and changing customer habits are shaking up capsule production. Over the past few years, the coloring and manufacturing of pill capsules have undergone significant changes due to new EU regulations and customer demand for natural ingredients. And while originally invented to mask and protect the contents inside a capsule, research suggests that the color of a tablet or pill can affect how patients feel about their medication. Until recently, manufacturers have primarily used Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) to create white capsules due to its efficiency in protecting the active ingredients from UV rays. However, this year an EU-wide ban on TiO2 has forced the industry to move towards alternatives that work as well, or better, than TiO2. To add to the colorant shake-up, many people are actively avoiding unnatural ingredients in their food and nutritional supplements, which has created a new demand for plant-based capsule colorants. Anticipating these changes and solving the technological challenges in a timely manner are key to a successful long-term strategy for capsule manufacturing. Curious to Know More? Listen to the conversation between A View On host Martina Hestericová and Ljiljana Palangetic, Lonza's Associate Director of Hard Capsules R&D, about the challenges and solutions in current capsule manufacturing.   KEY TERMS IN CONTEXT: Pharmaceutical capsules can be either hard or soft. Soft-shelled capsules are one unique mold that encapsulates the contents, whereas the more widely-used hard-shelled capsules—such as the ones produced by Lonza—are two molded telescopic pieces of capsule: a smaller one contains the active ingredients, and a larger one encloses the capsule. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a widely-used pigment in capsule manufacturing, as well as in food, paint and sunscreen. Considered completely inorganic and nontoxic from a chemical point of view, it is labeled as an unnatural ingredient for ingestion, and carries the E number E171. Earlier this year, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) announced a six-month phasing-out ban of the colorant over concerns about nano-sized particles of TiO2 accumulating in the body. The full ban takes effect in August. The dip molding process is the manufacturing process for capsules. The final shape of the two pieces that make the capsules is defined by specifically designed molds, which are dipped in a bath of liquid formulation to pick up material that will, after the drying process, give the final capsule form, shape and composition.

5 Minutes with Pastor Lutzer Podcast
Are We Ready For Heaven's Wedding? | The King Is Coming #13

5 Minutes with Pastor Lutzer Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2022 7:16


Anticipating the coming kingdom transforms how we live today. Pastor Lutzer paints a picture of heaven's wedding so we can center on what it's all about. As the redeemed, we await Christ's return. Are we being faithful to our True Lover?

Cloverdale Bibleway Sermons
Anticipating The Body Change - Br. David Mbuyi

Cloverdale Bibleway Sermons

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 130:38


Cloverdale Bibleway 22-0615

ACU Podcast Network
Corpus Christi | Classic ACU

ACU Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022


Anticipating this coming Sunday's celebration of THE MOST HOLY BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST (Corpus Christi), we searched ACU's historic archives and found this May 1989 Fr. Llorente homily on this Solemnity, touching on faith vs. miracles, Protestant vs. Catholic beliefs, on related experiences in his English seminary, on the value pf the Eucharist to us, on St. Teresa of Avila's views, and much more. Enjoy!

Christian Coaching School Podcast
Episode 3 - Increase Your Coaching Results

Christian Coaching School Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 15:49


In today's episode of the Christian Coaching School Podcast, Dr. Leelo Bush shares 7 ways to increase your coaching results by digging deep into your client's motivations and goals.   [03:22] Working towards long-term goals [04:08] Building confidence [05:27] Finding motivation [07:54] Counting the cost [09:37] Anticipating benefits [10:39] Building a support system [11:18] Believing God's will [12:01] Valuable bonus point   Here are the important points Dr. Bush will address to help you 10x optimize any client's coaching results. Is your client prepared to do what's needed even if the reward is distant? Have they mentally stepped into their desired future role and how to do so. Are they passionate regardless of financial reward and recognition? Have they counted the cost and whether this may affect their outcome. Will they receive benefits and what this means for their progress. Do they have a support system and ways to build one. Can they discern if it's God's will for them achieve their goals and how to move closer to this spiritual connection. PLUS A VALUABLE BONUS POINT! RESOURCES DOWNLOAD TRANSCRIPT HERE Join the Courageous Christian Coaching Tribe:  pccca.org/tribe Free Christian Coaching Masterclass:  pccca.org/getcertified

All Things Policy
India needs more institutions, not fewer

All Things Policy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 30:08


A popular way to think about strengthening the Indian republic is to ponder on improving its institutions. Sridhar Krishna speaks to Pranay Kotasthane who goes beyond this to talk about the institutions that don't exist. India is missing many meta-institutions which could truly strengthen our republic and Pranay has lots to say on this subject.Suggested Readings:The House that Jack built and other stories from Anticipating the UnintendedOver 4.70 crore cases pending in various courts – Economic TimesIndians have the most trust in societal institutions: Edelman reportFollow Sridhar on Twitter: https://twitter.com/sridhar_kriFollow Pranay on Twitter: https://twitter.com/pranaykotasCheck out Takshashila's courses: https://school.takshashila.org.in/You can listen to this show and other incredible shows on the new and improved IVM Podcast App on Android: https://ivm.today/android or iOS: https://ivm.today/iosYou can check out our website at https://www.ivmpodcasts.com

The Productive Executive Director Podcast
39 | The Emotional Labor of Being an ED

The Productive Executive Director Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 21:28 Very Popular


There's a reason EDs are exhausted all of the time (and no, it's not because you need more hours in the day!).    Say it with me: thinking is work.  Anticipating is work.  Planning is WORK.    In this episode, we'll talk about emotional labor and what you can do to navigate the extra mental load you carry as an ED.    Resources mentioned in the episode:  nytimes.com/2021/04/21/parenting/women-gender-gap-domestic-work.html english.emmaclit.com/2017/05/20/you-shouldve-asked/  fairplaylife.com/  www.fairplaylife.com/the-cards    Connect with Rachel from Small Shop Strategies:   smallshopstrategies.com instagram.com/smallshopstrategies facebook.com/smallshopstrategies

2nd Opinion Podcast | Gaming is our Passion, Podcasting is our Profession!
Some Big Games Are Coming This Week, Here's What We're Anticipating! | 2nd Opinion Podcast #338

2nd Opinion Podcast | Gaming is our Passion, Podcasting is our Profession!

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 9, 2022 50:32


In today's episode, we talk about the Xbox and Bethesda Games Showcase, Summer Games Fest, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare II, and the lack of content in Battlefield 2042! Welcome back to the regularly scheduled 2nd Opinion Podcast! Things have been rough these past few weeks, with the holidays upon us things have been getting crazier every day! We plan on setting up a lot of content for the future, including interviews, bringing back our Head2Head segment, as well as having our co-host rejoin the show! We hope you enjoy this episode of the podcast and please make sure to subscribe! MUSIC INFORMATION This Song certificate is granted by Artlist Ltd (hereinafter: "Artlist"), to: Caleb Soleb Gayle (hereinafter: the "Client") as of 20 Jan 2022, regarding the use of the song Future Groove (feat. Floating Anarchy) created by Peter Spacey (hereinafter: the "Song") by the Client. Artlist hereby grants the Client a non-exclusive, worldwide license to integrate and synchronize the Song into an audio-visual work and use the Song as part of the Project in accordance with Artlist's Terms of Use and Personal License. #2ndOpinionPodcast #XboxBethesdaShowcase #GamingPodcast --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/2nd-opinion-podcast/message

In the News
54: Stylus Wars, Pinpointing Plants, and Anticipating Dub-Dub!

In the News

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 3, 2022 41:34


Watch the video!https://youtu.be/bFUucQyxnpcIn the News blog post for June 3, 2022:https://www.iphonejd.com/iphone_jd/2022/06/in-the-news630.html Have a Donut!Dub-Dub Excitement!Home Screens & Field Guides!Magnanimous MagSafeCan a Laptop Replace My iPad?Plant-Based Digital DietShame on Tim and His CoffeeStylus WarsBrett's iTip: Password Protect your Keynote PresentationJeff's iTip: Force Quit an Apple Watch AppJason Snell: My WWDC 2022 wishlistMeet the 2022 Finalists for the Apple Design Awards Jeff's iPad and iPhone Home ScreensJeff's Review: Shortcuts for Mac Field Guide by David SparksSimon Jary: Best MagSafe chargersFederico Viticci: Rediscovering the Mac - An iPad User's Journey into macOS with the M1 Max MacBook ProAndrew O'Hara: How to identify plants and flowers with your iPhone cameraJon Brodkin: Tim Hortons coffee app broke law by constantly recording users' movementsKenny Wassus: Stylus Wars 2022: Apple Pencil, Surface Pen and Samsung S Pen ReviewedBrett's iTip: Password protect Pages, Numbers & Keynote files on your iPhone or iPad. If you need to secure a Keynote presentation with a simple password you can tap into settings and select “Set Password” to add a password. You can type a hint if you'd like and decide whether you want to use FaceID or not. If you send the file to someone else they'll need the password to open it (and so will you!). To remove a password, you'll have to enter the password first and turn OFF “Require Password.” Jeff's iTip: Force Quit an Apple Watch app: Open the app, if it is not already openPress and hold the Side Button.When the Power Down menu appears, release the Side Button.Press and hold the Digital Crown button until the app goes away and the watch face returns.Brett Burney from http://www.appsinlaw.comJeff Richardson from http://www.iphonejd.comSupport the show

The Best of the Sports Shop
There's officially only 100 days until the NFL season starts and each one of us in the Sports Shop support different teams, so what are we all anticipating?

The Best of the Sports Shop

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 18:17


There's officially only 100 days until the NFL season starts and each one of us in the Sports Shop support different teams, so what are we all anticipating? We look into which games look promising and which may give each trouble. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

WebTalkRadio.net
Anticipating the Impact of Dobbs—Will the Court next overturn the Obergefell case (same-sex marriage)? 

WebTalkRadio.net

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022


At the risk of getting ahead of ourselves, in this podcast we will discuss whether the anticipated Supreme Court ruling in Dobbs v Jackson Women's Health signals that the Court may also overturn the cases of Obergefell (which legalized same-sex marriage nationally) and Lawrence (striking down state anti-sodomy laws). The short answer is that I don't think so. But we will […] The post Anticipating the Impact of Dobbs—Will the Court next overturn the Obergefell case (same-sex marriage)?  appeared first on WebTalkRadio.net.

Peace Be Still- Daily Prayer Download
#543 Friend Fri- Anticipating pentecost & fasting challenge

Peace Be Still- Daily Prayer Download

Play Episode Listen Later May 27, 2022 18:29


Today is a little different in terms of length and a brief teaching. We're coming up on remembering Pentecost, so what might that look like for a believer? Also what about fasting and how can fasting help us experience more of the life Jesus promises? Listen in and prayerfully approach the coming week, asking God if He would help you fast with some of us and position to receive more of the life of the Spirit He promises! Believe! Please share us with a friend! And to learn more about us, please visit www.intothewaters.com!

Palisade Radio
Dale Pinkert: Debt is Crushing the System

Palisade Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 52:22


Tom welcomes a new guest Dale Pinkert to the show. Dale is an experienced commodity and FX trader. He is also head of trader development at Trade Gate Hub. Dale discusses the importance of gathering 'intelligence' in trading and questioning your own beliefs. It's important to manage emotions and practice risk management. Stops are important for those occasions where you're wrong, and the best traders use them diligently. If you don't know why you're getting into the market you shouldn't be doing it. He explains how all markets are manipulated, and no one complains when there is a bull market. The Fed can't print commodities so Fed policies will have little effect. Instead, Jay Powell should pray for rain. The debt burden means we can't survive much of a tightening cycle. Dale will be surprised if the Fed can get rates to three percent. It won't take much to topple a system that is so top-heavy with debt. The strength of the dollar hasn't impacted the metals market that much. The long dollar trade is quite a crowded trade. We could be looking at a new low for the Euro and a top for the dollar. Every major bottom in silver can be matched with a top in the dollar. We need a bear market in the dollar for silver to move. The U.S. might not be the best currency any longer. Some of our key market structures appear broken, and therefore the dollar may no longer be the cleanest dirty shirt. Dale believes a rally in metals is coming. Tom discusses the risks in the housing market and how things have changed since 2008. Mortgage rates are climbing, and risks are increasing. FOMOing into buying a house seems like a dangerous idea. Tom and Dale discuss how market tops often come withclear signs like ads on the television for crypto or real estate. Lastly, Dale gives some excellent advice for new investors learning to trade. Talking Points From This Episode Importance of learning and gathering 'intelligence' from others.Why the debt situation will limit the Fed's ability to act.Anticipating where the Dollar and Euro may head from here.Why the U.S. dollar might not be the best currency any longer. Time Stamp References:0:00 - Introduction2:10 - Managing Risks8:10 - Metals Manipulation?10:07 - Debts, Rates, & The Fed13:20 - Dollar Strength15:18 - Macro Factors17:40 - Devil Advocacy20:22 - Bond Yields22:47 - Risk-On Trades29:41 - Equity Sell-Off & Metals32:03 - Timeframes & Evidence33:56 - Picking Miners37:55 - Copper Outlook40:44 - Housing Markets?46:50 - Market Top Signposts48:12 - Volatility & Opportunity51:14 - Wrap Up Guest Links:Website: https://face-experience.comWebsite: https://tradegatehub.comTwitter: https://twitter.com/ForexStopHunter Dale is head of trader development at Trade Gate Hub and also the Host of Face. Dale began his career in operations on the CME floor for Dean Witter when they traded currency futures on chalkboards. He became a licensed Series 3 broker in 1976 and went on to own and operate Pinkert Commodities GIB. He became a Member of the CME (IOM) Division for a stint, and his forecasts have been aired on many Financial media including CNBC. Dale has Coached/Mentored retail and prop traders and has gained a solid reputation for his work on the other side of the mic having interviewed over 700 of the best of the best in Trading.

Edible-Alpha® Podcast
T4 Solutions Streamlines Grocery E-commerce

Edible-Alpha® Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 87:28


In Edible-Alpha® podcast #111, Brad talks with Steve Mehmert, managing partner at T4 Solutions, a Pewaukee, Wisconsin-based consulting firm that helps grocers and other food distributors map out profitable e-commerce programs, from ordering platforms through delivery. Brad and Steve have a fascinating conversation about key challenges, opportunities, and innovations in the rapidly evolving grocery landscape. Steve started T4 Solutions in 2019, shortly after selling his first company, Mehmert Store Services. He'd spent 30 years designing and developing grocery stores, focusing primarily on independents. Through his new venture, he could leverage his expertise and connections to continue serving that market. Prior to the pandemic, independent grocers were increasingly—but reluctantly—launching e-commerce just to stay competitive. Typically, their systems were inefficient and incapable of much volume. They'd lose money on every order, but since e-commerce represented a tiny percentage of total sales, they'd shrug it off. Anticipating where the market was heading, Steve knew, as did most of these retailers, that these systems weren't sustainable long-term. But nobody foresaw COVID-19 or its impact on the food industry. With millions of Americans suddenly wanting to buy groceries online, brick-and-mortars had to up their e-commerce game STAT. Now Steve's services were in even hotter demand. T4 Solutions helps identify, develop, and deliver the best technology, tools, and systems to make each client's e-commerce program run smoothly and cost-effectively. For example, the firm offers technology-managed, temperature-controlled lockers that hold online orders for customer pickup, as well as temperature-controlled delivery vehicles to replace crowdsourced drivers. T4 also helps clients set up micro-fulfillment centers, onsite order storage, and other e-commerce infrastructure. Brad and Steve discuss how the food landscape has shaken out over the last two years. Today, grocers' sales remain well above pre-pandemic levels, and many continue to do robust online business. Though most retailers have streamlined e-commerce, there are still kinks to work out and improvements to be made, especially amidst the challenging labor market. Next, they dig into Amazon's grocery strategy and how corporate grocers are expanding e-commerce services. Steve says even the big guys don't have everything figured out. He firmly believes independents can and should compete, and those willing to evolve and embrace technology can thrive. He envisions grocery stores big and small moving to more micro-fulfillment models, finding them more efficient and able to serve even more customers. T4 isn't done devising solutions either. Steve loves a challenge, and in today's food industry, new ones arise constantly. He details the latest projects he's working on, including figuring out a merchandiser for impulse purchases to accompany the lockers. And while most of his clients are grocers, he's also working with food banks and organizations serving rural and urban food deserts. This podcast is packed with many more insights, so be sure to tune in!

The God Minute
May 24- Helping Hand (Javier)

The God Minute

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2022 9:56


Anticipating the coming of the Spirit!

Disney at Work Podcast
Anticipating A Visit to Disneyland Paris During the 30th Anniversary

Disney at Work Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 40:17


In almost two weeks my wife and I will be heading to Europe. For my wife this is her first trip as we see the United Kingdom and France. For me it is a returning trip, but as it relates to visiting Disneyland Paris, it has been some 17 years since I last visited. I'm anticipating this trip and excited to not only take in all that is precious and beautiful about this park, but to be able to see things I haven't had a chance to see before. I'll walk through both the Disneyland Paris park and the Walt Disney Studios park to outline places that are new that I haven't taken in before--even places you may have never heard of. I'll also talk about the resort end of the experience. Plus, I'll discuss things some really wonderful things I may be missing as a part of this experience, because I was too late, or too early (i.e. Avengers Campus).

Blogging the Boys: for Dallas Cowboys fans
The Star Seminar: Anticipating position battles

Blogging the Boys: for Dallas Cowboys fans

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 79:57


Now that the draft is over we can start to look ahead at which positions are going to have some of the more interesting battles come training camp time. Check out the latest episode of The Star Seminar as Danny Phantom and Rabblerousr assess with special guests Bill Schlerf and Tony Thompson! Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Pantsuit Politics
Anticipating a Post-Roe U.S.

Pantsuit Politics

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 67:48 Very Popular


TOPICS DISCUSSEDAnticipating the Supreme Court overturning Roe vs. WadeThe Marshall Plan for Moms with Reshma SaujaniOutside Politics: Kim Kardashian wears the “Happy Birthday Mr. President” dress to the Met GalaUPCOMING EXCITING PROJECTS AT PANTSUIT POLITICSSarah and Beth were featured as GMA3's podcast of the monthNow What? is available where ever books are soldThe Audiobook for Now What? is now available for pre-orderPlease visit our website for full show notes and episode resources. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mad Radio
P&P - Ed Marinaro won't Get to It, and Anticipating Texan Jerseys

Mad Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 39:59


HOUR 4 - Seth and Sean react to former Viking Ed Marinaro waxing poetic on stage while everyone was waiting for the pick, discuss the favorite/consensus for who the Texans will pick in NEXT year's NFL Draft, try to anticipate which Texans will have their jerseys on sale in the team store, and see what Landry and Lopez have coming up.

In Touch TV Broadcast featuring Dr. Charles Stanley - In Touch Ministries

Dr. Stanley encourages us to actively seek and obey the will of God.