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Best podcasts about rf

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Latest podcast episodes about rf

Life After MLM
Episode 110: Bri

Life After MLM

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 3, 2022 88:05


Have you ever seen the comment section of an MLM Horror story? There is almost always someone proclaiming "My MLM isn't like that!" And it's true. Not all MLM stories are horrors that leave you broken and empty. So when I got an email from someone who had a "typical experience" I knew I needed to talk to Bri, who was with R+F for 6 years. Bri did all the things, worked her business, watched the webinars and treated the business like a business and she still felt the need to come on the show and share what happened. Show Notes Bri on IG - https://www.instagram.com/lifelivedbydesign/  Check out Bri's workbook for us! - https://www.lifelivedbydesign.com/podcast  Dr. Steven Hassan's BITE Model - https://freedomofmind.com/cult-mind-control/bite-model/ Ponzinomics by Robert L. FitzPatrick - https://amzn.to/3q16oJb How can you help? Report false income and health claims here: https://reportfraud.ftc.gov/ Or go to: https://www.truthinadvertising.org You can also report to your state Attorney General's office! https://www.naag.org/find-my-ag/ Not in the U.S.? Go here: https://www.ftc.gov/policy/international/competition-consumer-protection-authorities-worldwide Support the Podcast! Buy me a Taco and leave me a note!

The Update with Adam Copeland
F.P. Santangelo talks about why the Giants need to make a big splash deal

The Update with Adam Copeland

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 1, 2022 19:16


Adam Copeland is joined by KNBR/Giants Postgame Host FP Santangelo to talk about why the Giants need to make a big splash deal. FP gives his take on how the Giants are looking so far this season & how they need to play better vs the bad teams. He breaks down why he thinks the Giants need to make a big splash deal, but it might not be for a big bat. He gives his thoughts on Gabe Kapler's line shift moves with the lineup. And he talks about how hard it is to play RF at Oracle Park -You can hear FP weeknights after Giants games on KNBR 680/104.5FM & 6p-10p Monday-Frieay when there is no Giants game. -You can follow him on Twitter @FightinHydrant Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Roadie Free Radio
297: RFR Rewind: Arica Rust |Getting Started

Roadie Free Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 6:12


  Arica Rust is a live sound engineer specializing in Front-Of-House systems engineering based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her expertise lies in designing, deploying, and optimizing sound reinforcement systems tailored to the client's or artist's needs. She is an expert in L-Acoustics and advanced user in d&b audiotechnik systems. She also has extensive experience as a monitor engineer, mix engineer, stage tech, RF coordinator, and communications specialist. Born in Oakland, California, Arica came into audio with a passion to shape how the audience experiences music. Her love of music and technology led her to receive trade certificate in Live Sound and Sound Recording from City College of San Francisco as well as a Bachelor's Degree in Broadcasting and Electronic Media Arts with a focus in Audio Production from San Francisco State University. Arica currently works for Sound On Stage, Inc., providing audio production services for a wide range of events from high profile corporate entertainment to large-scale music festivals. Full Episode here: https://open.spotify.com/show/61e24ZD5A3oBTxO36WHQXq?si=2727433f968248d5 The Following links are affiliate links! Each sale helps our channel out at no additional cost to you. My VLOG & Streaming camera: https://amzn.to/3nEuIh2 The VLOG Lens: https://amzn.to/2y4Zrjd The ALL PURPOSE lens: http://amzn.to/2vPGayB My OTHER lens: https://amzn.to/38OVlfb My MAIN PODCAST mic: https://roswellproaudio.com/products/mini-k87 My OTHER podcast mic: https://amzn.to/3nK9oGQ Create ‘n Cast Bundle from SHURE & Focusrite: https://amzn.to/2LTUTTv The camera CAGE I use: http://amzn.to/2fWUwI2 My DESKTOP mixer: https://amzn.to/39yiSzZ My AUDIO interface: https://amzn.to/2LRF53W BEST FIELD recorder: http://amzn.to/2wfzCYI My FAVORITE mic stands: http://amzn.to/2xnBn6d Roadie Free Radio Merch: http://www.roadiefreeradio.com/merch/ RFR Website: http://www.roadiefreeradio.com  

Roxy Fever
104 - Prose And Conns

Roxy Fever

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2022 93:08


Monster-sized RF thing: Muppet Ice Storm/Avs-Bolts/Torts to Philly/Andrei Kuzmenko's dinner at JOEY/Hockey Canada lawsuit/HHOF inductees/renaming NHL awards CW: sexual assault. Hockey Canada lawsuit discussion from 56:50 to 1:03:06

Home Theater Forum Podcast
Episode 37 - new and returning hobbyists with Todd Rice and Dave Hahn

Home Theater Forum Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 28, 2022 89:55


Episode 37 June 27, 2022 7:30 PM EST New and returning hobbyists Todd Rice Dave Hahn   Reconnection: Sam's new toy: Rodecaster 2 - Robot Voices and spoiler alert Mini G2 review: HGIG is still broken but movies and HDR10 gaming are glorious New and returning hobbyists: Where are you at with your current build?  How long have you been assembling it?   Dave: What's different in your current build from where your last one was at? You thought your last one would be the ultimate build and get you 10-20 years.  What changed your thinking? What do you wish someone had told you about home theater before you began?  What are you still investigating? What do you wish the industry did a better job of explaining? What's got you jazzed about 2022 displays, and what other tech are you adding?  Is Atmos on your radar? Are projectors part of your investigation? Are TVs big enough for you or do you desire and have room for bigger screens?   Have we reached saturation and maturity on display tech?  Are you into HDR?  Have you experienced it yet? Are retail vendors able to demo it well for you? Do you read and participate on other forums besides HTF?  Are you on AVS or Bluray.com? Got an opinion on physical media vs streaming / buying digitally?  Is it “And” or “Or” for you? Where are you buying media?  Are sites like the HTF's WRU or HDDN's bargain hunting useful to you? Are you a movie goer?  Have you returned post pandemic? What do you see as the biggest home theater issues that most users are facing?  It's 2022 and we are still using one way (ie dumb) RF tech to try to coordinate all our components.  How has nobody fixed this?  CAN anyone ever fix it? Have you dealt with multiple HDMI and USB standards?  Are they as big a mess as Sam thinks it is? Quick Good Bad and Ugly: Sam - In the heat of the night Todd - Measure of a Man Dave - The Contractor

The Phoblographer
The Best! Tamron 17-70mm F2.8 Di III-A VC RXD Review

The Phoblographer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 27, 2022 12:21


The Tamron 17-70mm F2.8 Di III-A VC RXD could be the best lens for APS-C cameras ever made. The Tamron 17-70mm F2.8 Di III-A VC RXD could be the best lens for APS-C cameras ever made. It combines weather-resistance with fast autofocus and a lot of versatility. For the record, it's more or less a 24-120mm f2.8 equivalent zoom. And for any APS-C photographer, that's a dream. To boot, it's also incredibly small for what it is. While it feels fantastic on Sony cameras, some Fujifilm photographers might not necessarily want to use it. However, it's great on both camera systems. This review was updated June 27th 2022. A whole other section was created just for the Fujifilm variant. Pros and Cons Pros Small Weather sealed Under $1,000 Image stabilized Basically a 24-105mm at f2.8 Lightweight Cons Tamron is a beautiful diamond being wasted on the sad Ringpop that is the Sony APS-C camera system. What's Innovative About This? The Tamron 17-70mm F2.8 Di III-A VC RXD is the full-frame equivalent of a 26-105mm f2.8 lens. The depth of field will be around f4.2 in full-frame too. But the light gathering and true aperture will still be f2.8. This is the first time we've ever gotten a lens like this. Add onto all this the vibration compensation, sharp optics, and weather sealing features. Then realize that it's under $1,000. To me, this sounds like a no-brainer. It's a truly usable large range that photographers can use with confidence every day. Sigma has their 18-35mm f1.8 lens, but it's not as useable a range as this Tamron offering. For what it's worth, I think this lens is wasted on E Mount. Everyone fawns over the company's full-frame cameras. It has also come to Fujifilm X series. It could also even make the Nikon Z50 seem more useful. Gear Used We tested the Tamron 17-70mm F2.8 Di III-A VC RXD on the Sony a6600. We also used it with Profoto lighting. Tech Specs Specs are taken from AlphaShooters Lens construction: 16 elements in 12 groupsAngle of view (APS-C): 79゜55′-23゜00′Number of diaphragm blades: 9(Rounded diaphragm)Minimum aperture: F22Minimum focusing distance: 0.19m (7.5 in) (WIDE) / 0.39m (15.4 in) (TELE)Maximum magnification ratio: 1:4.8 (WIDE) / 1:5.2 (TELE)Filter size: φ67mmDiameter: 74.6mmLength: 119.3mm (4.7 in)Weight: 525g (18.5oz)Accessories: Flower-shaped hood, Lens caps included Ergonomics The Tamron 17-70mm F2.8 Di III-A VC RXD is a moderately sized lens. I say this because it depends a lot on the situation you're in. But overall, it's simple to use thanks to the construction. You can see above that the only controls are a large zoom ring and a small focusing ring. The exterior is made of plastic. However, the lens doesn't feel like a bad, plasticky lens. It's a ways better than anything Rokinon has made. When fully zoomed in, the lens also doesn't become much larger than it is. And that's really great for real-life use. Of course, that also means that it isn't an internally zooming lens. Build Quality Make no mistake; the Tamron 17-70mm F2.8 Di III-A VC RXD is a massive lens for an APS-C camera. But overall, it's still smaller than a Canon 50mm f1.2 RF prime lens. It's also far lighter. The lens is built solidly. It's a plastic body that doesn't feel cheap at all. Tamron is a specialist at constructing lenses like this. There are also nice rubber rings for grip. Of course, this lens is also weather-resistant. We're confident that it will outlast the Sony bodies it was designed for. Overall, this lens is built to be the only one you need. It's lightweight and fairly small. Stuff it into a camera bag slot, and you'll be good to go. Again, Tamron has built one of the most perfect lenses for APS-C cameras. It's again a shame it's being wasted on a format that I don't think sees its future in APS-C. Ease of Use Slap the lens on the camera, point, focus, and shoot. That's all there is to it. The lens has vibration compensation built-in, which translates into better hand-holding at slower shutter speeds. And if you're l...

The Tech Addicts Podcast
Sunday 26th June - Yolkfolk

The Tech Addicts Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2022 114:51


With Gareth Myles and Ted SalmonJoin us on Mewe RSS Link: https://techaddicts.libsyn.com/rss iTunes | Google Podcasts | Stitcher | Tunein | Spotify  Amazon | Pocket Casts | Castbox | PodHubUK Feedback and Contributions Matt Jones Great show again, guys, thanks! The photo of the Bike/Moped shop was taken in Whitstable, Kent. It used to be a lovely little Oyster fishing town, but most of the houses are now second homes for rich Londoners, including, sadly, Haywards Bike shop

Foundations of Amateur Radio
If you had money, what would your amateur adventure look like?

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 25, 2022 4:46


Foundations of Amateur Radio A couple of weeks ago a friend, Ben VK6NCB asked an interesting question in our weekly net. He wanted to know, if money wasn't a concern, what would your ideal shack look like? The answers varied widely from leaving everything as is and using the money to retire, through to purpose built fixed or mobile shacks, with world wide DXCC activation travel and everything in between. My own answer was a little different. I envisaged establishing an RF research laboratory and spending my life exploring and investigating the ins and outs of the fundamentals of our hobby. Building software defined radios and building tools to leverage their capabilities. As far-fetched as money not being a concern might sound, it's something that a group of radio amateurs had to grapple with in 2019 when their group came into some money. The result is a private foundation with the aim to support, promote, and enhance amateur radio digital communications and broader communication. The foundation, Amateur Radio Digital Communications or ARDC uses its resources to provide grants to the amateur community. There's a number of criteria to be eligible to receive an ARDC grant, but you must at least relate to the support and growth of amateur radio, education, research and development. Grants are evaluated on a range of aspirational goals, things like reach, inclusiveness, innovation, social good and others. One of the first questions you might ask is how did these people get the money and why are they giving it away? To answer that we'll need to travel back to 1981 when Hank, KA6M had the foresight to imagine that Internet-style networking was going to be a thing and requested a block of IP addresses for use by radio amateurs. If you're not familiar, an IP address is like a telephone number, but for a computer. Hank was granted a block of 16.7 million addresses. For decades these were informally administered by a group of volunteers working under the name of AMPRnet and later 44Net. In 2011 the group founded ARDC as a California non-profit and officially took ownership of the network space and its management. At this point I'll make a slight detour into IP addresses. I promise it's relevant. For information to travel to a computer on the Internet it needs to have an address. That address, originally specified using a 32-bit number, a so-called IPv4 address, made it possible to uniquely identify around 4 billion computers. With the explosive growth of computing and the Internet, the world started running out of addresses and in 1998, IPv6 was proposed to solve the problem. It uses a 128-bit number and has space to uniquely identify something like 340 trillion computers. In 2018, the ARDC was presented with a unique opportunity to sell some of its increasingly valuable address space, due to IPv4 address scarcity, but soon to be worthless, due to IPv6 adoption. After a year of internal discussion, in the middle of 2019, the decision was finalised and the ARDC sold a quarter of the address block that Hank had been granted back in 1981. On the 18th of July, 2019, Amazon Web Services became the proud new owner of just over 4 million new IP addresses. I should point out that radio amateurs haven't ever used more than half of the original block and IPv6 is going to make this no longer any issue. So, how much did they make from this adventure? Well, each address sold for about $25, making for a lump sum of well over $100 million dollars which the ARDC used to establish its grants program. To round off the story, in 2020, the ARDC changed from a public charity to a private foundation and continues to administer the 44Net and the grants program. Their grants list is impressive and inspirational, so check it out on the ampr.org website. While you're there, you can subscribe to the newsletter and read about some of the amazing work that's flowing from the ARDC as a result of its efforts. At this point you might be getting all excited about applying for a grant and you should, but I'd like to ask a different question. What have you done lately to grow our hobby, to stimulate it, to encourage new people, to innovate, research and learn? What has been your contribution? So, if you had money, what would you do with your amateur adventure? I'm Onno VK6FLAB

Doctor Supercoach
Ep. 265 JB & Pistol's Round 14 Recap

Doctor Supercoach

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 22, 2022 87:56


Powered by #CodeSports #Sponsored #Ad #MANSCAPEDPartner -House Keeping -How many trades do you need to do a luxury trade? -The best trade in options across the four lines -R/F trade in options vs. coping a donut in Round 15 -VC/C options for this week A big thank you to Manscaped for sponsoring today's episode!

ITmedia NEWS
コンパクトでも本格派 キヤノン「EOS R7」試作機を速攻レビュー

ITmedia NEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022


コンパクトでも本格派 キヤノン「EOS R7」試作機を速攻レビュー。 とうとう登場したAPS-Cサイズセンサーの「EOS R」。ソニーの「α」やニコンの「Z」が同一マウントでフルサイズセンサーとAPS-Cセンサー機をラインアップに入れてくる中、もともと別ラインとしてAPS-Cセンサーのミラーレス一眼「EOS M」シリーズを展開していたキヤノンはどうするのか、とその筋の人たちが思っていたところ、RFマウントのAPS-Cセンサー機が来たのだ。

Tuned In
Field Report: No Billet, No Worries — 1200HP 2.2L Tilton EVO.

Tuned In

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2022 13:34


1200HP, 42PSI, 2.2L 4G63, Tilton Interiors time attack legend, redux.After multiple lap records and back to back wins, owner, Pro-Am class driver and passionate time attack supporter Kosta Pohorukov and the infamous Tilton Interiors EVO IX V1 met an untimely end on track. While tragic, the incident that left the old chassis a write off enabled Trent Murphy of TM Automotive and others involved to use the winning formula on a new chassis and add all that extra knowledge they had learnt along the way to do it better.Want to learn how to EFI tune? Start with some free lessons right here: hpcdmy.co/tunebThe result was a keen focus on weight reduction, slight aero improvements care of Voltex Racing and after the chassis was completed by Riverside Racing, an incredible 3 month build time in order to make it to the World Time Attack Challenge before heading to Tsukuba in Japan, the home of time attack. With the car producing upwards of 3000kg of downforce, it is no surprise keeping the class spec tyres intact is an issue and an RF tyre delamination saw the team finishing the event early due to damage, but still walking away with 3rd place in the Pro Class with Garth Walden at the wheel, and 1st in Pro-Am via Kosta himself.The EVO 9's 4G63 retains its cast block as at around 1200HP it doesn't give them any issues producing 1200HP from a 2.2L capacity. The Emtron ECU and MoTeC PDM and dash display/logger control the engine and a myriad of sensors which ensure engine reliability as well as helping dial in aero and suspension setups to get the most out of the car. A Hollinger 6 speed sequential helps get the power to the ground and while Trent didn't give any specific numbers, the torque split has been adjusted to ensure the car turns into corners easily, as well as maintaining traction when the noise pedal is used on the exit.Also discussed is the new BorgWarner EFR 9280 turbo which hits a max boost of around 42PSI and 116,000RPM and its advantages over the old EFR 9180, the importance of packers, bump rubber and getting your spring rates right, using Nitrous and why the MIVEC system is retained. Also touched on is the difficulty of reducing weight when so much strength is needed to handle downforce with the tradeoff being the weight is placed as low as possible to improve handling.

Foundations of Amateur Radio
How to isolate and by how much?

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2022 4:29


Foundations of Amateur Radio If you connect the antenna ports of two radios together and transmit from one into the other, that would be bad, right? Just how bad would it be and what could you do differently? Before I dig in, you might ask yourself why on Earth this question even arises. Consider having two radios and one antenna. You couldn't use a T-piece to connect two radios to the antenna unless both were receivers. So, after connecting and disconnecting coax for a decade, you might decide to use a two position coaxial switch instead. Set the switch to one port and the first radio is connected to the antenna, flick it to the other port and you've just avoided swapping coax between radios. I'll point out that in most cases a coaxial switch can be used to connect multiple antennas to one radio, or in reverse, connect multiple radios to one antenna. When you do start looking for a switch it would be good to test that at no point it connected any two switching ports together, potentially causing the magic smoke to escape from your radio. A less obvious issue is that a coaxial switch has a property called isolation. It's a measure of what part of a signal leaks between ports and you'll see the isolation or cross-talk of a switch described in decibels or dB. If you recall, a dB is a relative measure. It means that it's something in comparison with something else, in our case, the amount of signal going into one port compared with the amount of signal leaking through to a disconnected port. You'd think that in a perfect switch none of the signal would leak through, but it turns out that under different frequencies a switch responds differently, even one specifically designed for switching radio frequencies. It might be that a 1 kHz signal is completely isolated, but a 1 GHz signal is not, which is why when you look at the specifications of a coax switch, you'll see something like "greater than 70 dB isolation at 200 MHz". It's worth noting that the lower the frequency, the higher the isolation, indicating that in the worst case, at 200 MHz, there's 70 dB isolation, but at lower frequencies it has higher isolation, sometimes much higher. If you were to transmit into this switch with 5 Watts at 200 MHz, the amount of signal that can leak through would be 70 dB less than 5 Watts. You might recall that you can convert Watts to dBm to allow you to do some interesting calculations. As with other dB scales, it's in comparison to something else, in this case a dBm is in reference to 1 milliwatt and 5 Watts is the equivalent of 37 dBm. This means that if you had a switch with 70 dB isolation, you'd start with a 37 dBm transmission, take 70 dB isolation and end up with a -33 dBm signal leaking through. That's the same as 0.0005 milliwatts. In other words your 5 Watt transmission leaks through your coax switch to the tune of 0.0005 milliwatts. Is that enough to damage your radio? Well, that depends on the radio, but let's put some numbers against it. S9 on VHF and UHF was defined in 1981 as -93 dBm assuming a 50 Ohm impedance of your radio. So, our leaking signal, -33 dBm, is 60 dB higher than S9. You'd report it as a 60 over 9 contact, a tad excessive, but not unheard of. So by that metric, you should be fine. Many, but not all, radios specify the maximum radio frequency or RF power that they can handle. For example, according to the documentation, both the NanoVNA and a Icom IC-706 can each handle a 20 dBm or 200 milliwatt signal without doing damage. That means that your -33 dBm signal should't do any damage to those two devices. I'm off to see what the isolation is for cheap 12V relays to see if I can construct a cost effective, modular, remote control antenna switch with lightning detection. What are you building next? I'm Onno VK6FLAB

Acilci.Net Podcast
Hocam, MR için Onayınız Gerekli

Acilci.Net Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 17, 2022 15:53


Hocam, iyi geceler.Buyurun beyefendi.Hocam, benden MR çektirmemi istemiştiniz.Evet, bir sorun mu oldu?Bu kağıdı radyolojiden gönderdiler hocam, geçen ay kalbime stent takılmıştı. Sorun olabilir dediler, sanırım onay vermeniz gerekiyormuş.….. İşte nedense büyük çoğunlukla gece saatlerinde, biz acilcilerin yaşadığı bu ve benzeri konuşmalardan esinlenerek bu yazımı kaleme alıyorum. Akıllarda yer alan; Hastanın meğer dizinde protez varmış, MR cihazı çalışır çalışmaz birden söküp alıvermiş bacağından…İki hafta önce stent takılmış meğer kalbine, MR çekilmeden önce halbuki en az 6 hafta beklemesi gerekiyormuş…Kalp pili var hastanın MR çekilemez ki…Dövmesi olan hastaların MR çekiminde neden sorun olsun ki? gibi mitler işte bu yazımızın örnek konu başlıkları olarak karşımıza çıkıyor. Yazar Notu: Bu oldukça önemli ve hassas konu hakkında yazar, güncel kitap bölümleri ve kılavuzlar eşliğinde bir derleme sunmayı amaçlamıştır. Ulaşılan kaynakların linkleri metin içinde yer almakta, referans alınan çalışmalar yazı sonunda bulunmaktadır. Konu hakkında güncel tıbbi uygulamalar sırasında alınan kararlar klinik içi ve klinikler arası kararlara dayanmalıdır. Öncelikle bir soru ile başlayalım. Çalıştığınız kurumda yer alan MR cihazının kaç Tesla olduğunu biliyor musunuz? Haydaaa. Şimdi bu neden gerekli oldu ki? Teknoloji sürekli gelişimini devam ettirmekte iken literatüre göz attığımda MR çekimi için kesin ve göreceli kontrendikasyonların farklı kaynaklarda tutarlılık arzetmediğini görmek tabi ki benim için şaşırtıcı olmadı. Süreci anlamak için bazı genel bilgiler ile başlayalım haydi. Manyetik rezonans görüntüleme (MRG) üstün yumuşak doku kontrastı ile fonksiyonel uygulamalara sahip non invazif bir görüntüleme tekniğidir. MRG vücudu radyasyona maruz bırakmamaktadır ve 1980'li yıllardan bu yana tanısal bir radyoloji modalitesi olarak kullanılmaktadır. MRG'de ayrıntılı görüntülerin elde edilmesi için çok güçlü bir manyetik alan, hızla değişen manyetik alanlar, radyo dalgaları ve bir bilgisayar kullanılmaktadır. MRG'nin tamamen risksiz olduğunu söylemek mümkün değildir ve hastaları potansiyel risklerden korumak için bilgi sahibi olunması önemlidir. MR cihazının üç major manyetik alanı bulunmaktadır ve bu üç alan da olası güvenlik riskini barındırır. MRG tarayıcılarının güçlü statik manyetik alanı, ferromanyetik nesneleri makinenin merkezine doğru çekebilir, hızlandırabilir ve onları tehlikeli mermilere dönüştürebilir. Bu alan aynı zamanda implantları yerinden oynatabilir ve pacemakerlar ve pompalar gibi cihazların fonksiyonuna etki eder. (Ferromanyetik nesne: Herhangi bir mıknatısın manyetik alanı içerisindeyken, o mıknatısın manyetik alan çizgileri ile aynı yönde mıknatıslanabilen demir, çelik gibi maddelere verilen isimdir). Radyofrekans (RF) bobinleri tarafından oluşturulan RF alanı, özellikle implantların varlığında potansiyel olarak doku ısınmasına neden olabilir. Ferromanyetik olmayan implantlar bile, osile olan manyetik alanlara maruz kalan metallerde yayılan akımlar nedeniyle ısınmaya neden olabilir.Zamanla değişken, hızlı değişen gradyan manyetik alan fonksiyonu, MRG sinyalinin uzamsal bir kodlamasıdır ve kasları veya periferik sinirleri uyarabilir ve implant ısınmasına neden olabilir. Ayrıca MR tarayıcı alanında 100 dB veya daha fazla seviyelere ulaşabilen ve işitme sistemine zarar verebilecek gürültü üretirler. MR incelemesi sırasında hastalar ve odada bulunan herkes için kulaklık ve kulak tıkacı gibi araçlarla işitmenin korunması çok önemlidir. MRG tarayıcılarındaki bu manyetik alanlar, metalik yabancı cisimleri olan hastalarda beş tehlikeli etkileşime neden olabilir: Mermi etkisi,Bükülme,Yanma,Artefaktlar veCihaz arızası (kalp pili ile etkileşim). Tıbbi malzemeler MRG güvenliği açısından üç grupta incelenir: MR Güvenli Olanlar: Yeşil renk ile kodlanırlar ve MR ortamında herhangi bir zarar oluşturmazlar.Şartlı MR Güvenli Olanlar: Sarı renk ile gösterilirler ve belirli MR...

Microwave Journal Podcasts
RF Industry Icon: Joel Dunsmore, Research Fellow at Keysight Technologies

Microwave Journal Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 25:53


Joel Dunsmore, Research Fellow at Keysight Technologies and RF test expert, book author and course instructor with more than 36 patents, talks with Microwave Journal Media Director, Pat Hindle, about his design work with various VNAs over the years, software and algorithm development, patent research and future outlook on the industry.

Berita Utama Koran Tempo
Berita Utama 16 Juni 2022: Reshuffle Dianggap Sebagai Cara Aman Jaga Koalisi

Berita Utama Koran Tempo

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2022 7:43


Berita hari ini: Hasil reshuffle 15 Juni 2022 dianggap sebagai cara aman jaga koalisi pemerintah; Hampir sebulan setelah ekspor CPO dibuka kembali, harga sawit petani masih rendah; Polisi diharapkan hapus pelat nomor berakhiran RF. --- Baca informasi harian komprehensif lainnya dengan mengunjungi website koran.tempo.co atau mengunduh aplikasi Tempo. Saran & kritik: podcast@tempo.co.id

The Phoblographer
A Remarkable AF, Low Light Jackpot: Canon EOS R3 Review

The Phoblographer

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 33:00


Photographers now can take their pick of cameras that can shoot stills fast enough to actually be movies. But Canon's approach to a speedy flagship is arguably the most different from Sony's and Nikon's. Instead of creating a camera that can shoot both fast and high resolution, the Canon EOS R3 uses a less-headline-worthy 24.1-megapixel sensor. Canon is taking a gamble that the photographers who want 30 fps are also the photographers who prioritize exceptional low light performance over high resolution. And, they're trying to sweeten the deal with an autofocus system that will just focus on wherever you're looking. You can view this article and much more with minimal ads in our brand new app for iOS, iPadOS, and Android. Will Canon's gamble pay off, or is the R3 going to lose out to a higher resolution foe? Does the AF in this headline mean autofocus or the Urban Dictionary definition of AF? I spent a few weeks with the Canon R3, shooting everything from wildlife to equestrian to low light portraits. I was blown away by both the autofocus and the noise reduction in the dark. And limited rolling shutter distortion may actually make the R3's top speeds useful. Table of Contents Too Long, Didn't Read Canon EOS R3 Pros and Cons Pros Cons Gear Used Innovations Canon EOS R3 Tech Specs Ergonomics Build Quality Autofocus Eye Control AF Ease of Use Metering Image Quality High ISO Images RAW File Versatility Extra Image Samples Edited Unedited Conclusion Likes Dislikes Too Long, Didn't Read The Canon R3 has a top burst speed that's actually useful because of a great autofocus system and a faster processor to limit rolling shutter. This camera can not only shoot in the dark but print ISO 128,000 and still look good. While the R5 may make more sense for detail work, the R3 is an exceptional low-light and fast-action camera. Canon EOS R3 Pros and Cons Pros Impressive autofocus performance with both action and low light Face recognition works phenomenally, even on birds and in dark scenes Reduced rolling shutter distortion and 1/180 flash sync with electronic shutter Excellent noise reduction at high ISOs Eye Control AF Built-in vertical grip Lots of great controls Weather-sealed Cons Resolution is lower than competitors (but this is partially why low light quality is so great) Higher learning curve Hot shoe adapter recommended for weather-sealing with older flashes Heavier and larger than the R5 and R6 Pricey Gear Used I used the Canon EOS R3 with the 70-200 f4, 85mm f2 Macro, and 16mm f2.8 RF mount lenses. I also paired the camera with both the EL-1 flash and the Flashpoint R2 Zoom Li-Ion III and a wireless trigger. I stashed the gear in the F-Stop Ajna backpack. The reflections you see in some of the night portraits were created with Lensbaby Omni wands. Innovations Canon wasn't the first to announce a sports-focused mirrorless flagship; it competes with the speed of the Sony A1 and the Nikon Z9. But, there's still a lot of innovation here. Canon has included Eye Control AF, which was previously on some of their film cameras. This moves the autofocus point to whatever part of the frame your eye is looking at. The processor that's behind the 30 fps top burst speed also reduces rolling shutter distortion with faster image processing. Canon EOS R3 Tech Specs Adorama lists the following specifications for the Canon EOS R3, shortened for clarity: Lens Mount: Canon RF Sensor Type: 36 x 24mm (Full-Frame) CMOS Sensor Resolution: Actual: 26.7 Megapixel; Effective: 24.1 Megapixels Crop Factor: None Aspect Ratio: 1:1, 3:2, 4:3, 16:9 Image File Format: JPEG, Raw, HEIF Bit Depth: 14-Bit Image Stabilization: Sensor-Shift, 5-Axis ISO Sensitivity: Auto, 100 to 102400 (Extended: 50 to 204800) Shutter Speed: Mechanical Shutter: 1/8000 to 30 Second, Bulb Mode Electronic Shutter: 1/64000 to 30 Second in Manual Mode; 1/64000 to 30 Second in Shutter Priority Mode; 1/8000 to 30 Second in Aperture Priority Mode; 1/8000 to 30 Second; in Program Mode; Bulb Mod...

Ham Radio 2.0
E901: RF-Kit RF2K-S Amp - Ham Radio Amplifier, Legal Limit, Hamvention 2022

Ham Radio 2.0

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 7:33


Special thanks to the folks from RF-kit who attended Hamvention 2022 and allowed me to record this video about this AWESOME Ham Radio Amp. Take a look.Website: https://rf-kit.de

Unnamed Reverse Engineering Podcast
058 - Technically Met the Specs

Unnamed Reverse Engineering Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 88:42


Special thanks to Andrea of Hardwear.io team for inviting us. We learned a ton and meet a bunch of new people while (as of this writing) stayed COVID-free. Interviews in order:   Eric Schlaepfer - author of the  new book with co-author Windell Oskay (of “Evil Mad Scientists Laboratories” fame )  “Open Circuits” on No Starch press. Notes there are PREORDER discounts. Jacob Creedon: Just before his talk… at the Mountain View Reverse Engineering Meetup. Spencer Moss from Google (I'm sure you can google the company) security engineer Ken from Somerset Recon  Will McGuiness as the workshop assistant for John McMaster's microprobing workshop. Mike Ryan: Bluetooth expert from Ice 9 Consulting and previous guest.  As promised he would be on this next show… but the part2 of our RF tools with him will be the next episode.   Have comments or suggestions for us? Find us on twitter @unnamed_show,  or email us at show@unnamedre.com. Music by TeknoAxe (http://www.youtube.com/user/teknoaxe)

SGT Report's The Propaganda Antidote
YOU ARE BEING BOILED ALIVE IN RADIATION -- PROF. OLLE JOHANSSON

SGT Report's The Propaganda Antidote

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2022 58:14


We are ALL being bathed in massive amounts of radiation on a daily basis - and from some very unexpected sources. Researcher and Professor Olle Johansson joins me to shine the light of truth on RF, 5G and the Davos agenda to track and trace every single person and thing on earth. Support Olle's research: https://www.emfsa.co.za/news/fundraiser-to-support-associate-professor-olle-johanssons-ongoing-research/ Who is Olle Johansson? https://vetapedia.se/olle-johansson-associate-professor-ki/ WATCH this episode here: https://www.bitchute.com/video/7M8O8ZbW6dNM/

Ham Radio Workbench Podcast
HRWB 157 - RF Filters: Duplexers, Diplexers, etc.

Ham Radio Workbench Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 14, 2022 173:10


In this episode we discuss the differences between common RF filters including duplexers, diplexers, circulators, isolators and combiners.

20 Minute Leaders
Ep829: Eran Ben Shmuel | CEO and Co-Founder, Juganu

20 Minute Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2022 22:41


Eran is the CEO and Co-Founder of Juganu. Beginning his career, unconventionally, as a classical violinist, he changed direction and earned his B.Sc. in Electrical Engineering and Physics from the Technion — Israel Institute of Technology. Eran has over 15 years of experience building high-tech companies from zero to mass production. Eran is an expert in solid-state electronics and high-speed control systems, and he holds numerous patents in physics and algorithms. Juganu is his second start-up with his partner, Alex Bilchinsky. The first start-up of the two was RF Dynamics (goji). The invention was the magical oven. A technology that allows a high degree of control on rapid energy transfer to food products based on digital high-power RF components capable of modifying the frequency, amplitude, and phase of radio waves transmitted in ovens. He always brings together a wide range of tech fields to solve unmet needs - Just like he did in Juganu, which significantly impacts people's lives - for example, what they are doing lately in Philadelphia, Arlington, Mexico, Guatemala, and Brazil

Foundations of Amateur Radio
Smith, the chart to end all charts ...

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2022 5:29


Foundations of Amateur Radio In the time that I've been a radio amateur not a day has gone by without learning something new. Today was no different and this time learning took me both by surprise and delight. I realise that being delighted by charts, since that's what we're talking about, might not be something that comes naturally, but I can highly recommend that you use this as an opportunity to explore. So, which specific chart am I referring to? The venerable Smith Chart, something which I've seen from a distance many times in the past decade, but never actually understood, or to be honest, even looked at with anything more than a glance and a shudder. My first exploration started with a book published in 1969 by the person who developed the chart, Phillip Hagar Smith, an electronics engineer. The book, over 250 pages, is dense and frankly my reading of the first part of the book did not fill me with delight, but based on what I discovered afterwards, I might revisit it. The purpose of the Smith chart is to visualise complex mathematical relationships. Instead of filling your worksheet with a litany of calculations, you can draw lines, circles and read the answer straight off the chart. For example, given the impedance of an antenna system, determining the standing wave ratio becomes a case of putting a dot on a chart, drawing a circle through the dot and reading the VSWR straight off the chart. It gets better. If you have a digital Smith chart, like the one shown on a NanoVNA or a RigExpert antenna analyser, you can read the antenna impedance in relation to frequency, use a tuner to change it and see the chart update in real-time in direct response to you changing inductance or capacitance by twiddling the knobs on the tuner. One of the main things that a Smith chart solves is to visualise a chart with infinity on it, twice. In radio a short-circuit is one extreme and an open-circuit is another. Coming up with a way to show both those conditions on the same chart is a stroke of genius. The chart has evolved over time, but in essence it's a circle with an amazing set of arcs drawn throughout. The very centre of the chart has the number 1.0 next to it. That's the point at which the VSWR is 1:1, the reactance is zero and it's called the prime centre. A dummy load should show up as a dot in that spot, regardless of frequency. The Smith chart is normalised. It doesn't matter if you're using a 50 Ohm or a 75 Ohm antenna network system, the middle of the chart is 1.0. Follow the horizontal axis to the right and you'll discover 2.0, that represents twice the resistance. If you're using a 50 Ohm system, 2.0 represents twice that, or 100 Ohm. Go to the left, find 0.5 and that represents half, or 25 Ohm. The far left point on the horizontal axis represents zero Ohm, or a short circuit, the far right represents infinite resistance, or an open circuit. Positive reactance, or inductance is shown above the horizontal line, negative reactance, or capacitance is shown below the line. Going back to the middle of the chart, you'll discover a circle. All along that circle the resistance is the same, that is, on a 50 Ohm system, all of that circle represents 50 Ohm. If you look directly above the prime centre, you'll discover another 1.0 on the edge of the chart. The arc coming from that point represents an inductive reactance of 50 Ohm all along its path. Similarly, at the bottom of the chart you'll see an arc coming from a 1.0, representing the capacitive reactance. Before you pack it in with all this inductive and capacitive reactance, think of it as another attribute of your 50 Ohm antenna system. You don't need to precisely know how it works in order to use it. Remember how I mentioned that you could just read off the VSWR from the chart? Drop a point on the chart, anywhere is fine. You can read off both the resistance and reactance following the two arcs through that point. If you draw a circle through the same point with the centre at the middle of the chart, the VSWR of that system is the number that you can read, where your circle crosses the horizontal axis. Before I go, there are plenty of YouTube videos on the topic, but there are a few that I'd recommend you explore. Among an amazing array of RF educational videos, Rhode and Schwartz made a ten minute presentation called "Understanding the Smith Chart" which walks you through how to read the chart and you don't need the prerequisites to follow along. In Part two of his "Smith Chart Basics" series, Carl Oliver shows how to look up the VSWR in three easy steps and Alan W2AEW has several videos showing the chart in action with several vector network analysers or VNAs and I'd recommend that you look at videos 264 and 314 to get started, but there's plenty more of his handy work to explore. If you take away anything from this, it should be that the Smith Chart isn't scary, there's just lots of stuff there, but spend a few minutes looking at it and you'll discover just how useful it can be in your day to day amateur antenna tuning adventures. If you've come across other interesting resources on the topic, don't hesitate to get in touch. I'm Onno VK6FLAB

Constellations, a New Space and Satellite Innovation Podcast
129 - Laser Terminals as a Global Market Disruptor, the Adoption Across SatCom and Creating Mesh Networks in the Sky

Constellations, a New Space and Satellite Innovation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 8, 2022 25:58


On the Constellations Podcast, we'll discuss how satellite communications are being impacted by the introduction of laser terminals for ground, air, and space. Radio frequency (RF)-based communications have been the constant for transmitting reasonable amounts of data in space, but the movement from analog to digital signals has opened the door for some new methods of data transmission. While RF may be here to stay for wide area coverage situations, optical communication lasers have emerged into the market for high bandwidth, high-security point-to-point communications on earth and in space. During this episode, Bulent Altan, CEO of Mynaric, will examine why laser terminal technology is one of the more prominent disruptors entering the global communications market. Hear Bulent outline the adoption of laser across the global space network and how its implementation will impact the future of space communications.

WashingTECH Tech Policy Podcast with Joe Miller

Most of us probably don't think about it much, but our cell phones and Wi-Fi connections use something called spectrum to send and receive data. The term “5G” refers to the fifth major version of this standard for transmitting information wirelessly. It's also known as “millimeter wave technology.” The 5GHz spectrum has long been viewed as a way to get around the crowded radiofrequency (RF) spectrum and its associated problems with Wi-Fi. The widespread adoption of wireless local area networks (WLANs) in the 2.4 GHz ISM band means that there are very few available channels in any given location, which can lead to high interference levels, reduced coverage range, and low throughput. The 5GHz spectrum is not as crowded as the 2.4GHz band, making it a better choice for high-throughput, low-interference deployments like indoor video surveillance networks. In general, this band also provides greater immunity from interference from devices like baby monitors or cordless phones that use frequencies in the 2.4GHz band. Ari Fitzgerald LinkedIn Ari Fitzgerald is a Partner with the law firm of Hogan Lovells, where he leads the firm's Communications, Internet, and Media practice. He provides strategic, legal, and policy advice on a wide range of communications and spectrum policy issues to some of the world's largest and most dynamic communications network operators and equipment manufacturers, as well as industry trade associations and investors. Resources Hogan Lovells' Communications, Internet, and Media Practice

Adafruit Industries
EYE on NPI - Murata Type 1SJ Integrated LoRaWAN Module

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 2, 2022 11:20


This week's EYE ON NPI is going loooooooooooooong with a fully integrated Long Range radio module + microcontroller - it's the Murata's Type 1SJ Integrated LoRaWAN Module (https://www.digikey.com/en/product-highlight/m/murata-electronics-north-america/type-1sj-integrated-lorawan-module). This nifty wafer-thin chip is an all-in-one compact solution for adding far-reaching wireless without the cost and power requirements of cellular or WiFi. Particularly for compact products that need to stay small and thin, we've never seen a smaller integrated LoRaWAN solution! This product is a true triple collaboration, combining the second-generation Semtech SX1262 radio frequency IC (https://www.digikey.com/short/342nj2dp) that comes with the licensed LoRa encoding support and an ARM Cortex-M0 STM32L072 microcontroller (https://www.digikey.com/short/z27vc2rn) from STMicroelectronics with 192 kB of Flash memory, and 20 kB of RAM, along with a built-in RF switch. Having the STM32L0 chip means excellent deep sleep capabilities, so the module can run on a battery - even a coin cell - for a long time. The STM32 also has plenty of peripherals, so whatever data you need to send over LoRa, you'll be able to read and process the data: USB, ADC, I2C, SPI, UART etc. The RF side of the module is the Semtech SX1262 - they're the company that licenses the LoRa RF specification so basically you're guaranteed to get working LoRa/LoRaWAN support with working code examples. The radio can transmit at up +22dBm for many-mile range, similar to the SX breakouts and FeatherWings we manufacture (https://www.adafruit.com/?q=lora&sort=BestMatch) with official driver code available through mbed (https://os.mbed.com/teams/Semtech/) and GitHub (https://github.com/Lora-net/sx126x_driver). All together they make for a compact, inexpensive module which saves you money and space over combining the radio plus microcontroller. We like the epoxy-coated slab look and it seems like it would be easy to use in a pick & place + reflow manufacturing line. To get started quickly, you can pick up the Murata LBAA0QB1SJ-TEMP-EVK evaluation board (https://www.digikey.com/short/rz8pmb3j) or two, it comes with Arduino-like headers, antenna connection options and a built in SWD/JTAG programmer debugger for the STM32 microcontroller. Once you've got your code working, the individual Murata LBAA0QB1SJ-296 (https://www.digikey.com/short/cct0q8cd) modules are available on tape & reel - book an order with Digi-Key for shipment as soon as they come into stock!

Hablemos de los Orioles de Baltimore
Capaces De Lo Peor Y De Lo Mejor

Hablemos de los Orioles de Baltimore

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2022 6:51


El pitcheo de Tyler Wells simplemente inmejorable, tanto así que con sus 6 entradas lanzadas, mejoró su ERA llevándola a 3.71. De nuevo el bullpen, haciendo la fácil: 3 entradas, 2 hits y 2 ponches. Rapidito. La ofensiva haciendo lo justo. Por ejemplo, recuerden el 5º inning: boleto a Mancini, doblete de Mountcastle y con hombres en 2B y 3B, Santander batea profundo al RF, y mueve los corredores. Luego Urías batea machucón y empuja la otra. 2 carreras un hit ningún error, ninguno quedado y con poca cosa, el juego ya iba 6 carreras por 0.

The MxU Podcast
#116 - Jason Waufle, Shure

The MxU Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 30, 2022 52:41


Lee and Jeff chat with Jason Waufle, Pro Audio Senior Specialist from Shure about microphones, and best practices for deployment and management of RF wireless systems. We know you're going to learn a lot. Enjoy!

Microwave Journal Podcasts
Samtec Interview: Learn About Wideband RF Launch Design Challenges and Solutions

Microwave Journal Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 15:01


Sandeep Sankararaman, Principal Engineer at Samtec, talks with Pat Hindle, Media Director at Microwave Journal, about the challenges of wideband RF launches and how Samtec is able to support engineers with connector design issues and educational tools to meet their design goals. Sponsored by Samtec.

Autism Parenting Secrets
Make The Invisible VISIBLE

Autism Parenting Secrets

Play Episode Listen Later May 26, 2022 55:17


Welcome to Episode 101 of the Autism Parenting Secrets. The topic this week is electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and the importance of minimizing exposure.  This matters for you the parent and it is especially important for children.We focus on one type of EMF exposure that's increasing at an exponential rate: radio frequencies (RF) from wireless communications such as WiFi, 5G, BlueTooth, etc.Our guest this week is Rob Metzinger.  He is the President and Founder of Safe Living Technologies.  With over 20 years of experience dedicated to electrical and electronic problem solving, he is an authority on EMF and RF pollution.  The truth is that excessive exposure to RF impacts our biology.  So knowing how much you are being exposed to is super important.The secret this week is... Make The Invisible VISIBLEYou'll Discover:Nature is The Ultimate Goal (5:22)How An RF Meter Helps (8:35)HEARING is Believing (9:31)Government Guidelines Don't Help (13:01)An Event That Warrants A Closer Look (16:33)The Case For Good Defense (20:27)Top Offenders And Practical Actions You Can Take (25:10)The Case for Inconvenience (27:46)Simpler Is Better (34:02)What To Look For In A Meter (38:42)A Simple Way To Gauge Your Home or School Environment (46:23)Why 5G Is Hard To Measure (49:10) About Our GuestRob Metzinger is the President and Founder of Safe Living Technologies.  By trade, Rob is an Electronics Engineering Technologist (1987) and has successfully completed the Institute of Building Biology USA (IBE), Electromagnetic Radiation (EMR) training (2004) and also acquired his Building Biology Environmental Consultant Certificate, BBEC (2010).  From his 20 years experience as an independent corporate electronics field service engineer, Rob has developed a strong background in electrical and electronic problem solving along with strong customer relation skills. He is an authority on all issues related to EMF pollution and RF pollution. Education, Detection, and Protection are the three pillars of his business.Safe Living Technologies is comprised of expert EMF service providers and RF service providers throughout Canada and the USA. These professionals each have unique talents and extensive experience in a variety of fields. Our team is proficient in Electromagnetic Field measurements, EMF troubleshooting, EMF shielding and Radio Frequency shielding, Mitigation of Electromagnetic Fields, and Electrical power engineering. We also have strong ties to the top EMF professionals in Europe which we can draw information from. Together we have been able to resolve many issues.https://safelivingtechnologies.com/our-team/References in This Episode:Safelivingtechnologies.com (use code WARRIOR for 10% off)Safe and Sound Micro RF DetectorSafe and Sound Pro RF MeterEMF MetersAdditional Resources:Free Resource: 33 Mistakes Most Autism Parents Make and How To Avoid ThemGot a Picky Eater? - this can helpTo learn more about Cass & Len, visit us at www.autismparentingsecrets.comBe sure to follow Cass & Len on InstagramIf you enjoyed this episode, share it with your friends.Don't forget to subscribe to the show on Apple Podcasts to get automatic episode updates for our "Autism Parenting Secrets!"And, finally, please take a minute to leave us an honest review and rating on Apple Podcasts. They really help us out when it comes to the ranking of the show and we read every single one of the reviews we get. Thanks for listening!

Ideas on Video Communications | Wireless | Cellular | Fiber Optics | IPTV | Video over IP
VISLINK HCAM HEVC/UHD Wireless Camera System with Camera Control [Recorded Download]

Ideas on Video Communications | Wireless | Cellular | Fiber Optics | IPTV | Video over IP

Play Episode Listen Later May 25, 2022 51:48


The HCAM is highly flexible and features configurable mounting options and video interfaces, allowing the unit to be mounted to broadcast cameras for sporting events, ENG cameras for news and even prosumer cameras to broaden the market reach. With user interchangeable RF modules and a range of software options, the HCAM continues the line of innovative, high-performance wireless camera systems from Vislink. The post VISLINK HCAM HEVC/UHD Wireless Camera System with Camera Control [Recorded Download] appeared first on VidOvation Corporation.

Foundations of Amateur Radio
The Thunder and Lightning that destroyed my station ...

Foundations of Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 21, 2022 4:46


Foundations of Amateur Radio The other day I was woken by the sound of a thunderclap. It was shockingly loud and came out of the blue. A few moments later, it happened again. I exploded out of bed, rushed to the shack, disconnected the beacon power and switched the antenna coax to "safe". After breathing a sigh of relief, everything went dark and with it came the distinctive sound of the sudden death of the uninterrupted power supply taking with it my workstation. With nothing else left to do, I reported the outage to the power company, went back to bed, pulled the covers over my head, snuggled in and surprisingly, slept pretty well despite the barrage of water hitting my QTH. The next morning the power was back on and I discovered that one of the residual current devices, the one that powered most, if not all, the wall sockets had tripped. I reset it and much to my surprise, most of my QTH came back to life. I say most, because after breakfast I had a moment to switch on my radios and see what, if any, damage there was. I could hear and trigger the local repeater, but HF was strangely dead. I could hear the coax switches turning on and off, but the SWR on the antenna was high and it didn't appear that the antenna coupler was doing anything. It's powered remotely using a device called a Bias-T. You use two of them to transport a power supply voltage along your antenna coax. In my case, I inject 12 Volts in my shack, and extract the 12 Volts at the other end near the antenna where it powers the antenna coupler. Occasionally the antenna coupler needs a reset, so I removed the power, waited a bit and reconnected. Still no response from the coupler, so I disconnected the power and left it for another time. A few days later I had a moment to investigate further, so I went outside to check out the antenna and coupler. Both looked fine. I removed and reinserted the power, heard a click, but wasn't sure since a car came barrelling down the road at the same time, so tried again and heard nothing. At this point I decided that this warranted a full investigation and started putting together a mental list of things I'd need. I wanted to test the coupler when it was isolated, I wanted to do a time-domain-reflectometry, or TDR test, to see if anything had changed. This test uses the RF reflection of a cable to determine its overall length and any faults like a cable break, high or low resistance and any joints. If you have a Nano VNA or an antenna analyser, you can do this test. It did occur to me that I didn't have a baseline to compare with, so that was disappointing, but I added it to the list. First thing to test was to check if the radio had been affected. I turned it on, did the same tests and discovered that the Bias-T was still disconnected, which could explain why I didn't hear a click when I tested a second time. Armed with a level of confidence around power, I tried again to trigger the antenna coupler and got nothing, dread building over the potential loss of a radio in the storm, I set about swapping my HF antenna to another radio. At this point I was reminded of an incident, 37 years ago, as a high school student during a class outing. My wonderful and inspirational physics teacher, Bart Vrijdaghs, took us to the local University where the head of the Physics Department of the University of Leiden gave us a tour of their facilities. He took us into a student lab full of oscilloscopes and tone generators and set-up a demonstration to show us how you could generate Lissajous figures. He was having some trouble making it work and with the impertinence reserved for teenagers I quoted a then popular IBM advertisement from 1985, "Of Je Stopt de Stekker Er In", which loosely translates to asking if he had plugged it in. I can tell you, if looks could kill, I wouldn't be telling this story. Suffice to say, it wasn't. Plugged in, that is. Back to my HF antenna. Yeah. It was already plugged into the other radio, so, unsurprisingly it was unable to send any RF to, or from, the first radio, much like some of the advanced telepathic printers I've had the pleasure of fixing during my help desk days a quarter of a century ago. After all that, I can tell you that HF seems to work as expected. The beacon is back online and I have some work ahead of me to create some baseline TDR plots and perhaps a check-in, check-out board to keep track of what's plugged in where. That and looking for another UPS, since keeping the computer it's connected to up and running, at least long enough to properly shut down, would be good. What other lessons can you take away from lightning hitting nearby? I'm Onno VK6FLAB

The Midday Show
Hour 3 - Acuna is playing RF today

The Midday Show

Play Episode Listen Later May 18, 2022 36:56


The Braves lineup is out and Acuna is playing RF. Andy & Randy react to that news before they were joined later in the hour by Bally Sports Braves Analyst Paul Byrd and Golf Channel Reporter Todd Lewis. 

Picture This: Photography Podcast
Canon R7 & R10 LEAKED! Sorry, Fuji :(

Picture This: Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 15:36


Tony Northrup discusses the two new Canon APS-C cameras for the RF mirrorless mount: The Canon R7 (a 32-megapixel sports & wildlife-oriented camera) and the Canon R10 (an entry-level vlogging & lifestyle camera). SPONSOR: Go to http://squarespace.com/tony & save 10% off your first website or domain with code “Tony"

Adafruit Industries
The Desk of Ladyada - Pocket VNA, Crystals and Minerals and Blood moon

Adafruit Industries

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2022 30:45


There's a full lunar eclipse tonight that you'll be able to see if you're in the eastern half of N America or in S America (https://moon.nasa.gov/news/172/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-lunar-eclipse/) if it isn't cloudy, go outside and look up! Or watch NASA's livestream. We also went to the NJ Rock, Gem, Mineral and Fossil show (https://nj.show/) yesterday with some Fruit Friends and picked up some really sweet gems - we'll show those off live under the overhead. Finally, we pulled out our pocket VNA we ordered many years ago to try it out - Once calibrated, you can use it to check antenna responsivity, we're also going to try to learn how to use it to tune our pi networks for boards where we DIY the RF section instead of using a module. The Great Search - 8 ohm 0.25W, 2" diameter round speaker https://www.digikey.com/short/3wnvzfm3 This week, we have a request from someone working on a kit with an an audio output - they need to spec out an inexpensive speaker that will play the audio clips in their design and they had a few rough requirements they wanted to hit: the audio driving circuit they're using is 8 ohms 0.25 Watt, so the speaker cant have have a lower power rating or it will blow out. The size is about 2 inches diameter, and it needs to be a round speaker to fit into the PCB. Finally, the audio frequency range is not that wide, we just need to play tones that are about 600 Hz. What You Need to Know about the Lunar Eclipse https://moon.nasa.gov/news/172/what-you-need-to-know-about-the-lunar-eclipse/ NJ Mineral, Fossil, Gem & Jewelry Show https://nj.show/ https://nj.show/exhibitor-list/ #adafruit #deskofladyada #bloodmoon Visit the Adafruit shop online - http://www.adafruit.com ----------------------------------------- LIVE CHAT IS HERE! http://adafru.it/discord Adafruit on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/adafruit Subscribe to Adafruit on YouTube: http://adafru.it/subscribe New tutorials on the Adafruit Learning System: http://learn.adafruit.com/ -----------------------------------------

This Week in Amateur Radio
PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio #1211

This Week in Amateur Radio

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022


PODCAST: This Week in Amateur Radio Edition #1211 Release Date: May 14, 2022 Here is a summary of the news trending This Week in Amateur Radio. This week's edition is anchored by Terry Saunders, N1KIN, Dave Wilson, WA2HOY, Don Hulick, K2ATJ, Will Rogers, K5WLR, Fred Fitte, NF2F, Eric Zittel, KD2RJX, George Bowen, W2XBS, and Jessica Bowen, KC2VWX. Produced and edited by George Bowen, W2XBS. Approximate Running Time: 1:40:39 Podcast Download: https://bit.ly/TWIAR1211 Trending headlines in this week's bulletin service: 1. Shortwave Radio Outlets Around The World Are Resurrected To Support The War In The Ukraine 2. FCC Has Resolved Technical Issues and Resumes Processing Amateur Radio License Applications 3. Annual Armed Forces Day Cross-Band Exercise Set for May 14th 4. Get To 2022 Dayton Hamvention -- May 20th through the 22nd 5. Día del Radioaficionado Celebrated May 10th, 2022 in Puerto Rico 6. ARES Activated in Oklahoma for Tornado Clean-Up Communications 7. National Hurricane Center Annual Communications Test to be Held on May 28th 8. Students HAM it up on Roof of Engineering Building At University of Arizona 9. Japan Tour Boat Operator Used Amateur Radio Illegally On Boat That Sank 10. Brazil Puts New Regulations In Place Limiting Radio Frequency Interference From Solar Panel Installations 11. Youth On The Air Will Welcome Visitors To The Dayton HamVention 12. Amelia Earhart Transatlantic Flight 90th Anniversary To Be Celebrated On The Air 13. The Village Of Geeks Is Happening This Summer In The U.K. 14. German Radio Amateurs Plan To Use GSM/GPRS Technology On The Ammateur Bands 15. Brazil Tackles Radio Frequency Polluting Solar Panel Installations 16. Ofcom Short Range Devices and MilliMeter Wave Consultations 17. Radio Hams Provide Public Service Communications During Tour De Tulsa, Oklahoma Cycling Event 18. Radio Society of Great Britain Beyond Exams Club Scheme relaunches as Brickworks 19. Dhruv Rebba KC9ZJX, 18, hopes to develop a program that will enable youth to build and program microsatellites 20. Mobile application available to help navigate the Dayton HamVention 21. The ARRL forum at the Dayton HamVention will feature the FCC Enforcement Bureau's Lark Hadley, KA4A 22. Online tickets are now available for the Northeast HamXposition 23. New rules are going to be in effect for the 2022 Field Day Operation 24. Amateurs in the southern US are preparing for another projected active hurricane season Plus these Special Features This Week: * Technology News and Commentary with Leo Laporte, W6TWT, will talk about how difficult it is to unsubscribe or reach technical support at Alphabet, which is Google. He will also talk about the new Firefox 100 release which actually has a functioning privacy switch supported by new regulations about web tracking thanks to the EU GDPR. * Working Amateur Radio Satellites with Bruce Paige, KK5DO - AMSAT Satellite News * Tower Climbing and Antenna Safety w/Greg Stoddard KF9MP, covers everything you need to know to install and maintain your tower and antenna installation for your station. This Week Greg cover the best methods for mounting electronics on the tower. * Foundations of Amateur Radio with Onno Benschop VK6FLAB, will introduce you to Augustian Jean Fresnel, Zepplins, and a picket fence, and what they collectively have to do with VHF and UHF signal propagation. * Weekly Propagation Forecast from the ARRL * The latest from Parks On The Air and Summits On The Air (April Report) with Vance Martin, N3VEM * Bill Continelli, W2XOY - The History of Amateur Radio. Bill returns with another edition of The Ancient Amateur Archives, this week, Bill takes us back in time to when he first got bit by the R-F bug, which happened at a long lost radio retailer in western New York...Olsen Electronics. ----- Website: https://www.twiar.net Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/twiari/ Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/twiar RSS News: https://twiar.net/?feed=rss2 iHeartRadio: https://bit.ly/iHeart-TWIAR Spotify: https://bit.ly/Spotify-TWIAR TuneIn: https://bit.ly/TuneIn-TWIAR Automated: https://twiar.net/TWIARHAM.mp3 (Static file, changed weekly) ----- Visit our website at www.twiar.net for program audio, and daily for the latest amateur radio and technology news. Air This Week in Amateur Radio on your repeater! Built in identification breaks every 10 minutes or less. This Week in Amateur Radio is heard on the air on nets and repeaters as a bulletin service all across North America, and all around the world on amateur radio repeater systems, weekends on WA0RCR on 1860 (160 Meters), and more. This Week in Amateur Radio is portable too! The bulletin/news service is available and built for air on local repeaters (check with your local clubs to see if their repeater is carrying the news service) and can be downloaded for air as a weekly podcast to your digital device from just about everywhere, including Acast, Deezer, iHeart, iTunes, Google Play, Spotify, TuneIn, Stitcher, iVoox, Blubrry, Castbox.fm, Castro, Feedburner, gPodder, Listen Notes, OverCast, Player.FM, Pandora, Podcast Gang, Podcast Republic, Podchaser, Podnova, and RSS feeds. This Week in Amateur Radio is also carried on a number of LPFM stations, so check the low power FM stations in your area. You can also stream the program to your favorite digital device by visiting our web site www.twiar.net. Or, just ask Siri, Alexa, or your Google Nest to play This Week in Amateur Radio! This Week in Amateur Radio is produced by Community Video Associates in upstate New York, and is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License. If you would like to volunteer with us as a news anchor or special segment producer please get in touch with our Executive Producer, George, via email at w2xbs77@gmail.com. Also, please feel free to follow us by joining our popular group on Facebook, and follow our feed on Twitter! Thanks to FortifiedNet.net for the server space! Thanks to Archive.org for the audio space.

TWiRT - This Week in Radio Tech - Podcast
TWiRT 593 - RF Propagation Mapping with Doug Vernier

TWiRT - This Week in Radio Tech - Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022


Doug Vernier, Consulting Engineer and founder of V-Soft, is talking to us about RF signal propagation and the incredible maps that reveal your coverage area in so many ways. We'll examine over a dozen real-world signal maps to compare FCC contours vs. Longley-Rice coverage. Plus Doug shows us the huge differences between your station’s “coverage area” with and without accounting for “interference areas”. Show Notes:The RF Maps we showed during the show are also viewable in this album on Google Photos.Doug Vernier’s V-Soft website with his software offerings and example outputs. Guest:Doug Vernier - President and CEO at Doug Vernier Telecommunications Consultants Co-Hosts:Chris Tarr - Group Director of Engineering at Magnum.MediaKirk Harnack, The Telos Alliance, Delta Radio, Star94.3, & South Seas BroadcastingFollow TWiRT on Twitter and on FacebookTWiRT is brought to you by:Nautel and the continuing informative live webinars. Sign up for free!Broadcasters General Store, with outstanding service, saving, and support. Online at BGS.cc. Broadcast Bionics - making radio smarter with Bionic Studio, visual radio, and social media tools at Bionic.radio.Nautel and the regular Transmission Talk Tuesday series of online engineering roundtable events.Angry Audio - with StudioHub cables and adapters. Audio problems disappear when you get Angry at AngryAudio.com. And MaxxKonnectWireless - Prioritized High Speed Internet Service designed for Transmitter Sites and Remote Broadcasts. Look for in-depth radio engineering articles in Radio-Guide magazine.Subscribe to Audio:iTunesRSSStitcherTuneInSubscribe to Video:iTunesRSSYouTube

This Week in Radio Tech HD
TWiRT Ep. 593 - RF Mapping with Doug Vernier

This Week in Radio Tech HD

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022


Doug Vernier, Consulting Engineer and founder of V-Soft, is talking to us about RF signal propagation and the incredible maps that reveal your coverage area in so many ways. We'll examine over a dozen real-world signal maps to compare FCC contours vs. Longley-Rice coverage. Plus Doug shows us the huge differences between your station's “coverage area” with and without accounting for “interference areas”.

This Week In Radio Tech (TWiRT)
TWiRT Ep. 593 - RF Mapping with Doug Vernier

This Week In Radio Tech (TWiRT)

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 71:12


Doug Vernier, Consulting Engineer and founder of V-Soft, is talking to us about RF signal propagation and the incredible maps that reveal your coverage area in so many ways. We'll examine over a dozen real-world signal maps to compare FCC contours vs. Longley-Rice coverage. Plus Doug shows us the huge differences between your station's “coverage area” with and without accounting for “interference areas”.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 13, 2022 64:35


Want to know how you can deploy a smart warehouse for your business? Today's guest is Dan Gilmore of Softeon, a company that provides a full suite of flexible and robust end-to-end supply chain software solutions to deliver success. He joins Joe Lynch to talk about the idea and technology behind their system. They discuss some of the big trends impacting warehouses, e-commerce, and retail. From labor shortages to automation, Dan enlightens on the benefits of WMS and WES for any business. Tune in to better understand the perks of this new smart technology for optimizing your business! The Smart Warehouse With Dan Gilmore Our topic is the smart warehouse with my friend Dan Gilmore. How's it going, Dan? It's great. I'm happy to be here. I'm glad I'm finally getting to interview you. Please introduce yourself, your company, and where you are calling from. I'm a Chief Marketing Officer of a supply chain software company called Softeon. Our company is headquartered in Reston, Virginia, outside of Dallas Airport. I happen to be in the Dayton/Cincinnati, Ohio area. What does Softeon do? It's a supply chain software company, primarily a supply chain execution. The company was founded in 1999. Our first customer all the way back then was the L'Oreal, and we proceeded to build out a suite of solutions that were brought in deep capability. That includes warehouse management systems, and all the stuff that goes around warehouse management systems including labor and resource management, slotting optimization, and yard management. A newer thing which we will get into because it's critical to what's happening in terms of the smart warehouse is something called warehouse execution systems, which have been around for a while but gained prominence in the last couple of years as a way to optimize and orchestrate order fulfillment level at a capability that's beyond even very good tier ones. This category of stuff is called distributed order management, which has to do with the optimal sourcing of products based on customer commitments as well as network capacities constraints in how do I get the lowest cost alternative that meets the customer needs? It's a very prominent in omnichannel commerce. It is almost essential in retail but we are having a lot of B2B type of successes in distributed order management as well. There are some other things that could give a flavor to what we do. You started well before eCommerce was a thing. Do you still support stores and that kind of warehousing? Traditional WMS type of capabilities for retailers, would largely be store replenishment. Now, we are moving into eCommerce fulfillment. Many retailers are also looking to have a lot of activity at the store level, whether that's buying online, pick up in-store, curbside pickup or store fulfillment. We've got some solutions there, both in terms of the distributed order management that I referenced. It is the tool going that says, “The best place to fulfill this order from based on the time commitments as well as inventory availability, labor availability, etc. is store 3, 4, 5, 6, 7,” and then have the ability to first identify where it's the right location. That could be obviously a DC, a third-party facility or something like that. The first word is the best place to source it from, and if it's a store, we have a store module that facilitates the inventory transactions, picking transactions, and shipping at a store level. That became a thing. Target is one of those companies that if you buy something online from them, they are more likely to ship from their stores these days. I have seen and the figure keeps rising. The whole market has changed. The more high-tech feel and touch, the less back-breaking work and less bending over and lifting heavy cases. It's like 80% or 90%. Let's say 90%. That's the number I had in my mind too. They are doing them from the store, which is incredible. Before we get into all that, tell us a little bit about you. Where did you grow up and go to school? Give us some career highlights and bullet points before you join Softeon. I'm an Ohio guy. My whole life, I grew up in Akron, Cleveland area, and then got a job with NCR after grad school. I got an MBA from the University of Akron. I got a job at NCR that was here in Dayton. I was a Product Manager in charge of barcode and data collection. The way serendipity works, I moved from barcode data collection systems to wireless systems and then got into WMS. I was into consulting for a while. I have done a lot of marketing in the space. I was also Chief Marketing Officer at the Red Prairie before it got acquired by JDA and became ultimately Blue Yonder. Earlier in my life, I spent a couple of years implementing WMS, a couple of major projects down here in the Cincinnati area that helped me learn a lot about how the technology works and what's good and less good. Notably, in 2003, I started a publication called Supply Chain Digest, which changed the face of online supply chain and logistics, news, and coverage. I still keep a light hand on it. I still write a column once a week still for Supply Chain Digest. I have read that. I wrote a lot of blog posts in the past. When you are a writer, I have joked that “My research is a little different than a professor's research, I Google.” You start to realize which publications have good content when you are a blogger. The bar is a little lower for a blogger than it is for somebody who is writing in a publication. I would say, “Supply Chain Digest always had good stuff.” When and why did you join Softeon? It has been a few years now. I had done a little bit of side consulting with Softeon before joining, and I was impressed with the breadth and depth of the software and the number of innovative capabilities, but as important as that is, lots of companies have good software. We think we've got leading-edge software but the approach to customers and success - I have never seen a company that consistently puts its own interests behind its customers on a regular basis. We are not going to let anything get in the way of a successful implementation. That's a direct record that's unequal in the marketplace. It's the care and concern for success at the customer level and not looking at everything through a lens of only professional services hours if I can sell or something like that. It was a different attitude. It intrigued me, and plus, the company needed some help in the marketing area to get that message out. The combination of those factors led me to join Softeon. Our topic is the smart warehouse. Obviously, things have changed quite a bit in this business. Talk about some of the big trends that are out there that are impacting warehousing, eCommerce, and retail. It impacts everybody. Most of the audience is going to say they are living this or these are big surprises but it's nice to still put it all in context, the growing distribution labor shortage and there's a shortage of manufacturing. It's very acute. Everywhere you go, that's what you hear about the turnover levels, retention, and even with the greatest rising substantially. That's everyone's concern. After about a decade of very flat wage growth in warehousing and distribution until a few years ago, now, all of a sudden, the costs are taken off. Amazon has over $20 an hour with attractive signing bonuses in many parts of the country. They now offer parental leave for twenty weeks. I saw it on TV. That would be a very attractive benefit. That's the advantage. Target announced that they were raising their wage in both stores and distribution centers, not all markets but in some markets, by $24 an hour. That's $48,000 a year, and assume there's probably some overtime in there, whatever husband and wife are making up, for example. They are working at a Target DC in those markets, you could be pulling in $100,000 a year for a family, which is not bad money. [caption id="attachment_7940" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: With the e-commerce-driven cycle time pressure, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days.[/caption]   This has come up on my show a few times. I'm getting too old for that kind of work, and I can't walk 10 miles a day but if I had a choice, we need to make that job easier. We are going to get to that because this is what technology does. It also makes the job more attractive when they can say, “I go to that job, and I'm learning all this cool technology.” If you can bring somebody in, there's a different feeling when I get to wear all that high-tech gear and use high-tech systems and say, “I'm part of the supply chain,” as opposed to, “I'm a strong back, walk 5 miles a day and nobody gives a crap about me.” There are no questions about that. It's going to be both in terms of the shortage of labor and, second, building to attract people into this career. Now the whole market has changed, that more high-tech feel and touch, less back-breaking work, less bending over and lifting heavy cases, and all the kinds of things to go on and work for a long time. You are spot-on on that dynamic. If we have a shortage, that means the people we do have to be more efficient. The way they can be more efficient is with tech. That's one big trend going on. What's another big trend? There's a bunch in there that interrelated as well. Obviously, the eCommerce-driven cycle time pressure. If you look ay Amazon over your tablet, it's unbelievable how fast you can get products these days, even somewhat obscure products not that long ago, I need a new power cord for my HP computer. Somehow Amazon was able to deliver that the next day. I'm like, “Probably, they have this cable in someplace that they can get it to me one day.” Think of all the thousands of cables that are out there, and they've got mine. The cycle time pressure in that both are in terms of getting the order process from when it drops into the DC and out the door. Obviously, companies are also moving distribution facilities closer to the customer, so the transportation part of the journey is cut down as well. They will remember the specific numbers. It's Home Depot that is building 170 or 180 different local fulfillment centers that are being the largely cross-dock type of facilities that bring bulky items in and get them right to the customer in addition to the big giant warehouses that they already have. It's a fact of life. Eventually, we will teleport or whatever the product from the warehouse because it seems like we are reaching the Laws of Physics there that it can't be here any faster but maybe we will find a way. I remember, many years ago, I was working on a digital marketing project. I was helping this distribution center, nice, concise in Chicago land Peoria. They said we are one-day shipping to 65% of the population of the US. That was always what Indiana, Illinois, and there are so many DCs down in Ohio can always make that claim, and that was good enough. If you said, “I have a DC in the Midwest that can get me to the Eastern Coast, and I have one out West, that was good enough.” We are not seeing that anymore. We are going to get increasingly where same-day delivery becomes a fact of life rather incredible. Amazon and others talk about getting it down to 2 hours or 30 minutes. That's what Target is doing, not with those DCs. We think we will get to Walmart doing some of the same. What's another trend? Obviously, because we are calling the session, we are going to talk about the smart and also the future but it's largely here nowadays. We've got smart everything. We've got smart houses, cars, refrigerators, and toothbrushes even. I saw that a couple of years ago. I'm not sure if it's exactly taken off the map but to monitor how often you brush your teeth. What does it mean? Primarily, it's talked about internet connectivity and some analytics around that. The least examples are John Deere, Caterpillar or companies of that kind, putting sensors and other IoT types of devices on their equipment out in the field so they can get a sense of how people are actually using it. They can do predictive maintenance on it. They could say, “Your guys aren't using the equipment as effectively as they could if they changed their techniques.” It's certainly timely. If we are going to almost start things where it's time for the smart warehouse too but we will get into for the rest of the broadcast era left different than more internet connectivity, sensors, and things like that. That can be part of it but it is a small part of it. The bottom line of it is we are entering a new era of where all soccer technologies that are, in fact, much smarter than we have ever had before. I have argued publicly for a couple of years now that we had about twenty years of relatively incremental progress in WMS technology. I used this in speeches before but a few years ago, I was cleaning up my office and running the holidays as I often do when I found an RFP from a major food company for a WMS circuit in 2003. I looked through that and I thought, “This doesn't look all that different than the RFPs we are seeing in 2019, 2020 or whatever year we are looking at that.” I looked at it and said, “The big difference is not in the functionality being asked for. It's that now, a lot of that functionality is, in fact, core product, configurable product than maybe a lot of it had to be achieved through customizations.” That's probably true. Same-day delivery has just become a fact of life. The fundamental way of where WMS operates didn't change all that much give or take from 2000 to 2020 or somewhere in that range. Now, with the smart technologies that we are talking about, they are brought by the world's execution systems in working with WMS, I talked about before. This is a new ball game, and it was going to be fun for the rest of the people here to talk about this. You throw in a new term there. You said warehouse execution system. Those have been around for a while but they are now becoming the norm. It's becoming very prominent, and then the value is starting to be recognized. What is it? A couple of three companies had the belief and correctly, for most of the WMS systems did not care enough about equipment throughput and utilization. We wound up with big peaks and valleys, and anybody have been in a district distribution center, even a busy one. You have seen it where there are all kinds of activity at the beginning and the middle of the wave, then as the wave starts to dissipate even on a big, expensive, huge sortation system, you've got a relatively small number of boxes moving around, waiting for that wave and everything to close out. You said wave. Does that mean the orders come in waves? Yeah. The work is released in what is called pick waves. That's based on any number of different attributes. It could be the carrier schedule, value-added processing that needs to be done or workload balancing across the different pick areas of the company. You organize the work against various attributes that constitute a block of work that's typically referred to as a wave. I know I've got all these trucks that are going to show up and they are taking different orders, so maybe I'm working to that order that's going to fill up that truck. The problem, to your point, is we've got already may be a shortage of headcount in there. Now when we have waves, I'm not being efficient because I've got too much work at one moment and then not enough at another. The whole goal of WMS of what we're talking about with the smart warehouse is overcoming, I mean, obviously, you've got to plan and execute based on the workforce that you have here, and we will talk about that. Having a warehouse management system that gives me stuff was great in the past but you are saying, “I will help you with a WES or Warehouse Execution System. I'm going to help you manage the flow.” Manage the flow work and the resource utilization, and then new ways. Part of that still ties into that interest in level loading or making the flow of goods across an automation system more smooth and consistent because if you can do that, there are a couple of things. First off, the total throughput of the system is likely to be better. Second, if it's a new facility, you could probably get by with a smaller sorter because you are going to be able to utilize it more consistently over a block of time, a shift or over what you want to look at it there. The other breakthrough that Softeon said is that the WES tends its roots and level loading of the automation and better utilization there. The WES works extremely well, even in non-automated facilities or lightly automated facilities. [caption id="attachment_7941" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: The fundamental way a warehouse operates didn't change all that much from 2000 to 2020. But now, with smart technologies, this is a new ball game.[/caption]   As a matter of fact, one of our leading customers did a press release a couple of years back that talked about 50% productivity gain from implementing WES or Warehouse Execution Systems on top of existing Softeon WMS, and doing that in a totally manual environment. Everything is part of a system. You can have a sortation system, goods to person system or put wall system or whatever. It's got a certain capacity, throughputs, inputs, and outputs. Twenty workers walked around on a three-level case pick module. There are systems too. They have inputs, outputs, throughput, and expectations. The one big difference is that with a more manual system, you can throw more bodies at it up to the point of diminishing returns and gain through the port from that area, whereas a heavily automated system is rate as its rating. You are not going to do a whole lot to affect that. Throughput is everything, whether you are a plant, a freight broker or a warehouse. The stuff that goes out the door and that we can charge for is what we want to do. Having a warehouse management system is great. I know there are certain warehouses. Probably the old ones still don't even have that. You are saying to be as efficient and effective as you need to be in the market, you need a warehouse execution system that gets me the flow and that throughput. It may not be for everybody, and there are certain things you can do. We could take your core WMS and add some select capabilities from a full-blown WES if a modest level of that kind of automation is necessary. It's not necessarily for one, and I don't want to position it that way but it's certainly something that you want to take a look at as you get to where you've got a significant number of workers. Even smaller operations, things like the automated release of work to the floor without the human being need needing to be involved, that's going to be attractive even for a mid-size operation. The first thing we need is we need to get into this. WMS is given. You said that there was an incremental improvement for many years. Now, you are starting to see big improvements that may be driven by the market that needed big improvements in recent years. Part of that is this WES. What else is there that's part of that smart warehouse? There's a whole bunch of stuff. First, as a reminder, the automation because automation is tied to the labor shortage. Even a couple of years ago, it was very common to talk to DC managers or logistics executives, and automation wasn't necessarily very high on the radar. Nowadays, almost close to 100% of the companies we talked to, even smaller companies, are looking at automation of some kind. That could be big automation where you've got traditional sortation systems but can be very large, goods to person systems, those kinds of things. There's also a lot of interest in lighter, more flexible, and less expensive technology things like what are called put walls. What's a put wall? In great simplicity, it is a technique or a structure, which is a module with a series of cubby holes or slots. In one of these modules, we have 1 customer that has 80 of these modules. What you do is you pick the orders, then when you come to the put wall, you distribute the order to the different orders that need that product. I batch pick the product. I bring it either mechanically or manually to the put wall. Typically, a series of lights says, “This company wall number 3 here and needs 1 of the skews. Put wall in. This one needs 2 that skew you put two in. This one needs 1 put 1 in.” That process repeats itself until all of the items for a given order are complete within that cubbyhole. That's called putting. That's why it's called a put wall because you are taking the order in back, and then you are putting it into the put wall. Around the backside, lights will turn on that indicate, “This cubbyhole is now complete.” The operator comes up and touches a button typically. That starts the printing of the label in any shipping documentation that's required in the orders packed, shipped, and off you go. It provides a tremendous amount of productivity. It's very flexible. You can start small. We had one customer that started with a 1-foot wall module, then added 8 or 9 more because they liked it, then they added 20 more because they really liked it, and did this all over a couple of three-year types of the period there. For any kind of piece picking, especially of soft goods but other types of products as well but often driven not only by eCommerce with any kind of heavy piece picking operation can be a great solution but you've got to have the right software to do it. You've got that big like almost a shelf you said like cubbies on that I'm putting a product through it. Maybe I walked over, and I got 10 different sweaters, 10 sweaters that are all the same, and this cubby gets one. As I do that, I'm scanning it or it recognizes that it's in there. It's informing the other side of the cubby when the order is complete. It needs two sweaters and a pair of shoes. That's just one more way. What do you call this? Technology is only part of it. The other piece of the cubby that walking up to that, I could be putting those in bins in the old days but this is putting that on steroids. The bottom line is we are entering a new era where all technologies are, in fact, much smarter than we've ever had before. It was just a new way of doing it. There are a lot of people who talk about this in terms of optimizing materials and handling systems because getting this right is not a trivial task. I don't want to steal all my thunder from later on but the ability to rapidly turn these put walls and cubbyholes are the whole key to the success. If it's taking you a long time to do that, you are not getting the throughput that you required and probably wasting your time and money but if you can rapidly turn those by making sure the inventory gets there on time and efficient execution on both sides of the wall, then you've got something that can drive a lot of productivity. I don't know what the number is. There are quite a few customers now that are using put walls. When we would go out to some new customers, we've got some videos to show them an operation, and they are interested in seeing how this works. It's the technology along with mobile robots that you are going to see, any eCommerce but any kind of piece picking as well, you are going to see a lot of adoption. I'm an automotive guy originally. When you used to go through a plant, you would see people doing lifting heavy things when I first started, crouching down and doing functions that were hard on the body. Maybe it's not hard on 1 day, 1 week or 1 month but over 1 year, you are going to have a bad back, shoulders or knees. The same thing happens in these DCS or the warehousing. This automation you are talking about is making it easier on the workers, which means, “Hopefully, I will be able to keep my workers healthy and make that job again more attractive.” One time, I talked to a VP of logistics at Sherwin-Williams, the paint company. He noted that on the manufacturing side of the operation, they were always having people retire, and during retirement, little parties were almost taken. He said, “There was no one that ever retired from the distribution side.” That's because the heavy worker is picking cases of paint as a young man's job. As people got older, they couldn't do that work anymore. People are obviously rethinking that for the aging factor, and then there's another factor, “How do I make the work easier so I can have somebody in their 50s and 60s continuing to do this at distribution center job?” If you gave me a choice to go work in an old school warehouse, go deliver food or deliver groceries, I'm going to do the grocery delivery. I can make decent money, sit in my car, and I don't have to hurt my back, or knees or walk 5 miles a day. We have to make these jobs more attractive or we are not going to be able to keep and get good people. This automation is of such interest to the jobs now that we become more technicians and less of an order pickers. Besides a put wall, what's some other automation you are seeing out there? The automated mobile robots, economists mobile robots or AMRs. There's a huge interest in that. One of the interesting things is that in both put walls and mobile robots, you are seeing a lot of adoption and interest by a third-party logistics companies. This makes the point. In the past, 3PLs were very reluctant to do any kind of heavy automation because they couldn't sync the return on investment with the contracts that they had from the shipper. If the shipper can pay off that equipment, it's going to take 5, 7 or whatever years, and the shippers only keep you where 2 or 3-year contract, the risk of automation is too great in these other kinds of systems. It includes things like voice, picks the lights, and smart cards. They are all connected in some ways. Those kinds of systems can be put in for much less expense, much lower risk, and be incrementally adapted. You can start with three mobile robots and see how you like it, then we have seven more later on or whatever until you get to the optimal point for your operation. The fact that 3PLs are making this kind of investment as a whole new phenomenon and it speaks to the way you can incrementally get into the technology and the high level of payback that they are seeing because we were very strong in the third-party logistics arena, as an aside, so we are seeing it very closely. The number of 3PLs that are interested in this mid-range of lighter picking systems, not heavy automation but it's often somewhat newer technologies. It speaks to the changes we are seeing out there in the marketplace. Those are robots. Depending on the facility, they are not necessarily always replacing people. I talked to the CEO or president of DHL. He says, “We thought we would be replacing people with robots. The more robots we add to a facility, the more work we end up getting for that facility. We ended up hiring more people.” Everyone has a shortage. Job is going unfilled. If the robots are taking some of that slack but very few case studies of people that are adopting these technologies, they are still looking for people who have been able to be on. [caption id="attachment_7942" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: WES (Warehouse Execution System) will help manage the flow of work and resource utilization.[/caption]   What's another thing we need for that smart warehouse? Let's get into it in some more detail. We talked about some of the core software components, things like warehouse management systems and warehouse execution systems. A platform for integrating this automation with both heavy and/or traditional and newer age capabilities. There are some enabling technologies, things like rules engines, simulation and some other things. The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. How do I get that right? That typically involves traditional WMS-type capabilities. What does that mean? What defines a warehouse management system versus an inventory system is the pervasive use of mobile terminals, barcode scanning, wireless RF devices or whatever term you want to use there, and then a lot of system directed activity, this whole notion of task management and task monitoring, where the system is orchestrating the different traditional paths of put away, receiving put away, picking replenishment, etc., and support for multiple strategies around that. We have lots of different picking method options, different replenishment strategies that I can use, and things that have been around for a while like slotting optimization, detailed labor management, labor reporting, and things like that. The foundation is core operations excellence. That's what everyone should strive to get to but nowadays, there's no ability to take that even further in terms of different types of capabilities that we think are defining what we are calling the smart warehouse. You used a term there that was an integration platform. What am I integrating? You were integrating primarily different materials handling technologies. That can be things we have had for a wall that conveyor transport and sortation. It can be some of these newer technologies like robots and put walls. The key is, “How do I optimize the flow so I don't have these islands of automation that are all doing their own thing.” I talked to somebody in the apparel industry. They have a very large and highly automated facility somewhere down in the Atlanta area. It's 1 million or 2 million square feet. They are seeing their throughput from that building after huge investments over the years and over time. They are seeing the throughput decline. What's happening, he believed, is that the business keeps changing. They keep having all these new requirements in terms of how an order needs to be processed. What they do is they keep building new wave types. We talked about wave planning before. Now they are up to like 70 or 80 different wave types. Every time there's another problem, wave fight number 82 if that solves our problem, it's not solving the problem. Part of the reason is that the system is not looking holistically across the facility and seeing how I can optimize the flow of work as a whole, not as an individual subsystem. That's part of what we are talking about here with the smart warehouse. That's the thing that traditional WMS has not done. That integration platform means I can connect all the tools and all the different systems I'm using all connect easily through that integration as opposed to the old way, which is a standalone $100,000 integration with expensive people who have to code. That's certainly part of it. It's managing the flow of work across that. I'm getting hit myself again but for example, you can have some scenarios where I have different paths for an order to be fulfilled. One of the paths and the most efficient for certain orders is maybe a group of put wall models. Let's say put wall area, for whatever reason, starts to be congested. All of a sudden, there's a big backup on the conveyor feeding into the put wall area. The system is going to automatically recognize that. For some time, route orders away from the put wall into manual cart picking, which takes them to the packing station, the same packing area where the put wall automotive leads. When the congestion is clear, then the system automatically reroutes that work back to the put walls again. Now you are looking at only the plain integration but in monitoring the flow of work that's happening and making real-time decisions accordingly. I'm an automotive guy, and we had all of those years. We used the term smart factories, and it was the same thing. How do we increase throughput? What can happen is you can end up with a local optimum where some guys are building a big stack of inventory and does nobody any good? What does all that excess inventory doing for me? What makes more sense is to say, “We are going to get this, so there's a flow to it. We are not building up too much inventory. There are no bottlenecks.” This is the same thing. What you are talking about here is, “How do I arrange my people so I don't have these guys sitting around because they already finished while these guys are in a congested area?” The core world's operations excellence is still the foundation. The term flow manufacturing came out of exactly what you are talking about there and was largely developed initially in the automotive industry. We are talking about the same thing. Now we are talking about flow distribution instead of flow manufacturing but the fundamental concepts, more of a pull-based system were being worked on capacities and constraints, more concerned with the total flow of goods and not what's happening in one individual area. All those are very consistent, whether you're looking at the principles that were established earlier in manufacturing or what's being applied here in distribution. I'm going to assume that at one time, the WMS, a big selling point would be, “We will tell you where your inventory is at,” That was probably a big step up. You go, “It does that. Now I'm going to tell you how that inventory moves off of your shelves and out the door and how you bring new inventory.” It's amazing. We still see quite a few every week, we see somebody that's a calling or emailing in, and then we talked to him. It turns out they don't have that real-time visibility of the inventory because they are using some kind of paper-based system or something, and sometimes these are even good size companies. In general, anybody that's implemented a tier-1 or tier-2 level, even WMS shouldn't have that real-time inventory visibility in doing that. It gets into that operations excellence and problem but that's the foundation, “I got to know what I got and where it is by lot, batch, serial number or whatever attribute is important for your operation or combination of attributes.” That's the foundation, but now, we are saying, “How do we optimize on top of that and get more product out the door and lower cost?” It requires investment. Having a WMS tell me, “Here is the information but it's not enough anymore.” To your point, we need all of this to get there. You asked me about some of the components of the smart warehouse, and I talked about it from a product category perspective, but now, I'm talking about it more from a philosophical or a functional view. One of the key foundations is constraining condition awareness, “What's happening in my building? What's happening with the flow of goods?” One of the things that first got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always-on listening and monitoring the environment. If you think about a traditional WMS, it's more sequential-oriented, “I receive the product. I put it away. I replenished pick sites. I do the picking. I take it to pack or evaluated services. I put it in this receiving staging. I get it shipping staging. I get it out the door all very good then the delivered.” A lot of companies don't have that. Organizing and automating all of that are big steps forward but we need to take it to the next level. If you think about this notion, the system is always on monitoring throughput and flow. There are certain rates and throughput that I'm expecting. I need to be able to have a flexible set of dashboards supported by event alerts and notifications. If there's a problem that says, “Here's what's happening across.” However, I wanted to find it in the area, I can define an area as a case picking module or as a whole three-level case pick module. I see that as one unit, and I want to know what the throughput is there. Maybe I want to see it at each level of that pick module. I can see it more gradually. What's nifty about this is that new level of visibility, the activity, throughput, bottlenecks, alerts, and corrective action automated, increasingly automated, if there are bottlenecks. That provides a nice set of real-time dashboards of looking stuff where people can see what's happening, “I have these many orders pending here that's already been completed. Here's how many are in picking,” or all of that level of detail. To understand what's going on here with the smart warehouse is, the system is using that same data that's being exposed to managers and supervisors that's what it's using to make decisions as well. I decided that example of being aware of the backup that's happening in the put wall and automatically, for some time, routing work around that until the congestion is cleared. That's what's different now about this visibility and activity monitoring. Being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area could be evaluated services. It could be peace picking and all these things. Obviously, now the design is at these different flows throughout the facility are in sync. I'm not getting old backed up and packing, which is causing problems way back, picking and replenishment because I haven't automated the visibility and the flow, release in a way that's going to be cognizant and aware that I've got a problem here and, “Here's what I need to do about it for some time until we are adjusting. We are just taking action to solve the problem.” You sent me a PowerPoint and I have this here. It's got that real-time configurable dashboard. It's been a while since I have seen somebody had me a piece of paper but somebody handed me a piece of paper that had 40 columns. It was like an Excel spreadsheet or something, maybe a spin out of a system. It had so much, I looked at it and I was like, “What am I supposed to do with this?” I liked the idea of being able to configure it for those KPIs that I care about. [caption id="attachment_7943" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: One of the things that got me to understand WES in a deeper way is this notion that it's always on, listening and monitoring the environment.[/caption]   I don't want to measure everything. That's just me. Tell me the 4, 5 or 7 things that matter that tells me my warehouse is moving in the right direction, and that things are working well. It says, “Orders with issues.” I also love the idea that I don't find out about the issues in next week's report. I find out about them in real-time. The point that you made is a nice transition to this notion of another component. We talked about the real-time visibility of capacities, constraints, the conditions up there, and the always-on nature of the WES. Now, we have talked about looking at a table of 40 rows of information or whatever. It's all in the past. It brings up a point there, which is even with higher-end WMS, this is one of the learnings and insights that we have. There's still a tremendous amount of decision-making that is being done by human beings. As the manager, whoever you were talking about there in your example, staring at a 40-row spreadsheet or whatever, you see the same thing nowadays of managers and supervisors staring at computer screens, trying to figure out what the right thing to do next. Here's the reality. Every time you do that, first off, you introduce some latency into the system because it takes time to look at those different screens, think about it, make decisions, and scribble some things down on a piece of paper to remind you this needs to be taken care of or whatever. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you are a smart guy or girl, there's just too much data and too much to try to process at one time. Part of the capabilities of the smart WMS is the much more advanced software-based decision-making. Things like order batch optimization, given block of orders, “What's the best way to most effectively execute that on the software floor?” What we think is absolutely huge is this notion of the autonomous warehouse, as a term of Gartner is used, and others have used it as well but it talks about being able to automatically release work without the need for a wave planner, inventory expediters or all the kind of people that you see often involved in these decisions about what work to do when. Work relation on a variety of attributes, things like the order of priority, the inventory and resource availability, what kind of optimization opportunities are there? The bigger the order pool and more optimization opportunities you have because they are more data or conditions to be optimized but you can't hold on so long. You are not getting the throughput out through your cutoff time. This is a huge one. It's sophisticated. Whereas now, at 4:00 or 5:00, when the UPS, FedEx or whatever truck is leaving, you often see, and we have made commitments to the eCommerce is going to ship, you see a certain amount of chaos going around, trying to figure out all the orders that need to go on that truck, have been on the trucking and what to do about it. What we are talking about here is we are saying, “This is the work. We know how long it's going to take to pick and transport those orders to the shipping dock.” The work is going to automatically release itself. At the beginning of the day, we are more concerned about optimization. We still got a lot of decent amount of time, so we can focus on doing it the most efficient we can but as you go throughout the day, that needle starts to change from the focus on efficiency and cost to efficiency on customer service and making sure that those items are on there. The system does that automatically. It's configured to take those into consideration. Now those orders are getting on the trucks automatically without the chaos and the difficulty that's going on out there. This is a step-change capability here. We are talking about a system that is self-learning and in optimal how releases work. This is another concept we have had in distribution software before, and this is what defines what works on the smart warehouse. I had a boss in the past when I was young, I remember I sent an Excel spreadsheet to him, and it told a story. He's pulled me into his office and said, “This is a great Excel spreadsheet. I have to go through here and come to the same conclusion you did.” I go, “It's easy.” He goes, “No. When you send me this Excel spreadsheet, send me a recommendation. I don't want to have to come to a conclusion. That's your job. Show me that you attach the data back up but give me a recommendation.” I feel the same take way about running a warehouse, “Don't make me figure it out myself. Give me an alert that says, ‘This is a problem. This is how many orders are at risk. This is how many orders need to get on that truck that isn't done yet.'” To show you a simple example. Still, a lot of people, especially for eCommerce, are doing manual cart picking. I may have a cart that's got a certain configuration 3x3 or 4x4. What I mean by a 3x3 would be 3 shelves that each have room for 3 cartons each. I have nine total orders that I'm working on there. Most companies that we see do that are doing it with paper picking or pick by label or something. There's some attempt to do that more efficiently but something as simple as cart picking. The smart warehouse can take it to a whole new level. First off, you've got to get this order pool that's out there and at any one period. I'm probably going to have done some cartonization logic there to determine what should go in what box, especially with a multi carton order. In most cases, there's no way a human being can make the optimal decision in the same way that a computer can. Even if you're really smart, there's just too much data to process at one time. If you are shipping, for example, you don't want to put perfume in the same carton as payroll because of the obvious contamination that can happen there. When a picker comes up and scans a barcode on that cart, the system is going to automatically know it's this configuration, 3x3, 4x4 or whatever. It will have done some optimization typically in terms of what's called cluster picking were, “I'm going to take that cart to one location. I will put as many orders as I can on the cart that is signed to that cart that has the same set of skews so I can minimize my travel distance. Hopefully, I'm being clear on what that means.” Now I get to that location that can be done with lights or it can be done with barcode scanning. It says, “Take one of these from this location, put it in the carton slot 3'1, which is the 3rd shelf and the first location. The next one is 3'2. 2'3, 2'1 or whatever that sequence. I'm doing that in a way that makes it very efficient but we can take it even still beyond that. What if a high-priority order comes on? The pickers walk along as long as there's a location on that cart, whether it's a carton or a tote they are picking into. If it hasn't been started, we can remove automatically a lower priority order and insert a higher priority order that has come down onto that card as long as we would typically do it. The picker doesn't have to turn around and go backward as long as it picks for the new order or ahead of that picker. We do that without the picker, even being aware that it happened. You can expedite automatically like, “I got a truck that's going to be here one hour. We haven't even started yet. Let's get this going.” We say, “If you get an order in by 2:00, we will ship it that day. If it's 1: 58, all of a sudden, an order drops. I got two minutes.” This isn't going to automatically insert a higher priority order possible. I like something you said in there that we talked about the labor problem with these guys walking around maybe 5 or 10 miles in a day. One of the reasons we are going to quit, especially if you are me, is I don't want that many steps. When I walk over there, all my orders are in the same area, then I walk over here, and all my orders are there, as opposed to one side of the warehouse, and another order on the other side or I'm walking and go, “What has my life become where I walk back and like this?” Order pool optimization as well because the bigger the batch that I'm working with, the more opportunities I have to gain those picks together. On a given card, I'm maybe walking a very few feet. To your point, and this is where you get into the whole notion of mobile robots because now, perhaps that, “I go to the pick location, I pick the order but I'm putting it on a pick card. I'm putting it on a mobile robot, and the mobile robots can move on to the next location or on the packing of the orders completed. I'm walking very little at that point or comparatively little, which is one of the attractiveness of mobile robot technology.” Hopefully, it's becoming clearer. The nature of the warehouse is changing, and a part of that's going to have to be to not only be more cost-efficient and get more out the door with the staff that I've got but it's making sure that people have a less miserable work experience and hence hopefully going to stay with this a lot longer. This is not your grandpa's warehouse anymore. To be competitive, it used to be like, “These guys are high tech because they have a WMS.” Now we are starting to spin out the automation, the warehouse execution, and the integration platform. This is all getting really high-tech. Do you think this is probably the lowest-tech business there was many years ago? House is all going to play out. It's going to be interesting to see but the lighter automation techniques, including the robots and the put walls, are so attractive in terms of their flexibility and expandability. There are machine learning, artificial intelligence, and all kinds of things going to be involved here. The warehouses are becoming technology centers. If you see the private equity money that's flowing into robotics firms, AI firms, and others, in a lot of the smart money, it's the work that they do. Companies, retailers, and other eCommerce companies are starting to realize the importance of a well-run warehouse. Was this guy's quiet logistics? They've got bought by American Eagle. That was American Eagle recognizing the traditional retailer, the same thing we're going to buy ourselves a warehousing company because that's how important this business is. The force behind what has become locus robots. We will move our vendors that happened because Amazon had bought key assist systems right before that and left a quiet without a partner for automation they were building the business on. They invented their own robot. [caption id="attachment_7944" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: What's really different now about this kind of visibility and activity monitoring is being able to flexibly do that however you want to define a processing area.[/caption]   Bruce Welty was at my show. He's the Founder of Quiet. He said he got a phone call saying, “Are you guys using those Locus robots?” He says, “Yeah, how do you like them?” “We like them a lot. Can we come to visit?” “Sure.” It was Amazon. Amazon looked around and said, “We love this.” They bought Locus. A couple of other things I would like to bring up. First, broader use of some automation ideas or IoT type devices. RFID is starting to make something of a comeback years after Walmart tried back in 2003 or 2004. Generally, you are going to see many manual scanning activities that are going to disappear or if I need to move this way back now from being implemented at the store level by customers concerned with the eCommerce fulfillment for inventory equity purposes, you are going to see a move back up into the distribution operations. That will certainly be a big part of it. We were already doing things like, for example, we are a broker with a pick cart. Picker with a pick cart can walk up to a fixed zone. The IoT automatically recognizes that this person is on. It automatically turns on the pick lights that are on those four pick locations. It's a minor thing there but that's an advancement we are going to see. We have even done some stuff with congestion management and COVID, where we can tell exactly where somebody is in the I or using IoT and being able to assign work based on real-time visibility to who's closest to that work, but also when the COVID area being able to space people apart so that they don't get to say within 8 feet of each other, whatever that happens to be, whatever your metric you want to use, therefore that group constraint. There are some various things that can happen there. This is still slow going. It hasn't taken off as fast as many people think but you are going to see RFID and IoT start to make some mural inroads over the next years. We have this follow the notion of Gartner and what's considered to be called a conversational voice. The transactional voice is doing the picking, pallet build or something using voice technologies. Typically, reading in a location check digit and doing a hands-free pick, replenishment or whatever the task might be but we're starting to get now into more of a dialogue. We are all ready to the point now where we can have a supervisor take a smartphone and say, “Show me how I'm doing on wave number 235,” over a smartphone. That's going to bring back exactly what's happening now or, “Where's the replenishment for location on 3652?” We are still early in this game here but certainly, we will move to more of a dialogue going on with the WMS and WES than just playing transactional voice-type of technology. We ended with a very exciting where the future interface of the software is going to had. This is where that integration platform you talked about comes in handy. I can connect to all this stuff. The new killer app that comes out, I can get it. We have been left there. Automation and optimization of materials handling systems is certainly a key part of this. We refer to it, not just as a smart warehouse's the future but as the smart automated across to the future due to the interest in the technologies we have talked about several times already. We can directly connect with these picking assistance, like walls, pick the light or voice without the need for third-party software. Everyone else uses some kind of software from the put wall vendor, pixelate vendor or voice vendor, which adds another layer of integration and costs. It often results in people operating silos. We can directly control a lot of these materials handling technologies. It allows you to operate and optimize those in the context of everything that's happening in the world and all the information that's available, which provides you a lot of benefits over time because you are not just trying to operate in silos. I talked to somebody that was using a pick-to-light system. They talked about how at the end of every week, they've got to go in and clean up all these pics that some of them never were executed in the pick-to-light system. I'm not quite sure why that is but it wouldn't happen with the way we are approaching things because we would be aware of that. It probably has to wait on a real punishment. The problem is the pixelate vendor doesn't do replenishment the documents. You've got these silos going on here and there are a lot of opportunities. In terms of that integration platform, we think this is especially true for mobile robots, people are using the mobile software of the mobile robots. What that does is it limits the total optimization that can be achieved but more importantly, you are now totally dependent on that robot software. What if you want to add different robots or change horses three years from now? There's a better mousetrap that works faster or whatever that happens to be. Now you have become locked in. We refer to it not just as smart but the smart automated across to the future. We think the market needs a mobile robot and a broader automation integration platform. It's almost like an operating system for automation in the warehouse that's going to allow you to have visibility to optimization of robots of different kinds from the same manufacturer of different types for different manufacturers. You are not locked in. It's like a plug-and-play type of environment here three years from now. You can keep the robots or keep dependent you bought, but now, you want to add five more from a different vendor, plug them into this operating system, and have instant connectivity and the ability to optimize the performance. We think that's a much more low-risk approach going forward than locking yourself into a vendor that's coming to the software that's coming from the robot vendor. Get back to the idea of a smart warehouse. It's all about throughput. If I have different systems that are connecting, that are doing local optimums, that's a problem because it's not supporting throughput. I always need that one source of truth. That's the main system that says, “This is all about getting stuff out the door here.” I wanted to bring up one. Earlier, I talked about wanting to give an example of what the put wall. I referenced that as the cubbyholes in put walls. Here's the scenario we are seeing. Let's say there are three line items eCommerce order. Two of those line items in the order come from a carton flow rec area, that's very close to packing. I mean those orders are efficient to pick, in short distance to transport. The third line item is actually coming from a slow-moving mezzanine pick area that's farther away and is less efficient to pick. If you don't do anything, otherwise what's going to happen in those first two items from that order are going to show up rather quickly, then they are going to sit and wait for 10, 15, 20, 45 minutes or whatever it happens to be for that third item on the pick, the order to finally show up. The cubbyhole has been tied up that entire time. What's the smarter warehouse way of doing it? What's the WES way of doing it? Let's say it's 25% slower to go through the mezzanine or whatever the number you want to use it. We would release that third line item in effect 25% or 30% earlier. After the time it takes to pick and transport that as it's on its way to the pack station, now we release the other two orders line items in the carton flow rack. They show up at the put wall for processing at relatively the same time, and now I'm able to turn that wall without the latency that would occur if you didn't have smart software to do that. Hopefully, that's an example that makes it somewhat clearer as to how the optimization can affect operational performance. You would never be able to get that done manually. It doesn't happen. This is like drinking from a fire hose. There is so much going on in this. Put a bow on this. Give us your final thoughts on this. What do I need to get to have that smart warehouse? First of all, the benefit is it is going to reduce labor costs, have higher and more consistent DC throughput, you are going to reduce your need for automation in terms of things like the number of diverse or get more throughput out of the automation you have there. We didn't talk much about labor planning but that's a big part of it. We can dynamically assign workers throughout the course of a shift from 1 to 8 to 9, 9 to 10, or 10 to 11 hours where are they needed motion and in what quantities, improved automated decision-making. It's an assessment. Certainly, if you are heavily automated, there are a lot of opportunities for you. As I tried to make the point earlier, even if you're only modestly automated or not automated at all, these capabilities can have some real benefit for your operations there. The important thing to note with Softeon is these can be implemented very incrementally. I could implement a traditional WMS. Let's say I want the labor planning and allocation part of it. We can take that capability from WES and attach it to the WMS. To give you a solution, conversely, if you want to implement WES and leave your existing WMS in place, we didn't talk too much about that but that's a key dynamic. You need cartonization, which is a warehouse management function and even attach cartonization to that WES implementation. Flexibility is key. That's what we try to design. We call it a shirt component library, where the applications can borrow components, functionality, and services from each other. We are pretty confident that it gives us a chance to understand what you are trying to accomplish, what your operations are like or whatever that some combination of these technologies is going to have a pretty good fit and take your world to a whole new level than we have seen over the last many years. What's new over at Softeon?. What conferences do you go into? We have done with the motor show, and it was a big success for us. We not only showed the smart warehouse, we presented the smart warehouse capabilities. We had a lot of equipment pick the light, other packing stations, etc., right on our routes. At the bottom of every hour, we did a presentation. We had consistently good traffic the whole time. We did a bit of an educational track and a session on the smart warehouse of the future available on Softeon. It was very well attended. That was good. We will be at the Gartner Supply Chain Symposium down in Orlando and then break after that. [caption id="attachment_7945" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Smart Warehouse: Even if you're just modestly automated, these capabilities can have some real benefits on your operations. These can be implemented very incrementally.[/caption]   We finished up a series of educational broadcasts called the WMS Bootcamp, six different sessions on everything from building the business case to how to implement it successfully. It was a huge success, but all of that's now available on-demand. If they go up to Softeon.com. You will be able to find some links to that. If you have any interest in WMS, they're not commercial, educational sessions. You will find they have a lot of value. The feedback we got on it was outstanding. I would like to watch myself because we went over this and it is gone from simple to more complex over time. I know you are simplifying it but to understand what's required requires a Bootcamp. We learned a lot of lessons. I brought in some consultants and people that I knew and knew what they were talking about in terms of building the business case. We had some folks from Invista that came on and did that. I had some experience or exposure. I knew they knew what they were talking about. Some of that applies to some other consultants as well. It's a real nice series. It's non-commercial. If you want to learn some tips about how to get WMS selection and implementation, you'll find the Bootcamp serves you well. How do we reach out and talk to you over at Softeon? The way to get me is via email. My email address is DGilmore@TheSofteon.com. You can also use Contact@Softeon.com for the general inquiry box. I love to hear from you. Hopefully, we came across, so at least you know a little bit about what I'm talking about and discuss your problems as well. Anyone who wants to reach out can reach out and talk to you about the smart warehouse. Thanks, Joe. I enjoyed it. It was a great conversation. Thank you so much, Dan. Thank all of you for reading. Your supports are very much appreciated, until next time and more network.   Important Links Softeon Supply Chain Digest WMS Bootcamp DGilmore@TheSofteon.com Contact@Softeon.com https://www.linkedin.com/company/softeon The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Project Geospatial
GEOINT 2022 - Spire - Iain Goodridge

Project Geospatial

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 5:24


Spire Global is a space-to-cloud analytics company that owns and operates the largest multi-purpose constellation of satellites. Its proprietary data and algorithms provide the most advanced maritime, aviation, and weather tracking in the world. In addition to its constellation, Spire's data infrastructure includes a global ground station network and 24/7 operations that provide real-time global coverage of every point on Earth. Iain Goodridge with Spire, discusses the new directions for Spire beyond AIS. Their space services, including constellation-as-a-service demonstrates their new capabilities as a company and their shift in focus. He also discusses the new opportunities in RF specifically. Watch or listen to more episodes by Project Geospatial at www.projectgeospatial.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/projectgeo/support

Project Geospatial
GEOINT 2022 - Kleos - Peter Round & Guillermo Gutiérrez

Project Geospatial

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 9:46


With the creation of distributed sensing and intelligence gathering capability, the Kleos satellites exploit rapidly deployed technologies to reduce risk and ensure that changing customer needs are fulfilled proactively by small, low cost satellites. Their engineers utilise propriety algorithms and data processing methodologies to ensure their unique data products can be used in conjunction with other data sources, mapping or GEOINT imagery to enhance the identification of dark maritime and land-based activity. Peter Round and Guillermo Gutiérrez, with Kleos, explain their unique services and why they choose to focus on the engineering and improvement on their constellation rather than analytics. They discuss the challenges facing the RF data industry and benefits of using that data. Watch or listen to more episodes by Project Geospatial at www.projectgeospatial.com --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/projectgeo/support

DatFeelin Entertainment
Real+Food Podcast Season 4, Episode 10 "Convo with Dres Tha Beatnik"

DatFeelin Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 115:12


Appetizer Section- :00-16:27 Smitty gives a huge shout out to to Mother's on this Mother's Day weekend and how his boss always asking did my money hit my bank account Main Course-16:28-1:01:27 Smitty conversates with a living (Dres Tha Beatnik) and starts the conversation off with his initial encounter meeting him 20 plus years ago…..definitely one of the best sit downs in the R+F archives…please listen and soak up history for the future Dessert Section-1:01:28-1:14:18 In commemoration of Mother's Day Smitty speaks of superstar boxer Gervonta “Tank” Davis's mother and self accountability….hopefully y'all get something from this segment and the show entirely…Happy Mother's Day!!

DatFeelin Podcast
Real+Food Podcast Season 4, Episode 10 "Convo with Dres Tha Beatnik"

DatFeelin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 115:12


Appetizer Section- :00-16:27 Smitty gives a huge shout out to to Mother's on this Mother's Day weekend and how his boss always asking did my money hit my bank account Main Course-16:28-1:01:27 Smitty conversates with a living (Dres Tha Beatnik) and starts the conversation off with his initial encounter meeting him 20 plus years ago…..definitely one of the best sit downs in the R+F archives…please listen and soak up history for the future Dessert Section-1:01:28-1:14:18 In commemoration of Mother's Day Smitty speaks of superstar boxer Gervonta “Tank” Davis's mother and self accountability….hopefully y'all get something from this segment and the show entirely…Happy Mother's Day!!

DatFeelin Podcast
Real+Food Podcast Season 4, Episode 9 "You Set the Standard"

DatFeelin Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 63:58


Appetizer Section-:00-36:20 Smitty has a day of working late then helping a stranger move her belongings and asks do you save your condiments? In the mean time he has a epic night for the ages all in the same day Main Course-36:21-50:20..The conversation transistons to relationships “double standards” and all the craziness that comes with it…listen closely and evaluate your situation and hopefully live happy ever after Dessert Section-50:21-1:03:11 The final conversation consists of celebrating people that affected Smitty's life that he's lost contact with (not for bad reasons) but just a phone number change or just life issues….tune in please R+F

DatFeelin Entertainment
Real+Food Podcast Season 4, Episode 9 "You Set the Standard"

DatFeelin Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 63:58


Appetizer Section-:00-36:20 Smitty has a day of working late then helping a stranger move her belongings and asks do you save your condiments? In the mean time he has a epic night for the ages all in the same day Main Course-36:21-50:20..The conversation transistons to relationships “double standards” and all the craziness that comes with it…listen closely and evaluate your situation and hopefully live happy ever after Dessert Section-50:21-1:03:11 The final conversation consists of celebrating people that affected Smitty's life that he's lost contact with (not for bad reasons) but just a phone number change or just life issues….tune in please R+F

Chi Sports Weekly
Episode 53: Talkin' Melky

Chi Sports Weekly

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 46:42


Episode 53 of the Chi Sports Weekly Podcast: - Number 53's- On This Day In Chicago Sports Events     - 5/11/2000 - Glenallen Hill hits a ball to the Wrigley rooftops     - 5/11/2009 - Patrick Kane scores his first career hat trick as the Hawks eliminate the Canucks     - 5/15/2015 - Polanco trips in RF after a flyball - Cubs go on to win the games in extras- The steroid era- Favorite Kane moments- Chicago Sky fact of the day- Cubs spin zones- Sox 6 game win streak- Starting 5 - Guys who hit tanksFollow up on Twitter, Instagram and the YouTube channel, @ChiSportsDay

Tower Talks with Inside Towers
#126 - 3 Questions with Johnny Broadband - DAS Passive RF Components with Wireless Supply

Tower Talks with Inside Towers

Play Episode Listen Later May 9, 2022 15:34


Often when we hear mention of distributed antenna systems or small cells, the main components that come to mind are radios and antennas.In fact, a DAS is a complex system of active and passive RF components that work together in a highly engineered manner.A faulty component design or improper installation of any part of the RF path can result in either poor performance or worst case, failure.Jeff Hall, General Manager at Wireless Supply talks with John Celentano, Inside Towers Business Editor about the types and importance of passive RF components used in indoor and outdoor, commercial and public safety DAS applications.Support the show

Beauty and the Biz
The Jump Into Private Practice - with Brock Ridenour, MD (Ep.151)

Beauty and the Biz

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 65:51


Hello and welcome to Beauty and the Biz where we talk about the business side of cosmetic surgery, and how Brock Ridenour, MD decided to take the plunge and start over at 45 by going into private practice. On this Beauty and the Biz podcast, my guest is Dr. Brock Ridenour, board-certified facial cosmetic surgeon running a very successful private practice in St. Louis, MO. However, before private practice, he was director of the division of facial plastic surgery at the prestigious Washington University in St. Louis for more than a decade, so we'll talk more about that. Dr. Ridenour has authored several book chapters and articles and is a member of numerous professional medical organizations, as well as frequent national and international speaker on facial cosmetic surgery and rhinoplasty. He works with several industry pharma companies and vendors of laser devices and is a strong supporter of many charitable causes throughout St. Louis. We talked about… What finally pushed him to private practice His challenges and regrets and, The many lessons he learned along the way   Visit Dr. Ridenour's website at: https://www.ridenourplasticsurgery.com   Enjoy and I look forward to your feedback –

Conscious Profits Unfiltered with Sebastian Naum
Conscious Leadership & Capitalism Fueled by Purpose w/ Arnaud Saint-Paul

Conscious Profits Unfiltered with Sebastian Naum

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 41:49


Whatsup Fam, Today I had on Arnaud Saint-Paul. An award-winning serial software, philanthropist, author, and finance and social impact entrepreneur for over 20 years. He has raised millions of dollars from angels, VCs and Family offices in Europe and the US.    He has also built channel partnerships with global brands, created and exited companies, learning what works and what does not. Arnaud is passionate about two specific topics: Conscious Capitalism & Conscious Leadership - as he mentors CEOs to become conscious and enlightened leaders. As an expert on Blockchain, Social Impact and Heartful Leadership™ he is often invited to keynote at global conferences. As you can tell from this intro, I was super excited to talk shop with him. It was such a pleasure to have him on and I can't wait for you to listen in. Enjoy the show! Show notes in order of appearance:   Arnaud's last oh shit moment We're both passionate about Conscious Capitalism and we're going to talk about conscious business, but first Arnaud shares a time when he lived life more unconsciously… Arnaud wrote a book called The Human Project. “You thought being an angel is easy…think again!” Arnaud explains this to us. The I and the Human Experience Do we have angels or spirits around us? Why Arnaud is not afraid (or less afraid) of death. The concept of business being spiritual and business entrepreneurship. R=F(i) Reality equals function of I. Pronoia. The world is here to love and support us. Example of an unfortunate kid growing up in poor conditions. The Heartful Method Magical and mathematical. Arnaud talks about the new Spiritual Masculine Blockchain is now being adopted by major players in all sorts of industries. And blockchain was started by Satoshi for its use in the digital record keeping of Bitcoin. Arnaud shares if he sees this actually becoming mainstream and overall thoughts on Bitcoin or crypto. Give nation, crypto for kids. Arnaud shares his top two traits for a conscious leader to embody. Connect with Arnaud at https://arnaudsaintpaul.com and on LinkedIn  Connect with Sebastian on Instagram SebastianNaum.com  

Constellations, a New Space and Satellite Innovation Podcast
126 - Collision Avoidance Services, Transparency in Dual Use Technology and Space Domain Awareness

Constellations, a New Space and Satellite Innovation Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2022 24:57


On the Constellations Podcast, we'll discuss the vast amount of debris now in space and how space companies are mitigating this problem through autonomous avoidance services. Dual-use technologies are becoming more prevalent for military and commercial applications, how do companies differentiate between users and their applications? The proliferation of constellations and taking advantage of different orbital regimes means there are consequences from an orbit phenomenology standpoint. There must be an understanding of those consequences which may also include emissions and RF interference with gateways and co-orbital objects. Learn about sharing data and the different levels of access permissions that should be addressed so that the right data is always with the right people.