Podcasts about Peace Corps

US volunteer agency

  • 2,020PODCASTS
  • 2,720EPISODES
  • 45mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 30, 2023LATEST
Peace Corps

POPULARITY

20152016201720182019202020212022

Categories



Best podcasts about Peace Corps

Show all podcasts related to peace corps

Latest podcast episodes about Peace Corps

Metta Hour with Sharon Salzberg
Ep. 199 – The Early Life of Sharon Salzberg & Joseph Goldstein

Metta Hour with Sharon Salzberg

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 30, 2023 71:04


For Episode 199 of the Metta Hour Podcast, Sharon and Joseph Goldstein are interviewed by Lily Cushman, recalling their early lives.They each share what drew them to the path of meditation in the late sixties and early seventies and their initial years of practice in the East. This podcast is being released in tandem with the Insight Hour Podcast. Joseph Goldstein has been teaching meditation since 1974. He and Sharon are co-founders of the Insight Meditation Society and the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies, located in Barre, Massachusetts. Joseph is the author of numerous books, including Mindfulness: A Practical Guide to Awakening and Insight Meditation: The Practice of Freedom. Dan Harris calls him “a key architect of the rise of mindfulness in our modern society.”Today's podcast is sponsored by BetterHelp. Click to receive 10% off your first month with your own licensed professional therapist: betterhelp.com/mettaIn this conversation, Joseph shares about:growing up in the Catskills • early encounters with death and loss • Studying philosophy at Columbia University • living in New York City during his college years • joining the Peace Corps and living in Thailand • his first encounters with Buddhist monks • the resonance of finding the spiritual path • the ups and downs of his initial years of practice • finding his teacher, Munindra • meeting Sharon at her first retreat with S.N. Goenka • his experiences as more westerners arrived in India • the community that emerged out of the Goenka retreats • grappling with his “body of steel” for many years • the parallels of the evolution of his and Sharon's pathSharon shares about:the difficulty of her childhood • her first encounter with Buddhist Philosophy in college • creating a study abroad program to take her to India • receiving Chögyam Trungpa's advice on where to learn meditation • searching for meditation instruction across India as a young woman • the scene at her first retreat led S.N. Goenka • the difficulty of her first instruction being a ten-day retreat • some themes of her initial meditation experiences • learning how to navigate her inner life • meeting Joseph for the first time • her and Joseph's different practice needs in their early years • crafting a spiritual path before there was a model for that life in the WestTo learn more about Joseph's work, you can visit dharma.org/joseph. His teachings can also be found on the Ten Percent Happier App, the Waking Up with Sam Harris App and on the Dharma Seed app.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Unstoppable Mindset
Episode 96 – Unstoppable Bird and BirdNote Advocate with Nick Bayard

Unstoppable Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 67:53


On this episode of Unstoppable Mindset, we get to speak with Nick Bayard the executive Director of BirdNote. This organization is a nonprofit that provides sound-rich programs on over 200 radio stations that discuss the challenges faced by birds. The program includes the sounds of birds. It can be heard daily. You will get to learn more about BirdNote during our episode.   Nick holds a Master's degree in Public Administration and International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School and a bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies from Brown University. He served three years in the Peace Corps Paraguay and has held several social service policy decisions in the Northwest U.S.   Nick gives us much to think about, not only about birds and BirdNote, but also he helps us think more deeply about how we live our lives and how we can help make our whole planet a more friendly and good place to live.     About the Guest: Nick Bayard is the Executive Director of BirdNote. BirdNote is a public media nonprofit organization that tells vivid, sound-rich stories about birds and the challenges they face in order to inspire listeners to care about the natural world and take steps to protect it. BirdNote Daily is their beloved flagship show that has been in production since 2005. It is a one minute, 45 second daily radio show that broadcasts on over 250 radio stations across the US. You can listen to BirdNote Daily and other longform podcasts produced by BirdNote anytime, wherever you listen to podcasts. You can also learn what BirdNote is doing to contribute to more diverse and inclusive birding and environmental communities at www.birdnote.org.    Nick holds a master's degree in Public Administration and International Development from the Harvard Kennedy School and a bachelor's degree in Environmental Studies from Brown University. He served for three years in the environmental sector of Peace Corps Paraguay and has served in leadership roles in social services and racial equity in government policy in the Pacific Northwest. Nick is an Eagle Scout and also a musician, having released an award-winning children's album, Wishing Well, with his oldest son in 2014.    Nick and his wife Sedia live in Washington State with their three kids.   Ways to connect with Nick:   BirdNote website: www.birdnote.org  BirdNote daily podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/birdnote-daily/id79155128 BirdNote's Bring Birds Back podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/bring-birds-back/id1566042634 BirdNote's Threatened podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/threatened/id1538065542 BirdNote en Español podcast: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/birdnote-en-espa%C3%B1ol/id1643711928 Nick Bayard's LinkedIn page: www.linkedin.com/in/nickbayard Nick Bayard's Twitter page: https://twitter.com/NickBayard Wishing Well children's album: https://www.amazon.com/Wishing-Well-Nick-Bayard/dp/B00IHIEUYE/ref=tmm_acd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=       About the Host: Michael Hingson is a New York Times best-selling author, international lecturer, and Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe. Michael, blind since birth, survived the 9/11 attacks with the help of his guide dog Roselle. This story is the subject of his best-selling book, Thunder Dog.   Michael gives over 100 presentations around the world each year speaking to influential groups such as Exxon Mobile, AT&T, Federal Express, Scripps College, Rutgers University, Children's Hospital, and the American Red Cross just to name a few. He is Ambassador for the National Braille Literacy Campaign for the National Federation of the Blind and also serves as Ambassador for the American Humane Association's 2012 Hero Dog Awards.   https://michaelhingson.com https://www.facebook.com/michael.hingson.author.speaker/ https://twitter.com/mhingson https://www.youtube.com/user/mhingson https://www.linkedin.com/in/michaelhingson/   accessiBe Links https://accessibe.com/ https://www.youtube.com/c/accessiBe https://www.linkedin.com/company/accessibe/mycompany/ https://www.facebook.com/accessibe/       Thanks for listening! Thanks so much for listening to our podcast! If you enjoyed this episode and think that others could benefit from listening, please share it using the social media buttons on this page. Do you have some feedback or questions about this episode? Leave a comment in the section below!   Subscribe to the podcast If you would like to get automatic updates of new podcast episodes, you can subscribe to the podcast on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher. You can also subscribe in your favorite podcast app.   Leave us an Apple Podcasts review Ratings and reviews from our listeners are extremely valuable to us and greatly appreciated. They help our podcast rank higher on Apple Podcasts, which exposes our show to more awesome listeners like you. If you have a minute, please leave an honest review on Apple Podcasts.     Transcription Notes Michael Hingson  00:00 Access Cast and accessiBe Initiative presents Unstoppable Mindset. The podcast where inclusion, diversity and the unexpected meet. Hi, I'm Michael Hingson, Chief Vision Officer for accessiBe and the author of the number one New York Times bestselling book, Thunder dog, the story of a blind man, his guide dog and the triumph of trust. Thanks for joining me on my podcast as we explore our own blinding fears of inclusion unacceptance and our resistance to change. We will discover the idea that no matter the situation, or the people we encounter, our own fears, and prejudices often are our strongest barriers to moving forward. The unstoppable mindset podcast is sponsored by accessiBe, that's a c c e s s i  capital B e. Visit www.accessibe.com to learn how you can make your website accessible for persons with disabilities. And to help make the internet fully inclusive by the year 2025. Glad you dropped by we're happy to meet you and to have you here with us.   Michael Hingson  01:21 Welcome once again to unstoppable mindset. Hi, everyone. It's a nice fall day here in Southern California, supposed to get up to 96 degrees today. It is late September. So for those who remember, it is also the time of hurricane Ian in Florida. And our thoughts are with all the people and creatures down there. But today, we get to interview someone and talk about some of those creatures. Nick Bayard is a person who has been involved in dealing with natural resources and so on. He's the Executive Director of bird note. And we're going to get to that. And all things, Nick, as we go along. So Nick, welcome to unstoppable mindset.   Nick Bayard  02:05 Thank you so much. It's an honor to be here.   Michael Hingson  02:07 Well, it's our pleasure, and we really appreciate you taking the time to be here with us. Let's start just kind of learning a little bit about you, can you kind of tell us where you came from and how you got where you   Nick Bayard  02:18 are a little bit? Sure, well, I grew up in Delaware, in kind of a little bubble, to be honest, and, you know, my educational career kind of took a winding path, because I didn't really see a career out there that looks like something I wanted to do forever. I just feel like there's there's too much to try to pack into one life to commit to sort of, you know, doctor, lawyer, you know, etc. And so, I think that was both a blessing and a curse, because it led me to follow a lot of different paths. And it led to a lot of frustration too, because our, I think our society is set up to reward sort of monotony and continue building, you know, of a career over a period of time. But I wouldn't trade it for anything, because it's it's given me a lot of unique experiences, serving in the Peace Corps in South America, getting to do racial equity work and in government. And now being executive director of a wonderful organization that I've loved for a long time, came a bit out of left field, because I had done so many things that kind of added up to what the burden of board members wanted in this role that all of a sudden, things kind of fell into place for something that I never could have predicted. So it's it's been a winding road, but I'm really thrilled to be where I am and happy to get the chance to talk about it with you.   Michael Hingson  03:56 Winding roads are always kind of fun, you know, you never know where you're gonna go next. Or maybe you do but at the same time, it's always the adventure of getting there. That's at least half the fun.   Nick Bayard  04:07 And you've had that experience too, right? Yes, quite a number of lifetimes packed into one right.   Michael Hingson  04:14 It has been a fun adventure. And it continues to be and I can't complain about that a single bit. It's, you know, it's all about choices. And but it is all about embracing the adventure of life to exactly.   Nick Bayard  04:28 So what you went to college, I went to Brown University in Rhode Island and studied environmental studies and really had a wonderful experience there. And then   Michael Hingson  04:41 what got you from there to the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  04:43 You know, I thought I was gonna go down the path of biologist scientists, ecologist, spent a year doing a residency in environmental education in the Grand Tetons, and we're realized after that year that actually maybe halfway into that year that I would be, I would feel kind of limited myself, I guess if I were to just sort of pick that path and run with it, although lots of people do that and love it, it just wasn't for me. What I recognized is that I just didn't have enough experience out in the world to be able to even say what I wanted to commit to for, you know, even for at least the next few years, so I thought that the Peace Corps was this opportunity to, to really throw myself into the unknown and experience something completely different. And hopefully learn about people learn more about people learn more about institutions learn more about how different cultures and communities operate. And it was like, throw myself in the deep end, I got even more than I bargained for, I'd say, How so, you know, the Peace Corps was hard in ways that I didn't expect, I, I think I was conditioned to think of it as a just really an opportunity to help make the world a better place. But there's a danger of that Savior mindset. If you go to a place thinking that you have the skills or the resources to be able to help or save in a way that you've maybe seen it on TV, and you realize you're, you're with people, and you're, you know, you're not any better or worse than the folks that you're going to live with. And as a Peace Corps volunteer, you are very much reliant on your community to take care of you and teach you and that was jarring. I think it's jarring for a lot of folks who go abroad for service work. They've, there's this idea that, you know, we go and we save, or we help. But really, going with a mindset of humility, and learning and growth, I think is much more important. And so I had to sort of adjust my worldview in a lot of ways and recognize that, you know, I had never really thought about, oh, gosh, you know, I'm gonna go help a community. In every community, there are people who are unkind, who lie, who, who cheat, who steal, etc. And I don't know why I think part of my my upbringing was thinking, well, if people are underprivileged, they're all nice all the time. And it's just a community like any other. So I thought that was really interesting to go and experience, you know, humanity in a different context. And recognize that a lot of the preconceptions I had about about other parts of the world were completely wrong. And so it was perfect learning and growth. For me, that's exactly what I needed.   Michael Hingson  07:52 Interesting kind of way to put it when you talk about underprivileged and so on. Do you think today that there is underprivileged other parts of the world as you thought they were, when you were first starting out in the Peace Corps,   Nick Bayard  08:06 I think the biggest blind spot I had was really on, it wasn't even so much about global issues, it was about American history. And as I've, as I've grown, you know, and, and gotten older, the extent of the, the blind spots I had around race and racism in America, have really driven sort of this last 10 years of my my life and my career, really, from a place of just, you know, feeling like I was robbed of an understanding of how formative racism was at the at the heart of how the country was born, and how it's evolved, and how it's progressed, and why certain communities experienced the conditions that they do. And so that's something that I've really worked hard at to understand, because it's not history that I got in school, it's not history that I heard about in my community, you know, as I came to find out, that's very much by design. And so I, I don't blame myself for it. But I recognize the responsibility I have to keep to always keep learning and growing. Yeah.   Michael Hingson  09:19 Well, I think that we do oftentimes find that there. Are there any number of people who think well, we're so much better off than than they are. And I think it depends on what you mean, by better off if you think about the world being more technologically advanced, we have access to more technologies and more creature comforts, in some ways. Anyway, there's probably some truth to that. But when you get down into community, you get down into family and you get to dealing with those concepts, and the closeness and the loyalty that that people have. That's a whole different animal and it's not necessarily at all clear that we're really any better off as, as well as some people, at least from what I've heard and learned?   Nick Bayard  10:05 Yeah, I think back to, you know, I developed some really important friendships in Paraguay and really got close to folks in a way that can't really compare it to some of the friendships I've had in America even just because the cross cultural cross language divide, bridging, that is a powerful thing. And I've, I think I laughed more in Paraguay than I, I ever have in a similar stretch of time and in America, because there's, there's a sense of humor and a lightness in the Paraguayan culture that I experienced that it's just delightful. And, you know, there's, I hosted a weekly radio show. And every week, folks would, would give me jokes to tell in the, in the native language, Guarani. And it was, you know, on the radio show, we talked about things like, you know, the environment and agriculture and green manures and things like that. But the thing that really stood out to people are the jokes, because they, there were things that people connected with, and sense of humor is just a really important part of the culture. So it was, it was just interesting to to experience that the joy of being there with folks who really, really did not have infrastructure around them. Shiny water, paved roads, things like that. Just just having a great time in life. That that was a good, a good lesson for me.   Michael Hingson  11:47 Yeah. And oftentimes, I think, here in this country, we don't slow down and stop and think about life. And that's something that I've been thinking about a lot. And we're actually going to talk about it in the new book that I'm writing, which tentatively is titled The Guide Dogs Guide to Being brave, but it's about taking time each day to stop and really think about what you did that day, what worked, what didn't and just thinking about life, we don't meditate nearly enough, do we?   Nick Bayard  12:17 And you can say that, again, I don't know if you have any, go two ways to remind yourself, that's something I struggle with is just actually committing to a pause until I feel like I really need it. I don't know if you if you have any insight,   Michael Hingson  12:36 you know, what we're what we're talking about in the book are several different techniques that can help. One thing that I find a lot of people use our vision boards and treasure mapping and visioning, where you put something up on a refrigerator, or somewhere to remind you of something like if you're going to take a vacation. And you want to really keep in the mindset of getting prepared for that you put a picture of like if you're going to go to Hawaii, you put a picture of Hawaii up well, you can do the same thing with with what we're talking about here, you can put up something around the house that says Don't forget to meditate at the end of the day, or when you when you get into bed before you turn off the light. If there's someplace that you normally look, put there a note, don't forget to take five minutes or 10 minutes to meditate. And you can put reminders up to do that. And what eventually happens, if you do it, and are consistent about it, you'll create a mindset that will cause you to automatically do it. And you'll be able to go more into a mode of of meditating. I took a course in transcendental meditation in college. And what they suggested was this make it a habit to get up 20 minutes early and meditate in the morning or and take and set up a time to do it at night. Nowadays, we have other ways to help with visioning. I, for example, put a lot of reminders in my little Amazon Echo device, I got to be careful of what I say or she's going to talk to me, but But I I put reminders in of things that I want to do not just about meetings on the calendar, but other things. And that's another way to vision it doesn't have to be from an eyesight standpoint. So you if you have an echo, you can tell it to remind you at 11 o'clock every night hey, go meditate for 10 minutes. I mean, there are a lot of ways to use technology and techniques to create a visioning environment to get you into the habit of doing something.   Nick Bayard  14:46 That's great. Yeah, I My My issue is I think I have to keep coming up with new ways to get my attention but get my own attention. Sort of like exactly how sometimes the sign word Some other times, I feel like I need up a sign that all kind of slapped me in the face. Because I'm not, I'm not willing to listen to what my my past self had reminded me to do. Well, that's   Michael Hingson  15:11 why I like the idea of the echo device. And I can tell it to we have several echo devices around the house. So I can have the reminder play on every echo device as well, so that it will remind me wherever I am in the house that you can't escape it. For me, I'm pretty much in the habit of doing it all the time. But still, having the reminder doesn't hurt. Right, right, right. So there are a lot of ways to give yourself a reminder to do something that will force you to at least for the second set, it's on to listen, and hopefully that will help you move forward and doing what it is you want to do. And taking time really to stop and or at least slow down and think a little bit is always an important thing to do.   Nick Bayard  16:03 Hmm. Yeah, I think one of the challenges of work from home is there's, there's folks that do that is less, less travel, less transition. And so it's easy for things to kind of pile up and go just back to back to back. And it's like, oh, let me actually go into the other room here and sit down for a minute and or take a walk outside. That's Those are good reminders.   Michael Hingson  16:29 Yeah. And those can be verbal with an echo device, you can send yourself a calendar invite that just remind you, every day, it's such and such a time, take the time to go off and do something and you know, you may not be able to do it right at that moment. But the reminder is still there. And by having something that forces you to at least think about it that is reminders in various formats and forms. That helps. All right, right. So we can take the time to do it. The problem that I think we mostly have is, oh, I just don't have time to do that. I've got to get this done or that done. Yeah, we do have time. Mental health is one of the most important thing, if not the most important thing that we can be doing for ourselves that we normally don't pay attention to. But in reality, we can make work for us.   Nick Bayard  17:22 For sure, for sure. I think that's that's originally actually what drew me in to burn out which is, which is the organization where I am. And it's a the flagship show that we run on radio stations, and our podcast is it's called burnout daily, that people probably know it as burnout. It's a minute, 45 seconds, and it's got a catchy theme song that invites you in and invites you to pay attention to the lives of burns for just Just a minute, 45 seconds. And that seems to be enough time that you can go deeply into something but not so much time that you you can't justify just sitting there and listening. Which is originally why you know why I came to love the program so much. Well,   Michael Hingson  18:15 how long were you in the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  18:17 I was there for I did a a two year volunteer service term. And then I stayed on for an additional year to be the coordinator of the environment sector.   Michael Hingson  18:28 Where the volunteers were was that. I'm sorry, where was that? Where did you do that?   Nick Bayard  18:34 In Paraguay? Okay, one of two landlocked countries in South America and the other?   Michael Hingson  18:40 Yeah. Right. Yeah, there's a lot of water around South America.   Nick Bayard  18:46 Yeah. You know, and, unfortunately, if Paraguay has not been, as that benefited from a lot of the natural resources on the continent, partly due to the, you know, the history of war, there was a major war that Paraguay found itself in against Brazil, Argentina, and Uruguay, and it just turned into an actual massacre of genocide. It was, I think it was just after the US Civil War ended, or it was right around that time, and something like 80% of all boys and men are killed. And then the country shrunk. And then it was President Rutherford B. Hayes who brokered an agreement to give Paraguay back some of its land and so there's actually a county in Paraguay called President Hays County or it's been caught, but as they didn't they i Yes. And so I saw more busts and sort of recognitions of President Hayes in Paraguay than I ever expected to see anywhere. It's really interesting.   Michael Hingson  19:57 There's a historic fact I didn't know Cool. And that's, that's a good thing. And and we do have a Paraguay today. And so you spent time in the Peace Corps there, which is always a good thing.   Nick Bayard  20:10 Yeah. And it was, it was interesting to go and realize that Spanish wouldn't help me very much. I spoke a little bit of Spanish. I got there. But the Peace Corps trainer is quickly put me into a class to learn the language, quad knee, which is the language that most Paraguayan speak most of the time, and the class itself was taught in Spanish. And so I was just really having a hard time with that one, because I sort of it sort of felt like, you know, trying to use tweezers with oven mitts on it's like, I barely know what you're saying, I'm supposed to understand it enough to, to learn a whole new language, it ended up working out really well. But I ended up learning it very well, very, very, very fluently,   Michael Hingson  21:02 but but those first few months were pretty rough. Well, there's nothing like immersion to force you to learn something, which is going back to what we talked about, as far as giving yourself reminders to take time to think about life. You know, it's all about immersion.   Nick Bayard  21:18 Yeah, that the other really surprising thing that happened when I was first arriving in Paraguay was I was I was just starting to go bald. And I was dealing with all the emotions around that. And having a hard time with that, and, and some of the folks in my community where I was training, would ask me about it, and prod me about it, and even make fun of me about it. And so I, I realized, okay, if I'm gonna be able to have a snappy comeback or something, I've got a, I got to figure this out, because I just, I'm having a hard enough time with this already. And just to have people kind of prodding me in on something that I'm sensitive about, you know, I, I need to learn to communicate here.   Michael Hingson  22:03 Also a good way to maybe pick up some more jokes for a future radio program.   Nick Bayard  22:09 Yeah, exactly, exactly.   Michael Hingson  22:12 So what did you do after the Peace Corps?   Nick Bayard  22:15 Well, I came back to the US and wanted to be in DC, because that's where a lot of international development work was, was based, but actually ended up working for a nonprofit that develops high quality preschools in low income neighborhoods, called appletree. Institute, and help help them raise money and develop new schools. In areas where there hadn't traditionally been been very effective schools. And, you know, it was there that I really learned how to how to pitch an organization to funders. It was a, it was a fundraising role. And so that was really valuable for me, because I got to really understand how, you know what, what's compelling to people who might want to give and what is fundraising other than really giving somebody the opportunity to support something maybe they didn't know that they wanted to support. So I came to really enjoy fundraising and realize that if it's for something that I care about, it's it's a great opportunity for me and for the people that I connect with to to make the world a better place.   Michael Hingson  23:30 Yeah. How long did you do that?   Nick Bayard  23:33 I was there for two years. After about a year and a half, I felt like, Okay, I've kind of plateaued in this role, I'm going to apply to grad school, I got a very good score on my GRE and a friend of mine and her dad told her the score, and she said, you could go to Harvard. And I had not thought of that before she said it. And it sort of got the wheels turning, like maybe see what see what Harvard has gone on. And they had a master's program and Public Administration and International Development, which was really appealing because it was quantitative, heavy. It focused on economics, which everybody in international development just kept saying, you know, you got to have that foundation. And it ended up you know, being a program that the math was so advanced that it was sort of like being hit with a ton of bricks for the first year. You know, and then after the after that first year, I get into take more courses on, you know, things like public speaking and leadership and negotiation and writing, you know, the stuff that now feels a little bit more practical to my day to day, but it was actually that was where I met my wife and so I'm especially glad that that was worked out the way that it did because it completely. It completely, you know, formed every every moment since, you know, since I met Cydia, my wife. So that's probably the most valuable thing I got from Harvard.   Michael Hingson  25:18 Well that makes makes a lot of sense. So you got your master's degree was she in the same program,   Nick Bayard  25:23 she was in the School of Education getting she was getting her second master's degree. She had gotten a master's degree from the school for international training. And this master's degree was in learning and teaching at Harvard Graduate School of Education. And everybody at Harvard was just kind of blown away by her and what she knew about learning and teaching. Because she'd done it for so long understood it so well. And I think a lot of her classmates more and more from her than they did from some of the professors, to be honest. So she's she, she really understands how people learn better than anyone I've, I've met. And she's she's really helped me whenever I've given a training or had I sort of convey a concept to a group. Well just   Michael Hingson  26:16 give her permission to remind you every day to take some time to meditate and think about life. And I bet you'll have the habit in no time. I bet you're right. Wives, wives do that. And that's a blessing. So sure. So they're, and all that math. Well, everything needs math in one way or another. But I can appreciate the fact that once you survive the math, and sometimes I wonder when, when colleges and universities do those things that you don't expect, like in a program, like you're thinking of giving you so much math, or when I was at UC Irvine, the people who went into the bioscience program, before they got to the point of being able to take all of the regular bioscience courses other than introductory courses, they had to take a year of organic chemistry. And a lot of the people in the biocide program, we're gonna go into med so they were kind of pre med and all that. And what what happened is that people who enrolled in the biocide program at UC Irvine, I know the first year I was there, 1600 people enrolled. And there were 200 left by the end of their sophomore year, because organic chemistry and other courses like that weeded them out. And the bioscience department was very deliberate about insisting that you have to do all that before you can go on, even though and the reality is, of course, you would use that organic chemistry. But still, before you can get to the real practical stuff, you've got to be able to deal with the theory. So kind of wonder if they were doing that at Harvard, if that was part of the logic.   Nick Bayard  27:54 I wonder, you know, there's, you know, you wonder how sadistic some of these design these programs. One of the things that, you know, I feel like our program at Harvard does, you know, as it is it signals to folks who know about that degree, that you can do something very intense and difficult. Even if you don't end up using a lot of the hard skills, you know, that you you worked on there. So that's, that's been valuable for when folks know about that degree program. Anybody who's been through the Harvard Kennedy School will, I think set up a little straighter when you tell them that you have an NPA ID is that's that's the one that it's really the you know, the gut punch, especially in that first year.   Michael Hingson  28:45 Yeah, well, you survived it and you moved on, what did you do after you got that   Nick Bayard  28:50 degree? I actually spent a year working on music and recognize that like, there probably wouldn't be a time in a transition period when I'd have the opportunity to, to pursue music was something I've always loved and always done for, for, you know, just a full time thing for a while. And so when I when I met Cydia, she had been with our oldest son at the time, she'd come over as a single mom with her son, Wally, to Harvard, they kind of upgraded everything and came to Cambridge. And when I met Cydia, qualia was 10. And so we kind of became a family unit pretty quickly. And obviously when you know when to do it, and I got married, and so one of the things that came of that time we were living in DC was city I said, Why don't you write a children's album? And all of a sudden, all this music just started coming out of me, inspired by my conversation was with a query. And so it was really quite a fun time to, to be able to talk to him and understand his worldview and then write some music based on what I learned. And we, we ended up recording and producing this album together called wishing well. And it became pretty popular on the children's radio stations. And Wally and I were invited to be showcased performers at the world's only at the time Children's Music Conference. kindy calm, and at the time, we were the only act that had an actual kit, and you know, in the group, so that was quite a special time. And you know, we moved back out to cometa to put a trailer back in his his school he had been in, but we stayed on the East Coast for a year and did music and, you know, made some memories.   Michael Hingson  30:54 What good memories Wow, that's pretty amazing. I'm going to have to go look for the album.   Nick Bayard  31:00 Yeah, it was it was a surprise. To me, I had never thought of writing or recording children's music till Cydia suggested it. And I've, you know, I loved music as a kid Rafi has always been a hero of mine. And things kind of came full circle when I had a chance to take. Now our two youngest kids, we have four and a six year old to see Rafi alive. Just before the pandemic hit, we had a chance to meet him and give him a hug. And it just the you know, the the waterworks were turned on I it was more emotional than I expected it to be he so what did you do after music. That was we came out to Tacoma. And I was basically, you know, trying to figure out my place in this community and had a lot of meetings with folks and learned about an opening for the director of a social service organization that was working to support youth and young adults who were struggling with education and employment or housing, mental health, substance use disorders. And getting that job and really trying to build this thing into something that was, you know, trusted by young people and offered as many services as we can offer in one place. Because the young folks that have been burned by institutions are a lot less likely to trust institutions. And so we, as an institution could could help start to rebuild that trust a little bit by creating a space where people were, were welcomed and felt accepted, felt represented, and really could could be put on a path towards success, then we can make a big difference. And so it was a it was about as there for about five years, and we were able to increase mental health services on site, we were able to expand the the housing options for young people experiencing homelessness for our county. And we're able to really start the conversation around how institutional racism in the nonprofit sector is, is making our nonprofits not only in some cases, not effective, but in other cases, actually, the perpetuators of harm and so that's, that's something that I'm really pleased came out of that experience was was an opportunity to lead some of those conversations and be part of some of those efforts to to make it tough to make a change in the sector in terms of racial equity.   Michael Hingson  33:56 What made you go out to Tacoma in general,   Nick Bayard  34:00 well Cydia and equate my my wife and oldest son before I met them, they had been here my wife was born in eastern Washington and grew up in Tacoma. And so they had had they had a wife here before they went east to, to for city to get her second master's. And so we, you know, quaintly had his friends back here and I liked what I knew of Washington and so we decided to come out here and start a life together as a family. Less snow than the East Coast. Yes, sadly for me, but happily for much others in my family, who aren't as as big snow fans as I am,   Michael Hingson  34:47 but still get to snow.   Nick Bayard  34:49 We can. That's true. That's true. But it's a wonderful place to raise a family just because it's it is like you said you can get to almost anything Whether it's you know, the city, whether it is performing arts, venues, nature hikes, mountains, rivers, lakes, the ocean, you know, it's just, it's just great. And it's sort of like the home that I never knew I wanted.   Michael Hingson  35:20 And I'll bet being in Washington, you even know where Gonzaga University is where everyone else only knows once a year during basketball season.   Nick Bayard  35:28 That's right, we have some fierce, fiercely loyal folks, you know, in those, you know, in those in those fights, and I try to stay out of it. Yeah, the sports. The sports debates,   Michael Hingson  35:45 I had the honor of being invited to speak at Gonzaga several years ago, it was a lot of fun, and very much enjoyed being up there. So that's great. I've spent a lot of time around various places in Washington, which is always a good thing. We love Washington. Although we we love Victorville where we are we love it, especially because our house is very accessible, we built the house so that it's accessible for my wife. And so we can't complain. And then as you said, working at home, you know, you have all the things that you got to do. But we can create schedules and set it up to work, right. So it works out very well for us. So we're, we're pretty, we're pleased.   Nick Bayard  36:25 That's great. I'm curious if you, if you have any reflections on, you know, the people in Washington versus the folks where you are, one of the things I learned when I came out was that, that there's just sort of this, this norm of, it's okay to just start talking to somebody without even sort of an intro, sort of like you'd be at the supermarket and you can just, you can enter the middle of a conversation with somebody you've never met. I don't know if that was your experience when he came out here.   Michael Hingson  36:55 It was, and there are parts of California where you can do some of that. But I think the whole world is changing, we're getting to be such a polarized world, because of things that are happening in politics, that shouldn't happen, that people aren't talking to each other nearly as much as they used to, I don't know whether you're finding that out there. But we are seeing a lot more of it down here than we used to,   Nick Bayard  37:19 I find myself a lot more closed off. For a couple of reasons. One being, I still mask most places I go. And I also wear hearing aids. And so the combination of the mask and hearing loss, and, you know, just the mechanics of that, and then if somebody else is wearing a mask, it makes it really hard for me to, to hear what they're saying. Because I can't read their lips. And at the same time also, like, being a little bit wary of, you know, being around folks for too long and close environments. We've been lucky with COVID we haven't, haven't had it, but just, you know, I'm looking forward to, you know, science, figuring out more about how to how to prevent it, how to treat it, how to deal with long COVID, that kind of stuff. So yes, I've I've not been as gregarious as I think I always used to be. But I hope to get back to that at some point.   Michael Hingson  38:21 We have stayed pretty close to home, I've traveled a few times to speak, done a lot of virtual things, but we stay pretty close to home, just because it is safer. And you know, we can cope with that we we are pretty good at being flexible about things changing. And when people talk about getting back to normal. That just is never going to happen. And I first thought about that after September 11. Because people kept saying after September 11 With all the things that were going on and government being closed for a week and airports being closed and all that and just all the discussions and people started saying we got to get back to normal. And it was very frustrating to me. And I finally realized that it was frustrating, because normal will never be the same again.   Nick Bayard  39:09 Right. Right. And and what opportunities do we have to identify what what was bad about the old normal that we can we can change. One of the I think real blessings over the last few years has been people have been forced or and invited, I think to to examine how they're spending their time, what they give their time and effort to. And I see people being bolder about pursuing what they love and spending more time with their families. And I think that's a wonderful byproduct of what's been a really difficult couple of years.   Michael Hingson  39:53 Yeah. And I hope that that trend will continue in that path. People will recognize that, and that companies and bosses and leaders will recognize that there's value in letting people do that, because it'll be much better for their mental health. Absolutely. Well, you ended up going at least for a while into city government in Tacoma, right?   Nick Bayard  40:17 I did, I was the assistant chief equity officer in the Office of Equity and Human Rights, which is charged with supporting equitable representation in the workforce. Making sure that our community outreach is is, is really robust, making sure that policies and procedures are equitable, and, and that they recognize the harm that's been done over over decades, you know, against certain groups, and so it's, it's an office that I have a ton of respect for, and I was really happy to be able to serve for for a couple of years. And it was really, I think, it's really valuable to, to go back and forth between different sectors to, to be able to keep fresh eyes on things, one of the things I really appreciate being able to do was being able to come into the government role with lots of grassroots community development experience, and having relationships with a lot of folks that a lot of the city employees didn't have. And so I was able to kind of be a trusted liaison for a lot of those groups and for city staff, and, you know, everybody's got their own path. But for me, being able to, you know, take that experience, somewhere where it can be of good use is, is important. And that's that's also, you know, translated to coming back to the nonprofit sector and going into public media now, is that I've got, you know, that perspective of what it's like to be in government and, you know, as as an entity that reports to, to voters and to community members in a, you know, in the way that in the way that our elections are set up, and the way that our community engagement set up. So it was, it was a, it was quite a valuable experience,   Michael Hingson  42:19 did you in dealing with all of the various issues and aspects around equity? Of course, everybody talks about diversity and so on. But generally, when they do disabilities get left out of that, did you find that you were involved at all or very much in dealing with equity from the standpoint of dealing with persons with disabilities and making sure that they get into the, to the workforce, and that were treated fairly, and so on?   Nick Bayard  42:48 Yes, there actually, prior to my arrival, there had been a long standing Tacoma area commission on disabilities. And most of the members of that commission, if not all, experience, pretty significant disabilities, you know, carry those in their lives. And so our office was charged with being the liaison for that commission. And so whenever there was, the commission would bring a concern or a policy proposal to the city come through our office. One of the projects that was underway that we helped move forward while I was there, was around accessible taxis. And it, it's a good, it was a good window into just how complex is policy challenges can be. Because, you know, the the elected officials that would have to get put put this into place, you know, had to figure out, we had to figure out how much it costs, we had to figure out where folks would need to go, we had to figure out what it would mean to retrofit a taxi company's vehicles. And then how Uber and Lyft and others will be involved with that. And it was it's a multi year process that's still underway. But what we did was we commissioned a feasibility study, so that we could get a clearer and clearer sense of what the cost and scope would need to be so that the elected officials could make a good decision based on that. Something else that commission accomplished was I'm really proud of, but I didn't have any personal part of this is that they had the council pass an ordinance to require closed captioning in all places of business, restaurants and so on. So somebody that's hearing impaired or deaf, would be able to watch TV watch a sports game and know what's going on in a way that they hadn't before. So I think the the bigger issues to tackle had to do with accessible housing and accessible streets And, and that kind of thing. And those are those that's ongoing work. Of course,   Michael Hingson  45:03 other aspects of all that that still don't get addressed very well are things that deal with with eyesight and things like Braille menus in restaurants. So we're, now you've got many companies that we in one way or another are putting kiosks in their facilities and McDonald's and McDonald's is now starting to make those kiosks talk or even accessible voting machines, so that a person who happens to be blind or low vision can go in and use an accessible machine to be able to vote independently. And there are just a lot of challenges like that, that continue to get left out of a lot of the discussions, which is unfortunate.   Nick Bayard  45:47 Very unfortunate. So a question for me is always how do how do we elevate voices like yours and and others? Who? Who oftentimes, I think the, the discussion is it the, the the attention is ends up going on, you know, the, the group or the person that can shout the loudest? Yeah. And so that's not that shouldn't be the case, it should be, you know, we should take a look at intersecting issues of privilege and access and figure out, you know, if, if we can redesign our system so that those of us who you know, have the most barriers, or have have an easy time of it, I think we'll all have an easier time of it, boy struck by the universal design concepts that make things accessible for folks with disabilities, but also make them easier to access for folks without disabilities. It's hard to argue against a lot of investment and that kind of change, I think.   Michael Hingson  46:54 And therein lies one of the real keys that is that, in reality, a lot of the things that might make life more inclusive for us really would help other people as well. But so many people emphasize just one thing that it makes it more of a challenge, like eyesight, you know, so even and one of my favorite topics I've discussed a couple of times on this podcast are the Tesla vehicles were everything is really driven by a touchscreen. And to use not only voice input, what voice output is limited or non existent, there is some voice input to be able to do things. But I as a passenger in a Tesla can't even work the radio, because it's all touchscreen driven. That's really lovely. Except that whoever does it, and the case of a driver, a driver has to look at the screen. And yes, you do have some other capabilities of the Tesla helping with driving. But the reality is that with the state of technology today, people should be watching the road. And we've got the technologies to allow us to use other senses. And we don't do it nearly as much as we should. We have not and we have not embraced in inclusive mindset yet. And when we do, then a lot of the questions that people may have and the concerns that people may have will go away, because they'll realize that what affects some will really help everyone,   Nick Bayard  48:28 for sure. I think part of the part of the reason we get stuck on some of these things is that we tend to think about things in either or terms like either either you support blind people, or you support immigrants, or you support people of color or you support the LGBTQ community. And there's these like saying these soI completely separate projects is a recipe for complete failure to make anything change. And I think what we we need to recognize is that every group contains elements of every other group. Correct. And so helping helping one group fully is going to help other groups in different ways and thinking of ways that we can invest in those, you know, in the middle of those Venn diagrams, so that so that everybody benefits. Right.   Michael Hingson  49:30 Well, so you worked in government, and then how did you get to bird note from that?   Nick Bayard  49:35 Well, I've always loved birds and been fascinated by their behavior, their anatomy, their resilience, and had had taken some ornithology masters levels classes. I when I was out in Wyoming, and, you know, it hadn't been at the front of my mind. You know, since I started family hadn't been out bird watching too much. But then I saw that, you know, the executive director job at burnout had opened up. And it was interesting to me because I didn't realize that bird note itself was independent of radio stations. As a listener, I always thought the burden out was just part of our either part of our local radio station or part of NPR. But in fact, it's an independent nonprofit. And so it, it took me seeing the job opening to understand how the organization was set up. And all of a sudden, it I was just very excited about that opportunity. Because, you know, I'd had nonprofit leadership experience, I love birds, I love the burnt out daily show, and the long form podcasts that burned out, produces. And it it seemed to me that it was just a great next step, in terms of in terms of getting to know a new field of public media, in terms of being able to take some skills I've learned elsewhere and apply them. And it was, you know, it was it was a job where I didn't know anyone going into it. And so, you know, a lot of people and myself included, you know, get jobs through, you know, a personal connection, introduce you to somebody, and then you go through an application or interview process. With burnout, it was it was first time recently where I just applied and was invited to interview. And so in that way, it was, it was gratifying, just not that I, you know, not that there's anything wrong with, you know, having those connections, but, you know, it's It felt good to just apply and just on the nature of what they saw, have them give me a call and,   Michael Hingson  51:58 and asked me to, to interview. And the rest is sort of history.   Nick Bayard  52:05 That's right. That's right, as coming up on one year and November.   Michael Hingson  52:08 So tell us a little about bird note, I'd appreciate knowing more about what exactly the organization is, what it does, and so on.   Nick Bayard  52:17 Sure, we're an independent public media nonprofit organization that's been around since 2005. And it it started really, as a as a radio program under the auspices of Seattle Audubon. And eventually, after a few years it, it became its own nonprofit. And it started really with this vision that the founders vision was to produce a short, sound rich audio experience for radio listeners about birds. And it's just become a really beloved institution in the areas where it's broadcast. And it it's now we've got the flagship show is the minute 45 second show, copper note daily that broadcasts in about 250 public radio stations across the US. We've got long form podcasts, those are called threatened and bring birds back. And we do virtual events and things that most listeners know us for burning out daily. Because that's our biggest audience. We've got, we think around 5 million daily listeners to that show. And so what's really powerful about that, is that we're able to, I believe, create a mindset shift for all of those folks, in terms of inviting them to slow down, pay attention to nature, learn something amazing about birds, and hopefully get inspired to spend more time with nature, with birds, and to the point where we hope we inspire action. For conservation, whether that's something simple, like the way that you live your life, the way that you set up your bird feeders, the way that you turn off your lights during migration season, those kinds of things, all the way up to advocating for more federal legislation for conservation. You know, we hear from listeners that we we have changed their lives, which is really amazing to hear that we've inspired people to to pursue careers in ornithology bird science, that we have helped people with mental health. People say that the show calms them down. It's something that they look forward to every day. And I think the really, really big opportunity we have is to continue showcasing and diversifying people from every background on the show and stories that reflects different kinds of knowledge. folks that aren't, you know, this the the typical profile of somebody who's been centered a conservation over the last 100 years. white male, able bodied person recognize that every group is connected to burns and has a love of, of burning in the outdoors. And we have an opportunity to elevate those stories that haven't been elevated, you know, over over our country's history, which is, I think, very powerful.   Michael Hingson  55:20 So what is the typical one minute 45 second show, like what happens?   Nick Bayard  55:27 Well, sometimes we we start with our theme song, which I'm not going to attempt to recreate with my voice here on burnout.org. And hear that it's a it's a very short, little, just very catchy, you know, couple of seconds thing and then you'll hear the narrator say, this is bird note. And then you'll hear the sound of birds usually, and the narrator will talk you through what you're hearing. And well explained something about the birds behavior, something that we you know, we're learning about the birds something that scientists have just figured out, that kind of thing, then we'll take you back to the sounds of the birds, and then maybe one or two more pieces of information. And then from time to time, well, well let folks know what they can do to to learn more or to connect or to you know, to to make a difference for birds. This morning show was about the white Bennett storm petrel, which is a seabird lives off the coast of Chile and Peru. And it lives most of its life just over the water. And it took scientists eight years to figure out that this storm petrol actually nests about 50 miles inland and the desert and part of the continent that people describe as looking like the surface of bars. So anytime we can, we can drop in some surprising fun tidbits of information for our listeners, we love to do that too. So is bird node, a standard 501 C three nonprofit it is. And if you've got a burden on.org, you can learn more about how to get our email list, which gives you a sneak preview of all of our daily or weekly shows. You can support bird note, we, we we rely on the generosity of listeners to do what we do. And so, you know, unlike a radio station public radio station, which does a fun to drive every couple of years, or sorry, a couple times a year, we we are asking listeners over social media and have our email list to support us with gifts. And we're fortunate to have a lot of generous listeners who donate monthly and who give annually. And one of the services that we've created is something called Bird note plus, where you can subscribe at a different level of monthly giving to get ad free podcasts and get access to special events and get early access to shows and so if there any podcast fans or bird lovers out there that want to check out bird note plus, I would encourage them to do that.   Michael Hingson  58:19 I would as well. It it sounds like a lot of fun. I have not I guess either been up at the right time or whatever have not heard bird no daily here so I'm going to have to go set up a reminder to go listen on the website, I guess every   Nick Bayard  58:34 day. Please do. Yes, you can subscribe anywhere you can podcasts, you can subscribe to the sempurna daily, something that's really exciting as we just launched burnout en Espanol. So it's our first dual language production. So there's a new podcast feed for burnout and Espanyol where it's it's the same experience of the English burden on daily but in Spanish and speaking with folks in and in it throughout the Americas that are doing conservation work. In conversation in Spanish, it's, I think a really great opportunity for us to broaden our audience throughout the Americas. And then our our long form podcasts you can also find anywhere you get podcasts or bring birds back is is I think there's just a really special program that's hosted by a woman named Tanisha Hamilton who models her entry into birding and you just feel the enthusiasm and excitement as she gets into this and talks about things like what it's like to be a black woman birder what it's like to find your own community and birding. You know, how do people with disabilities? What are some of the technologies that they can use to get out and look at birds there and then there are different sort of species specific Two episodes, one of the really popular ones is about the purple Martin, which, which has an amazing history of interplay with with Native American communities and, and carried forward today where people will become what they call purple Martin landlords and create houses for them and just it's just a great story. Great, great program. And then our we have a field based long form podcast called threatened, which is hosted by already Daniel who's on NPR science desk now, and that's about going to the place they're doing in depth work to understand the conservation challenges birds are facing. And so that that podcast is coming out with new episodes in January, focused on Puerto Rico and island habitats. We just wrapped up the season on Hawaii, which was, which was really fascinating.   Michael Hingson  1:00:57 Well, I, I'm gonna go listen, I It will be fun to go do that. Well, if people want to reach out and learn more about you and burden on I assume they can go to bird node.org. But how can they contact you and learn more?   Nick Bayard  1:01:11 Sure they can. They can email me directly at Nick B. At bird note dot org. Always happy to chat. If it's a general bird note inquiry, you can email info at bird note.org We get a lot of people writing in with bird questions. You know, how do we get burned out on our local radio station, that kind of thing. We love to hear those kinds of questions because it helps us connect with new audiences and new radio stations. And, you know, I'm hopeful that we can grow the broadcasts range of Berto because right now we brought about 250 radio stations. But if if we were to, you know, get broadcasts on some of the bigger stations, we could double or triple our audience overnight, which would be, which would be amazing. And it's just a minute 45 seconds. So it's not exactly like a huge investment. I understand that, that time is a finite resource on radio, but I just I don't think there's any good reason why every radio station shouldn't play Burnin Up   Michael Hingson  1:02:18 is short Is it is it makes perfect sense to do. Well, I, I find it fascinating and I hope everyone listening to us today will find it fascinating as well. And that they will reach out to you I think it will be beneficial. And as I said, I'm gonna go make it a habit, I think I can easily do that minute and 45 seconds is just not that long. It's not a big ask just and it's such a such a joyful   Nick Bayard  1:02:47 show. You know, I came into this job as a huge fan, and just have become an even bigger fan, just, you know, getting under the hood and understanding everything that goes into developing creating and producing these shows. So I just feel really lucky to be doing what I do and lucky to have the chance to try to share it with as many people as I can and lucky to ask people to write us check some of sign up to God because that's that's what, that's what keeps us producing the stories and what what allows us to keep growing?   Michael Hingson  1:03:27 Well, I'm gonna go check out bird note.org. And a little bit more detail. Do you know if the website designer paid any attention to or spend any time making sure that it's accessible and put an accessibility kinds of elements to the site? And or do you know if they've done that?   Nick Bayard  1:03:42 We've done a, we our web developer ran an accessibility audit. I need to dig into the details around which aspects are good and which are bad. They told us we got a 91% score.   Michael Hingson  1:03:58 That's pretty good.   Nick Bayard  1:03:59 I think yeah, I think it's pretty good. That's you know, there's always, always room for improvement. One of the things that we were early early adopters of is the the transcripts of every episode on how to be really descriptive in those but I know that we've got got work to do and would welcome any, any feedback you have for sure when you when you go and check it out.   Michael Hingson  1:04:26 We'll do it. And I will definitely communicate either way. Well, Nick, thanks again for being with us. This has been fun and fascinating. I hope you've enjoyed it and and we really appreciate you coming on and we hope you'll be back and update us as burnout progresses.   Nick Bayard  1:04:44 Well, thanks so much, Michael. And I just want to say I'm really inspired by you and your story and I was just thrilled to hear from you and get the invitation to talk. So it's been just a really wonderful Expo. grandson a great honor to be able to chat with you today.   Michael Hingson  1:05:03 Well, my pleasure as well. And for all of you out there listening, please reach out to Nick, please learn more about bird note. And we hope that you'll give us a five star rating wherever you're listening to the podcast. We really appreciate you doing that. I'd love to hear your comments, please feel free to email me at Michaelhi at accessibe.com A C C E S S I B E, or go to our podcast page, Michael hingson.com/podcast. But either way, I would appreciate your five star review would appreciate your comments. And Nick, for you and for everyone listening if you know of anyone else who you think ought to be a guest on unstoppable mindset. We'd love to hear from you about that as well. So thanks for listening. And Nick once more. Thank you very much for being a part of us today and our podcast. Thanks so much.   Michael Hingson  1:05:55 You have been listening to the Unstoppable Mindset podcast. Thanks for dropping by. I hope that you'll join us again next week, and in future weeks for upcoming episodes. To subscribe to our podcast and to learn about upcoming episodes, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com slash podcast. Michael Hingson is spelled m i c h a e l h i n g s o n. While you're on the site., please use the form there to recommend people who we ought to interview in upcoming editions of the show. And also, we ask you and urge you to invite your friends to join us in the future. If you know of any one or any organization needing a speaker for an event, please email me at speaker at Michael hingson.com. I appreciate it very much. To learn more about the concept of blinded by fear, please visit www dot Michael hingson.com forward slash blinded by fear and while you're there, feel free to pick up a copy of my free eBook entitled blinded by fear. The unstoppable mindset podcast is provided by access cast an initiative of accessiBe and is sponsored by accessiBe. Please visit www.accessibe.com. accessiBe is spelled a c c e s s i b e. There you can learn all about how you can make your website inclusive for all persons with disabilities and how you can help make the internet fully inclusive by 2025. Thanks again for listening. Please come back and visit us again next week.

Ski Moms Fun Podcast
Ski Moms Talk to Connie Marshall, Alta's First Marketing & PR Director

Ski Moms Fun Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 38:06


In this episode Nicole and Sarah host ski mom Connie Marshall, the first Director of Marketing and PR at Alta Ski Area in Alta, Utah. Connie grew up in Ohio, her family loved the outdoors, they hiked a lot and skied as much as they could.  Connie learned to ski at Clear Fork (in central Ohio), a ski area built on a reclaimed garbage dump. Connie first saw Alta when she was in 6th grade during a visit to her aunt and uncle's home. Connie's Uncle Chic was the then GM of Alta. She took her first flight (on TWA) in her first pair of blue jeans. (To hear Connie talk about it, it sounds like just yesterday.)After her first visit out west, she knew she wanted to get back there. After college when her dreams of the Peace Corp did not come true, Connie headed back to Alta and got a job working in the ticket office.And from there one thing led to another, Connie spent 44 years working at Alta in a number of roles. Her last role before retiring was as the Marketing and PR Director. Connie tells us about her early days at Alta and her tips for navigating the resort area for those visiting now.  If you are visiting on a Friday, Saturday, Sunday or a holiday you need to make a parking reservation ahead of time. And the ski school is amazing, it's a great place to learn or improve your skills. Alta is on both the Ikon Pass and Mountain Collective Pass.Keep up with the Latest from Alta:Website: https://www.alta.com/plan-your-tripInstagram: https://instagram.com/altaskiareaFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/altaskiarea Alta Ski School: https://www.alta.com/ski-schoolPlease Help Support our Podcast:Check out the Ski Pack at www.puremountainfun.com and use code SKIMOMS2023 for 20% off your orderJoin the Ski Moms Fun Community!Follow us on Apple Podcasts and please rate and share with a friend!On Instagram @skimomsfunCheck out the Ski Moms Fun StoreEmail us sarah@skimomsfun.comJoin the Ski Moms Fun Community! Follow us on Instagram @skimomsfunCheck out the Ski Moms Fun Store at www.skimomsfun.comContact us sarah@skimomsfun.com

Trick or Treat Radio
TorTR #548 - Gringos Locos Forever

Trick or Treat Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 224:01


Prison, drugs and gang war touch three friends from the east coast. A guest co-host joins them and learns that the previous co-host was killed by these friends, and he fears the same will happen to him. On Episode 548 of Trick or Treat Radio we are joined by EF Contentment for another Patreon Takeover! This time EF has selected the films Blood In, Blood Out from director Taylor Hackford and Unman, Wittering and Zigo from director John Mackenzie for us to discuss! We spend a large portion of this oversized show talking about the highly quotable crime epic Blood In, Blood Out close to the film's 30th anniversary! Orale, grab your copy of Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide, expect nothing and get everything, and strap on for the world's most dangerous podcast!Stuff we talk about: Patreon Takeover, MZ's glossy-eyed stare, The Offering, watching the wrong movie, EF Contentment, Cruise Gooseman, going to the theater, Watch/Skip+, Nasty Boys, Blood In Blood Out, Teddy Wilson, Delroy Lindo, Damian Chapa, Jesse Borrego, Michael Pare, Nemesis, Albert Pyun, Taylor Hackford, Benjamin Bratt, Tom Towles, Billy Bob Thornton, descrambled ppv, David Ayer, Harsh Times, Christian Bale, Peace Corps, American Me, Tom Cruz, Heroes, Fame, drug-addicted artist stereotype, Vatos Locos Forever, how you recover from tragedy, Richard Masur, Risky Business, License to Drive, Ving Rhames, The Thing, Thomas F. Wilson, doing the vengeance, John Woo, Bullet in the Head, RRR, Dashcam, Lanny Flaherty, Stuart Gordon, William H. Macy, Edmond, scared straight, Inglourious Basterds, Schindler's List, Helen Mirren is the bridge between worlds, Fast and Furious, True Lies, Unman Wittering and Zigo, John Mackenzie, David Hemmings, Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide, Carolyn Seymour, Droogs, A Clockwork Orange, 70s film stock, boarding school kids are dicks, Benedict Cumberbatch, Serpico, spin-offs 50 years later, Hobo with a Shotgun, Kids vs. Aliens, Jason Eisener, Tales from the Territories, Dark Side of the Ring, San Quentin, East LA, racism in the lunch line, Menace 2 Society, Boyz in the Hood, Hollywood Pictures, White Knights, Miklo Ravenshadow, 20/23 Vision, and Hooked on Buttcrack.Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/trickortreatradioJoin our Discord Community: discord.trickortreatradio.comSend Email/Voicemail: mailto:podcast@trickortreatradio.comVisit our website: http://trickortreatradio.comStart your own podcast: https://www.buzzsprout.com/?referrer_id=386Use our Amazon link: http://amzn.to/2CTdZzKFB Group: http://www.facebook.com/groups/trickortreatradioTwitter: http://twitter.com/TrickTreatRadioFacebook: http://facebook.com/TrickOrTreatRadioYouTube: http://youtube.com/TrickOrTreatRadioInstagram: http://instagram.com/TrickorTreatRadioSupport the show

RAISE Podcast
141: David Nolan, Texas Christian University.

RAISE Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 27, 2023 64:18


David Nolan is associate vice chancellor of University Development and campaign director at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth, Texas.He graduated TCU and began his professional development career as an annual fund officer in University Advancement during The Next Frontier campaign. After serving two years in the Peace Corps as a non-governmental organization development advisor, David became the associate director of development for the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech. He then served as the director of development for the College of Engineering at North Carolina State, where he led a $250 million campaign as part of a $1 billion university-wide effort. David returned to his alma mater in 2005 to help design and implement The Campaign for TCU, which raised more than $434 million including more than $100 million for scholarships. He currently serves as the director of Lead On: A Campaign for TCU, which aims to raise $1 billion in support of TCU's people, programs, and endowment.He earned the Master of Arts in Philanthropic Studies from Indiana University's Lilly Family School of Philanthropy and served as a Summer Fellow of Vanderbilt University's Peabody College Institute for Vice Presidents of Institutional Advancement. David was recognized in the 2009 Fort Worth Business Press Forty Under Forty and successfully completed Leadership Fort Worth in 2007.

The Friday Beers Podcast
Bath Time With Gus

The Friday Beers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 49:00


Rusty is trying to lose 15 lbs in one week, Willy D is trying to join the Peace Corps, and Emily searches for love in all the wrong places. 00:00 Intro 01:29 The Boys Are Taking Baths 09:06 Angus Is Graying and Liam is Bald 14:02 Checking in with Rusty 18:03 Characters Segment 36:37 Checking in with Willy D 44:12 Character Submissions FOLLOW OUR SOCIALS: https://www.flowcode.com/page/fridaybeerspodcast SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS: GO TO betterhelp.com/BEERS TO GET 10% OFF ONE WHOLE MONTH OF ONLINE THERAPY USE CODE “BEERS” for up to $1000 RISK FREE ON YOUR 1ST WAGER: https://promo.nj.betmgm.com/en/promo/sports/risk-free?wm=7085202&zoneId=1676294

Seemingly Ordinary
122. Alan Thomas's Life Changing Experience in the Peace Corps

Seemingly Ordinary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 68:11


Alan Thomas teaches biology. But two decades ago, he joined the peace corps--and it changed his life. (This episode was recorded in December 2022.)

New Books in Environmental Studies
Jeff Fearnside, "Ships in the Desert" (Santa Fe Writer's Project, 2022)

New Books in Environmental Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:27


Many of us have likely seen photos of the Aral Sea, and the rusted Soviet-era ships, sitting in the desert with no water in sight. The Aral Sea is now just 10% of its former volume, shrinking down from what was once the fourth-largest body of inland water in the world, after what writer Jeff Fernside calls “one of the worst human-caused environmental catastrophes.” Jeff traveled to the region as a Peace Corps volunteer. Afterward, he turned his experiences into an essay collection, Ships in the Desert (Santa Fe Writers Project: 2022), where Jeff writes about the families he met, his thoughts on missionaries, and his visit to the Aral Sea, where he saw “a fleet of rusting Soviet fishing ships, hammer and sickle still clearly discernible on many, sitting bolt upright in desert sands as if plowing through ocean waves.” Jeff Fearnside is the author of the short-story collection Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air (Stephen F. Austin State University Press: 2006), which won the 2005 SFWP Awards Program. He is also the author of the chapbook A Husband and Wife Are One Satan (Orison Books: 2021), winner of the Orison Chapbook Prize. His work has appeared in literary journals and anthologies such as The Paris Review, Los Angeles Review, Story, and many others. In this interview, Jeff and I talk about what inspired his essays, including what he saw in the barren Aral Sea. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Ships in the Desert. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/environmental-studies

New Books Network
Jeff Fearnside, "Ships in the Desert" (Santa Fe Writer's Project, 2022)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:27


Many of us have likely seen photos of the Aral Sea, and the rusted Soviet-era ships, sitting in the desert with no water in sight. The Aral Sea is now just 10% of its former volume, shrinking down from what was once the fourth-largest body of inland water in the world, after what writer Jeff Fernside calls “one of the worst human-caused environmental catastrophes.” Jeff traveled to the region as a Peace Corps volunteer. Afterward, he turned his experiences into an essay collection, Ships in the Desert (Santa Fe Writers Project: 2022), where Jeff writes about the families he met, his thoughts on missionaries, and his visit to the Aral Sea, where he saw “a fleet of rusting Soviet fishing ships, hammer and sickle still clearly discernible on many, sitting bolt upright in desert sands as if plowing through ocean waves.” Jeff Fearnside is the author of the short-story collection Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air (Stephen F. Austin State University Press: 2006), which won the 2005 SFWP Awards Program. He is also the author of the chapbook A Husband and Wife Are One Satan (Orison Books: 2021), winner of the Orison Chapbook Prize. His work has appeared in literary journals and anthologies such as The Paris Review, Los Angeles Review, Story, and many others. In this interview, Jeff and I talk about what inspired his essays, including what he saw in the barren Aral Sea. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Ships in the Desert. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

New Books in Central Asian Studies
Jeff Fearnside, "Ships in the Desert" (Santa Fe Writer's Project, 2022)

New Books in Central Asian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:27


Many of us have likely seen photos of the Aral Sea, and the rusted Soviet-era ships, sitting in the desert with no water in sight. The Aral Sea is now just 10% of its former volume, shrinking down from what was once the fourth-largest body of inland water in the world, after what writer Jeff Fernside calls “one of the worst human-caused environmental catastrophes.” Jeff traveled to the region as a Peace Corps volunteer. Afterward, he turned his experiences into an essay collection, Ships in the Desert (Santa Fe Writers Project: 2022), where Jeff writes about the families he met, his thoughts on missionaries, and his visit to the Aral Sea, where he saw “a fleet of rusting Soviet fishing ships, hammer and sickle still clearly discernible on many, sitting bolt upright in desert sands as if plowing through ocean waves.” Jeff Fearnside is the author of the short-story collection Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air (Stephen F. Austin State University Press: 2006), which won the 2005 SFWP Awards Program. He is also the author of the chapbook A Husband and Wife Are One Satan (Orison Books: 2021), winner of the Orison Chapbook Prize. His work has appeared in literary journals and anthologies such as The Paris Review, Los Angeles Review, Story, and many others. In this interview, Jeff and I talk about what inspired his essays, including what he saw in the barren Aral Sea. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Ships in the Desert. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/central-asian-studies

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies
Jeff Fearnside, "Ships in the Desert" (Santa Fe Writer's Project, 2022)

New Books in Russian and Eurasian Studies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2023 40:27


Many of us have likely seen photos of the Aral Sea, and the rusted Soviet-era ships, sitting in the desert with no water in sight. The Aral Sea is now just 10% of its former volume, shrinking down from what was once the fourth-largest body of inland water in the world, after what writer Jeff Fernside calls “one of the worst human-caused environmental catastrophes.” Jeff traveled to the region as a Peace Corps volunteer. Afterward, he turned his experiences into an essay collection, Ships in the Desert (Santa Fe Writers Project: 2022), where Jeff writes about the families he met, his thoughts on missionaries, and his visit to the Aral Sea, where he saw “a fleet of rusting Soviet fishing ships, hammer and sickle still clearly discernible on many, sitting bolt upright in desert sands as if plowing through ocean waves.” Jeff Fearnside is the author of the short-story collection Making Love While Levitating Three Feet in the Air (Stephen F. Austin State University Press: 2006), which won the 2005 SFWP Awards Program. He is also the author of the chapbook A Husband and Wife Are One Satan (Orison Books: 2021), winner of the Orison Chapbook Prize. His work has appeared in literary journals and anthologies such as The Paris Review, Los Angeles Review, Story, and many others. In this interview, Jeff and I talk about what inspired his essays, including what he saw in the barren Aral Sea. You can find more reviews, excerpts, interviews, and essays at The Asian Review of Books, including its review of Ships in the Desert. Follow on Twitter at @BookReviewsAsia. Nicholas Gordon is an associate editor for a global magazine, and a reviewer for the Asian Review of Books. He can be found on Twitter at @nickrigordon. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/russian-studies

The Bridge by OR360
How to think about Oregon's housing and homelessness crisis with John Tapogna | EP 89

The Bridge by OR360

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 49:07


How to think about Oregon's housing and homelessness crisis with John Tapogna John Tapogna is a well-respected figure in the Oregon policy scene. He served as president of ECONorthwest, a prominent economic consulting firm, from 2009-2021. He now serves as a Senior Policy Advisor. Previously, John worked for U.S. Congressional Budget Office and served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Chile. This episode is about a recent paper that ECONorthwest published called “Postcard from the Future: What Portland can learn from the implementation of Los Angeles's Measure H?” We hope this provides a framework for thinking about housing and homelessness policy issues that the state must grapple with. In the first half, we talk about which specific interventions are most effective (and which aren't)—and in the second half, we talk about the six specific recommendations for policymakers to avoid the missteps from LA's measure.

Careers Over Beers Podcast
TESOL (Teaching English to Students of Other Languages) talks Traveling & Living in S. Korea!

Careers Over Beers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2023 105:11


Stephen Walker has been teaching english to students of other languages in South Korea for over 20 years. During this episode, Stephen talks about leaving for the Peace Corps, what it takes to become a TESOL, and how important he thinks it is to travel the world.

Stories From Women Who Walk
60 Seconds for Motivate Your Monday: Celebrating Martin Luther King Day. How America the Dream Came to Be With Award-Winning Recording Artist and Composer Steve Schuch, Part 1

Stories From Women Who Walk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 2:56


Hello to you listening in Weare, New Hampshire!Coming to you from Whidbey Island, Washington this is Stories From Women Who Walk with 60 Seconds (and quite a bit more because we're celebrating Martin Luther King Jr. Day) and your host, Diane Wyzga.Today we have a special bonus episode because the boys are back in town. My guest Steve Schuch is joining us from Hancock, New Hampshire. Steve is a former Peace Corps volunteer, Audubon naturalist, award-winning recording artist and author, composer, musician, and the recipient of the Parent's Choice Gold Award for his CD Trees of Life. You've heard his music on NPR, PBS, and 2 compositions right here on this podcast. But mostly I've known Steve as my delightfully droll brother-in-law. Barry in the 3rd grade wrote:"I really likt your songs and storeys. What do you do for a liveing?" I've invited Steve to share with us a most wonderful story about how his musing on Martin Luther King, Jr. and America the Beautiful traveled all its musical way to becoming a new America the Dream composition. What makes this such a neat story? Let's listen to learn how musing became musical notes.Click this LINK to access Part 1, links, resources, America the Dream website, downloadable music, and get in touch with Steve and Night Heron Music!Easy-to-access resources: America the Dream To learn more from Steve, tap the Interview Clips: Steve Schuch and Night Heron Music You're invited: “Come for the stories - stay for the magic!” Speaking of magic, I hope you'll subscribe, follow, share a 5-star rating and nice review on your social media or podcast channel of choice, and join us next time! Remember to stop by the website, check out the Services, arrange a Discovery Call, and Opt In to stay current with Diane and Quarter Moon Story Arts (while we are under re-construction) and on LinkedIn.  Stories From Women Who Walk Production TeamPodcaster: Diane F Wyzga & Quarter Moon Story ArtsMusic: Mer's Waltz from Crossing the Waters by Steve Schuch & Night Heron MusicAll content and image © 2019 to Present: for credit & attribution Quarter Moon Story Arts 

NextGen Banker
Jason Mikula: Digital Marketer Turned Fintech Thought Leader

NextGen Banker

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2023 39:12


Jason Mikula started his weekly newsletter, Fintech Business Weekly, as a pandemic project. Today, the financial technology publication is one of the better-known reads in the industry.  Mikula talks with David about his predictions for the future of finance – including thoughts on NFTs, crypto and where these elements of Web3 fit into the financial industry. Banking as a Service is also discussed in addition to fintech's potential to support financial health among consumers. Mikula also speaks to his time in the Peace Corps and how he moved from working in digital marketing to the financial industry.

Cops and Writers Podcast
101 Stop The Presses! Author, Pulitzer Prize Nominee, And Chicago Newsman Extraordinaire, John Gorman Is On My Show!

Cops and Writers Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 74:58


Today's show takes us to the Windy City, The City of Big Shoulders. Yes, of course, I'm talking about the place of my birth and where I spent my youth, Chicago. Today we will be speaking with Pulitzer Prize nominee John Gorman.John Gorman started his journalism career at the storied City News Bureau of Chicago before joining the Chicago Tribune. He spent half of his 26 years at the Tribune as a reporter covering courts, cops, and catastrophes, and was twice a runner-up for the Pulitzer Prize. As an Assistant City Editor for 13 years, he oversaw the city desk, herding, helping, and harassing reporters. Later, he spent nearly a decade as the Communications Director for the Cook County State's Attorney's office. Prior to starting his journalism career, he was in the Peace Corps in India and later worked in Australia and South Africa, and traveled through Europe before returning to the U.S. in 1971.John is also an author and we discuss his debut novel, Death Before Life. In today's episode we discuss:·      His time in the Peace Corps and traveling around the world as a young man. ·      His interest in journalism and his time as a reporter, then editor for the Chicago Tribune.·      What it was like being on the ‘front lines' reporting some of the most dangerous stories.·      Close calls and putting himself in harm's way when getting a story. ·      Being one of the first reporters on the scene of serial killer John Wayne Gacy's home. ·      His debut novel, “Death Before Life.”All of this and more on today's episode of the Cops and Writers podcast.Check out John's Amazon Author Page!Check out Field Training (Brew City Blues Book 1)!!Enjoy the Cops and Writer's book series.Please visit the Cops and Writers website.If you have a question for the sarge, hit him up at his email.Join the fun at the Cops and Writers Facebook groupConsider buying me a coffee :-)Do you enjoy gritty, action-packed real-life police dramas to get your fill of blood, heartache, and cop humor, and maybe even a little romance? You've come to the right series! If you're a fan of Hill Street Blues, Southland, or Bosch you're going to love Brew City Blues! Book one, Field Training, and two, Probation, are now live, and book three, Choir Practice, is now on pre-order and will be available for purchase February 10, 2023. Exclusively on Amazon!Support the show

Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers
Dan Lutz - One Writer's Conundrum: Shaping a Novel to Sell

Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2023 31:48


Dr. Dan Lutz began his education career and passion for international education as a high school teacher in the Teacher Corps in New York and the Peace Corps in Afghanistan. His career has included training new Peace Corps Volunteers in Iran, helping initiate the development of Korean Heritage Camp for families with adopted children from that country, serving on the Board of Directors for Colorado Heritage Camps, co-founding the International Studies Schools Association (ISSA), and teaching graduate global education classes for teachers. He developed a high school international studies magnet program which he directed for twenty-one years. He expanded that  program into the Denver Center for International Studies (DCIS), a DPS magnet school for grades 6-12, where he served as principal for four years. Subsequently he designed and established three more DCIS schools for DPS and consulted with a national network of international studies schools to which the DCIS schools belonged. From his professional experience Dan writes on global competence education and reinventing school design. His forthcoming book challenges obsolete assumptions still in play in most schools which continue to defy equity of learning access for all students. Dr. Lutz loves creating poetry and sketch pieces, short stories, and is seeking publication of his first completed novel. It introduces a series spotlighting an identity journey of a child adopted internationally, beginning with the traumatic story preceding his adoption. For video versions of this podcast, subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBP81nfbKnDRjs-Nar9LNe20138AiPyP8 Mark Stevens' website: https://www.writermarkstevens.com/ Intro Music by Moby Gratis: https://mobygratis.com/ Outro Music by Dan-o-Songs: https://danosongs.com/

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast
The Oral Microbiome Plays A Big Role In Regulating Your Immune System

The Real Truth About Health Free 17 Day Live Online Conference Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 7:52


The Oral Microbiome Plays A Big Role In Regulating Your Immune System Dr. Gerald Curatola• http://www.RejuvDentist.com • Book – The Mouth Body Connection #GeraldCuratola#RejuvenationDentistry #HealthyMouth #Inflammation Dr. Gerald Curatola is the founder of Rejuvenation Dentistry and the author of the The Mouth-Body Connection. The Mouth-Body Connection explores the bi-directional relationship between the health of your mouth and your body and provides a groundbreaking program for creating a healthy mouth that will help maintain a healthy body. The mouth acts as mirror and a gateway and reflects what is happening in the rest of your body and the health of your mouth appears to have a profound impact on the rest of your body. Chronic, low-grade oral disease is a major source of inflammation throughout your body, which can sometimes result in serious systemic problems, including cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and premature birth. The Mouth-Body Connection educates the reader on the natural ecology of the mouth. The oral microbiome consists of communities of 20 billion microorganisms of more than six hundred types-keeping these communities balanced is the key to well-being. Dr. Curatola's program, thirty years in the making, helps to restore microbiome balance and reduce health-destroying inflammation. The Curatola Care Program fosters a healthy oral microbiome by means of diet, supplements, exercise, and stress reduction. Four weeks of meal plans and fifty delicious recipes will convince you that eating for balance can be a treat. There are supplement schedules for each stage, two high-intensity band workouts that take only 15 minutes twice a week, relaxation techniques, and yoga postures to fight inflammation. In just four weeks, you will reboot your body and begin to take control of your health. Best of all, your brilliant smile will prove that you have never felt better. He is an internationally recognized biologic doctor with nearly four decades of experience as a clinician, researcher, educator, and humanitarian. Dr. Curatola graduated from Colgate University with a topical concentration in Neuroscience, and his BS degree in Biology and Psychology. He received his Doctor of Dental Surgery (DDS) from New York University College of Dentistry, where he currently serves as Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor in Cariology and Comprehensive Care. Prior to his graduation, Dr. Curatola performed voluntary dentistry and oral surgery with the Ministry of Health of the Government of Jamaica, West Indies with the Peace Corps. Dr. Curatola received three United States Patents for his clinical research and formulations, and he is the co-inventor of the first “prebiotic” oral care formulation, Revitin (revitin.com) Dr. Curatola's dental work has been featured on The Doctor Oz Show, CBS, FOX and ABC television networks, and he has published extensively in professional and lay publications. Dr. Curatola's latest book, The Mouth-Body Connection, explores the intricate bidirectional pathways between oral and systemic disease. To Contact Gerald Curatola go to RejuvDentist.com Disclaimer:Medical and Health information changes constantly. Therefore, the information provided in this podcast should not be considered current, complete, or exhaustive. Reliance on any information provided in this podcast is solely at your own risk. The Real Truth About Health does not recommend or endorse any specific tests, products, procedures, or opinions referenced in the following podcasts, nor does it exercise any authority or editorial control over that material. The Real Truth About Health provides a forum for discussion of public health issues. The views and opinions of our panelists do not necessarily reflect those of The Real Truth About Health and are provided by those panelists in their individual capacities. The Real Truth About Health has not reviewed or evaluated those statements or claims. 

Think and Be Fit: Fitness Redesigned
254. Throw Rocks in the Water and Be a Ripple Maker

Think and Be Fit: Fitness Redesigned

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2023 7:56


Few will have the greatness to bend history itself, but each of us can work to change a small portion of events, and in the total of all those acts will be written the history of this generation. Thousands of Peace Corps volunteers are making a difference in isolated villages and city slums in dozens of countries. Thousands of unknown men and women in Europe resisted the occupation of the Nazis and many died, but all added to the ultimate strength and freedom of their countries. It is from numberless diverse acts of courage and belief that human history is shaped. Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope, and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current which can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance.” –Senator Robert F. Kennedy, June 6 , 1966 And with that be a ripple maker. Hosted by Dane Boyle | Master Transformation Coach |Life Coach | Personal Trainer | Motivational Speaker Follow me on Instagram --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/dane-boyle/message

Hiking Unfiltered
Episode #42 - Claire Dal Nogare "How is hiking like commercial fishing?"

Hiking Unfiltered

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2023 51:09


In this episode, Courtney talks with Claire Dal Nogare, thru hiker and soon to be Alaskan pilot. They discuss the fear mongering that can spring up on trail, what it is like to use a thru hike as physical therapy and they answer the question: "How is hiking like commercial fishing?" About Claire: "More than anything else, I want the world to know that I live in Alaska. I am currently working on my pilot's license to truly become a full Alaskan. In 2019 I hiked the PCT and the AT in 2022. I have also biked across the country multiple times. Most of my professional life has been as a Park ranger and commercial fisherman. Outside of the States, I have lived in Antarctica, China, and did the Peace Corps in the Dominican Republic." See her photo albums here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/cfdalnogare/albums/72157635276244963 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/exparkranger/ LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/clairedalnogare Remember, I'd love to hear from you on any topic that comes up in the show or if you know someone that would be a great guest for the show. Email me at hikingunfiltered@gmail.com. Enjoying the show? Leave us a review wherever you listen to the podcast. It really helps the show! You can also leave a voicemail for me on through the website. I may even share it on the show! Click here: https://www.hikingradionetwork.com/show/hiking-unfiltered/ You can join the Unfiltered community on Facebook to share your questions and show ideas. https://www.facebook.com/HikingUnfiltered You also find me on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/hikingunfiltered/ Check out the other shows on the Hiking Radio Network https://www.hikingradionetwork.com/ *Stuff I love!* Show the love with t-shirts and goodies from the Hiking Radio Network Trading Post https://hrntradingpost.com/ Get your Myaderm CBD pain relief products here: https://www.myaderm.com/ Use the code HIKING at checkout to get 20% off your first order! Start your own Riverside Podcast here: https://riverside.fm/?utm_campaign=cam

Truyền hình vệ tinh VOA Express - VOA
Du khách Singapore tố cán bộ sân bay Nội Bài vòi tiền | Truyền hình VOA 5/1/23 - Tháng Một 05, 2023

Truyền hình vệ tinh VOA Express - VOA

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 29:59


Một người đàn ông Singapore đăng bài lên trang cá nhân hôm 1/1/2023 tố cáo rằng ông này bị cán bộ xuất nhập cảnh tại sân bay Nội Bài ở Hà Nội vòi tiền khi ông làm thủ tục rời Việt Nam. Xem thêm: https://bit.ly/3wSHe49 Tin tức đáng chú ý khác: Cháu bé rơi vào móng cọc ở Đồng Tháp đã tử vong. Tình nguyện viên Peace Corps chính thức ra mắt tại Việt Nam. Bệnh viện Thượng Hải quá tải, bệnh nhân la liệt trên hành lang vì COVID. COVID tăng, dân Trung Quốc xếp hàng dài tại nhà xác. Đa số EU ủng hộ việc xét nghiệm COVID đối với du khách Trung Quốc. Trung Quốc sẵn sàng xử lý các vấn đề hàng hải ‘thân thiện' với Philippines. Nga nói bị trúng phi đạn của Ukraine là do lính dùng điện thoại di động. Nếu không vào được VOA, xin hãy dùng đường link https://bit.ly/VOATiengViet3 để vượt tường lửa.

Stats + Stories
A News and Numbers Alum | Stats + Stories Episode 260

Stats + Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2023 28:41


Data have always been important to the work of journalists. from Jacob Riis is reporting on how the other half lived in late 1800s New York City, to stories about gun violence in 2022, journalists need numbers to tell their stories. But not every reporter is trained to find and work with data. For those who want to dive into investigative journalism which often depends on complicated data, learning the skills to clean and analyze statistical information is a crucial part of the job. That is the focus of this episode of Stats+Stories with guest Austin Fast. Fast is a journalist based in Phoenix with over a decade of radio, TV, print and web experience, currently focusing on data analysis and investigative work at National Public Radio. He specializes in data analysis on NPR's investigations team, often collaborating with reporters from NPR Member stations across the country. Before coming to NPR, Fast reported for KJZZ in Phoenix and covered the world's largest wild salmon fishery at KDLG in Dillingham, Alaska. He's also written breaking news at a Cincinnati TV station and taught English overseas with the Peace Corps.

Owl Have You Know
Generations of Rice Grads feat. Chuck Yates ‘94

Owl Have You Know

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 42:08


From grandparents to parents, brothers and uncles, it seems like almost everyone in the Yates family has attended Rice, some even multiple times! That includes our guest today Chuck Yates, who earned a B.A. in political science from Rice in 1991, graduating magna cum laude, and later returned to earn his MBA from Rice in 1994.Chuck Yates is an investor and former managing partner at Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, as well as the host of the Chuck Yates Needs a Job podcast. He is a self-proclaimed “dysfunctional life coach who's had enough therapy to quote Brene Brown chapter and verse,” pivoting to creating and hosting a podcast after being publicly fired from Kayne Anderson, when the firm consolidated its energy teams. Chuck sits down with host Scott Gale at the Digital Wildcatters Podcasting Studio right here in Houston to talk about his long-standing ties to Rice, pursuing a career in investment banking, his connections to Nashville and the music industry, and his hopes for rebranding the energy industry. Read more about how Rice Business ranks #6 for best MBA for finance (Princeton Review).Episode Quotes:Advice from Dr. Zeff in Accounting at Rice33:11 - Zeff would do this thing where you'd sit and talk and it would be, “What do you want to do in your career?” Oh, I want to be an investment banker, management consultant, whatever. And Zeff would go, “Oh, that's great.” And kind of bait you into some conversation. Then Zeff would go, “Hey, If you won the lottery tomorrow and you had $200 million, what would you go do then?” And just kind of bait you along on your story. And inevitably your story was not, I want to be a banker, you know, or I want to be a management consultant. It was, I'd go join the Peace Corps, I'd do all that, and Zeff would get you all you jazzed up about whatever you're saying when you have all the money in the world and then Zeff would go, “Why do you need money to do that? I've never seen you that excited in your life.”The Rice student body04:30 - The collection of intelligence that I was surrounded with at Rice, far and away, the greatest amount of intelligence I've ever been surrounded by.Changing the narratives about the energy industry39:23 - 75% of that in terms of just getting the narrative back is convincing people we're human, so don't print up the “Freeze a Yankee” bumper sticker when they have high energy prices. And it's okay to have an Instagram page where you go out to the oil field and just say, man, here's a drill bed, and isint it kind of cool? It's amazing how close we actually are to being able to change the narrative.Life after getting fired31:28 -  I've read all of Brene Brown's stuff, but I think the key thing she finds in her research is, do we feel worthy? And when we don't feel worthy, that's ultimately our bad behavior. We drink too much, we do this, we do that. We yell, scream, all that good stuff. And so, figuring out why you should feel worthy is something I think individuals just have to do. Mine kind of came with a reconnection back with God.Breaking into investment banking:23:26 - So convince 'em that you're ready to work. Convince 'em that it's okay that half your work gets thrown in the garbage can. Just the nature of the beast. And third, go find yourself an advocate who can really pound the table for you in there. Show Links:Guest Profile: Chuck Yates on LinkedIn Chuck Yates Needs A Job Podcast

Dorothy's Place
Episode #33: Jamie Price on Sargent Shriver's Politics of Conscience

Dorothy's Place

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 2, 2023 49:28


Guest host Joe Waters (co-founder and CEO of Capita) joins Elias for a conversation with James R. Price, co-author with Kenneth R. Melchin of a new biography of the founder of the Peace Corps and head of Lyndon Johnson's War of Poverty in the 1960s. The focus is on the way Shriver (1915-2011) brought an instinctive spirituality to public service while avoiding sectarianism of any kind. Price is the executive director of the Sargent Shriver Peace Institute. Copies are available here: https://bookshop.org/p/books/spiritualizing-politics-without-politicizing-religion-the-example-of-sargent-shriver-james-r-price/17522834.

All About the Girls
Katie Ridinger: Youth Enrichment Director at Valpo Parks, Peace Corps Volunteer in Ukraine, & future pickleball expert

All About the Girls

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 1, 2023 61:30


This episode features Katie Ridinger. Katie, Youth Enrichment Director at Valpo Parks, has been involved in youth development work for over 20 years.  Her proudest accomplishment was her service as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ukraine from 2013-2016.  Katie has an undergraduate degree in broadcasting and a master's degree in Intercultural Youth and Family Development.  She enjoys playing pickleball, line dancing and putting together jigsaw puzzles.GreatNews.Life and Podcast Host Jenny Craig-Brown have transformed the All About the Girls annual event into a podcast! These monthly episodes feature incredible women giving the audience all the insight about what makes them happy, successful, and motivational. New episodes launch on Sundays to make sure to start your week on a positive note!The All About the Podcast is brought to you by GreatNews.Life

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast
#217 SynGAP1 with Mike Graglia and Elli Brimble

DNA Today: A Genetics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2022


Patient advocate, Mike Graglia, and genetic counselor, Elli Brimble, join DNA Today for a conversation about SYNGAP1-related non-syndromic intellectual disability, a rare genetic disorder caused by a variant on the SYNGAP1 gene. Mike Graglia has always worked on complicated problems – he can't help himself. So when his son was diagnosed with SYNGAP1 in 2018, he founded the SynGAP Research Fund and continues to lead it as a volunteer. Mike has been trying to make the world a better place for a while – after the Peace Corps & grad school (MBA/MA) he joined the World Bank, then BCG Healthcare and eventually the Gates Foundation. His professional background is an ideal preparation for leading SRF to a cure for SYNGAP1.Elli Brimble has worked as a genetic counselor since 2016 and is currently the Research Director for Rare Disease at Ciitizen (now part of Invitae), a company that empowers people with access to their health data. She earned her B.Sc. in Genetics at Western University, a M.Sc. in Molecular Genetics at the University of Toronto, and pursued her genetic counseling degree at Boston University School of Medicine. On This Episode We Discuss:Mike's experience as a patient advocate and his son Tony's diagnostic odyssey Elli's role as a genetic counselor in diagnosing SYNGAPHow SYNGAP1 affects the body on a biochemical level (SYNGAP1 haploinsufficiency)Sleep issues associated with SYNGAP and other symptomsThe prevalence of SYNGAP and why it's advantageous to identify 1,000 or more people with the conditionLabs and organizations that have been helpful in supporting the SYNGAP communityConnecting with fellow parents/caregivers who have kids with SYNGAPThe status of SYNGAP1 research and potential treatmentsMike's podcast, SYNGAP10You can learn more about Mike's family and the SynGAP Research Fund in this youtube video, and by following them on Twitter (SynGAp Research Fund, Mike Graglia), Facebook, LinkedIn, and Instagram. Stay tuned for the next new episode of DNA Today kicking off the new year on January 6th, 2023! New episodes are released every Fridays. In the meantime, you can binge over 215 other episodes on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, streaming on the website, or any other podcast player by searching, “DNA Today”. Episodes since 2021 are also recorded with video which you can watch on our YouTube channel. DNA Today is hosted and produced by Kira Dineen. Our social media lead is Corinne Merlino. Our video lead is Amanda Andreoli. Our outreach Intern is Sanya Tinaikar. Our Social Media Intern is Kajal Patel. And our Graphic Designer Ashlyn Enokian.See what else we are up to on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and our website, DNAToday.com. Questions/inquiries can be sent to info@DNAtoday.com. As a listener of DNA Today you have heard me interview countless guests about genetic testing. I'm sure you have thought to yourself, “I wonder what my results would be”. Now you can find out or gift it to someone else for the holidays! At Panacea, you can access affordable Whole Exome Sequencing, that's analyzing all of your coding genes, genetic counseling and physician oversight in a 10-minute workflow for under $1000. As a DNA Today listener you get 30% off (that's a $300 discount), just use the code “DNATODAY” at seekpanacea.com. Check out our interview with the Founder and CEO of Panacea, Dahlia Attia-King, in Episode #215 of DNA Today. (Sponsored)As a listener of DNA Today, you probably heard me talk about NIPT, non-invasive prenatal screening, that looks for extra or missing chromosome conditions during pregnancy. But did you know there is one that can also screen for recessive disorders (like cystic fibrosis) and fetal antigens? BillionToOne offers UNITY Screen, which does all this from one blood draw from a pregnant person. Visit unityscreen.com for more info. And stay tuned for our upcoming episodes with BillionToOne exploring non-invasive prenatal screening for recessive conditions and red blood cell fetal antigens! (Sponsored)Do you like listening to podcasts that help you get centered and reframe your mindset? Check out All Things Therapy. The show focuses on the concept that we can change consciousness one conversation at a time. Most episodes are the same length as ours, about a half hour, and feature an engaging guest. You can stream on all major podcast players by searching “All Things Therapy”.

How Humans Heal
#140 Naturopathic Medicine with Dr. Tia Trivisonno

How Humans Heal

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 43:45


In today's podcast interview, I had the chance to talk about naturopathic medicine with my friend and colleague Dr. Tia Trivisonno (@drttrivisonno)    Dr. Tia and I met about 15 years ago when she was a naturopathic medical student in Portland, Oregon and I went to lecture at the naturopathic medical school about the effort to license the profession in New York. That was when I was president of the New York Association of Naturopathic Physicians (NYANP). Subsequently, after Tia graduated as a naturopathic doctor and acupuncturist, she took a position at Transformational Healing Solutions in Glen Head, NY, where she has practiced for the past 12 years, and she is currently president of the NYANP.    Dr. Tia and I have several things in common: We both specialize in helping with mental health issues using naturopathic approaches, we are passionate about increasing awareness for naturopathic medicine, and we both love to travel.    Prior to getting her naturopathic degree, Dr. Tia studied Ayurvedic medicine in India and spent two years doing environmental work as a Peace Corps volunteer in Paraguay. Through her travels she developed a love of service and a deep respect for cultural traditions and indigenous medicine.    In this professional conversation, Dr. Tia and I talk about how the philosophy of naturopathic medicine differs from that of conventional medicine. For example, naturopathic medicine aims to treat the whole person instead of addressing the human body as separate parts.     Naturopathic medicine uses scientific evidence and an understanding of how the body works with the benefits of using nutrition, herbs, homeopathy, and other natural approaches to support the body's ability to heal.     Naturopathic medicine also includes the mind-body connection to address health issues related to anxiety, depression, and other stress-related health issues. Our minds are part of our bodies, and if we have mental health issues, we will probably suffer from another health issue somewhere else in our bodies, and vice versa.    And yet too often people end up being led to believe there is something “wrong with them” and that the problem is all in their heads. Dr. Tia and I both see that unfortunately, many people who suffer from mental health issues may be placed on a medication and yet could still be suffering from a lot of symptoms and never get to solve the actual underlying problem. They may be going to see a specialist, like a psychiatrist for example, but often the root cause of the issue is not identified or addressed.     For example, whenever a person is experiencing anxiety and /or depression, it is important to consider and address gut health, nutrient deficiencies, adrenal function, thyroid, and the endocrine system in general, as well as underlying infection(s) and food intolerances or sensitivities.     To learn more, definitely listen in to the full podcast episode.    With a naturopathic approach to mental health, we see our patients improve so much faster because we take into account the whole person, aim to identify all the underlying causes and address them, and rebalance what is out of balance. Not only that, but we find that patients are able to resolve issues such as anxiety and depression and be able to safely decrease the use of medications (with their psychiatrist). This can be life changing to be free of the use of medications that have many side effects and withdrawal symptoms.    As Dr. Tia summarizes: It's all about balancing that mind-body connection. So, when we get to the root of that imbalance, we can address it and fix the whole situation. A few years Dr. Tia started surfing, so I asked her if that has influenced the way she understands health and how she helps her patients. She said absolutely! She realized that our emotions are like weather patterns. They are meant to be with us, and they do change. Feeling better and living a healthy life does not mean that you will never experience anxiety or that you will feel sad over a loss for example. But if we really work with all these different factors supporting the balance of body and mind, we can minimize their impact on our daily lives.     Dr. Tia and I want to make sure everyone knows that you don't have to choose between naturopathic medicine or conventional medicine. They can be combined so that you get the best of both approaches. Your naturopathic doctor will work as a detective, looking for the root cause of any kind of symptomatology. In some cases that may be multi-factorial, which may be why a person is been suffering so much and not finding so many answers because it's not just the gut health, for example, it could also be connected to trauma and some other system like the endocrine system.     The naturopathic doctor will be a guide who teaches and helps you with basic treatment guidelines, like things that you can do at home, whether its hydrotherapy, castor oil packs, or other simple things to care for yourself that will support your overall general health and reduce symptoms and make the need for other more invasive interventions less likely.    Naturopathic doctors also understand all about the conventional medicine approach and different specialties like cardiology, gastroenterology, and dermatology. Often patients come in with a diagnosis, but their only option is a medication, and they would like to address the underlying cause instead of relying on a medication. Or they come in with laboratory results showing signs that there could be an issue down the line in which case a naturopathic doctor will help them prevent the health issue from getting worse.    Overall, naturopathic doctors who are licensed or qualified to be licensed in states that offer licensure, are trained to understand health issues and lab tests, and not just look at it as disease care, but look for patterns that could emerge and guide you in modifying your habits, like dietary changes or stress recovery activities, to get to a healthier life naturally.    If you want to reach out to Dr. Tia Trivisonno and learn how she can help you, please check out her website: https://www.drtiatrivisonno.com or her Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/drttrivisonno/     To learn more about naturopathic medicine, visit NYANP.org, Naturopathic.org and AANMC.org.    If you want to learn more about my approach to helping with mental health and how I help patients transform their lives, you can find a free masterclass here: https://doctordoni.com/transformanxiety/     You can read all about my protocol in my book Master Your Stress Reset Your Health: https://doctordoni.com/master-your-stress/.    In the book, I share the quiz I developed to help you identify how stress has affected you specifically by knowing your Stress Type. You can also take the Stress Type Quiz online here: https://doctordoni.com/quiz/stress-quiz/     You can also reach out to me to set up a one-on-one appointment if you prefer here: https://doctordoni.com/work-with-me/     We're here to help you!     Connect with Dr. Doni:    Facebook HTTPS://FACEBOOK.COM/DRDONIWILSON   Instagram HTTPS://INSTAGRAM.COM/DRDONIWILSON   YouTube HTTPS://YOUTUBE.COM/USER/DONIWILSONND   Weekly Wellness Wisdom Newsletter: HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/WWW     -   Books and Resources:    Order My New Book: https://www.amazon.com/Master-Your-Stress-Reset-Health/dp/1953295576   Stress Warrior Book (FREE)  HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/STRESSWARRIOR      Stress Warrior Stress Resiliency Facebook Group (FREE)  HTTPS://FACEBOOK.COM/GROUPS/STRESSWARRIOR     7-day Stress Reset (FREE)  HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/STRESS-RESET     HPV & Cervical Dysplasia Guide (FREE)  HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/HPV-AND-CERVICAL-DYSPLASIA-GUIDE/     -   Personalized Solutions:    If you'd like to meet with Dr. Doni one-on-one for your health, request a Health Breakthrough Session: HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/BREAKTHROUGH     To get an idea of more comprehensive options, read about Dr. Doni's Signature Consultation Programs: HTTPS://DOCTORDONI.COM/SERVICES   Disclosure: Some of the links in this post are product links and affiliate links and if you go through them to make a purchase I will earn a commission at no cost to you. Keep in mind that I link these companies and their products because of their quality and not because of the commission I receive from your purchases. The decision is yours, and whether or not you decide to buy something is completely up to you.

The Rob Burgess Show
Ep. 223 - Dan Grossman

The Rob Burgess Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 52:53


Hello and welcome to The Rob Burgess Show. I am, of course, your host, Rob Burgess. On this our 223rd episode, our guest is Dan Grossman. Dan Grossman is an adjunct professor of English at Marian University in Indianapolis and a former Peace Corps volunteer in Niger from 1992 to 1994. He has published often in NUVO, a news publication covering the central Indiana area. He also served as managing editor and arts editor for that publication. He has also published poetry in So it Goes, pLopLop, The Indianapolis Anthology and in many other publications. Currently, he edits the online blog IndyCorrespondent.org You can find his book Mindfucking Roundabouts of Carmel, Indiana on his author spotlight page at: https://www.lulu.com/spotlight/dangrossman Follow the podcast on Mastodon at: https://newsie.social/@therobburgessshow Sign up for my newsletter at: http://tinyletter.com/therobburgessshow Listen to and support the podcast at: https://linktr.ee/therobburgessshow

Afrolit Podcast
BRB Doing the WERK ft. Ludi Nsimba

Afrolit Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 57:08


Hey Afrolit Fam: Welcome back to the pod!! Today's episode of Afrolit with Ludi Nsimba. A friend of the pod, as well as a force to be wrecked with! A true global citizen (you'll hear where she's from), has served in the Peace Corps and now works from Prompt PR as the Chief Operations Officer. In this episode, Ekua and Ludi talk about how to stay motivated during uncertainty, graduating during the pandemic, and not feeling like you are wasting time as you stroll down unexpected paths. Check out Afrolit's Social: https://www.instagram.com/afrolitpodcast https://www.twitter.com/afrolitpodcast Ekua's Info: https://www.instagram.com/ekua.pm https://www.twitter.com/ekuapm https://www.youtube.com/ekuapm Ludi's Info: https://www.instagram.com/maisonludi/ https://twitter.com/MaisonLudi --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/afrolit/message

Dastardly Cleverness in the Service of Good
Sam Farr: How Democracy Can Work

Dastardly Cleverness in the Service of Good

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 89:28


Sam Farr devoted 44 years of his life to elected office at the local, state, and federal level. That included 24 years as the Congressman for the Central Coast of California, where he grew up in the seaside village of Carmel.  Among his inspirations were his father, longtime state legislator Fred Farr; President John F. Kennedy; and the Peace Corps, which he joined as a young man. If that makes him sound like an idealist, that's accurate, but it's only half the picture. The other half is very pragmatic, with an obsessive focus on the nuts and bolts of policy and politics. As you'll hear in this interview, when both of those halves come together, democracy can work. Sam has lots of great stories about how that happens, some of them funny, some very moving, and all of them hopeful.

Gutsy Health | Nutrition and Medicine
S2E50 - Unpacking the Superfood Moringa

Gutsy Health | Nutrition and Medicine

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 41:06


 Show Summary: "Based on the scientific research of Dr. Jed Fahey, who started the Chemo Protective Institute at Johns Hopkins University, cruciferous Moringa and Broccoli share closest properties such as the NRF2 pathways and sulforaphane, which detoxifies and fights off cancer."Moringa is the phenomenal superfood you never thought you needed. A humble yet miraculous tree found in third world countries, its leaves are the locals' secret that keeps their bodies healthy and strong. Declared the national vegetable in the Philippines and a staple of ancient Ayurvedic medicine, it is a source of 49 vitamins, minerals, and essential amino acids, not to mention the abundant medicinal benefits of its tiny leaves and the entire tree.Our guest, Lisa Curtis, is the CEO and Founder of Kuli Kuli Inc. She was a former Peace Corps assigned to Niger, Africa, and as a vegetarian, she survived only through the subsistence of rice and millet. Feeling terrible, she soon learned of the amazing Kuli Kuli, or what is globally known as Moringa Oleifera.After including Moringa in her daily diet, she dramatically felt energized, and her joints hurt much less. Then, through more profound research, she knew that bringing it to America would positively impact more people and even help save the planet. As a result, they distribute 90% of their products with post-consumer recycled plastic and have planted 24 million trees in their supply chain.Combat malnutrition and hunger in your own home through Moringa. Join us and listen to Episode 49 of the Gutsy Health Podcast to learn more!Exceptional Highlights:Offering a wide range of health benefits, the Moringa has high fiber, helps with satiety, weight management, blood sugar, and cholesterol control, and even lactation enhancement for breastfeeding moms.Moringa has nine times more protein than yogurt, ten times more vitamin A than carrots, 15 times more potassium than bananas, 17 times more calcium than milk, and 25 times more iron than spinach.Moringa is more bioavailable than Turmeric, which means that the absorption rate of its potent active ingredients is higher.Show Highlights: Pickers communities in the US are obsessed with Moringa because it provides everything the body needs. Lisa Curtis 09:32Composed of 80% water, it has more space to carry macronutrients and phytonutrients in its leaves. It's also anti-inflammation, anti-cancer, and a cruciferous vegetable.Kuli Kuli products contain 400 to 500 milligrams of active Moringa ingredients.Lisa Curtis 18:03 Moringa can be mixed in for lattes, oatmeal, and pancakes. Superfood shakes, peanut butter, chocolate bars, and gummies are also perfect for kids. Use the code GUTSY to get 30% off when you order.Kale's origin as a superfood example of how it took time before it became widely acceptedLisa Curtis 28:04 Kale was a backyard weed that Pizza Hut only purchased as a garnish or a salad bar ornament fifteen years ago. Since then, the American palate has evolved and is more open to bitter tastes due to its superior nutritional content.Get 20% off your first order of Resist Nutrition Bars, a powerhouse snack for hormone and blood sugar regulation. Order yours at www.resistnutrition.comSponsor Link:www.resistnutrition.comImportant Links: Kulikuli Foods WebsiteGutsy Health Academy

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman
1936: Rise of Housing Prices & Loan Limits, Confessions of An Economic Hit Man by John Perkins

Creating Wealth Real Estate Investing with Jason Hartman

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 62:30


Today Jason has something old, and something new for you as he welcomes John Perkins, his favorite Economic Hit Man. John has helped U.S. intelligence agencies and multinational corporations cajole and blackmail foreign leaders into serving U.S. foreign policy and awarding lucrative contracts to American business. From the U.S. military in Iraq to infrastructure development in Indonesia, from Peace Corps volunteers in Africa to jackals in Venezuela, Perkins exposes a conspiracy of corruption that has fueled instability and anti-Americanism around the globe, with consequences reflected in our daily headlines. Having raised the alarm, Perkins passionately addresses how Americans can work to create a more peaceful and stable world for future generations. But before that, listen in as Jason explains why housing prices are going UP as he compares FHA loan limits versus GSE ones. Make sure to watch the video on his YouTube channel so you can see the CHARTS!  And tomorrow night, Tuesday December 20, catch a Live Q & A with the 3 Amigos- Ken McElroy, George Gammon and Jason! 4pm PT 7pm ET on Jason's YouTube channel! Early bird rates are ending soon! Go to EmpoweredInvestor.com/LIVE today and join a group of people who are invested in your financial success! Learn how to leverage income property, the world's most favored asset class, to your advantage! Connect with other investors, third party vendors like lenders, 1031 exchange specialists (to name a few) and Jason's amazing team of specialists who are ready to help you succeed!  Key Takeaways: Jason's editorial 1:26 Something old, something new  2:37 What will push housing prices... UP due to increase in FHA 'loan limits' 3:29 For example Atlanta, Georgia 4:00 This surprises me: Austin, Texas; kudos to the lobbyists? 5:24 Los Angeles! Buy a million dollar house with thirty grand!  7:06 Conventional loans- Atlanta and Los Angeles 8:14 A cyclical market like Phoenix FHA vs. GSE loan limits 9:12 Orlando, Florida; why this matters 10:05 Live Q & A with the 3 Amigos- Ken McElroy, George Gammon and Jason 10:52 The room diagram for the Empowered Investor LIVE! VIP tickets have sold out! 13:32 Meet some of our speakers 14:06 The Twitter Files with Matt Taibbi John Perkins interview 17:55 Introducing John Perkins; creating a truly global empire primarily without the military 20:51 Destroying Jamaica and Honduras 24:30 Minimum wage argument and exploiting cheap labor 25:52 What is an Economic Hit Man; a brief background and work of John Perkins 29:10 Predatory capitalism a failed system; exploiting a country's natural resources and labor 31:54 A John Maynard Keynes response 34:43 The company needs to be a good corporate citizen in the community 36:46 Predatory government, invasion of privacy, very orwellian 1984 39:04 Fascist Corporatocracy; from religion to governments to corporations 41:54 Insight in Iran  47:27 The coming deregulation; serving the public interest 51:31 The regulation scam 53:48 Up to what degree; not having control over a market in any given area or community 56:44 Consumers must take more responsibility   Quotables: "Less than 5% of us live in the US and we consume 25% of the world's resources" - John Perkins "Lose money for a little while in order to monopolize a marketplace" - Jason Hartman "In order for us to have homeland security in the United States, we have to recognize that the entire planet is our homeland." - John Perkins "We have to recognize we are in a space station, with no space shuttle to rescue us; we've got to rescue ourselves." -  John Perkins   Mentioned: Hate Inc. by Matt Taibbi Confessions of An Economic Hit Man by John Perkins JohnPerkins.org     Follow Jason on TWITTER, INSTAGRAM & LINKEDIN Twitter.com/JasonHartmanROI Instagram.com/jasonhartman1/ Linkedin.com/in/jasonhartmaninvestor/ Call our Investment Counselors at: 1-800-HARTMAN (US) or visit: https://www.jasonhartman.com/ Free Class:  Easily get up to $250,000 in funding for real estate, business or anything else: http://JasonHartman.com/Fund CYA Protect Your Assets, Save Taxes & Estate Planning: http://JasonHartman.com/Protect Get wholesale real estate deals for investment or build a great business – Free Course: https://www.jasonhartman.com/deals Special Offer from Ron LeGrand: https://JasonHartman.com/Ron Free Mini-Book on Pandemic Investing: https://www.PandemicInvesting.com

Authors on the Air Global Radio Network

Join authors Nola Nash and Laura Kemp as they talk writing and travel with their new friend author Bonnar Spring! Pour a drink and join the fun! https://bonnarspring.com/ I learned to read in kindergarten and never stopped. The restrictive policy of my town library (What? Only fourteen books per card?) led me to become omnivorous—my brothers' science fiction and adventure, my mother's classics, my father's, well, those books hidden behind the hardcovers on the top shelf. A nomad at heart, I hitchhiked across Europe at sixteen and joined the Peace Corps after college. I teach ESL at a community college. I'd do it for free, but I'm pleased they pay me—and long school vacations mean leisurely travels. Hosts: author Nola Nash https://nolanash.com and author Laura Kemp https://laurakempbooks.com/ Thanks to Pam Stack - Executive Producer - Authors on the Air Global Radio Network www.authorsontheair.com @Copyrighted by Authors on the Air Global Radio Network LLC.

Big League Philanthropist
Sn 4, Episode 8: Tori Ramataboee, US Soccer Foundation

Big League Philanthropist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 43:44


Tori joined the U.S. Soccer Foundation in February 2019 as a Program Associate, and has since tackled many roles across the Soccer for Success program to support training, technical assistance, curriculum development, events, grant management, and special projects. Prior to joining the Foundation, she was the Director of Development at ComePlayDetroit helping to grow community programming and partnerships, ultimately increasing opportunities for physical activity and play throughout the city. Additionally, Tori was Community Affairs Intern at the Detroit Tigers and served as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Lesotho at the intersection of health and youth programs for more than two years. Danielle and Tori chat about her background in both sport management and social work and how that impacted her career, her time in the Peace Corps and the work she does at the US Soccer Foundation. Tori shares what philanthropy looks like in her eyes and shares her advice on making an impact. You can learn more about the US Soccer Foundation at their website, https://ussoccerfoundation.org/. Also, make sure to follow the US Soccer Foundation on Instagram @ussoccerfoundation, on Twitter @ussoccerfndn, and on LinkedIn @U.S.SoccerFoundation. You can connect with Tori on LinkedIn as well, https://www.linkedin.com/in/tori-ramataboee/. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/bigleaguephil/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/bigleaguephil/support

Engaging Franciscan Wisdom
Living Presence: uniquely gifted by God for the world – Episode 49

Engaging Franciscan Wisdom

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 41:41


Join Jamie Deering as she shares stories and considers with curiosity what it is to be present to oneself and others as we allow God to flow through us in the midst of different ways of thinking, seeing and being in the world. For a video version of this episode, see: https://youtu.be/PZ9MDBvRbe8   From Jamie's interview: “One of the first and primary ways that God grabbed a hold of me and that I knew the presence of God in me and in the world, was through music. When I was four years old, I began piano lessons and when I was in elementary school, there was a choir and I was so excited to be part of this, creating music with our bodies and with our souls, which has felt to me like a special portal, a special pathway to God. … The thread of music through my entire life is what has anchored me in knowing and experiencing God's presence.”   “It was so important for me as my kids were growing up to be sure that they had this experience of the diversity of humankind and the diversity of thought and movement and ideas. … It was such a blessing and gift to be exposed to different ways of thinking, different ways of being in the world. I served in the Peace Corps, as you know, and lived in Macedonia for a little under two years. That plus my experiences in a variety of churches throughout my formative spiritual formation years was understanding the power of a community to form, to be so influential, in how our worldview, I'll stick with me, how my worldview was formed.”   “Recently a friend of mine distinguished for me this word, interdependence, and we've been having conversations. We come from different cultures and so I've been curious about, again, the formation of this person coming, growing up in a different culture. And my growing up in the American culture, in sort of a spirit of independence; this other culture was a spirit of interdependence. I've been learning more about what that is and connecting that to all the experiences that I've had; they have been helpful in pointing me to what it means to be interdependent and communal in thinking.”   “There are some things in contemplation we can do to set down striving; this concept of being with our thoughts then gets integrated in somatic presence with being in our bodies, being in my body. What is my body experiencing right now? Because our bodies live in present time. And so to the degree that I can be in my body, I can be present in present time. So there's that sense of being with. Then in spiritual direction, being with another, companioning another. Again, it's so important for me to be able to know what it is that's going on in me, physically, emotionally, mentally, spiritually, so that I can hold space. So I can offer that space to another person for them to be with whatever is going on in them.”   “Haecceitas … this notion that we are all uniquely gifted by God for work here on earth for God. Presence in God through us, manifesting God through us in the world. I feel this mysterious, mystical, and special gift that my gifts now are partnered so beautifully with the Franciscan Sisters, and what might God be bringing into the world through us.”   “There's an expression in contemplative prayer of the wellspring of love, the wellspring of God; that is probably the primary image that I use when I'm leading contemplation, because the wellspring is always available to us. Always. We just sit by the wellspring, contemplating the wellspring, being with the wellspring of love.”   “Living life from a place of curiosity - I find that to be very Franciscan. And expanding beyond that, the spiritual journey, to live from curiosity. To be listeners seeking to understand another, is also very Franciscan, rather than be understood. …The wellspring cultivates curiosity and the ability to be with another and hold space for another's essence, to see another in their essence.”   For a full transcript, please include episode number and email: fslfpodcast@fslf.org.   References: Saint Francis, The Praises of God: https://www.catholic.org/prayers/prayer.php?p=180   Peace Corps, Macedonia: https://www.peacecorps.gov/north-macedonia/   Contemplative Practice: see Shalem Institute for Spiritual Formation: https://shalem.org/   Spiritual Direction and Spiritual Coaching: see Jamie's website: https://soulisticcoach.com/   Haecceitas: a Franciscan term coined by John Duns Scotus re: the unique value, dignity, ‘thisness', of every person and everything; two references: https://cac.org/irreplaceable-thisness-2018-03-18/ , and https://www.ssfamericas.org/post/a-hagiography-of-blessed-john-duns-scotus     Franciscan Sisters of Little Falls, Minnesota: https://www.fslf.org/ Franciscan Programs Ministry, including Engaging Franciscan Spirituality course: https://www.fslf.org/pages/Franciscan-Programs-Ministry   Third Order Regular Rule, reference to admonishing with compassion: If discord caused by word or deed should occur among them, they should immediately (Mt. 18:35) and humbly ask forgiveness of one another even before offering their gift of prayer before the Lord (cf. Mt 5:24).And if anyone seriously neglects the form of life all profess, the minister, or others who may know of it, are to admonish that person. Those giving the admonition should neither embarrass nor speak evil of the other, but show great kindness. Let all be careful of self-righteousness, which causes anger and annoyance because of another's sin. These in oneself or in another hinder living lovingly.   Sheffield train station fountain in England, image of the Trinity as fountain fullness of God; see photo below, see a YouTube of the fountain: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9RPXt-MvN0Q      

Using the Whole Whale Podcast
Helping 40,000 Young Entrepreneurs | Sky's The Limit

Using the Whole Whale Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2022 48:37


Interview with co-founder and CEO of Sky's The Limit ,Bo Ghirardelli. Bo discusses how they built a youth entrepreneurship network that has supported over 40k young people. Learn how Sky's The Limit leverages corporate partners to help achieve its mission.    Links: Success stories Twitter Corporate partnerships   Rough Transcript [00:00:00] Today on the podcast, we have a great guest who has bravely come on, despite, frankly, Responding out of the blue to a message that we sent him cuz I found the organization very interesting. Bo Garelli, co-founder and CEO of Sky's The Limit, and that's sky's the limit.org if you wanna find them on the interwebs. [00:00:23] Really quickly on Bo, since I did find him on LinkedIn, which is amazing, but this is quite a track record. After graduating with an [00:00:31] mpa, [00:00:32] In nonprofit management from the University of Washington was in the Peace Corps. Love it. And he was a small business development consultant in Morocco. Wow. And then goes on to co-found two other organizations [00:00:45] in Morocco before, I guess in 2010 [00:00:50] for 12 years now. [00:00:51] Co-founding Sky's limit. So Bo thanks for joining us and maybe you can start with that. Why is there a limit at the sky? What is going on there? Can you tell us what the organization does? ? [00:01:01] Sure, yeah, a little. We work with underrepresented young adult entrepreneurs to help 'em chase their business dreams. [00:01:09] And we combine business mentoring, advising and support and community with learning and training and access to a startup grant fund that we build. And so those three things that the mentoring, training and funding are really Produces some greater than their parts. [00:01:25] And we've been as you mentioned, doing this for 12 years, but only six as a technology organization. And we can get more into that that journey later on maybe. Interesting. So maybe just to pull back why this cause, why this. Okay. I'd probably start at the beginning in that sense then so I was born and raised in Oakland, California to a family full of small business owners. [00:01:49] And the conversations at the table were were about how to build businesses, how to solve problems for your customers, how to think about and develop. A business that's truly valuable to the community and and then, concurrently out, out in society and school, raised on this this myth of the American dream where America was touted as this land of equal opportunity. [00:02:17] And I, I did not see that playing out in my friend group and my community. As I saw vastly different outcomes for people based on arbitrary things like their skin color and their gender and other other opportunities that were there weren't Really gave lie, I think, to in, in many ways this this idea of the American dream and equal opportunity for all. [00:02:40] And that really sparked a desire in me to figure out how I could kinda combine my. Love of entrepreneurship and love of entrepreneurs themselves with with a way of creating a more just and equitable world. So the journey led to being a, a middle school teacher. [00:02:57] I'm in south central la and when I got the opportunity to teach a, an elective chorus to, in, in middle school, I asked my students what they wanted to learn and they said they wanted to learn about business and money. And that was the first entrepreneurship course I taught and built was was helping sixth graders understand. [00:03:16] What it's like to build a business. And students loved it. I loved it. And and I went on in into the the Peace Corps and during the Arab Spring I joined the Peace Corps in order to kinda respond to this this crisis that was brewing in North Africa in particular. It was really rooted in a lack of economic opportunity for young adults of working age. [00:03:40] So roughly 50% of working age young adults at the time were unemployed. So it's a massive unemployment rate, completely destabilizing the the countries and societies and. While I was there, I asked the young people in the community, like about what what they needed. And they said, Look, we have business ideas. [00:04:01] I've got a business idea, but I don't know what to do with it. So we built a business training program really rooted in business planning. And they said, Okay, now I got this plan. What do I do? And so we said, Okay, let's go to the microfinance organizations and see if they'll lend any money. So we went to all the, these ostensibly non-profit microfinance organizations. [00:04:20] None of them would lend money to, to the young entrepreneurs. I was working with and and so we said, Screw it. We'll build our own fund. So I flew back to the Bay Area, raised some money from some generous folks in the community. And we created our own loan fund and underwrote interest free loans to entrepreneurs. [00:04:38] They got their businesses up and going, and they said, Okay. Now what, how do I keep this thing alive? How do I grow it? And that's where we tap the community of business leaders for mentors and advisors, supporters to wrap a community of support around the entrepreneurs. And so that's the birth kind of our model of combining those three things that mentoring, training and funding. [00:04:59] And and my Moroccan co-founder took that, that over. And I went back home to Oakland because the same thing the same gap in the ecosystem exists in the United States and existed in my own hometown. And so I, I felt a need to respond to my own community at home. And sure enough we can approved that out, right? [00:05:18] We launched and quickly got served hundreds of entrepreneurs. We had thousands applying from around the country, and this is for everywhere from, rural Georgia to Detroit to, to the Bronx, like people were applying from across the country. And it just showed that there was this massive gap for earliest stage young entrepreneurs, people of color, women. [00:05:39] Low income entrepreneurs who had all kinds of business ideas, everything from starting a clothing line to building a gourmet popcorn company to launching a beauty line. So the so I think that was the catalyst for kinda why we. Why we needed to transform what we were doing as a brick and mortar in Oakland to, to figure out how to serve a national and eventually global community to meet this need. [00:06:06] So that's a long answer to your question, but but that's the why and what of our story that's. [00:06:13] That's what I love about podcasts too, because guess what, , We have the time. We have the time to talk about it. And the truth is it matters quite a bit. The motivation and the process of how organizations are formed, how they have listened to the community and how they've responded over time, and very impressive that you have. [00:06:34] Served over 40,000, if I have that right. 40,000 underrepresented young entrepreneurs from 50 states, and also a number of countries. And it seems like when you move from brick and mortar to digital, I'm seeing a sort of app look on your site. It looks like there is in fact an online. Portal that you created. [00:06:56] I wonder if that isn't that moment where you went from serving into the hundreds to the thousands. Maybe you can talk me through that shift and what [00:07:03] led to it. Yeah. So in, in 2015 when we had over 5,000 applicants to our Oakland based program that at best could serve people in the Bay Area we, I went to one of my best friends and who was a tech founder. [00:07:18] He was at the time working on a small startup called blockchain.com, which is now a very big startup. And he and I, it's, he and I had spent many late nights in college talking about. What what our purpose was in life and what the what was the meaning of all this and what should we do about it? [00:07:38] And he was a child entrepreneur in the same way I was different kinds of businesses, all technology based. For him, he to building a web company as a, 14, 15 year old building websites for other businesses. And and I said, Hey, look, I know you're really busy with this other startup, but what about helping us transform? [00:07:56] There's a clear deman