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Titan, culture hero, and trickster figure in Greek mythology

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Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

This week we learn that gamblers are never happy. We watched All Dogs Go To Heaven, the animated sequel to The Cannonball Run. Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will All Dogs Go to Heaven hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Daniel, Lauren, Kellie

Screaming in the Cloud
Breaking the Tech Mold with Stephanie Wong

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 24, 2021 45:02


About StephanieStephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist. She is a leader at Google with a mission to blend storytelling and technology to create remarkable developer content. At Google, she's created over 400 videos, blogs, courses, and podcasts that have helped developers globally. You might recognize her as the host of the GCP Podcast. Stephanie is active in her community, fiercely supporting women in tech and mentoring students.Links: Personal Website: https://stephrwong.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/stephr_wong TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Vultr. Spelled V-U-L-T-R because they're all about helping save money, including on things like, you know, vowels. So, what they do is they are a cloud provider that provides surprisingly high performance cloud compute at a price that—while sure they claim its better than AWS pricing—and when they say that they mean it is less money. Sure, I don't dispute that but what I find interesting is that it's predictable. They tell you in advance on a monthly basis what it's going to going to cost. They have a bunch of advanced networking features. They have nineteen global locations and scale things elastically. Not to be confused with openly, because apparently elastic and open can mean the same thing sometimes. They have had over a million users. Deployments take less that sixty seconds across twelve pre-selected operating systems. Or, if you're one of those nutters like me, you can bring your own ISO and install basically any operating system you want. Starting with pricing as low as $2.50 a month for Vultr cloud compute they have plans for developers and businesses of all sizes, except maybe Amazon, who stubbornly insists on having something to scale all on their own. Try Vultr today for free by visiting: vultr.com/screaming, and you'll receive a $100 in credit. Thats v-u-l-t-r.com slash screaming.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle Cloud. Counting the pennies, but still dreaming of deploying apps instead of "Hello, World" demos? Allow me to introduce you to Oracle's Always Free tier. It provides over 20 free services and infrastructure, networking, databases, observability, management, and security. And—let me be clear here—it's actually free. There's no surprise billing until you intentionally and proactively upgrade your account. This means you can provision a virtual machine instance or spin up an autonomous database that manages itself all while gaining the networking load, balancing and storage resources that somehow never quite make it into most free tiers needed to support the application that you want to build. With Always Free, you can do things like run small scale applications or do proof-of-concept testing without spending a dime. You know that I always like to put asterisks next to the word free. This is actually free, no asterisk. Start now. Visit snark.cloud/oci-free that's snark.cloud/oci-free.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. One of the things that makes me a little weird in the universe is that I do an awful lot of… let's just call it technology explanation slash exploration in public, and turning it into a bit of a brand-style engagement play. What makes this a little on the weird side is that I don't work for a big company, which grants me a tremendous latitude. I have a whole lot of freedom that lets me be all kinds of different things, and I can't get fired, which is something I'm really good at.Inversely, my guest today is doing something remarkably similar, except she does work for a big company and could theoretically be fired if they were foolish enough to do so. But I don't believe that they are. Stephanie Wong is the head of developer engagement at Google. Stephanie, thank you for volunteering to suffer my slings and arrows about all of this.Stephanie: [laugh]. Thanks so much for having me today, Corey.Corey: So, at a very high level, you're the head of developer engagement, which is a term that I haven't seen a whole lot of. Where does that start and where does that stop?Stephanie: Yeah, so I will say that it's a self-proclaimed title a bit because of the nuance of what I do. I would say at its heart, I am still a part of developer relations. If you've heard of developer advocacy or developer evangelist, I would say this slight difference in shade of what I do is that I focus on scalable content creation and becoming a central figure for our developer audiences to engage and enlighten them with content that, frankly, is remarkable, and that they'd want to share and learn about our technology.Corey: Your bio is fascinating in that it doesn't start with the professional things that most people do with, “This is my title and this is my company,” is usually the first sentence people put in. Yours is, “Stephanie Wong is an award-winning speaker, engineer, pageant queen, and hip hop medalist.” Which is both surprising and more than a little bit refreshing because when I read a bio like that my immediate instinctive reaction is, “Oh, thank God. It's a real person for a change.” I like the idea of bringing the other aspects of what you are other than, “This is what goes on in an IDE, the end,” to your audience.Stephanie: That is exactly the goal that I had when creating that bio because I truly believe in bringing more interdisciplinary and varied backgrounds to technology. I, myself have gone through a very unconventional path to get to where I am today and I think in large part, my background has had a lot to do with my successes, my failures, and really just who I am in tech as an uninhibited and honest, credible person today.Corey: I think that there's a lack of understanding, broadly, in our industry about just how important credibility and authenticity are and even the source of where they come from. There are a lot of folks who are in the DevRel space—devrelopers, as I insist upon calling them, over their protests—where, on some level, the argument is, what is developer relations? “Oh, you work in marketing, but they're scared to tell you,” has been my gag on that one for a while. But they speak from a position of, “I know what's what because I have been in the trenches, working on these large-scale environments as an engineer for the last”—fill in the blank, however long it may have been—“And therefore because I have done things, I am going to tell you how it is.” You explicitly call out that you don't come from the traditional, purely technical background. Where did you come from? It's unlikely that you've sprung fully-formed from the forehead of some god, but again, I'm not entirely sure how Google finds and creates the folks that it winds up advancing, so maybe you did.Stephanie: Well, to tell you the truth. We've all come from divine creatures. And that's where Google sources all employees. So. You know. But—[laugh].Corey: Oh, absolutely. “We climbed to the top of Olympus and then steal fire from the gods.” “It's like, isn't that the origin story of Prometheus?” “Yeah, possibly.” But what is your background? Where did you come from?Stephanie: So, I have grown up, actually, in Silicon Valley, which is a little bit ironic because I didn't go to school for computer science or really had the interest in becoming an engineer in school. I really had no idea.Corey: Even been more ironic than that because most of Silicon Valley appears to never have grown up at all.Stephanie: [laugh]. So, true. Maybe there's a little bit of that with me, too. Everybody has a bit of Peter Pan syndrome here, right? Yeah, I had no idea what I wanted to do in school and I just knew that I had an interest in communicating with one another, and I ended up majoring in communication studies.I thought I wanted to go into the entertainment industry and go into production, which is very different and ended up doing internships at Warner Brothers Records, a YouTube channel for dance—I'm a dancer—and I ended up finding a minor in digital humanities, which is sort of this interdisciplinary minor that combines technology and the humanities space, including literature, history, et cetera. So, that's where I got my start in technology, getting an introduction to information systems and doing analytics, studying social media for certain events around the world. And it wasn't until after school that I realized that I could work in enterprise technology when I got an offer to be a sales engineer. Now, that being said, I had no idea what sales engineering was. I just knew it had something to do with enterprise technology and communications, and I thought it was a good fit for my background.Corey: The thing that I find so interesting about that is that it breaks the mold of what people expect, when, “If someone's going to talk to me about technology—especially coming from a”—it's weird; it's one of the biggest companies on the planet, and people still on some level equate Google with the startup-y mentality of being built in someone's garage. That's an awfully big garage these days, if that's even slightly close to true, which it isn't. But there's this idea of, “Oh, you have to go to Stanford. You have to get a degree in computer science. And then you have to go and do this, this, this, this, and this.”And it's easy to look dismissively at what you're doing. “Communications? Well, all that would teach you to do is communicate to people clearly and effectively. What possible good is that in tech?” As we look around the landscape and figure out exactly why that is so necessary in tech, and also so lacking?Stephanie: Exactly. I do think it's an underrated skill in tech. Maybe it's not so much anymore, but I definitely think that it has been in the past. And even for developers, engineers, data scientists, other technical practitioner, especially as a person in DevRel, I think it's such a valuable skill to be able to communicate complex topics simply and understandably to a wide variety of audiences.Corey: The big question that I have for you because I've talked to an awful lot of folks who are very concerned about the way that they approach developer relations, where—they'll have ratios, for example—where I know someone and he insists that he give one deeply technical talk for every four talks that are not deeply technical, just because he feels the need to re-establish and shore up his technical bona fides. Now, if there's one thing that people on the internet love, it is correcting people on things that are small trivia aspect, or trying to pull out the card that, “Oh, I've worked on this system for longer than you've worked on this system, therefore, you should defer to me.” Do you find that you face headwinds for not having the quote-unquote, “Traditional” engineering technical background?Stephanie: I will say that I do a bit. And I did, I would say when I first joined DevRel, and I don't know if it was much more so that it was being imposed on me or if it was being self-imposed, something that I felt like I needed to prove to gain credibility, not just in my organization, but in the industry at large. And it wasn't until two or three years into it, that I realized that I had a niche myself. It was to create stories with my content that could communicate these concepts to developers just as effectively. And yes, I can still prove that I can go into an hour-long or a 45-minute-long tech talk or a webinar about a topic, but I can also easily create a five to ten-minute video that communicates concepts and inspires audiences just the same, and more importantly, be able to point to resources, code labs, tutorials, GitHub repos, that can allow the audience to be hands-on themselves, too. So really, I think that it was over time that I gained more experience and realized that my skill sets are valuable in a different way, and it's okay to have a different background as long as you bring something to the table.Corey: And I think that it's indisputable that you do. The concept of yours that I've encountered from time to time has always been insightful, it is always been extremely illuminating, and—you wouldn't think of this as worthy of occasion and comment, but I feel it needs to be said anyway—at no point in any of your content did I feel like I was being approached in a condescending way, where at every point it was always about uplifting people to a level of understanding, rather than doing the, “Well, I'm smarter than you and you couldn't possibly understand the things that I've been to.” It is relatable, it is engaging, and you add a very human face to what is admittedly an area of industry that is lacking in a fair bit of human element.Stephanie: Yeah, and I think that's the thing that many folks DevRel continue to underline is the idea of empathy, empathizing with your audiences, empathizing with the developers, the engineers, the data engineers, whoever it is that you're creating content for, it's being in their shoes. But for me, I may not have been in those shoes for years, like many other folks historically have been in for DevRel, but I want to at least go through the journey of learning a new piece of technology. For example, if I'm learning a new platform on Google Cloud, going through the steps of creating a demo, or walking through a tutorial, and then candidly explaining that experience to my audience, or creating a video about it. I really just reject the idea of having ego in tech and I would love to broaden the opportunity for folks who came from a different background like myself. I really want to just represent the new world of technology where it wasn't full of people who may have had the privilege to start coding at a very early age, in their garages.Corey: Yeah, privilege of, in many respects, also that privilege means, “Yes, I had the privilege of not having to have friends and deal with learning to interact with other human beings, which is what empowered me to build this company and have no social skills whatsoever.” It's not the aspirational narrative that we sometimes are asked to believe. You are similar in some respects to a number of things that I do—by which I mean, you do it professionally and well and I do it as basically performance shitpost art—but you're on Twitter, you make videos, you do podcasts, you write long-form and short-form as well. You are sort of all across the content creation spectrum. Which of those things do you prefer to do? Which ones of those are things you find a little bit more… “Well, I have to do it, but it's not my favorite?” Or do you just tend to view it as content is content; you just look at different media to tell your story?Stephanie: Well, I will say any form of content is queen—I'm not going to say king, but—[laugh] content is king, content is queen, it doesn't matter.Corey: Content is a baroness as it turns out.Stephanie: [laugh]. There we go. I have to say, so given my background, I mentioned I was into production and entertainment before, so I've always had a gravitation towards video content. I love tinkering with cameras. Actually, as I got started out at Google Cloud, I was creating scrappy content using webcams and my own audio equipment, and doing my own research, and finding lounges and game rooms to do that, and we would just upload it to our own YouTube channel, which probably wasn't allowed at the time, but hey, we got by with it.And eventually, I got approached by DevRel to start doing it officially on the channel and I was given budget to do it in-studio. And so that was sort of my stepping stone to doing this full-time eventually, which I never foresaw for myself. And so yeah, I have this huge interest in—I'm really engaged with video content, but once I started expanding and realizing that I could repurpose that content for podcasting, I could repurpose it for blogs, then you start to realize that you can shard content and expand your reach exponentially with this. So, that's when I really started to become more active on social media and leverage it to build not just content for Google Cloud, but build my own brand in tech.Corey: That is the inescapable truth of DevRel done right is that as you continue doing it, in time, in your slice of the industry, it is extremely likely that your personal brand eclipses the brand of the company that you represent. And it's in many ways a test of corporate character—if it makes sense—as do how they react to that. I've worked in roles before I started this place where I was starting to dabble with speaking a lot, and there was always a lot of insecurity that I picked up of, “Well, it feels like you're building your personal brand, not advancing the company here, and we as a company do not see the value in you doing that.” Direct quote from the last boss I had. And, well, that partially explains why I'm here, I suppose.But there's insecurity there. I'd see the exact opposite coming out of Google, especially in recent times. There's something almost seems to be a renaissance in Google Cloud, and I'm not sure where it came from. But if I look at it across the board, and you had taken all the labels off of everything, and you had given me a bunch of characteristics about different companies, I would never have guessed that you were describing Google when you're talking about Google Cloud. And perhaps that's unfair, but perceptions shape reality.Stephanie: Yeah, I find that interesting because I think traditionally in DevRel, we've also hired folks for their domain expertise and their brand, depending on what you're representing, whether it's in the Kubernetes space or Python client library that you're supporting. But it seems like, yes, in my case, I've organically started to build my brand while at Google, and Google has been just so spectacular in supporting that for me. But yeah, it's a fine line that I think many people have to walk. It's like, do you want to continue to build your own brand and have that carry forth no matter what company you stay at, or if you decide to leave? Or can you do it hand-in-hand with the company that you're at? For me, I think I can do it hand-in-hand with Google Cloud.Corey: It's taken me a long time to wrap my head around what appears to be a contradiction when I look at Google Cloud, and I think I've mostly figured it out. In the industry, there is a perception that Google as an entity is condescending and sneering toward every other company out there because, “You're Google, you know how to do all these great, amazing things that are global-spanning, and over here at Twitter for Pets, we suck doing these things.” So, Google is always way smarter and way better at this than we could ever hope to be. But that is completely opposed to my personal experiences talking with Google employees. Across the board, I would say that you all are self-effacing to a fault.And I mean that in the sense of having such a limited ego, in some cases, that it's, “Well, I don't want to go out there and do a whole video on this. It's not about me, it's about the technology,” are things that I've had people who work at Google say to me. And I appreciate the sentiment; it's great, but that also feels like it's an aloofness. It also fails to humanize what it is that you're doing. And you are a, I've got to say, a breath of fresh air when it comes to a lot of that because your stories are not just, “Here's how you do a thing. It's awesome. And this is all the intricacies of the API.”And yeah, you get there, but you also contextualize that in a, “Here's why it matters. Here's the problem that solves. Here is the type of customer's problem that this is great for,” rather than starting with YAML and working your way up. It's going the other way, of, “We want to sell some underpants,” or whatever it is the customer is trying to do today. And that is the way that I think is one of the best ways to drive adoption of what's going on because if you get people interested and excited about something—at least in my experience—they're going to figure out how the API works. Badly in many cases, but works. But if you start on the API stuff, it becomes a solution looking for a problem. I like your approach to this.Stephanie: Thank you. Yeah, I appreciate that. I think also something that I've continued to focus on is to tell stories across products, and it doesn't necessarily mean within just Google Cloud's ecosystem, but across the industry as well. I think we need to, even at Google, tell a better story across our product space and tie in what developers are currently using. And I think the other thing that I'm trying to work on, too, is contextualizing our products and our launches not just across the industry, but within our product strategy. Where does this tie in? Why does it matter? What is our forward-looking strategy from here? When we're talking about our new data cloud products or analytics, [unintelligible 00:17:21], how does this tie into our API strategy?Corey: And that's the biggest challenge, I think, in the AI space. My argument has been for a while—in fact, I wrote a blog post on it earlier this year—that AI and machine learning is a marvelously executed scam because it's being pushed by cloud providers and the things that you definitely need to do a machine learning experiment are a bunch of compute and a whole bunch of data that has to be stored on something, and wouldn't you know it, y'all sell that by the pound. So, it feels, from a cynical perspective, which I excel at espousing, that approach becomes one of you're effectively selling digital pickaxes into a gold rush. Because I see a lot of stories about machine learning how to do very interesting things that are either highly, highly use-case-specific, which great, that would work well, for me too, if I ever wind up with, you know, a petabyte of people's transaction logs from purchasing coffee at my national chain across the country. Okay, that works for one company, but how many companies look like that?And on the other side of it, “It's oh, here's how we can do a whole bunch of things,” and you peel back the covers a bit, and it looks like, “Oh, but you really taught me here is bias laundering?” And, okay. I think that there's a definite lack around AI and machine learning of telling stories about how this actually matters, what sorts of things people can do with it that aren't incredibly—how do I put this?—niche or a problem in search of a solution?Stephanie: Yeah, I find that there are a couple approaches to creating content around AI and other technologies, too, but one of them being inspirational content, right? Do you want to create something that tells the story of how I created a model that can predict what kind of bakery item this is? And we're going to do it by actually showcasing us creating the outcome. So, that's one that's more like, okay. I don't know how relatable or how appropriate it is for an enterprise use case, but it's inspirational for new developers or next gen developers in the AI space, and I think that can really help a company's brand, too.The other being highly niche for the financial services industry, detecting financial fraud, for example, and that's more industry-focused. I found that they both do well, in different contexts. It really depends on the channel that you're going to display it on. Do you want it to be viral? It really depends on what you're measuring your content for. I'm curious from you, Corey, what you've seen across, as a consumer of content?Corey: What's interesting, at least in my world, is that there seems to be, given that what I'm focusing on first and foremost is the AWS ecosystem, it's not that I know it the best—I do—but at this point, it's basically Stockholm Syndrome where it's… with any technology platform when you've worked with it long enough, you effectively have the most valuable of skill sets around it, which is not knowing how it works, but knowing how it doesn't, knowing what the failure mode is going to look like and how you can work around that and detect it is incredibly helpful. Whereas when you're trying something new, you have to wait until it breaks to find the sharp edges on it. So, there's almost a lock-in through, “We failed you enough times,” story past a certain point. But paying attention to that ecosystem, I find it very disjointed. I find that there are still events that happen and I only find out when the event is starting because someone tweets about it, and for someone who follows 40 different official AWS RSS feeds, to be surprised by something like that tells me, okay, there's not a whole lot of cohesive content strategy here, that is at least making it easy for folks to consume the things that they want, especially in my case where even the very niche nature of what I do, my interest is everything.I have a whole bunch of different filters that look for various keywords and the rest, and of course, I have helpful folks who email me things constantly—please keep it up; I'm a big fan—worst case, I'd rather read something twice than nothing. So, it's helpful to see all of that and understand the different marketing channels, different personas, and the way that content approaches, but I still find things that slip through the cracks every time. The thing that I've learned—and it felt really weird when I started doing it—was, I will tell the same stories repeatedly in different forums, or even the same forum. I could basically read you a Twitter thread from a year ago, word-for-word, and it would blow up bigger than it did the first time. Just because no one reads everything.Stephanie: Exactly.Corey: And I've already told my origin story. You're always new to someone. I've given talks internally at Amazon at various times, and I'm sort of loud and obnoxious, but the first question I love to ask is, “Raise your hand if you've never heard of me until today.” And invariably, over three-quarters of the room raises their hand every single time, which okay, great. I think that's awesome, but it teaches me that I cannot ever expect someone to have, quote-unquote, “Done the reading.”Stephanie: I think the same can be said about the content that I create for the company. You can't assume that people, A) have seen my tweets already or, B) understand this product, even if I've talked about it five times in the past. But yes, I agree. I think that you definitely need to have a content strategy and how you format your content to be more problem-solution-oriented.And so the way that I create content is that I let them fall into three general buckets. One being that it could be termed definition: talking about the basics, laying the foundation of a product, defining terms around a topic. Like, what is App Engine, or Kubeflow 101, or talking about Pub/Sub 101.The second being best practices. So, outlining and explaining the best practices around a topic, how do you design your infrastructure for scale and reliability.And the third being diagnosis: investigating; exploring potential issues, as you said; using scripts; Stackdriver logging, et cetera. And so I just kind of start from there as a starting point. And then I generally follow a very, very effective model. I'm sure you're aware of it, but it's called the five point argument model, where you are essentially telling a story to create a compelling narrative for your audience, regardless of the topic or what bucket that topic falls into.So, you're introducing the problem, you're sort of rising into a point where the climax is the solution. And that's all to build trust with your audience. And as it falls back down, you're giving the results in the conclusion, and that's to inspire action from your audience. So, regardless of what you end up talking about this problem-solution model—I've found at least—has been highly effective. And then in terms of sharing it out, over and over again, over the span of two months, that's how you get the views that you want.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by something new. Cloud Academy is a training platform built on two primary goals. Having the highest quality content in tech and cloud skills, and building a good community the is rich and full of IT and engineering professionals. You wouldn't think those things go together, but sometimes they do. Its both useful for individuals and large enterprises, but here's what makes it new. I don't use that term lightly. Cloud Academy invites you to showcase just how good your AWS skills are. For the next four weeks you'll have a chance to prove yourself. Compete in four unique lab challenges, where they'll be awarding more than $2000 in cash and prizes. I'm not kidding, first place is a thousand bucks. Pre-register for the first challenge now, one that I picked out myself on Amazon SNS image resizing, by visiting cloudacademy.com/corey. C-O-R-E-Y. That's cloudacademy.com/corey. We're gonna have some fun with this one!Corey: See, that's a key difference right there. I don't do anything regular in terms of video as part of my content. And I do it from time to time, but you know, getting gussied up and whatnot is easier than just talking into a microphone. As I record this, it's Friday, I'm wearing a Hawaiian shirt, and I look exactly like the middle-aged dad that I am. And for me at least, a big breakthrough moment was realizing that my audience and I are not always the same.Weird confession for someone in my position: I don't generally listen to podcasts. And the reason behind that is I read very quickly, and even if I speed up a podcast, I'm not going to be able to consume the information nearly as quickly as I could by reading it. That, amongst other reasons, is one of the reasons that every episode of this show has a full transcript attached to it. But I'm not my audience. Other people prefer to learn by listening and there's certainly nothing wrong with that.My other podcast, the AWS Morning Brief, is the spoken word version of the stuff that I put out in my newsletter every week. And that is—it's just a different area for people to consume the content because that's what works for them. I'm not one to judge. The hard part for me was getting over that hump of assuming the audience was like me.Stephanie: Yeah. And I think the other key part of is just mainly consistency. It's putting out the content consistently in different formats because everybody—like you said—has a different learning style. I myself do. I enjoy visual styles.I also enjoy listening to podcasts at 2x speed. [laugh]. So, that's my style. But yeah, consistency is one of the key things in building content, and building an audience, and making sure that you are valuable to your audience. I mean, social media, at the end of the day is about the people that follow you.It's not about yourself. It should never be about yourself. It's about the value that you provide. Especially as somebody who's in DevRel in this position for a larger company, it's really about providing value.Corey: What are the breakthrough moments that I had relatively early in my speaking career—and I think it's clear just from what you've already said that you've had a similar revelation at times—I gave a talk, that was really one of my first talks that went semi-big called, “Terrible Ideas in Git.” It was basically, learn how to use Git via anti-pattern. What it secretly was, was under the hood, I felt it was time I learned Git a bit better than I did, so I pitched it and I got a talk accepted. So well, that's what we call a forcing function. By the time I give that talk, I'd better be [laugh] able to have built a talk that do this intelligently, and we're going to hope for the best.It worked, but the first version of that talk I gave was super deep into the plumbing of Git. And I'm sure that if any of the Git maintainers were in the audience, they would have found it great, but there aren't that many folks out there. I redid the talk and instead approached it from a position of, “You have no idea what Git is. Maybe you've heard of it, but that's as far as it goes.” And then it gets a little deeper there.And I found that making the subject more accessible as opposed to deeper into the weeds of it is almost always the right decision from a content perspective. Because at some level, when you are deep enough into the weeds, the only way you're going to wind up fixing something or having a problem that you run into get resolved, isn't by listening to a podcast or a conference talk; it's by talking to the people who built the thing because at that level, those are the only people who can hang at that level of depth. That stops being fodder for conference talks unless you turn it into an after-action report of here's this really weird thing I learned.Stephanie: Yeah. And you know, to be honest, the one of the most successful pieces of content I've created was about data center security. I visited a data center and I essentially unveiled what our security protocols were. And that wasn't a deeply technical video, but it was fun and engaging and easily understood by the masses. And that's what actually ended up resulting in the highest number of views.On top of that, I'm now creating a video about our subsea fiber optic cables. Finding that having to interview experts from a number of different teams across engineering and our strategic negotiators, it was like a monolith of information that I had to take in. And trying to format that into a five-minute story, I realized that bringing it up a layer of abstraction to help folks understand this at a wider level was actually beneficial. And I think it'll turn into a great piece of content. I'm still working on it now. So, [laugh] we'll see how it turns out.Corey: I'm a big fan of watching people learn and helping them get started. The thing that I think gets lost a lot is it's easy to assume that if I look back in time at myself when I was first starting my professional career two decades ago, that I was exactly like I am now, only slightly more athletic and can walk up a staircase without getting winded. That's never true. It never has been true. I've learned a lot about not just technology but people as I go, and looking at folks are entering the workforce today through the same lens of, “Well, that's not how I would handle that situation.” Yeah, no kidding. I have two decades of battering my head against the sharp edges and leaving dents in things to inform that opinion.No, when I was that age, I would have handled it way worse than whatever it is I'm critiquing at the time. But it's important to me that we wind up building those pathways and building those bridges so that people coming into the space, first, have a clear path to get here, and secondly, have a better time than I ever did. Where does the next generation of talent come from has been a recurring question and a recurring theme on the show.Stephanie: Yeah. And that's exactly why I've been such a fierce supporter of women in tech, and also, again, encouraging a broader community to become a part of technology. Because, as I said, I think we're in the midst of a new era of technology, of people from all these different backgrounds in places that historically have had more remote access to technology, now having the ability to become developers at an early age. So, with my content, that's what I'm hoping to drive to make this information more easily accessible. Even if you don't want to become a Google Cloud engineer, that's totally fine, but if I can help you understand some of the foundational concepts of cloud, then I've done my job well.And then, even with women who are already trying to break into technology or wanting to become a part of it, then I want to be a mentor for them, with my experience not having a technical background and saying yes to opportunities that challenged me and continuing to build my own luck between hard work and new opportunities.Corey: I can't wait to see how this winds up manifesting as we see understandings of what we're offering to customers in different areas in different ways—both in terms of content and terms of technology—how that starts to evolve and shift. I feel like we're at a bit of an inflection point now, where today if I graduate from school and I want to start a business, I have to either find a technical co-founder or I have to go to a boot camp and learn how to code in order to build something. I think that if we can remove that from the equation and move up the stack, sure, you're not going to be able to build the next Google or Pinterest or whatnot from effectively Visual Basic for Interfaces, but you can build an MVP and you can then continue to iterate forward and turn it into something larger down the road. The other part of it, too, is that moving up the stack into more polished solutions rather than here's a bunch of building blocks for platforms, “So, if you want a service to tell you whether there's a picture of a hot dog or not, here's a service that does exactly that.” As opposed to, “Oh, here are the 15 different services, you can bolt together and pay for each one of them and tie it together to something that might possibly work, and if it breaks, you have no idea where to start looking, but here you go.” A packaged solution that solves business problems.Things move up the stack; they do constantly. The fact is that I started my career working in data centers and now I don't go to them at all because—spoiler—Google, and Amazon, and people who are not IBM Cloud can absolutely run those things better than I can. And there's no differentiated value for me in solving those global problems locally. I'd rather let the experts handle stuff like that while I focus on interesting problems that actually affect my business outcome. There's a reason that instead of running all the nonsense for lastweekinaws.com myself because I've worked in large-scale WordPress hosting companies, instead I pay WP Engine to handle it for me, and they, in turn, hosted on top of Google Cloud, but it doesn't matter to me because it's all just a managed service that I pay for. Because me running the website itself adds no value, compared to the shitpost I put on the website, which is where the value derives from. For certain odd values of value.Stephanie: [laugh]. Well, two things there is that I think we actually had a demo created on Google Cloud that did detect hot dogs or not hot dogs using our Vision API, years in the past. So, thanks for reminding me of that one.Corey: Of course.Stephanie: But yeah, I mean, I completely agree with that. I mean, this is constantly a topic in conversation with my team members, and with clients. It's about higher level of abstractions. I just did a video series with our fellow, Eric Brewer, who helped build cloud infrastructure here at Google over the past ten decades. And I asked him what he thought the future of cloud would be in the next ten years, and he mentioned, “It's going to be these higher levels of abstraction, building platforms on top of platforms like Kubernetes, and having more services like Cloud run serverless technologies, et cetera.”But at the same time, I think the value of cloud will continue to be providing optionality for developers to have more opinionated services, services like GKE Autopilot, et cetera, that essentially take away the management of infrastructure or nodes that people don't really want to deal with at the end of the day because it's not going to be a competitive differentiator for developers. They want to focus on building software and focusing on keeping their services up and running. And so yeah, I think the future is going to be that, giving developers flexibility and freedom, and still delivering the best-of-breed technology. If it's covering something like security, that's something that should be baked in as much as possible.Corey: You're absolutely right, first off. I'm also looking beyond it where I want to be able to build a website that is effectively Twitter, only for pets—because that is just a harebrained enough idea to probably raise a $20 million seed round these days—and I just want to be able to have the barks—those are like tweets, only surprisingly less offensive and racist—and have them just be stored somewhere, ideally presumably under the hood somewhere, it's going to be on computers, but whether it's in containers, or whether it's serverless, or however is working is the sort of thing that, “Wow, that seems like an awful lot of nonsense that is not central nor core to my business succeeding or failing.” I would say failing, obviously, except you can lose money at scale with the magic of things like SoftBank. Here we are.And as that continues to grow and scale, sure, at some point I'm going to have bespoke enough needs and a large enough scale where I do have to think about those things, but building the MVP just so I can swindle some VCs is not the sort of thing where I should have to go to that depth. There really should be a golden-path guardrail-style thing that I can effectively drag and drop my way into the next big scam. And that is, I think, the missing piece. And I think that we're not quite ready technologically to get there yet, but I can't shake the feeling and the hope that's where technology is going.Stephanie: Yeah. I think it's where technology is heading, but I think part of the equation is the adoption by our industry, right? Industry adoption of cloud services and whether they're ready to adopt services that are that drag-and-drop, as you say. One thing that I've also been talking a lot about is this idea of service-oriented networking where if you have a service or API-driven environment and you simply want to bring it to cloud—almost a plug-and-play there—you don't really want to deal with a lot of the networking infrastructure, and it'd be great to do something like PrivateLink on AWS, or Private Service Connect on Google Cloud.While those conversations are happening with customers, I'm finding that it's like trying to cross the Grand Canyon. Many enterprise customers are like, “That sounds great, but we have a really complex network topology that we've been sitting on for the past 25 years. Do you really expect that we're going to transition over to something like that?” So, I think it's about providing stepping stones for our customers until they can be ready to adopt a new model.Corey: Yeah. And of course, the part that never gets said out loud but is nonetheless true and at least as big of a deal, “And we have a whole team of people who've built their entire identity around that network because that is what they work on, and they have been ignoring cloud forever, and if we just uplift everything into a cloud where you folks handle that, sure, it's better for the business outcome, but where does that leave them?” So, they've been here for 25 years, and they will spend every scrap of political capital they've managed to accumulate to torpedo a cloud migration. So, any FUD they can find, any horse-trading they can do, anything they can do to obstruct the success of a cloud initiative, they're going to do because people are people, and there is no real plan to mitigate that. There's also the fact that unless there's a clear business value story about a feature velocity increase or opening up new markets, there's also not an incentive to do things to save money. That is never going to be the number one priority in almost any case short of financial disaster at a company because everything they're doing is building out increasing revenue, rather than optimizing what they're already doing.So, there's a whole bunch of political challenges. Honestly, moving the computer stuff from on-premises data centers into a cloud provider is the easiest part of a cloud migration compared to all of the people that are involved.Stephanie: Yeah. Yeah, we talked about serverless and all the nice benefits of it, but unless you are more a digitally-born, next-gen developer, it may be a higher burden for you to undertake that migration. That's why we always [laugh] are talking about encouraging people to start with newer surfaces.Corey: Oh, yeah. And that's the trick, too, is if you're trying to learn a new cloud platform these days—first, if you're trying to pick one, I'd be hard-pressed to suggest anything other than Google Cloud, with the possible exception of DigitalOcean, just because the new user experience is so spectacularly good. That was my first real, I guess, part of paying attention to Google Cloud a few years ago, where I was, “All right, I'm going to kick the tires on this and see how terrible this interface is because it's a Google product.” And it was breathtakingly good, which I did not expect. And getting out of the way to empower someone who's new to the platform to do something relatively quickly and straightforwardly is huge. And sure, there's always room to prove, but that is the right area to focus on. It's clear that the right energy was spent in the right places.Stephanie: Yeah. I will say a story that we don't tell quite as well as we should is the One Google story. And I'm not talking about just between Workspace and Google Cloud, but our identity access management and knowing your Google account, which everybody knows. It's not like Microsoft, where you're forced to make an account, or it's not like AWS where you had a billion accounts and you hate them all.Corey: Oh, my God, I dread logging into the AWS console every time because it is such a pain in the ass. I go to cloud.google.com sometimes to check something, it's like, “Oh, right. I have to dig out my credentials.” And, “Where's my YubiKey?” And get it. Like, “Oh. I'm already log—oh. Oh, right. That's right. Google knows how identity works, and they don't actively hate their customers. Okay.” And it's always a breath of fresh air. Though I will say that by far and away, the worst login experience I've seen yet is, of course, Azure.Stephanie: [laugh]. That's exactly right. It's Google account. It's yours. It's personal. It's like an Apple iCloud account. It's one click, you're in, and you have access to all the applications. You know, so it's the same underlying identity structure with Workspace and Gmail, and it's the same org structure, too, across Workspace and Google Cloud. So, it's not just this disingenuous financial bundle between GCP and Workspace; it's really strategic. And it's kind of like the idea of low code or no code. And it looks like that's what the future of cloud will be. It's not just by VMs from us.Corey: Yeah. And there are customers who want to buy VMs and that's great. Speed up what they're doing; don't get in the way of people giving you their money, but if you're starting something net-new, there's probably better ways to do it. So, I want to thank you for taking as much time as you have to wind up going through how you think about, well, the art of storytelling in the world of engineering. If people want to learn more about who you are, what you're up to, and how you approach things, where can they find you?Stephanie: Yeah, so you can head to stephrwong.com where you can see my work and also get in touch with me if you want to collaborate on any content. I'm always, always, always open to that. And my Twitter is @stephr_wong.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:40:03]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me.Stephanie: Thanks so much.Corey: Stephanie Wong, head of developer engagement at Google Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry comment telling me that the only way to get into tech these days is, in fact, to graduate with a degree from Stanford, and I can take it from you because you work in their admissions office.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Perfect Organism: The Alien Saga Podcast
177 // I‘ll Give Them F*cking Aliens: An Archaeological Expedition into Alien: Covenant (Exquisite Corpse Part Five)

Perfect Organism: The Alien Saga Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 23, 2021 54:55


There is a time shortly after the release of Prometheus and before pre-production on Alien: Covenant where things get ... murky. Ridley Scott was doing interview after interview, talking about a planned trilogy (or was it a quintology?) of prequel films in the coming years. The rumor mill on Prometheus 2 (or was it Paradise Lost?) was in full swing. Things were happening. In this installment in our ongoing exploration into Alien: Covenant, Jaime and Patrick are joined by Aaron Percival of AVP Galaxy to comb through those early days in a search for answers. What happened to Lindelof? How did Blomkamp's art dumps change the narrative? We dive into all this and more in this archaeological dig of an episode. Be sure to listen to Aaron and friends on the AVP Galaxy Podcast! Concept art by Khang Le. // Apple Podcasts: bit.ly/perfectorganismitunes // For more on this and our other projects, please visit www.perfectorganism.com. // If you'd like to join the conversation, find us on our closed Facebook group: Building Better Worlds // To support the show, please consider visiting www.perfectorganism.com/support. We've got some great perks available! // And as always, please consider rating, reviewing, and sharing this show. We can't tell you how much your support means to us, but we can hopefully show you by continuing to provide better, more ambitious, and more dynamic content for years to come.

Shonky Lab
Is That All You've Got?

Shonky Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 5:38


Trying something a little different with this episode. Very nervous, anxious and feeling a little silly but a little different doesn’t mean wrong. BTW, swear word at the very end. We hope you... Don your smoking jacket, pop on your slippers and reach for your pipe... Sit back and enjoy the feeling of being a 'real man'. Elton and Pete guide you through the topics of the day and movies of great interest that every discerning gentleman should be well informed on.

The Thomistic Institute
Is Belief in God Rational? Aquinas on Faith, Philosophy, and Skepticism | Prof. Francis Beckwith

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 22, 2021 58:58


This talk was delivered on October 13, 2021 at the University of Texas El Paso. For information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Francis J. Beckwith is Professor of Philosophy & Church-State Studies at Baylor University, where he also serves as Associate Director of the Graduate Program in Philosophy, Affiliate Professor of Political Science, and Resident Scholar in Baylor's Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR). With his appointment in Baylor's Department of Philosophy, he also teaches courses in medical humanities, political science, and religion. From July 2003 through January 2007, he served as the Associate Director of Baylor's J. M. Dawson Institute of Church-State Studies. He is also member of the Board of Scholars of the James Wilson Institute in Washington, D.C. A graduate of Fordham University (Ph.D. and M.A. in philosophy), he also holds the Master of Juridical Studies (M.J.S.) degree from the Washington University School of Law in St. Louis, where he won a CALI Award for Academic Excellence in Reproductive Control Seminar. His books include Never Doubt Thomas: The Catholic Aquinas as Evangelical and Protestant (Baylor University Press, 2019); Taking Rites Seriously: Law, Politics, and the Reasonableness of Faith (Cambridge University Press, 2015 ), winner of the American Academy of Religion's 2016 Book Award for Excellence in the Study of Religion in the category of Constructive-Reflective Studies; (w/ R. P. George, S. McWilliams) A Second Look at First Things: A Case for Conservative Politics (St. Augustine Press, 2013); Politics for Christians: Statecraft as Soulcraft (InterVarsity Press, 2010); Return to Rome: Confessions of an Evangelical Catholic (Brazos Press, 2009); Defending Life: A Moral and Legal Case Against Abortion Choice (Cambridge University Press, 2007); (w/ W. L. Craig, J. P. Moreland) To Every One An Answer: A Case for the Christian Worldview (InterVarsity Press, 2004); Law, Darwinism, & Public Education: The Establishment Clause and the Challenge of Intelligent Design (Rowman & Littlefield, 2003); (w/ C. Mosser & P. Owen) The New Mormon Challenge: Responding to the Latest Defenses of a Fast-Growing Movement (HarperCollins/Zondervan, 2002), finalist for the 2003 Gold Medallion Award in theology and doctrine; Do the Right Thing: Readings in Applied Ethics and Social Philosophy, 2/e (Wadsworth, 2002); (w/ G. P. Koukl) Relativism: Feet Firmly Planted in Mid-Air (Baker, 1998); (w/ L. P. Pojman) The Abortion Controversy 25 Years After Roe v. Wade: A Reader, 2/e (Wadsworth, 1998); (w/ T. Jones) Affirmative Action: Social Justice or Reverse Discrimination? (Prometheus, 1997); and Politically Correct Death: Answering the Arguments for Abortion Rights (Baker, 1993), winner of the 1994 Cornerstone Magazine ethics book of the year award.

Who Are They? Reel Entertainment
REELY SCARED - Prometheus w/ Nick Harley

Who Are They? Reel Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 19, 2021 111:40


Greetings ghouls & goblins! This week, we make our first foray into the Alien franchise along with special guest Nick Harley! We're discussing Ridley Scott's pseudo-prequel Prometheus! Follow Nick Harley! https://twitter.com/Mick_Marley Subscribe to “Who Are They? Reel Entertainment” and watch our next broadcast live! You can find us at: Facebook: WhoAreTheyMovies YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/WhoAreTheyReelEntertainment Twitch: wat_reelpodcasts
Twitter: @WATReelEnt Also on iTunes, Spotify, Soundcloud, and iHeartRadio! Join our Discord!
https://discord.gg/9H7AXXDm Help support WAT on Streamlabs! https://streamlabs.com/whoaretheypodcasts/tip Follow Reely Scared on Instagram! @reelyscared Follow Spin From The Reel on Twitter! twitter.com/spinfromthereel For all of your WAT merchandise, be sure to visit: https://teespring.com/stores/wat-reel-entertainment Don't miss a second of our live gaming streams by following us on Twitch! http://twitch.tv/wat_reelpodcasts

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

This week on Myopia Movies, Danny Devito helps knock up Arnold Schwarzenegger with Emma Thompson's baby...Hey man, you want a believable premise? They were twins in the previous film. We watched Junior, my transition into Parental Leave.  Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will Junior hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Matthew, Daniel

CreepsMcPasta Creepypasta Radio
"A Romanian Prometheus" Creepypasta

CreepsMcPasta Creepypasta Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 17:23


CREEPYPASTA STORY►by LaDeckard: https://www.reddit.com/r/nosleep/comm...Creepypastas are the campfire tales of the internet. Horror stories spread through Reddit r/nosleep, forums and blogs, rather than word of mouth. Whether you believe these scary stories to be true or not is left to your own discretion and imagination. LISTEN TO CREEPYPASTAS ON THE GO-SPOTIFY► https://open.spotify.com/show/7l0iRPd...iTUNES► https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast...CREEPY THUMBNAIL ART BY►Gilles Ketting: https://www.artstation.com/artwork/9e...SUGGESTED CREEPYPASTA PLAYLISTS-►"Good Places to Start"- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7YCb...►"Personal Favourites"- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEa2R...►"Written by me"- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gX6RA...►"Long Stories"- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...FOLLOW ME ON-►Twitter: https://twitter.com/Creeps_McPasta►Instagram: https://instagram.com/creepsmcpasta/►Twitch: http://www.twitch.tv/creepsmcpasta►Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CreepsMcPastaCREEPYPASTA MUSIC/ SFX- ►http://bit.ly/Audionic ♪►http://bit.ly/Myuusic ♪►http://bit.ly/incompt ♪►http://bit.ly/EpidemicM ♪-This creepypasta is for entertainment purposes only-

Igor Levits Klavierpodcast - 32 x Beethoven
#07 Die Verhältnisse zum Tanzen bringen: Beethovens "Eroica-Variationen" (7/17)

Igor Levits Klavierpodcast - 32 x Beethoven

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 32:18


Ein ziemlich harmloser Tanz aus seinem Ballett "Die Geschöpfe des Prometheus" wird für Beethoven zum kreativen Spielfeld. Kein Stein bleibt auf dem anderen, Beethoven probt die revolutionäre Umgestaltung: Auch scheinbar festgefügte Strukturen lassen sich auf die erstaunlichste Weise verwandeln. Erst später verwendete Beethoven dieselbe Musik auch für das Finale seiner 3. Symphonie, der Eroica. Igor und Anselm werfen natürlich auch einen Blick auf die Symphonie.

Episode One
E2 #31 - Gone Huntin' [Preview] [Patreon Exclusive]

Episode One

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 15, 2021 5:00


Amateur hunters Harlan Pitts (@necrobranson), Pancake (@intellegint), and Keester (@thevillainjoel) are joined by screenwriter Randall Gavin (@ByYourLogic) on a hunting trip to avenge the death of their friend Clarence Clearwater at the hands of the legendary white stag Prometheus. Full episode on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/posts/58746308

Jewellers Academy Podcast
75. Which Kiln Should I Buy? A Guide for Jewellers with Petra Cameron

Jewellers Academy Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 14, 2021 46:27


Whether you're a new jewellery maker or want to take your skills to the next level, buying a great kiln is one of the best investments you can make. Petra Cameron of Metal Clay Ltd. knows this from experience; she started making jewellery in her guest bedroom several years ago and has since grown Metal Clay into a successful supply company. In this episode, Petra joins us to discuss everything you need to know when purchasing a kiln, along with some important safety tips.    EPISODE RECAP Why did you start Metal Clay? (1:57) What should people look for when buying their first kilns? (5:03) Common uses of a kiln for jewellery makers (7:27) Differences between the Prometheus and Paragon kilns (10:10) What is ramp speed? (14:35) Advantages of purchasing a programmable kiln (17:40) How to safely store your kiln (20:23) Do you need a surge protector? (25:40) What other types of kilns are available? (30:28) Do you need accessories to go with your kiln? (33:58) How to get in touch with Petra and Metal Clay (37:33) How much does it cost to run a kiln? (38:41)   Resources Beginners and Intermediate Enameling for Jewellers Metal Clay Ltd. Metal Clay Ltd. Facebook Metal Clay Ltd. YouTube   Find Jewellers Academy on Instagram and Facebook!

OnWriting: A Podcast of the WGA East
Episode 62: Jon Spaihts and Denis Villeneuve, "Dune"

OnWriting: A Podcast of the WGA East

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 12, 2021 39:10


Host Geri Cole is joined by Jon Spaihts and Denis Villeneuve—two-thirds of the writing team behind DUNE—to discuss the challenges of writing a story that serves two audiences, relearning the lesson of focusing on the human element in science fiction, and just how much coffee it takes for three masters of filmmaking to collaborate on the script of DUNE (spoiler alert… it's a lot). Jon Spaihts wrote the screenplays for PROMETHEUS, THE DARKEST HOUR, and MARVEL'S DR. STRANGE. Denis Villeneuve is perhaps best known as the director of SICARIO, ARRIVAL, and BLADE RUNNER 2049. Third co-writer Eric Roth—who, unfortunately, couldn't join us because of technical difficulties—is the writer of titles like FORREST GUMP, THE CURIOUS CASE OF BENJAMIN BUTTON, and A STAR IS BORN, among many others. DUNE—co-written by Spaihts, Villeneuve, and Roth and directed by Villeneuve— is a mythic and emotionally charged hero's journey adapted from the 1965 science fiction novel by Frank Herbert. The film tells the story of Paul Atreides, a brilliant and gifted young man born into a great destiny beyond his understanding, who must travel to the most dangerous planet in the universe to ensure the future of his family and his people. As malevolent forces explode into conflict over the planet's exclusive supply of the most precious resource in existence-a commodity capable of unlocking humanity's greatest potential-only those who can conquer their fear will survive. DUNE is now playing in theaters, and can also be streamed on HBO Max. --- Before it was a podcast, OnWriting was a print publication. Check out OnWriting: The Print Archives. Read shownotes, transcripts, and other member interviews: www.onwriting.org/ Follow the Guild on social media: Twitter: @OnWritingWGAE | @WGAEast Facebook: /WGAEast Instagram: @WGAEast

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

Zoinks! Hey guys, this week we learn how bad CGI can be! We watched Scooby Doo (2002), the movie that presupposes Linda Cardellini would get jiggy with something. Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will Scooby Doo hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Matthew, Daniel

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

This week on Myopia Movies, we learn all girls are princesses. We watched A Little Princess, nothing bad could ever happen during World War I! Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will A Little Princess hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Kellie, Matthew, Daniel

Jason and Deb Full Show
The Morning X with Jason Dick and Friends - Full Show - Being Tall Is Awesome!

Jason and Deb Full Show

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2021 64:41


We discuss why Nick is mad at the gif makers of the world in Dear Redacted, why Emily enjoys being a big friendly giant to her short friends and Dennis De La Pena from Fox 7 Sports on whether the Longhorns can get that losing monkey off their backs against Iowa State. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

White Claw Wednesdays
WCW 95, Dune, Prometheus, and Lil Nas X

White Claw Wednesdays

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 4, 2021 65:29


Welcome back to White Claw Wednesdays. Dune has come out and Frank gives his two cents on the movie without spoiling anything. We delve into Prometheus and the Alien series. Finally, we close on discussing Lil Nas X's rise to fame and his great music. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/white-claw-wednesdays/message

Should you watch this? with The Popcorn Priest

Should you watch ‘Prometheus' from 2012? Part 2 of our 2 part review. Part 2 is our deep dive review and breakdown. The search for our beginning could lead to our end...and the start of our 12 movie journey to watch and unlock all the that is Alien and all that is Predator. Strap in, buckle up, get into your stasis pod. Once we start we can not go back. Join us for many more to come...

Artfully Told
Episode 075 - Kelsey Aicher

Artfully Told

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 2, 2021 45:55


In today's episode, I welcome Kelsey Aicher! Kelsey is a trapeze artist and coach, as well as the Artistic Director of Aerheart and the Training Company Program Director for Kansas City Aerial Arts. She shares her experience with mental health issues and why she's so passionate about opening conversations about it. She shares with us her heart behind her latest show "n0rmal" (premiering in Kansas City and on livestream soon!) and some of her exciting future plans. (Fun fact: the cover image for this episode is part of the show image for "n0rmal"!)   Get in touch with Kelsey Aicher: www.kansascityaerialarts.com | kelsey@kansascityaerialarts.com Enroll in Lindsey's dance and wellness courses: www.elevateart.thinkific.com  Support Artfully Told: www.paypal.me/elevateart Artfully Told links: www.facebook.com/artfullytold | www.artfullytold.podbean.com | elevateartskc@gmail.com Get a free audiobook through Audible!  http://www.audibletrial.com/ArtfullyTold Schedule your own interview as a featured guest with Artfully Told! https://calendly.com/artfullytold/podcast-interview   Episode 75 - Kelsey Aicher [00:00:00] Lindsey Dinneen: Hello, and welcome to Artfully Told, where we share true stories about meaningful encounters with art. [00:00:06] Krista: I think artists help people have different perspectives on every aspect of life. [00:00:12] Roman: All I can do is put my part in to the world. [00:00:15] Elizabeth: It doesn't have to be perfect the first time. It doesn't have to be perfect ever really. I mean, as long as you, and you're enjoying doing it and you're trying your best, that can be good enough. [00:00:23] Elna: Art is something that you can experience with your senses and that you just experiences as so beautiful. [00:00:31] Lindsey Dinneen: Hi friends, whether you are just getting started or you're a seasoned professional looking to up your game, I have an exciting opportunity for you. Did you know that I am actually the creator of 10 different courses online that range from ballet, jazz, tap. They also include a mindset detox course and two Stretch and Tone courses. So if you're looking to start a new hobby or get a little bit fitter, or you're looking to do a deep dive into your mindset, really perform a true detox, I have the course for you, and I would love to help you out with that. So if you go to elevateart.thinkific.com, you will see all of the different courses I've created. [00:01:26] You don't have to step in a classroom to take your first dance class. I teach a signature 20 Moves in 20 Days course that allows you to learn 20 steps in just 20 days. It's a lot of fun. We have a great time together. And I think you're going to absolutely love the different courses. And Artfully Told listeners get a little something from me. So if you go, you'll sign up and use the promo code "artfullytold," all one word, and when you do so you'll get 15% off the purchase of any and all your favorite courses. All right, listeners, enjoy that. Again, it's elevateart.thinkific.com. See you there. [00:02:11] Hello and welcome back to another episode of Artfully Told. I'm your host Lindsey and I am very excited to have as my guest today, Kelsey Aicher. She is a trapeze artist and coach. She is the Artistic Director of Aerheart and also the training director for Kansas City Aerial Arts for their training company. She's the director for that. And I am just absolutely thrilled that she is joining us here today. Thanks so much for being here, Kelsey. [00:02:43] Kelsey Aicher: Thank you for having me. [00:02:44] Lindsey Dinneen: Of course. Well, I would love if you wouldn't mind sharing just a little bit about your background, maybe how you got involved in art in general, and then specifically in aerial arts and let us know a little bit about what you're doing now to, if you don't mind. [00:02:58] Kelsey Aicher: Yeah. So I have a very strange accidental journey to where I am right now. I've always been really good at math. And that's honestly what got me into art was, I was just, I skipped a grade in math and in third grade and was always advanced. And I was so bored in all of my math classes in high school because I just felt it was too easy. So I started writing short stories instead of paying attention in class. And that's when I fell in love with writing. I started taking creative writing classes, realized I love writing short stories and wondered if I could make a profit or like make a career out of it. So I started studying screenwriting by reading every book that I could. And when I was a junior in high school, I took a summer screenwriting camp at Drexel University and studied screenwriting intensely with the professors and fell in love, went to NYU at first and then switched to Columbia College to finish my Bachelor's in Screenwriting. [00:04:01] And then my life pulled me into Portland. My ex-husband got a job there and I didn't know what to do. And so I was freelancing as a screenwriter doing commercial scripts. I started taking aerial classes to do something, to feel, to feel productive. It was just a hobby. And then a year later I started performing and coaching. And a year after that, I was hired professionally to perform trapeze and just somehow accidentally became a trapeze artist. I don't think that's most people's journey. And now moving to Kansas City, I moved here four years ago. I've been able to combine my love of writing and my aerial arts by writing circus stage shows for the training company, student company, and the professional company. [00:04:54] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. That's amazing. I love that you've been able to incorporate both of your passions into this one cool endeavor that you've been able to undertake. So that's, that's really interesting. So, like you said, sort of the accidental everything coming together, but it sounds like it, it came together pretty, pretty, perfectly, so that's, that's great. So you talked about, you know, starting with the background in, in writing. And so I'm curious how that transition has been, because you were talking about screenplays and whatnot. So, so how have you found that background to be obviously incredibly helpful as you plan out shows, but then also, how has it changed or evolved over the years just because it's necessary to do so with producing a, an aerial show versus let's say a movie? [00:05:45] Kelsey Aicher: So starting at NYU for college, they have your freshman year, you have all the --all dramatic writing students are combined to a class. So it's playwrights, TV writers, and screenwriters. And the first semester, all we did was study plays. And then the second semester we started moving into TV and films. So I actually got a lot of training in playwriting as well as part of my education into screenwriting. When I write a show: one, I think just in general, any type of writer, whether it's short story, novels, whatever, there's still always standard structures of a story. They're generally three acts and character development, multiple plot points. So just understanding story, I think, helps with creating any type of show on stage. Even if it's silent, like ours are-- I shouldn't say silent, but free of dialogue, like ours are-- in a circus show. But having the playwriting understanding actually helps me more. I treat it like I'm writing a musical, so I still outline all my habits and stuff like that like I do for screen writing. I write like my treatment, my outlook. [00:07:01] But then when I think about it, conceptually, I think of it like a musical, because a musical has this narrative story, but then the idea of having a musical number where you're just singing is so removed from reality that it's like a large moment that's just capturing one tiny little feeling. And that's kind of what I do with aerial is like, okay, we're having this story flowing through. And now we have this character locks eyes with this character. And instead of singing a song about it, we're going to have three aerialists on silks doing a whole dance that's showing how these two characters have just fallen in love at first sight. [00:07:41] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I love that. Yeah. I can completely see that. It's so helpful to have that background of understanding the, the building blocks of creating a story in order to translate it to an art form that you really can't do as much with as far as-- well, you could, I suppose with dialogue-- but traditionally you don't. So yeah, I think that's, that's really neat. And I'm curious, has there been one show in particular that you've worked on, perhaps that has been the most difficult to translate from your concept in your head and like, "I know I want to get these messages across" to put it on, you know, an aerial production where they can, they can interact with each other? Yes, you can see those very human moments and these connections, but still to get across your main point, you know, what was, what has been one of the most challenging that you've experienced so far? [00:08:36] Kelsey Aicher: I think the one that has not actually been released yet. I wrote a show for the training company, Kansas City Aerial Arts called "The Spaces Between," and it's very conceptual. I started writing it-- honestly, I think it was the first show I started to write. But it just didn't make sense to have them start with the students, start with like a really highly conceptual show. And so I put it on hold for several years and we finally were doing it to debut on April 3rd, 2020. So we spent six months building up for this show, getting everything ready. And the three weeks before the show, we shut down the whole studio. And so we actually just filmed it in this past April, April 2021, and it's still in the editing process, so I haven't seen it yet. So that's why I'm interested to see if it goes across. [00:09:33] In the past I've written really, really narrative shows. We've did one about the story of Prometheus and the one that we did before "Spaces Between" was called "Masked: A Superhero Love Story." And it was very clear that here's our hero, here's our villain. And they fall in love and like everything that's happening. So generally I go very narrative where like one person is playing a character and it's the whole through line. With "The Spaces Between," there was a narrator that was just telling the story about growing up, dealing with parents' divorce and death of her sister and escaping, using her imagination to escape what was the stress of what was happening in her life and going to your imagination by thinking of like the worlds that are created in the space inside of bubble or the space between two pages of a book. So it's interesting to make things really, really highly conceptual, where people are just like in normal clothes. And it's not really obvious. They're not heavy characters. Even if the narrator is talking about bubbles beforehand, will people be able to tell that these three lyra performers are supposed to be fairies come to life in this magical world between bubbles? [00:10:46] So I, I think that that's the hardest one, but I also don't know yet the end results, since it hasn't been released yet. It's not fully edited. So I'm when we interested to see if the whole concept and idea that comes across. I hope it does, but I know that that's definitely-- it's a lot harder to convey a concept, especially when we're doing everything very conceptual anyway. Like falling in love is easier to do with dialogue than with aerial, but at least we can create a lot of set up with the right music and costuming and movement to convey it, than trying to convey something like-- I'm trying to think of an example. Oh, there's one where it is-- they're portraying the space between notes in music and on trapeze. And whether that's going to come across or not, I don't know. [00:11:45] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Yeah. You know, on some level I think every time I write and produce a show is, you know, I, I have some level of confidence having been able to produce shows that I'm proud of in the past, but there's always that, you know, when you produce something new, is it, is it going to read, is it going to come across to your audience or did you just create this cool thing in your head that everyone's like, "oh yeah, that was interesting," but they don't quite get. So I can certainly relate to that. But I'm excited for that, that show. That sounds really interesting and unique. And I think, I think that will be a really cool concept to watch. Well, a series of concepts to, to watch in a, in an aerial show specifically. Well, I know that you're currently working on a show that is coming up pretty quickly here, just a few weeks away. And I would love if you wouldn't mind sharing that. I know it's a very, you know, personal thing for you. And I don't want to give anything away ahead of time. I want you to speak to it, but I would love if you would share just a little bit about maybe your next upcoming production that is finally live again. So exciting. [00:12:56] Kelsey Aicher: I am very excited to be back to live theater. It is, I don't enjoy filming things that were meant for stage, despite my screenwriting background. Yeah. So I am making, I've directed the student company before. This is my first time directing our professional company, Aerheart. It is also my first time directing a show that I'm performing in since I'm in Aerheart, but the show is called "n0rmal." Doesn't sound so exciting, but I want to spell this out. We're spelling it lowercase n, the number zero, r m a l. I put the zero in because I wanted to show that like no one is free from mental health or no one is untouched by mental health topics. Like everyone is affected. We're not alone. So I put the zero in there, one, to make the spelling a little bit quirkier, but to, to show that like we're all in this together, no one is exempt from dealing with mental illness or mental health issues. And that's the subject of the show we are talking about trying to normalize talking about mental health and suicide prevention. [00:14:07] Yes, you mentioned that it is a more of a personal story or personal project for me. One, in the pandemic, I saw a lot of my friends have more mental health issues. And for me, I went deeper into my depression, which I've been dealing with since I was 14. And more on a very personal level, I had an addiction to self-harm, to cutting specifically when I was in high school, and I struggled a lot with it. I was hospitalized in college for self harm and I have struggled on and off, but I've been pretty good in my adult years. And during the pandemic with everything being as hard as it was and depressing that it was, I picked up the habit again and it was a struggle and it was a thing that I didn't like. And so I resumed therapy and got back out of the, I stopped it before it became an addiction or a habit again. So I was already dealing with like, "okay, I'm having a tough time. And I know I'm not the only person having a tough time, but none of us are talking about it." [00:15:17] And I'm coming from a place of privilege like that I get to create art all the time. I have been in therapy. I am willing to talk about my own struggles with anyone. But not everyone feels that safety because there are so many reasons to feel like talking about having depression or having suicidal thoughts is taboo. It's going to be a sign of weakness or people just don't understand. And people end up feeling isolated and alone for that reason because they feel like they're the only one feeling what they're feeling. So I wanted to create a show that was to say like, "Hey, you aren't alone." We all experienced this thing in different ways, but it's okay to talk about it and there is support out there. So that's kind of how "n0rmal" started. [00:16:09] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. Well, first of all, I just want to say, you know, for me personally, but just for, for the world, for people in general-- I, I'm so thankful that you are willing to, to address this and to address it in a way that brings people together and says you're not alone, that, that many of us struggle daily with various, you know, mental health concerns. And I think that, you know, I agree with you a lot of times we're led to feel like we're the only ones experiencing something, and that's just not true. And I've noticed for myself that the more honest and open I can be about my own struggles with, you know, with the appropriate people-- not, not everybody-- but with the appropriate people that there's this extremely supportive community in the feeling of, if I can be honest, that allows other people to be honest too. And then we can support each other, but if we don't know what's going on and we can't be honest, then we're stuck in this loop of, of feeling like we're alone because clearly nobody else is going through this. Everybody else has their lives together when that is so not true. So, yeah, I, so I really commend you for, for doing this, and I'm really curious to me, this sounds like one of those concepts that is extremely difficult to translate to an aerial show. So I'm curious how that process has gone for you. And are you sort of tackling different aspects of mental health per piece or is there like a very clear running narrative throughout the whole? [00:17:55] Kelsey Aicher: It is more the former. So I have a description that has some statistics and my, my apologies if this number is wrong. If you come see the show, the correct information is on the program, but it's-- I have a two paragraph description, one paragraph for each act, and the first act talks about some statistics. Like the first piece is called-- and I'm going to get this number wrong, I'm so sorry-- 48,481, I think is the number, which is the number of lives lost to suicide in the year 2020 in the US. Wow. Which is a lot. And so I start with the first act being a lot of statistics and things like psychosis, depression, and substance use disorder are three of the highest risk factors for suicide. Things like being a member of a minority community, especially LGBTQ, or having experienced post-traumatic stress disorder, veterans. There are a lot of risk factors that show signs like that go into complete suicide. And so the first act kind of covers a lot of the different warning signs or common risk factors that can lead to suicide. [00:19:28] And then in what I think is the hardest piece in the show, like not hardest physically, but the hardest piece to watch is an acro number where-- I'm in this piece, of course, my partner and I at the end commit suicide. And then the second act is more about like, okay, so we know that there are these problems that people are facing. There's these mental health issues. There are these risk factors. There are certain groups that are more at risk than others and it's really prevalent. So then the second act is about like, okay, so people might be drawn to suicide because they feel like they're a burden to other people or because they want their pain to end and we can support them. And what you're talking about with the, having the conversation to find out, like, by actually saying like what's going on and you end up finding that you're not alone and that there's a support system. The second to last piece-- which I'm also in-- apparently I'm in the hard pieces emotionally. [00:20:29] It's called "Honest Conversation." And it's performed with my duo partner, Elena Sherman, and my real life best friend. And we are-- our piece is duo lyra, and we're having an honest conversation where in this piece we are through aerial saying like, "Hey, I have been feeling this way." And then all of a sudden hearing, "oh, I've been feeling this way too, and I love you." And we love each other and maybe we can like support each other. So having that honest conversation, just talking about it. So it's very conceptual because there isn't like a strong through line, but I did have these two paragraphs written in the program. And the title of each act is in bold and caps in the paragraph. So if you want to kind of follow along, so you're just like, "I don't even know what's going on right now," you have that safety backup to find out like what we're talking about with psychosis, hopefully like in the piece specifically about psychosis, where we have two people that are kind of like the same sometimes, and then moving further away from each other at other times, hopefully you can kind of get that sense of having -- not multiple personalities-- but having conflicting feelings and manic and depressive states that are sometimes together and sometimes battling each other. Hopefully in the piece about depression, you get the sense of just feeling defeated and depressed. But there is that option of go back and look at the paragraph and you can figure out what we're doing. [00:22:00] Lindsey Dinneen: That's awesome. Yeah. And I know this show is coming up pretty quickly. So do you want to share the details of how we might be able to watch it, whether we're local to Kansas City or not? [00:22:12] Kelsey Aicher: If you are local to Kansas City, we are going to be performing this show live at City Stage at Union Station on November 18th, 19th, 20th, and 21st. You can buy tickets at kansascityaerialarts.com. There'll be a link to our EventBrite page. If you are not local to Kansas City, and you want to check out the show, we are going to do a live stream on the Friday, November 19th show, and you can buy tickets through our same EventBrite page there. And if you do the live stream, you'll be able to not only watch it live on Friday, but you'll have access to watch it at another time after that, that weekend. So I know some of my students that are coming to see the show in person that have family members that are in different states are also gifting a live stream to their family members so that everyone they want to share it with can see this show. [00:23:06] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, that's a perfect option. Thank you for sharing all about it and the process and all of that. And I'm wondering how it's been for you personally, and you can go into as little or as much detail as you want, but this is obviously-- like, we've kind of touched on something near and dear to your heart. And I, I, I know from my own personal experience that sometimes taking something that is really, really difficult, and frankly, even just difficult to talk about regardless of your comfort level of it, it's just still hard. I'm, I'm curious how that's been for you to translate that for yourself as a performer and then watching your creation come to life. How has that process been for you? I mean, I can only imagine that you are, you're needing to do a lot of self care on the side to really you know, not go down a rabbit hole of, of, of you know, reliving some of those harder moments, but, but, but still able to portray it. Do you mind speaking to that? [00:24:11] Kelsey Aicher: Yeah, of course. Yeah, I feel like I've been sharing my story more in the last few weeks than I ever have in my life, but I have, I've decided about five years ago that I was going to stop worrying about covering up my scars and not worry about telling people that I have depression, like not trying to hide it. I grew up in a Catholic small town, rural Wisconsin, conservative family. And when the school counselor told my parents that like I had talked about suicide ideation and that I should seek counseling, my parents were really upset that I would need extra help. My mom would drive me to and from therapy in silence and she would always like give me a doctors' note, like that I had a doctor's appointment. Like she would not let the school know that it was for counseling. I was told that I was not allowed to tell anyone, like none of my friends. So I went through my teenage years, dealing with an addiction to cutting, dealing with depression, dealing with starting meds for major depression and anxiety. [00:25:24] And my parents wouldn't talk to me about it. And I couldn't talk to any of my friends. And so I grew up being like, everything that I'm dealing with is something to be ashamed about. And even when I was hospitalized in college, it was only because some one saw --a neighbor in the dorms. I started like bleeding through my shirt and I didn't realize I was bleeding through my shirt from all of my wounds that I had self-inflicted, and they're the ones that took me to the hospital. And then coming back from that break, my parents and I really didn't talk about it. So it's just been like this whole, like life of like, you're supposed to be ashamed of having depression. You're supposed to hide it. You're not supposed to talk about it because like it's improper and it reflects poorly on your family and everyone else around you. [00:26:09] And in Portland, I had a coach who was wearing tank tops all the time and I could see her scars. And I asked her about at one time, like really like hesitantly about like, "Why do you feel comfortable showing your scars?" And she's like, "I get hot easily. I don't want to wear sleeves when I'm training." And it was just like this whole idea of like, "oh, this isn't a big deal." And so I made it a goal for myself that once a week, from them that point on, I was going to wear either shorts or short sleeves or something that revealed at least a scar once, once a week. And it wasn't necessarily around people I knew, or to like my aerial classrooms, and that it would be like to the grocery store, but I was just going to like gradually become okay with like having my scars exposed because I would like literally wear long sleeves and pants. And I like cover absolutely everything. [00:27:02] And so when I started getting comfortable with like my body and people seeing this, and I started like realizing. There's this other person that has this thing. And then we start talking these other people and they have depression. I was like, "oh, I'm not alone." And "Hey, I can start talking about these things." And I've found for me that the best thing for my own mental health and my own control of my problems with self harm has been being honest in talking about it. So I think for me, because I have been now for like, six, seven years been very open. Like if anyone asks me about something that's going on or my past experience, I will tell them. I will be honest. And it's just been something that's been so helpful for me. So I think along this journey, working on this show, even though it is so personal to me and personal to all the performers, I've already-- I don't want to say made my peace but it's the best phrase that's coming to my head right now-- made my peace with that that I don't feel super vulnerable to it. [00:28:00] That said, I am reading something on stage that I wrote. And I have found that when I listened to myself say these words, I have a really tough time. That's when I get triggered. So I have to, there's a piece where I'm reading something I wrote while a contortionist is performing to my words on stage. And anytime she sends me her videos to show me like, "oh, this is what I'm working on," I have to turn the sound off because if I hear myself saying these words, these about having anxiety and feeling stressed out, I get like, I have a physical reaction. So I have found that like, that's my one like trigger in this show, everything else I've been okay with. I've seen a lot of the performers, so many of the performers, if not every performer in this show has started putting their own emotions, their own feelings and their own experiences into this show as well. And so I've seen it more, I've seen more reactions from the other cast members seeing like how their real feelings are getting into the pieces and sometimes disrupting it. [00:29:09] And so I've talked to some of the newer performers. And the way that I keep my, the way I picture it is, you want to be you adjacent. So I think like, there's this character and then there's yourself and you want to have them next to each other so that they're just touching enough that you can pass the emotions and the feelings of your own experiences into your character, but you don't want them to be overlapping and you don't want them to be the same. Because if you are now becoming your reality into this piece, it's going to be so hard as a performer. It's going to be too easy to break down and to not actually separate yourself from the art that you're working on. So I talked to someone else about this and they just decided that they described it as a mask work, where you don't want your mask to be so tight fitting that it's yourself. You want to have a little bit of space between you and your mask that you're presenting. I think of it as being adjacent. Either way, it's this idea that you need to put all of your feelings and your experiences and your person next to your character that you're being. So pull on your experiences of self-harm and depression in this piece about depression, but don't make it actually your real experiences. If that makes sense. [00:30:25] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, and that's great advice. And I wish I had heard that advice a few years ago. I performed a piece where my character was the subject of some pretty intense bullying and, you know, a lot of gossip swirling around the character and the character had to deal with it. And, and it was very difficult to, to be adjacent to that character, having experienced some, some similar kinds of-- not the same obviously things-- but similar things to have those feelings brought back up, right? And so, yeah, that is such a good piece of advice. Yes, draw on your own experience to be able to portray it, to be able to share with the audience, "this is how this feels to me," but not so much that you get to a point of reliving the difficult, like-- I mean, trauma is a strong word-- but you know, things are traumatic, so don't relive the trauma exactly. But yeah, but, but be willing to sit with the feeling. And stay a little bit separate. I like, I like the way that, that you talked about that. Yeah. That's really important. [00:31:33] Kelsey Aicher: And you don't want to completely remove yourself from it because then your performance is inauthentic. Like you still want to give an honest portrayal, but that's why I always think of it, like as adjacent, like touching but not overlapping. [00:31:46] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. That's, that's fantastic. And I'm sorry to hear that you didn't have that support system growing up. I think there-- there's still is-- but there were for many, many years just so much stigma surrounding any sort of mental health difficulty. And I'm so thankful that you have a great support system now, from the sounds of it. And again, we, we are all touched by it. I love what your concept of that is, is nobody has been untouched in some way, whether it's you yourself or, or somebody that you love deeply or whatever. It's, it's there. And so being able to have those honest conversations and draw on the support of others and professionals. And I'm a huge advocate for therapy. I, I think therapy is for absolutely everyone. [00:32:30] Kelsey Aicher: Yes. I think that is something that everyone should experience at least once in their life. Like we go to the dentist twice a year to make sure that our teeth are still okay. We go to the doctor to make sure that everything's okay. Why don't we do this same thing for our emotional and mental wellbeing? Like everyone should be just at least once in their life should get that like tune-up. We do it for our cars. We do it for everything. But we should do it for our brain as well. [00:32:54] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes. Amen. Fully on board with that. Yes. So I'm sure that you're a pretty wrapped up in, you know, everything that is "n0rmal" right now, but then what is on the horizon for you? Where do you see yourself heading to next? [00:33:12] Kelsey Aicher: Well, always more things. I'm sure you already know that our training company is doing this production in December with VidaDance, called "Cracked!" So I'm simultaneously working on training and getting everything together and directing "n0rmal" while also doing some choreography and coaching for the training company for "Cracked!" And the training company at KCAA is already starting to work on our spring show which is a pop goth, gender neutral fairytale retelling, called "The Glass Combat Boot." So I'm already doing auditions for that and choreography and getting everything lined up. That will be in May, again at City Stage. And then, because I'm always thinking so far ahead, I'm getting the concept ready for their Fringe show and I'm already working on Aerheart's show for next year, next fall. So I'm constantly, I always like to stay one year ahead when it comes to writing the show that we're going to do. [00:34:17] So I kind of have a system of "alright, idea for next year's show needs to be done at least one year in advance. I need to have an outline at least 10 months in advance. I need to start auditions and choreography" by the time that we have started by the time we're in production of the previous show. So I'm going year-round constantly thinking of like what the next project is. It helps that I always like to create, so I get excited about things and the people I work with, both in Aerheart and in the training company, they're so inspiring. And so sometimes they'll just say something or do something and I see an image and that sparks a whole entire show. [00:35:02] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Well, and I have the privilege of actually knowing you in real life, not just, you know, over the, the podcast. And so, yeah, you are one of the most organized people I've ever met, which obviously you have to be, considering you always have like 15,000 things on your plate, so kudos to you. [00:35:21] Kelsey Aicher: I don't usually feel that way so thank you for the compliment. [00:35:24] Lindsey Dinneen: Well, yeah, and I understand that the not feeling that way, but clearly, you know, you are very. So good, good for you, but yeah, that, that is awesome. And for those who haven't had the chance to experience Kansas City Aerial Arts yet-- first of all, I just have to say the company, the professional company Aerheart, and then of course the training company, but the students in general are just amazing people first and they're amazing performers second, but they are just-- you have to watch, you have to watch their shows, frankly. Just shameless plug, but like, it just, you have to do it because they're, they're so good. And one of the things that I enjoy so much about watching them perform is how much they enjoy performing together. It's just obvious. [00:36:11] Kelsey Aicher: Yes. Yes. 100%. This is the most supportive community I have ever known. Like, I am constantly baffled by them. We hold auditions and it's almost like people get more excited to find out that they didn't get a solo because they're excited that someone else got the solo. It's, it is so crazy how much they all support each other and love each other. And like you said, it just shows on stage. [00:36:38] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. It's, it's magical. It's a really special atmosphere that you all have obviously carefully curated and support, but it is awesome the kind of people that you draw in and the way that they interact with each other. It's, it's always a blessing when we get to interact with y'all, but just in general, it's so much fun to watch you. And I would highly also encourage that if anybody is local to Kansas City and has any interest in aerial art, definitely that's the way to go. Like I said, they're extremely supportive people. Even if you've literally never done anything aerial before, they're not going to make you feel goofy or anything. I mean, I did an intro lesson one time and I was so like, I, you know, don't have the upper body strength or anything, and everyone was just so supportive and sweet and you know, that's the way to go. Well Kelsey, you know, thank you so much in general for, for being honest and open with, with us and specifically with the show. I'm really excited that you're doing this and I commend the work. I think it's extremely important that you're doing it. So thank you so much for that. I do have a couple sort of generic questions that I like to ask my guests if you're comfortable with that. [00:37:50] Kelsey Aicher: Yeah, of course. [00:37:51] Lindsey Dinneen: Awesome. Well, first of all, what is one change that you would really like to see in the art world? It could be really anything-- could be a very serious sort of change that you feel like needs to be made or something fun. Just what's one thing you would like to see changed about the art world? [00:38:10] Kelsey Aicher: One thing that I really struggle with is I don't feel that artists receive the same respect as someone that works like a standard nine to five. Like we're constantly asked to work for experience or do work for free promotion, but you wouldn't ask an architect to build a design your building for free, just for exposure. And I think that artists frequently thought of as, "oh, you're just doing it because you love it. And so you should just do it for the love and you don't have to worry about getting paid or getting paid equally." And I don't know, I feel like it's kind of like, you know, people that are computer programmers, they don't just write code because they want to make money. They do it also because they enjoy it, and artists do their work because they enjoy it. But why are we expected to just enjoy it and not seek compensation? So I do wish that there was a little bit more respect financially for artists. [00:39:12] Lindsey Dinneen: Yes, yes. And amen. Yep, absolutely agree. And then is there something arts related that you still want to explore that you haven't yet? So maybe another form of art that has it kind of, you know, prodded you here and there that, "oh, try me!" But you haven't had the opportunity or, or haven't gone for it yet? [00:39:38] Kelsey Aicher: Hmm. That is a really good question. I tend to be a person who-- I don't want to say impulsive, I'm impulsive light. So if there's something that interests me, I usually go for it and I dive in to it. So most things I feel like I have tried. I do still have the goal and it's not new. I, I love writing and I still write regularly. I still have the goal of writing a novel someday. But I'm trying to think of other art forms that I haven't dabbled in that I had just like really would like to try. I can tell you that one of my favorite art forms to watch is, I love watching dance. I love watching all types of dance and I just get mesmerized by it. And when there's an aerialist and a dancer on stage at the same time, the audience is almost always watching the aerialist because that's the thing that they haven't seen so much. And for me, I'm always watching the dancers cause I'm like, "But, but the dancer!" But I, I have tried dancing. I'm not great at dancing. I really respect everything that you guys do. Because I, I'm not a great mover on the ground by any means. [00:40:43] Lindsey Dinneen: But maybe something to further explore someday if you feel like it! [00:40:46] Kelsey Aicher: Possibly. Yeah. I mean, things in the circus arts, I know I want to get better at hand balancing and I've even considered-- it's just like, not professionally-- but like, I'm like when I retire from aerial, I think I might try to get a little bit more into contortion. You know, cause someone just gets into contortion for fun. But yeah, I think that my art, I just like to, I like being creative. I like, I like to move my body a lot, so I think it'd be something along those lines or even in the martial arts, I know. Not everyone considers that to be an art, but there certainly is a movement and an art form to things like Tai Chi or TaeKwonDo. So I think maybe the martial arts would be something I would try out. [00:41:30] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah, absolutely. Great. And then my final question is-- so at the end of your life, what is one arts related experience that you would want to experience one last time for the last time? [00:41:45] Kelsey Aicher: Directing a show with aerialists. It's funny that I have fallen in love with it in the last few years, because I, when I was in film school, I really just wanted to be a writer. I had no ambition to be a director, almost everyone I was in classes with was like director, director, or writer, director. And I was like, no, I really do not want to direct. And the last four years with Kansas City Aerial Arts and working with the student company in particular, like being able to see us, all that team effort put in heart and soul from choreographers and performers and coaches and make a vision come to life. And it's not just like this vision that I have, like, I love seeing their reaction. Like "Masked" was my favorite show that we've done so far on stage. And after "Masked," so many of the students came up to me were just like, "We can do this again, right? Like we should just like, get the, the theater again next week and just keep performing this show." And that joy and that excitement of "we did this together as a team, we got this concept, we were the best artists we could be and we executed a vision." It's just so incredible. And so I imagine that like at the end of my life, I just want to direct one more show with this community again. [00:43:06] Lindsey Dinneen: Yeah. I can understand that. Certainly relate to that. Yeah. Well, Kelsey, thank you so very much for being here today. I'm just so inspired by what you've been talking about and your courage in speaking out about things that are important, that matter to you, that matter to everyone. So thank you for doing that. And if, if people are interested in connecting with you specifically, is there a way for them to do? [00:43:33] Kelsey Aicher: Yes. You can go to kansascityaerialarts.com and you'll be able to find my bio and my contact information. If you want to email me, it's kelsey@kansascityaerialarts.com. I am not very good about social media, but I do have an Instagram account, which is mindfulaerhead. Airhead is A E R. So M I N D F U L A E R H E A D. So mindfulaerhead because I am really into mindfulness while being in the air. And yep. So you can follow me on Instagram there and message me that way as well. I will do my best to respond. I'm working this year on improving my social media presence, but it has been a thing that I have been removed from for several years. [00:44:23] Lindsey Dinneen: Oh, I can relate to that. Well, thanks again so much for being here. I really appreciate it. And if you are feeling as inspired as I am after listening to this episode, I'd love if you'd share this with a friend or two, and we will catch you next time. [00:44:41] If you have a story to share with us, we would love that so much. And I hope your day has been Artfully Told. [00:44:51] Hi friends. I wanted to share with you another podcast that I think you're going to fall in love with just as I have. It's called Harlem with a View, and it is hosted by Harlem Lennox, who was a previous guest of mine on Artfully Told and a dear friend. Just because it looks easy doesn't mean it is. There is so much that goes into the work of your creative. She wants to know how the artists got into their line of work, what inspires them, but most importantly, what keeps them going? She'd asked them about how they make it through the blood, sweat, and tears. She wants to know what it's like to live this creative life: the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the magical. So she goes behind the scenes with creatives, from different genres and she explores their history, their take on life and talks about the business of art and the dedication of making art. She has a brilliant, brilliant platform. I think you will fall in love. I highly recommend that you search for Harlem with a View. Thanks!

BayArea Compass
J. Thurston - Prometheus [BayAreaCompass]

BayArea Compass

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 31, 2021 2:54


MP3 Stream: http://www.BayAreaCompass.blogspot.com #BayAreaCompass #JThurston #Prometheus Subscribe now to watch more https://www.youtube.com/c/BayAreaCompassMusic?sub_confirmation=1

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

Cheers from beyond the grave, folks! William S. Castle, Jr. here, warning you of the latest advancement in spook technology destined to turn the podCastle world upside-down! You may THINK you've seen the 2001 remake of my beloved Thir13en Ghosts, but you can't call yourself a cinephile until you've experienced it in COMMENT-O-SCOPE. Do you dare listen to this BOP n' A Tragedy commentary track, as your thr3e hosts explore their love/hate/love relationship with Scott Beck's disorienting cult classic? Some say this haunted house ride of a film paved the road that Dark Castle and others would follow for a decade, but can YOU walk the same path, dodging knife-wielding beauties, plus-sized babies, and spasming Matthew Lillards? The faint of heart need not worry, though, if the secrets of the Black Zodiac are too much for you, just press the "PANIC" button on your seat, and you'll be escorted to our NPR Corner, where you can listen to harmless shows more befitting a... well, I'M not going to say it! Now where is that skeleton waiter with my vodka and boo-bon? Avoid The Hammer, The Jackal, and The Juggernaut by downloading now! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

Shonky Lab
Ghostwatch

Shonky Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2021 105:49


In 1992 the UK was rocked by a TV show so scary, it frightened both of your hosts tonight. That show was Ghostwatch. We hope you enjoy, stay safe and well.   LIVE Episodes are recorded on the... Don your smoking jacket, pop on your slippers and reach for your pipe... Sit back and enjoy the feeling of being a 'real man'. Elton and Pete guide you through the topics of the day and movies of great interest that every discerning gentleman should be well informed on.

Python Bytes
#256 And the best open source project prize goes to ...

Python Bytes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 29, 2021 59:36


Watch the live stream: Watch on YouTube About the show Sponsored by Shortcut - Get started at shortcut.com/pythonbytes Special guest: The Anthony Shaw Michael #0: It's episode 2^8 (nearly 5 years of podcasting) Brian #1: Where does all the effort go?: Looking at Python core developer activity Łukasz Langa A look into CPython repository history and PR data Also, nice example of datasette in action and lots of SQL queries. The data, as well as the process, is open for anyone to look at. Cool that the process was listed in the article, including helper scripts used. Timeframe for data is since Feb 10, 2017, when source moved to GitHub, through Oct 9, 2021. However, some queries in the article are tighter than that. Queries Files involved in PRs since 1/1/20 top is ceval.c with 259 merged PRs Contributors by number of merged PRs lots of familiar names in the top 50, along with some bots it'd be fun to talk with someone about the bots used to help the Python project nice note: “Clearly, it pays to be a bot … or a release manager since this naturally causes you to make a lot of commits. But Victor Stinner and Serhiy Storchaka are neither of these things and still generate amazing amounts of activity. Kudos! In any case, this is no competition but it was still interesting to see who makes all these recent changes.” Who contributed where? Neat. There's a self reported Experts Index in the very nice Python Developer's Guide. But some libraries don't have anyone listed. The data does though. Łukasz generated a top-5 list for each file. Contributing to some file and have a question. These folks may be able to help. Averages for PR activity core developer authoring and merging their own PR takes on average ~7 days (std dev ±41.96 days); core developer authoring a PR which was merged by somebody else takes on average 20.12 days (std dev ±77.36 days); community member-authored PRs get merged on average after 19.51 days (std dev ±81.74 days). Interesting note on those std deviations: “Well, if we were a company selling code review services, this standard deviation value would be an alarmingly large result. But in our situation which is almost entirely volunteer-driven, the goal of my analysis is to just observe and record data. The large standard deviation reflects the large amount of variation but isn't necessarily something to worry about. We could do better with more funding but fundamentally our biggest priority is keeping CPython stable. Certain care with integrating changes is required. Erring on the side of caution seems like a wise thing to do.” More questions to be asked, especially from the issue tracker Which libraries require most maintenance? Michael #2: Why you shouldn't invoke setup.py directly By Paul Ganssle (from Talk Python #271: Unlock the mysteries of time, Python's datetime that is!) In response to conversation in Talk Python's cibuildwheel episode? For a long time, setuptools and distutils were the only game in town when it came to creating Python packages You write a setup.py file that invokes the setup() method, you get a Makefile-like interface exposed by invoking python setup.py [HTML_REMOVED] The last few years all direct invocations of setup.py are effectively deprecated in favor of invocations via purpose-built and/or standards-based CLI tools like pip, build and tox. In Python 2.0, the distutils module was introduced as a standard way to convert Python source code into *nix distro packages One major problem with this approach, though, is that every Python package must use distutils and only distutils — there was no standard way for a package author to make it clear that you need other packages in order to build or test your package. => Setuptools Works, but sometimes you need requirements before the install (see cython example) A build backend is something like setuptools or flit, which is a library that knows how to take a source tree and turn it into a distributable artifact — a source distribution or a wheel. A build frontend is something like pip or build, which is a program (usually a CLI tool) that orchestrates the build environment and invokes the build backend In this taxonomy, setuptools has historically been both a backend and a frontend - that said, setuptools is a terrible frontend. It does not implement PEP 517 or PEP 518's requirements for build frontends Why am I not seeing deprecation warnings? Use build package. Also can be replaced by tox, nox or even a Makefile Probably should just check out the summary table. Anthony #3: OpenTelemetry is going stable soon Cloud Native Computing Foundation project for cross-language event tracing, performance tracing, logging and sampling for distributed applications. Engineers from Microsoft, Amazon, Splunk, Google, Elastic, New Relic and others working on standards and specification. Formed through a merger of the OpenTracing and OpenCensus projects. Python SDK supports instrumentation of lots of frameworks, like Flask, Django, FastAPI (ASGI), and ORMs like SQLalchemy, or templating engines. All data can then be exported onto various platforms : NewRelic, Prometheus, Jaeger, DataDog, Azure Monitor, Google Cloud Monitoring. If you want to get started and play around, checkout the rich console exporter I submitted recently. Brian #4: Understanding all of Python, through its builtins Tushar Sadhwani I really enjoyed the discussion before he actually got to the builtins. LEGB rule defines the order of scopes in which variables are looked up in Python. Local, Enclosing (nonlocal), Global, Builtin Understanding LEGB is a good thing to do for Python beginners or advanced beginners. Takes a lot of the mystery away. Also that all the builtins are in one The rest is a quick scan through the entire list. It's not detailed everywhere, but pulls over scenic viewpoints at regular intervals to discuss interesting parts of builtins. Grouped reasonably. Not alphabetical Constants: There's exactly 5 constants: True, False, None, Ellipsis, and NotImplemented. globals and locals: Where everything is stored bytearray and memoryview: Better byte interfaces bin, hex, oct, ord, chr and ascii: Basic conversions … Well, it's a really long article, so I suggest jumping around and reading a section or two, or three. Luckily there's a nice TOC at the top. Michael #5: FastAPI, Dask, and more Python goodies win best open source titles Things that stood out to me FastAPI Dask Windows Terminal minikube - Kubernetes cluster on your PC OBS Studio Anthony #6: Notes From the Meeting On Python GIL Removal Between Python Core and Sam Gross Following on from last week's share on the “nogil” branch by Sam Gross, the Core Dev sprint included an interview. Targeted to 3.9 (alpha 3!), needs to at least be updated to 3.9.7. Nogil: Replaces pymalloc with mimalloc for thread safety Ties objects to the thread that created them witha. non-atomic local reference count within the owner thread Allows for (slower) reference counting from other threads. Immortalized some objects so that references never get inc/dec'ed like True, False, None, etc. Deferred reference counting Adjusts the GC to wait for all threads to pause at a safe point, doesn't wait for I/O blocked threads and constructs a list of objects to deallocate using mimalloc Relocates the MRO to a thread local (instead of process-local) to avoid contention on ref counting Modifies the builtin collections to be thread-safe (lists, dictionaries, etc,) since they could be shared across threads. IMHO, biggest thing to happen to Python in 5 years. Encouragingly, Sam was invited to be a Core Dev and Lukasz will mentor him! Extras Michael Python Developers Survey 2021 is open More PyPI CLI updates bump2version via Bahram Aghaei (youtube comment) Was there a bee stuck in Brian's mic last time? Brian PyCon US 2022 CFP is open until Dec 20 Python Testing with pytest, 2nd edition, Beta 7.0 All chapters now there. (Final chapter was “Advanced Parametrization”) It's in technical review phase now. If reading, please skip ahead to the chapter you really care about and submit errata if you find anything confusing. Joke:

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

This week on Myopia Movies, we learn why they don't allow gum in school. We watched The Blob (1988), gospel to COVID deniers.  Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will The Blob hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Adams, Daniel, Jeremy

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More
Crisis on Infinite Nights He Came Home: The Many Timelines of Michael Myers

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021


Death has come to our little podcast. We can either ignore it, confront it, or choose our own version to stare down as we shout SIX TIMES! at it. For this episode, we discuss the night HE came home... or is it the night HE continued being home? Or, wait, was it the night HE came home ten years later? Twenty years later? FORTY years later? Resurrected? Out to return? For revenge? Quite frankly, we're not sure what's going on with serial slasher and mechanic coverall enthusiast Michael Myers of the famed HALLOWEEN franchise, but we're putting our best tan trench coats on and figuring it out, tackling the many differing timelines of the horror series and what's unique and occasionally broken about each! You don't know what death is/was/could be but download the episode and find out! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

Should you watch this? with The Popcorn Priest
86 - Prometheus (2012) PT1

Should you watch this? with The Popcorn Priest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 16:41


Should you watch ‘Prometheus' from 2012? Part 1 of our 2 part review. Part 1 is the spoiler free intro and then Part 2 will be our deep dive review and breakdown, which will be released next week. The search for our beginning could lead to our end...and the start of our 12 movie journey to watch and unlock all the that is Alien and all that is Predator. Strap in, buckle up, get into your stasis pod. Once we start we can not go back. Join us! Part 1 of many...

Conspiracy Theories & Unpopular Culture
Halloween Special 2021: Films, Symbolism, Satanic Holidays and Rocky Horror Picture Show!

Conspiracy Theories & Unpopular Culture

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 86:52


We take a look at the most popular holiday of the year- HALLOWEEN! The occult holiday of Samhain approaches and we'll explore the hidden history of this paranormal holiday. We'll get into the satanic tradition, pagan roots, blood sacrifices, druid symbolism, and much more! We'll hear about the classic Michael Myers films in the Halloween series and wrap it up with a 40 minute analysis of Rocky Horror Picture Show!Show Topics:2021 Updates (check out the Halloween Special of "Breaking Social Norms" with ourTop 10 Halloween Films, favorite costumes, personal ghost stories and more here: https://breakingsocialnorms.com/2021/10/21/halloween-special-2021-costumes-top-10-movies-real-scary-ghost-stories/)Halloween: A special holiday (and one of three Satanic holidays!)Halloween films: Michael Myers and the Occult (from 1978 to the 2018 reboot)Pagan roots of SamhainSamhain the Pagan New YearThe Horned GodBlood SacrificesSun WorshipDivination: Language of the DEVILDruidsSymbolsRocky Horror Picture Show analysis:Follow me on Instagram @IsaacWeishaupt for photos of me dressing as Frank N FurterRocky Horror Picture Show book is available- check out the options https://illuminatiwatcher.com/rocky-horror-picture-show-the-unauthorized-guide-to-occult-symbolism/You can get the Rocky Horror Audible audiobook of it (as part of a larger compendium) for FREE https://www.audible.com/pd/B01G29SH48/?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-059794&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_059794_rh_usIf you are interested in learning more about Rocky Horror Picture Show- here is what the book is all about:Prepare to take a journey into the hidden realm of the occult as your host, Isaac Weishaupt, explores the vast conspiracy that is cleverly hidden in this beloved cult classic of The Rocky Horror Picture Show with Fair Use images from the actual film that are used to support the case.The annual rituals on the pagan holiday of Samhain draw its viewers into a world of sex magick and Luciferian doctrine through the Time Warp dance and virgin sacrifices...Learn how Brad, Janet, Riff Raff, and Frank N Furter all play a part in this age old belief in the perfected form of mankindFrank N Furter is the "sweet transvestite" that seeks to draw in the Prometheus in a hidden play on Luciferian doctrine that many aren't able to see...Aleister Crowley's Aeon of Horus and channeling of the alien LAM are a bit TOO close to home in this tale of pansexual aliens from Transsexual TransylvaniaVampires of the Qlippoth are attempting to cross the Da'ath side of the life force while conducting the Time Warp Dionysian ritualWhy do we see the lightning bolt so often in the film? Could it be the fallen angel of Lucifer "falling like lightning" from the heavens?...Occult history of the world and the creation of mankind with the battle between the mother goddess and Saturnian serpent, which is played out in RHPS with Frank vs. Eddie.Hitler's Triumph of the Will is evident- as are the allegations that these aliens are Nazi transexualsFamiliar names like Mick Jagger, Lady Gaga, Marianne Faithfull, Anton LaVey, and Kenneth Anger are all revealed to have links to the RHPS as is laid out in this tell-all that proves the beloved Riff Raff to be one of Crowley's "Black Brothers"The hidden secret teachings of Kabbalah, Alchemy, transhumanism, pursuits of self-deification, and the satanic worship of the Prometheus are laid out for all to see in this revealing book...Get bonus content AND go commercial free + other perks with 3 options:1. VIP: Due to the threat of censorship, I set up a Patreon-type system through MY OWN website! It's the VIP section of illuminatiwatcher.com! It's even setup the same: FREE ebooks, Kubrick's Code video, Tier 2+ shoutouts, Tier 3 Livestreams! Sign up at: https://illuminatiwatcher.com/members-section/2. Patreon: Get free ebooks, bonus content, no commercials at Patreon.com/IlluminatiWatcher! 3. ROKFIN: Check out my new PRIVATE show! I'm now on the Rokfin network! Check out all the premium bonus content of Conspiracy Theories & Unpopular Culture podcast AND an exclusive new podcast “INSIDE THE MIND OF A CONSPIRACY THEORIST” (*one subscription gets you all my bonus content as well as all other creators like Tin Foil Hat's Sam Tripoli, Jay Dyer, Crrow777, Eric Dubay, Jason Bermas, Whitney Webb and more!): https://www.rokfin.com/creator/isaac [**Rokfin also gets the uncensored version and commercial free version of my third podcast- “BREAKING SOCIAL NORMS” with Mrs. Weishaupt (we talk about trending topics, marriage and self-help with a dash of conspiracy!)]More from Isaac- special offers:1. Check out another free podcast I make with my wife called the BREAKING SOCIAL NORMS podcast! You can get it free wherever you listen to podcasts (e.g. Apple: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/breaking-social-norms/id1557527024?uo=4). You can get the Uncensored and commercial-free option available at https://www.rokfin.com/creator/isaac2. Signed paperbacks, coffee mugs, shirts, & other merch: Gumroad.com/IsaacW3. Get 3 books for $5: https://illuminatiwatcher.com/how-to-get-free-books/4. ALIENS, UFOS & THE OCCULT IS NOW UP ON AMAZON AND AUDIBLE (*author narrated): https://amzn.to/3j3UtZz5. Enjoy some audiobooks and support the show! Go to Audible.com/Illuminati or text “Illuminati” to 500-500 to start your free 30 day FREE trial6. If you want to hear more from me AND also want to support the show, search for "Isaac Weishaupt" on Audible and pick up my narrated audiobooks! My most popular book- THE DARK PATH! https://www.audible.com/pd/B0759MN23F/?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-095441&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_095441_rh_us AND the popular alien books USE YOUR ILLUSION are also on Audible: https://www.audible.com/pd/B08NRXFNDM/?source_code=AUDFPWS0223189MWT-BK-ACX0-223105&ref=acx_bty_BK_ACX0_223105_rh_us7. My show's sponsors- get discounts while you support the show and do a little self improvement! Get 10% off your first month of starting your happier life at BetterHelp.com/IlluminatiWatcher AND get free 30 day trial to great audiobooks at Audible.com/Illuminati (or text “illuminati” to 500-500)8. ATTENTION CRYPTO NERDS!!! CopyMyCrypto.com/Isaac is where you can copy James McMahon's crypto holdings- listeners get access for just $1*Want to advertise/sponsor our show?
We have partnered with AdvertiseCast to handle our advertising/sponsorship requests. They're great to work with and will help you advertise on our show. Please email: sales@advertisecast.com or click the link below to get started. https://www.advertisecast.com/ConspiracyTheoriesandUnpopularCulture*Isaac's Socials:-illuminatiwatcher.com -twitter.com/IlluminatiEyes -instagram.com/isaacweishaupt -facebook.com/illuminatiwatcher-tiktok.com/@isaacweishaupt-youtube.com/c/isaacweishaupt-https://www.amazon.com/~/e/B00CWH6PHQ

That Video Game Podcast
TVGP Critical Misses S07E05 - Prometheus (2012)

That Video Game Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 62:33


Featuring: Michael “Boston” Hannon Paul “Moonpir” Carver-Smith Running Time: 1:02:32 Video Version: YouTube Surprise, this season continues! With our two additional movies will we see additional aliens? Or will we be left with just more awesome horseshoe spaceships? Applause sound effect from SoundBible Royalty free music from https://www.fesliyanstudios.com Become a patron of TVGP for just a few dollars a month at E1M1's Patreon Page! Get two month early access to Critical Misses, uncensored outtakes, and much more for just $5/month!

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

In honor of the new Addams Family Animated film, we visit Addams Family Values for the Patreon few! Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will Addams Family Values hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Lauren, Daniel, Jon

Verbal Diorama
Prometheus & Alien: Covenant

Verbal Diorama

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 31:44


Welcome to the second Nanorama episode - episodes slightly shorter, but focusing on interesting titbits of information. For this episode, I'm continuing with the Alien franchise by talking a little about the saga's attempts at prequels: Prometheus brought back Alien director Ridley Scott, to distance itself from the franchise and delve into the origins of humanity, and the story around Alien's space jockey with a big-name cast including Noomi Rapace, Michael Fassbender, Charlize Theron and Idris Elba, but while it was a financial success, audiences struggled with this Alien prequels reliance on philosophical ideas about the creation of humanity. and distinct lack of actual aliens.... Alien: Covenant, also directed by Ridley Scott, distanced itself from its prequel, by returning to its franchise roots and almost disregarding the plot and characters of the previous movie (bar Michael Fassbender's David). It was being worked on at the same time as Neill Blomkamp's Alien 5, which would reunite Sigourney Weaver and Michael Biehn as Ripley and Hicks. No guesses which movie out of the two got cancelled as a result.... Support this podcast

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

Ohhhh yes! Wrestling fans rejoice, Netflix has released a spooky—allegedly—treat for this Halloween season, starring the Deadman himself, The Undertaker. Ever wanted to play a game with the BOP Crew? Now you can! Join us and adventure-along as we enter Death Valley and the Phenom's Yard to uncover the mysterious secrets of Taker's posh mansion. Will we guide The New Day through this Interactive movie and steal the Urn with the power of positivity? Or will we merely… rest… in… peace…? Knock Rikishi off the top of the Cell by downloading the commentary now. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

Catch Da Craze
Indie comic creators Laurens F Colson and Ben Mills Ep317

Catch Da Craze

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 59:43


We caught up with the creative team behind "In the shadows of Prometheus" https://www.authocracy.com/in-the-shadow-of-prometheus/  Laurens F Colson and Ben Mills Forbidden Book 2 Launch Nov 1st Please share, support and sign up   Indiegogo https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/forbidden-issue-2-the-hunt/coming_soon/x/25894633   Kickstarter: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/forbidden/forbidden-issue-2-the-hunt   Get the latest news from Catch Da Craze: Sign Up Here https://shoutout.wix.com/so/7dNbOtEMq?languageTag=en Previous Episode: Bigfoot knows Karate https://youtu.be/DBJOXsQisv0 Sponsor an Episode and promote your brand today https://www.icreatestories.com/become_a_sponsor #prometheus #shadows #comics

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

This week Dean Wermer puts Klowns on double secret probation! We watched Killer Klowns from Outer Space, what are ya gonna do with those 'pies,' boys?" If you want to see Matthew and get a book of his signed, come by Tall Tale Books in Atlanta on 10/30, from 1-3pm Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will Killer Klowns from Outer Space hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Brittany, Daniel, Matthew  

Kultur – detektor.fm
Jasmin Schreiber über Kindheitsfreundschaften

Kultur – detektor.fm

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 17:37


Prometheus ist verzweifelt: Er sitzt allein im Auto auf der Flucht nach Dänemark und sein bester Freund ist tot. Wie es dazu gekommen ist, darum geht es in Jasmin Schreibers neuem Roman „Der Mauersegler“. >> Artikel zum Nachlesen: https://detektor.fm/kultur/n99-jasmin-schreiber-ueber-kindheitsfreundschaften

Public Enemies Podcast
Ep. 180 "Prometheus & Bob" | WWE vs. AEW fallout, Crown Jewel + NXT, NBA - NFL news & more

Public Enemies Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 125:37


The Enemies return one mo again for episode 180. World Shit: RIP Colin Powell, Kanye's new name (5:30). The fallout from WWE/AEW head to head (13:00), Rocket Boyz promo (44:10), NXT recap (48:40), Crown Jewel (1:03:20), Smoke Break: Pop Tart Gate, PE3, DK Metcalf (1:18:42). The Count Out: NFL News & NBA opening week (1:42:37) & more. Intro: Lil Durk - Pissed Me Off | https://youtu.be/DdDdQZHH2cM Kid Reed x Lil N8 - Boss Mode | https://twitter.com/thebadreed/status/1450924894259134477?s=21 Blapstar - Berries & Cream | https://youtu.be/lyvSUVe0dJk R8ed R - Power Of The Punch ft. Mega Ran, O_super | https://youtu.be/eoZlig8YUBI Outro: Young Thug - Peepin Out The Window ft. Future & Bslime | https://youtu.be/Y8amvochwKA

The Stuff Dreams Are Made Of
Catalog Day, Episode III: Revenge of the Bids

The Stuff Dreams Are Made Of

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 106:33


David and Ryan crack open the latest Prop Store catalog to pore over the latest treasures to hit the block. They discuss screen-matched Nazi demons, more Aliens props, Spectre rings, Gladiator movies, volleyballs named Wilson, hoverboards, the possibility of David expanding his hood ornament collection, what might be the greatest call sheet of all time, and, of course, one of the hosts' enduring fascination with Prometheus. Texas Tax rate at 80% of 8.25%

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

It seems we're entitled to yet another good scare as The BOP Crew forms a mob to discuss the latest entry in Michael Myers' Life Story. No, not the old life story, the new life story. As one of the most divisive sequels in the franchise slashes cinema and streaming screens everywhere, we tackle heady spoiler territory, the deeper themes at play, what it adds to Michael and the ramifications thereof, plus why the discourse might be so controversial. All in all we discover, once and for all, that yes indeed... HALLOWEEN KILLS. Don't stare outward, stare inward by downloading the episode now. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

The Perfume Nationalist
Le Labo Oud 27 w/ Howling Mutant

The Perfume Nationalist

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 102:59


Oud 27 (2009) by Le Labo + Ridley Scott's Alien (1979) + Prometheus (2012) + Alien: Covenant (2017) + James Cameron's Aliens (1986) + David Fincher's Alien 3 (1992) + Jean-Pierre Jeunet's Alien Resurrection (1997) with Howling Mutant 10/16/2021 s03.ep127   To gain access to the full catalog of TPN content please support us at https://www.patreon.com/perfumenationalist

不丧
"人类是愚蠢的、无助的,但可能值得拯救"——读莱姆的《无敌号》有感

不丧

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021


节目摘要 今年是波兰科幻大师斯坦尼斯瓦夫•莱姆诞辰一百周年的日子,我们有幸参加了译林出版社组织的莱姆精读计划,在这期节目里,我们一起聊了聊《无敌号》这部作品的读后感。 节目备注 支持我们 订阅听友通讯请点击这里。 欢迎通过微博关注我们的节目@不丧Podcast和女主播@constancy好小气。 关于线上读书微信群:由于目前群人数超过100人,无法继续通过扫码入群。想要入群的朋友可以先加我的微信号(ID: hongming_qiao),然后再拉你入群。 我们的电报(Telegram)听友群:不丧电报群 我们播客的邮箱地址:busangpodcast@gmail.com 这集播客中提到的相关作品的介绍和链接: 莱姆精读计划 痴人之爱,Vol.29当你前往索拉里斯星,愿你的道路漫长,充满奇迹与发现 咸鱼罐头,E27 眼见为虚的科幻经典 |《未来学大会》 西夏酒馆,vol.38 “做完莱姆就退休!” 落日间,《其主之声》(即将上线) 女主播“单飞不解散”新播客《一人有一个》 请添加RSS:https://oneatatime.typlog.io/episodes/feed.xml 斯坦尼斯瓦夫•莱姆,《无敌号》 斯坦尼斯瓦夫•莱姆,《索拉里斯星》 库尔特·冯内古特,《五号屠场》 普罗米修斯 Prometheus (2012) 星际穿越 Interstellar (2014) 飞向太空 Солярис (1972) 索拉里斯 Solaris (2002) 他们已不再变老 They Shall Not Grow Old (2018) 羊崽 Dýrið (2021) 绿衣骑士 The Green Knight (2021) Roisin Kiberd, "A Century in Stanislaw Lem's Cosmos" Scott Bradfield, "Humanity Is Stupid, Helpless and Possibly Worth Saving" Agnieszka Gajewska, Holocaust and the Stars: The Past in the Prose of Stanisław Lem 如何收听「不丧」 任何设备都可以通过访问「不丧」的网站在线收听 我们推荐使用泛用型播客客户端收听「不丧」 泛用型播客客户端直接通过播客上传者提供的RSS向用户提供播客内容和信息,不会有第三方的干涉;并且只要上传者更新了Feed,就能在客户端上收听到节目。 iOS平台上我们推荐使用Podcast(苹果预装播客客户端),Castro,Overcast和Pocket Casts。 Android平台上收听方式可以参照这里。 macOS和Windows平台可以通过iTunes收听。 现在你也已经可以在小宇宙、Spotify和Google Podcast平台上收听我们的节目。

Shonky Lab
Halloween

Shonky Lab

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 107:58


Everyone likes Halloween right? What’s not to like? Dressing up, sweets and candy, scaring people, ghost stories and all that jazz. Brilliant right? Nope, not for Elton. You can knock as much... Don your smoking jacket, pop on your slippers and reach for your pipe... Sit back and enjoy the feeling of being a 'real man'. Elton and Pete guide you through the topics of the day and movies of great interest that every discerning gentleman should be well informed on.

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

This week, turns out, he wasn't dead! Will Loomis shoot cops at random? Halloween 2: The Hospital! If you want to see Matthew and get a book of his signed, come by Tall Tale Books in Atlanta on 10/30, from 1-3pm Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will Halloween 2 hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Adam, Daniel, Jeremy

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More
BLACK PUMPKIN Commentary Track (A Big-Ass Pumpkin Day Extravaganza)

Box Office Pulp | Film Analysis, Movie Retrospectives, Commentary Tracks, Comedy, and More

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021


The gourdiest time of year is here! And while we may have all started the festivities a month ago like Satan intended, the official-official start of this pumpkin spiced season is here and now! HAPPY BIG-ASS PUMPKIN DAY! Yes, it's our favorite holiday, and per usual we're celebrating the only way we know how: with a random horror movie featuring a pumpkin. This time it's another round of Amazon Prime roulette and the winner is the legend of Bloody Bobby in the surprisingly goosebump-y BLACK PUMPKIN. So crack open your can of gourd guts and join us for this feature commentary track! Begin carving and download here! Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BoxOfficePulpPodcast/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/BoxOfficePulp Apple Podcasts: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/box-office-pulp/id577338641 Stitcher: http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=37192&refid=stpr Amazon Podcasts:https://music.amazon.com/podcasts/7c11ff8b-2875-454d-8770-8b1d36d04b52

Screaming in the Cloud
Keeping the Cloudwatch with Ewere Diagboya

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 32:21


About EwereCloud, DevOps Engineer, Blogger and AuthorLinks: Infrastructure Monitoring with Amazon CloudWatch: https://www.amazon.com/Infrastructure-Monitoring-Amazon-CloudWatch-infrastructure-ebook/dp/B08YS2PYKJ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ewere/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/nimboya Medium: https://medium.com/@nimboya My Cloud Series: https://mycloudseries.com TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Honeycomb. When production is running slow, it's hard to know where problems originate: is it your application code, users, or the underlying systems? I've got five bucks on DNS, personally. Why scroll through endless dashboards, while dealing with alert floods, going from tool to tool to tool that you employ, guessing at which puzzle pieces matter? Context switching and tool sprawl are slowly killing both your team and your business. You should care more about one of those than the other, which one is up to you. Drop the separate pillars and enter a world of getting one unified understanding of the one thing driving your business: production. With Honeycomb, you guess less and know more. Try it for free at Honeycomb.io/screaminginthecloud. Observability, it's more than just hipster monitoring.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by Liquibase. If you're anything like me, you've screwed up the database part of a deployment so severely that you've been banned from touching every anything that remotely sounds like SQL, at at least three different companies. We've mostly got code deployments solved for, but when it comes to databases we basically rely on desperate hope, with a roll back plan of keeping our resumes up to date. It doesn't have to be that way. Meet Liquibase. It is both an open source project and a commercial offering. Liquibase lets you track, modify, and automate database schema changes across almost any database, with guardrails to ensure you'll still have a company left after you deploy the change. No matter where your database lives, Liquibase can help you solve your database deployment issues. Check them out today at liquibase.com. Offer does not apply to Route 53.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Corey Quinn. I periodically make observations that monitoring cloud resources has changed somewhat since I first got started in the world of monitoring. My experience goes back to the original Call of Duty. That's right: Nagios.When you set instances up, it would theoretically tell you when they were unreachable or certain thresholds didn't work. It was janky but it kind of worked, and that was sort of the best we have. The world has progressed as cloud has become more complicated, as technologies have become more sophisticated, and here today to talk about this is the first AWS Hero from Africa and author of a brand new book, Ewere Diagboya. Thank you for joining me.Ewere: Thanks for the opportunity.Corey: So, you recently published a book on CloudWatch. To my understanding, it is the first such book that goes in-depth with not just how to wind up using it, but how to contextualize it as well. How did it come to be, I guess is my first question?Ewere: Yes, thanks a lot, Corey. The name of the book is Infrastructure Monitoring with Amazon CloudWatch, and the book came to be from the concept of looking at the ecosystem of AWS cloud computing and we saw that a lot of the things around cloud—I mostly talked about—most of this is [unintelligible 00:01:49] compute part of AWS, which is EC2, the containers, and all that, you find books on all those topics. They are all proliferated all over the internet, you know, and videos and all that.But there is a core behind each of these services that no one actually talks about and amplifies, which is the monitoring part, which helps you to understand what is going on with the system. I mean, knowing what is going on with the system helps you to understand failures, helps you to predict issues, helps you to also envisage when a failure is going to happen so that you can remedy it and also [unintelligible 00:02:19], and in some cases, even give you a historical view of the system to help you understand how a system has behaved over a period of time.Corey: One of the articles that I put out that first really put me on AWS's radar, for better or worse, was something that I was commissioned to write for Linux Journal, back when that was a print publication. And I accidentally wound up getting the cover of it with my article, “CloudWatch is of the devil, but I must use it.” And it was a painful problem that people generally found resonated with them because no one felt they really understood CloudWatch; it was incredibly expensive; it didn't really seem like it was at all intuitive, or that there was any good way to opt out of it, it was just simply there, and if you were going to be monitoring your system in a cloud environment—which of course you should be—it was just sort of the cost of doing business that you then have to pay for a third-party tool to wind up using the CloudWatch metrics that it was gathering, and it was just expensive and unpleasant all around. Now, a lot of the criticisms I put about CloudWatch's limitations in those days, about four years ago, have largely been resolved or at least mitigated in different ways. But is CloudWatch still crappy, I guess, is my question?Ewere: Um, yeah. So, at the moment, I think, like you said, CloudWatch has really evolved over time. I personally also had that issue with CloudWatch when I started using CloudWatch; I had the challenge of usability, I had the challenge of proper integration, and I will talk about my first experience with CloudWatch here. So, when I started my infrastructure work, one of the things I was doing a lot was EC2, basically. I mean, everyone always starts with EC2 at the first time.And then we had a downtime. And then my CTO says, “Okay, [Ewere 00:04:00], check what's going on.” And I'm like, “How do I check?” [laugh]. I mean, I had no idea of what to do.And he says, “Okay, there's a tool called CloudWatch. You should be able to monitor.” And I'm like, “Okay.” I dive into CloudWatch, and boom, I'm confused again. And you look at the console, you see, it shows you certain metrics, and yet [people 00:04:18] don't understand what CPU metric talks about, what does network bandwidth talks about?And here I am trying to dig, and dig, and dig deeper, and I still don't get [laugh] a sense of what is actually going on. But what I needed to find out was, I mean, what was wrong with the memory of the system, so I delved into trying to install the CloudWatch agent, get metrics and all that. But the truth of the matter was that I couldn't really solve my problem very well, but I had [unintelligible 00:04:43] of knowing that I don't have memory out of the box; it's something that has to set up differently. And trust me, after then I didn't touch CloudWatch [laugh] again. Because, like you said, it was a problem, it was a bit difficult to work with.But fast forward a couple of years later, I could actually see someone use CloudWatch for a lot of beautiful stuff, you know? It creates beautiful dashboards, creates some very well-aggregated metrics. And also with the aggregated alarms that CloudWatch comes with, [unintelligible 00:05:12] easy for you to avoid what to call incident fatigue. And then also, the dashboards. I mean, there are so many dashboards that simplified to work with, and it makes it easy and straightforward to configure.So, the bootstrapping and the changes and the improvements on CloudWatch over time has made CloudWatch a go-to tool, and most especially the integration with containers and Kubernetes. I mean, CloudWatch is one of the easiest tools to integrate with EKS, Kubernetes, or other container services that run in AWS; it's just, more or less, one or two lines of setup, and here you go with a lot of beautiful, interesting, and insightful metrics that you will not get out of the box, and if you look at other monitoring tools, it takes a lot of time for you to set up, for you to configure, for you to consistently maintain and to give you those consistent metrics you need to know what's going on with your system from time to time.Corey: The problem I always ran into was that the traditional tools that I was used to using in data centers worked pretty well because you didn't have a whole lot of variability on an hour-to-hour basis. Sure, when you installed new servers or brought up new virtual machines, you had to update the monitoring system. But then you started getting into this world of ephemerality with auto-scaling originally, and later containers, and—God help us all—Lambda now, where it becomes this very strange back-and-forth story of, you need to be able to build something that, I guess, is responsive to that. And there's no good way to get access to some of the things that CloudWatch provides, just because we didn't have access into AWS's systems the way that they do. The inverse, though, is that they don't have access into things running inside of the hypervisor; a classic example has always been memory: memory usage is an example of something that hasn't been able to be displayed traditionally without installing some sort of agent inside of it. Is that still the case? Are there better ways of addressing those things now?Ewere: So, that's still the case, I mean, for EC2 instances. So before, now, we had an agent called a CloudWatch agent. Now, there's a new agent called Unified Cloudwatch Agent which is, I mean, a top-notch from CloudWatch agent. So, at the moment, basically, that's what happens on the EC2 layer. But the good thing is when you're working with containers, or more or less Kubernetes kind of applications or systems, everything comes out of the box.So, with containers, we're talking about a [laugh] lot of moving parts. The container themselves with their own CPU, memory, disk, all the metrics, and then the nodes—or the EC2 instance of the virtual machines running behind them—also having their own unique metrics. So, within the container world, these things are just a click of a button. Everything happens at the same time as a single entity, but within the EC2 instance and ecosystem, you still find this there, although the setup process has been a bit easier and much faster. But in the container world, that problem has totally been eliminated.Corey: When you take a look at someone who's just starting to get a glimmer of awareness around what CloudWatch is and how to contextualize it, what are the most common mistakes people make early on?Ewere: I also talked about this in my book, and one of the mistakes people make in terms of CloudWatch, and monitoring in generalities: “What am I trying to figure out?” [laugh]. If you don't have that answer clearly stated, you're going to run into a lot of problems. You need to answer that question of, “What am I trying to figure out?” I mean, monitoring is so broad, monitoring is so large that if you do not have the answer to that question, you're going to get yourself into a lot of trouble, you're going to get yourself into a lot of confusion, and like I said, if you don't understand what you're trying to figure out in the first place, then you're going to get a lot of data, you're going to get a lot of information, and that can get you confused.And I also talked about what I call alarm fatigues or incident fatigues. This happens when you configure so many alarms, so many metrics, and you're getting a lot of alarms hitting and notification services—whether it's Slack, whether it's an email—and it causes fatigue. What happens here is the person who should know what is going on with the system gets a ton of messages and in that scenario can miss something very important because there's so many messages coming in, so many integrations coming in. So, you should be able to optimize appropriately, to be able to, like you said, conceptualize what you're trying to figure out, what problems are you trying to solve? Most times you really don't figure this out for a start, but there are certain bare minimums you need to know about, and that's part of what I talked about in the book.One of the things that I highlighted in the book when I talked about monitoring of different layers is, when you're talking about monitoring of infrastructure, say compute services, such as virtual machines, or EC2 instances, the certain baseline and metrics you need to take note of that are core to the reliability, the scalability, and the efficiency of your system. And if you focus on these things, you can have a baseline starting point before you start going deeper into things like observability and knowing what's going on entirely with your system. So, baseline understanding of—baseline metrics, and baseline of what you need to check in terms of different kinds of services you're trying to monitor is your starting point. And the mistake people make is that they don't have a baseline. So, we do not have a baseline; they just install a monitoring tool, configure a CloudWatch, and they don't know the problem they're trying to solve [laugh] and that can lead to a lot of confusion.Corey: So, what inspired you from, I guess, kicking the tires on CloudWatch—the way that we all do—and being frustrated and confused by it, all the way to the other side of writing a book on it? What was it that got you to that point? Were you an expert on CloudWatch before you started writing the book, or was it, “Well, by the time this book is done, I will certainly know [laugh] more about the service than I did when I started.”Ewere: Yeah, I think it's a double-edged sword. [laugh]. So, it's a combination of the things you just said. So, first of all, I have experienced with other monitoring tools; I have love for reliability and scalability of a system. I started Kubernetes at some of the early times Kubernetes came out, when it was very difficult to deploy, when it was very difficult to set up.Because I'm looking at how I can make systems a little bit more efficient, a little bit more reliable than having to handle a lot of things like auto-scaling, having to go through the process of understanding how to scale. I mean, that's a school of its own that you need to prepare yourself for. So, first of all, I have a love for making sure systems are reliable and efficient, and second of all, I also want to make sure that I know what is going on with my system per time, as much as possible. The level of visibility of a system gives you the level of control and understanding of what your system is doing per time. So, those two things are very core to me.And then thirdly, I had a plan of a streak of books I want to write based on AWS, and just like monitoring is something that is just new. I mean, if you go to the package website, this is the first book on infrastructure monitoring AWS with CloudWatch; it's not a very common topic to talk about. And I have other topics in my head, and I really want to talk about things like networking, and other topics that you really need to go deep inside to be able to appreciate the value of what you see in there with all those scenarios because in this book, every chapter, I created a scenario of what a real-life monitoring system or what you need to do looks like. So, being that I have those premonitions, I know that whenever it came to, you know, to share with the world what I know in monitoring, what I've learned in monitoring, I took a [unintelligible 00:12:26]. And then secondly, as this opportunity for me to start telling the world about the things I learned, and then I also learned while writing the book because there are certain topics in the book that I'm not so much of an expert in things, like big data and all that.I had to also learn; I had to take some time to do more research, to do more understanding. So, I use CloudWatch, okay? I'm kind of good in CloudWatch, and also, I also had to do more learning to be able to disseminate this information. And also, hopefully, X-Ray some parts of monitoring and different services that people do not really pay so much attention into.Corey: What do you find that is still the most, I guess, confusing to you as you take a look across the ecosystem of the entire CloudWatch space? I mean, every time I play with it, I take a look, and I get lost in, “Oh, they have contributor analyses, and logs, and metrics.” And it's confusing, and every time I wind up, I guess, spiraling out of control. What do you find that, after all of this, is a lot easier for you, and what do you find that's a lot more understandable?Ewere: I'm still going to go back to the containers part. I'm sorry, I'm in love containers. [laugh].Corey: No, no, it's fair. Containers are very popular. Everyone loves them. I'm just basically anti-container based upon no better reason than I'm just stubborn and bloody-minded most of the time.Ewere: [laugh]. So, pretty much like I said, I kind of had experience with other monitoring tools. Trust me, if you want to configure proper container monitoring for other tools, trust me, it's going to take you at least a week or two to get it properly, from the dashboards, to the login configurations, to the piping of the data to the proper storage engine. These are things I talked about in the book because I took monitoring from the ground up. I mean, if you've never done monitoring before, when you take my book, you will understand the basic principles of monitoring.And [funny 00:14:15], you know, monitoring has some big data process, like an ETL process: extraction, transformation, and writing of data into an analytic system. So, first of all, you have to battle that. You have to talk about the availability of your storage engine. What are you using? An Elasticsearch? Are you using an InfluxDB? Where do you want to store your data? And then you have to answer the question of how do I visualize the data? What method do I realize this data? What kind of dashboards do I want to use? What methods of representation do I need to represent this data so that it makes sense to whoever I'm sharing this data with. Because in monitoring, you definitely have to share data with either yourself or with someone else, so the way you present the data needs to make sense. I've seen graphs that do not make sense. So, it requires some level of skill. Like I said, I've [unintelligible 00:15:01] where I spent a week or two having to set up dashboards. And then after setting up the dashboard, someone was like, “I don't understand, and we just need, like, two.” And I'm like, “Really?” [laugh]. You know? Because you spend so much time. And secondly, you discover that repeatability of that process is a problem. Because some of these tools are click and drag; some of them don't have JSON configuration. Some do, some don't. So, you discover that scalability of this kind of system becomes a problem. You can't repeat the dashboards: if you make a change to the system, you need to go back to your dashboard, you need to make some changes, you need to update your login, too, you need to make some changes across the layer. So, all these things is a lot of overhead [laugh] that you can cut off when you use things like Container Insights in CloudWatch—which is a feature of CloudWatch. So, for me, that's a part that you can really, really suck out so much juice from in a very short time, quickly and very efficiently. On the flip side, when you talk about monitoring for big data services, and monitoring for a little bit of serverless, there might be a little steepness in the flow of the learning curve there because if you do not have a good foundation in serverless, when you get into [laugh] Lambda Insights in CloudWatch, trust me, you're going to be put off by that; you're going to get a little bit confused. And then there's also multifunction insights at the moment. So, you need to have some very good, solid foundation in some of those topics before you can get in there and understand some of the data and the metrics that CloudWatch is presenting to you. And then lastly, things like big data, too, there are things that monitoring is still being properly fleshed out. Which I think that in the coming months and years to come, they will become more proper and they will become more presentable than they are at the moment.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: The problem I've always had with dashboards is it seems like managers always want them—“More dashboards, more dashboards”—then you check the usage statistics of who's actually been viewing the dashboards and the answer is, no one since you demoed it to the execs eight months ago. But they always claim to want more. How do you square that?I guess, slicing between what people asked for and what they actually use.Ewere: [laugh]. So yeah, one of the interesting things about dashboards in terms of most especially infrastructure monitoring, is the dashboards people really want is a revenue dashboards. Trust me, that's what they want to see; they want to see the money going up, up, up, [laugh] you know? So, when it comes to—Corey: Oh, yes. Up and to the right, then everyone's happy. But CloudWatch tends to give you just very, very granular, low-level metrics of thing—it's hard to turn that into something executives care about.Ewere: Yeah, what people really care about. But my own take on that is, the dashboards are actually for you and your team to watch, to know what's going on from time to time. But what is key is setting up events across very specific and sensitive data. For example, when any kind of sensitive data is flowing across your system and you need to check that out, then you tie a metric to that, and in turn alarm to it. That is actually the most important thing for anybody.I mean, for the dashboards, it's just for you and your team, like I said, for your personal consumption. “Oh, I can see all the RDS connections are getting too high, we need to upgrade.” Oh, we can see that all, the memory, there was a memory spike in the last two hours. I know that's for you and your team to consume; not for the executive team. But what is really good is being able to do things like aggregate data that you can share.I think that is what the executive team would love to see. When you go back to the core principles of DevOps in terms of the DevOps Handbook, you see things like a mean time to recover, and change failure rate, and all that. The most interesting thing is that all these metrics can be measured only by monitoring. You cannot change failure rates if you don't have a monitoring system that tells you when there was a failure. You cannot know your release frequency when you don't have a metric that measures number of deployments you have and is audited in a particular metric or a particular aggregator system.So, we discovered that the four major things you measure in DevOps are all tied back to monitoring and metrics, at minimum, to understand your system from time to time. So, what the executive team actually needs is to get a summary of what's going on. And one of the things I usually do for almost any company I work for is to share some kind of uptime system with them. And that's where CloudWatch Synthetics Canary come in. So, Synthetic Canary is a service that helps you calculate that helps you check for uptime of the system.So, it's a very simple service. It does a ping, but it is so efficient, and it is so powerful. How is it powerful? It does a ping to a system and it gets a feedback. Now, if the status code of your service, it's not 200 or not 300, it considers it downtime.Now, when you aggregate this data within a period of time, say a month or two, you can actually use that data to calculate the uptime of your system. And that uptime [unintelligible 00:19:50] is something you can actually share to your customers and say, “Okay, we have an SLA of 99.9%. We have an SLA of 99.8%.” That data should not be doctored data; it should not be a data you just cook out of your head; it should be based on your system that you have used, worked with, monitored over a period of time so that the information you share with your customers are genuine, they are truthful, and they are something that they can also see for themselves.Hence companies are using [unintelligible 00:20:19] like status page to know what's going on from time to time whenever there is an incident and report back to their customers. So, these are things that executives will be more interested in than just dashboards, [laugh] dashboards, and more dashboards. So, it's more or less not about what they really ask for, but what you know and what you believe you are going to draw value from. I mean, an executive in a meeting with a client and says, “Hey, we got a system that has 99.9% uptime.”He opens the dashboard or he opens the uptime system and say, “You see our uptime? For the past three months, this has been our metric.” Boom. [snaps fingers]. That's it. That's value, instantly. I'm not showing [laugh] the clients and point of graphs, you know? “Can you explain the memory metric?” That's not going to pass the message, send the message forward.Corey: Since your book came out, I believe, if not, certainly by the time it was finished being written and it was in review phase, they came out with Managed Prometheus and Managed Grafana. It looks almost like they're almost trying to do a completely separate standalone monitoring stack of AWS tooling. Is that a misunderstanding of what the tools look like, or is there something to that?Ewere: Yeah. So, I mean by the time those announced at re:Invent, I'm like, “Oh, snap.” I almost told my publisher, “You know what? We need to add three more chapters.” [laugh]. But unfortunately, we're still in review, in preview.I mean, as a Hero, I kind of have some privilege to be able to—a request for that, but I'm like, okay, I think it's going to change the narrative of what the book is talking about. I think I'm going to pause on that and make sure this finishes with the [unintelligible 00:21:52], and then maybe a second edition, I can always attach that. But hey, I think there's trying to be a galvanization between Prometheus, Grafana, and what CloudWatch stands for. Because at the moment, I think it's currently on pre-release, it's not fully GA at the moment, so you can actually use it. So, if you go to Container Insights, you can see that you can still get how Prometheus and Grafana is presenting the data.So, it's more or less a different view of what you're trying to see. It's trying to give you another perspective of how your data is presented. So, you're going to have CloudWatch: it's going to have CloudWatch dashboards, it's going to have CloudWatch metrics, but hey, this different tools, Prometheus, Grafana, and all that, they all have their unique ways of presenting the data. And part of the reason I believe AWS has Prometheus and Grafana there is, I mean, Prometheus is a huge cloud-native open-source monitoring, presentation, analytics tool; it packs a lot of heat, and a lot of people are so used to it. Everybody like, “Why can't I have Prometheus in CloudWatch?”I mean—so instead of CloudWatch just being a simple monitoring tool, [unintelligible 00:22:54] CloudWatch has become an ecosystem of monitoring tool. So, we got—we're not going to see cloud [unintelligible 00:23:00], or just [unintelligible 00:23:00] log, analytics, metrics, dashboards, no. We're going to see it as an ecosystem where we can plug in other services, and then integrate and work together to give us better performance options, and also different perspectives to the data that is being collected.Corey: What do you think is next, as you take a look across the ecosystem, as far as how people are thinking about monitoring and observability in a cloud context? What are they missing? Where's the next evolution lead?Ewere: Yeah, I think the biggest problem with monitoring, which is part of the introduction part of the book, where I talked about the basic types of monitoring—which is proactive and reactive monitoring—is how do we make sure we know before things happen? [laugh]. And one of the things that can help with that is machine learning. There is a small ecosystem that is not so popular at the moment, which talks about how we can do a lot of machine learning in DevOps monitoring observability. And that means looking at historic data and being able to predict on the basic level.Looking at history, [then are 00:24:06] being able to predict. At the moment, there are very few tools that have models running at the back of the data being collected for monitoring and metrics, which could actually revolutionize monitoring and observability as we see it right now. I mean, even the topic of observability is still new at the moment. It's still very integrated. Observability just came into Cloud, I think, like, two years ago, so it's still being matured.But one thing that has been missing is seeing the value AI can bring into monitoring. I mean, this much [unintelligible 00:24:40] practically tell us, “Hey, by 9 p.m. I'm going to go down. I think your CPU or memory is going down. I think I'm line 14 of your code [laugh] is a problem causing the bug. Please, you need to fix it by 2 p.m. so that by 6 p.m., things can run perfectly.” That is going to revolutionize monitoring. That's going to revolutionize observability and bring a whole new level to how we understand and monitor the systems.Corey: I hope you're right. If you take a look right now, I guess, the schism between monitoring and observability—which I consider to be hipster monitoring, but they get mad when I say that—is there a difference? Is it just new phrasing to describe the same concepts, or is there something really new here?Ewere: In my book, I said, monitoring is looking at it from the outside in, observability is looking at it from the inside out. So, what monitoring does not see under, basically, observability sees. So, they are children of the same mom. That's how I put it. One actually needs the other and both of them cannot be separated from each other.What we've been working with is just understanding the system from the surface. When there's an issue, we go to the aggregated results that come out of the issue. Very basic example: you're in a Java application, and we all know Java is very memory intensive, on the very basic layer. And there's a memory issue. Most times, infrastructure is the first hit with the resultant of that.But the problem is not the infrastructure, it's maybe the code. Maybe garbage collection was not well managed; maybe they have a lot of variables in the code that is not used, and they're just filling up unnecessary memory locations; maybe there's a loop that's not properly managed and properly optimized; maybe there's a resource on objects that has been initialized that has not been closed, which will cause a heap in the memory. So, those are the things observability can help you track. Those are the things that we can help you see. Because observability runs from within the system and send metrics out, while basic monitoring is about understanding what is going on on the surface of the system: memory, CPU, pushing out logs to know what's going on and all that.So, on the basic level, observability helps gives you, kind of, a deeper insight into what monitoring is actually telling you. It's just like the result of what happened. I mean, we are told that the symptoms of COVID is coughing, sneezing, and all that. That's monitoring. [laugh].But before we know that you actually have COVID, we need to go for a test, and that's observability. Telling us what is causing the sneezing, what is causing the coughing, what is causing the nausea, all the symptoms that come out of what monitoring is saying. Monitoring is saying, “You have a cough, you have a runny nose, you're sneezing.” That is monitoring. Observability says, “There is a COVID virus in the bloodstream. We need to fix it.” So, that's how both of them act.Corey: I think that is probably the most concise and clear definition I've ever gotten on the topic. If people want to learn more about what you're up to, how you view about these things—and of course, if they want to buy your book, we will include a link to that in the [show notes 00:27:40]—where can they find you?Ewere: I'm on LinkedIn; I'm very active on LinkedIn, and I also shared the LinkedIn link. I'm very active on Twitter, too. I tweet once in a while, but definitely, when you send me a message on Twitter, I'm also going to be very active.I also write blogs on Medium, I write a couple of blogs on Medium, and that was part of why AWS recognized me as a Hero because I talk a lot about different services, I help with comparing services for you so you can choose better. I also talk about setting basic concepts, too; if you just want to get your foot wet into some stuff and you need something very summarized, not AWS documentation per se, something that you can just look at and know what you need to do with the service, I talk about them also in my blogs. So yeah, those are the two basic places I'm in: LinkedIn and Twitter.Corey: And we will, of course, put links to that in the [show notes 00:28:27]. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me. I appreciate it.Ewere: Thanks a lot.Corey: Ewere Diagboya, head of cloud at My Cloud Series. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn, and this is Screaming in the Cloud. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with a comment telling me how many more dashboards you would like me to build that you will never look at.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

The Cloud Pod
138: Cloud Pod productivity is way up thanks to the Facebook outage

The Cloud Pod

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 66:32


On The Cloud Pod this week, the team is running at half-duplex without Peter and Ryan. Plus Cloudflare R2 is here, Facebook died for a day, and AWS releases Cloud Control Plane.  A big thanks to this week's sponsors: Foghorn Consulting, which provides full-stack cloud solutions with a focus on strategy, planning and execution for enterprises seeking to take advantage of the transformative capabilities of AWS, Google Cloud and Azure. JumpCloud, which offers a complete platform for identity, access, and device management — no matter where your users and devices are located.  This week's highlights

Dev Game Club
DGC Ep 279: BioShock (part five)

Dev Game Club

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 75:54


Welcome to Dev Game Club, where this week we complete our series on BioShock. We delve into the end and endings of the game, and of course address our takeaways.Dev Game Club looks at classic video games and plays through them over several episodes, providing commentary. Sections played: Finished the game! Issues covered: Brett's terrible fathering, Big Daddy issues, developing Suchong more as a character, Yellow Peril, leaning into pulp, being like a ship, turning the lower classes via demogoguery, leaning on the Irish, tracing the arc of Diane McClintock, using abstraction to hide real harm, character dualities, turning you into a Big Daddy, seeing the evolution and development of the program, putting the big boots on, fully integrating the backstory into the level and narrative design, redesigning to support the movement of the Big Daddy, changing the perspective, moving from alien camera views to first-person perspective, forcing the section where you protect the Little Sister, being paranoid about keeping the Little Sister alive, playing this section on Hard, BioShock 2 as a better-playing game, handing you the syringe, also becoming a Little Sister, where the series goes from here, the specificity of the series, how to adapt the themes of the series repeatedly, the point of no return, the boss working on paper and maybe not in-game as much, Fontaine being under-developed, still getting Ryan's story after his death, not knowing enough about Fontaine before meeting Ryan, the binary that drives the bad ending, becoming like your fathers, unmotivated world monstrosity, the good ending, doing something other games hadn't, BS jobs, failures of capitalism, a shooter with the heart of an immersive sim, greater approachability, two senses of place (sight and sound), high production values, ease of use/play how you like to/forgiving design. Games, people, and influences mentioned or discussed: Fu Manchu, Titanic, Ratchet & Clank, Revenge of the Jedi, 2K Games, Cloud Chamber Studios, Activision, Call of Duty, Fallout, Star Wars, Metroid, Prometheus, Alien, Six Feet Under, The Fountainhead, Ayn Rand, Bullshit Jobs, David Graeber, Debt: The First 5000 Years, Occupy Wall Street, Dishonored 2, Prey, God of War (series), Portal, Control, Kirk Hamilton, Aaron Evers, Mark Garcia. Next time: Bonus: the sequels! Twitch: brettdouville or timlongojr, instagram:timlongojr, Twitter: @timlongojr and @devgameclub DevGameClub@gmail.com

The Beethoven Files Podcast
Ep. 18: Beethoven's The Creatures of Prometheus

The Beethoven Files Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 52:54


We'll look at Beethoven's ballet, The Creatures of Prometheus.

Much Ado About Nerding
Must Watch Horror Movies: Flicks We Binge Every Halloween

Much Ado About Nerding

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 60:07


Join Us! For a not so comprehensive list of the Frightening Flicks we binge during Halloween, plus alittle help from our Friends!!  Movies Discussed but not limited to... Friday the 13th all of them!! Fready vs Jason Poltergeist Blair witch Killer Klowns From Outter Space Pumpkinhead Just the first one Evil Dead All three originals The reboot was awesome as well Dawn of the Dead Both 78 and 04 Night of the Living Dead Aliens My opinion the greatest sci-fi horror film Trick R Treat Quickly becoming a favorite Monster House Monster Squad Troll Hunter From Carlos Halloween 1,2,3. Event Horizon, Aliens,Aliens,Prometheus and Covenant. Night of the Creeps, The taking of Deborah Logan, Friday the 13th 2,3,4. From Steller Gem Trick r Treat From Cam - Halloween (78) - Trick ‘r Treat - The Exorcist - A Nightmare on Elm Street - Friday the 13th Family Freindly  - The Nightmare Before Christmas - Halloweentown - Beetlejuice - Monster House - The Addams Family From Em Show Episodes Perfect for Halloween  Roseanne "Boo" Bob's Burgers "The Hauntening" Bob's Burgers "Fort Night" The Simpsons (any Treehouse of Horror but we just picked a couple we remembered liking) Parks and Rec "Halloween Surprise" Parks and Rec "Greg Pikitis" Boy Meets World "And Then There was Shawn" Friends "The One With thr Halloween Party" The Office "Halloween" Sabrina the Teenage Witch "A River of Candy Corn Runs through it" New Girl "Keaton" 30 Rock "Stone Mountain" Much Ado About Nerding Content written, performed and edited by Joe Otero and Selena Otero. Theme created by Selena Otero. Executive Producers Joe Thanks for stopping by, if you like what you heard please LIKE, COMMENT, RATE and SUBSCRIBE to the Pod on whatever platform you are listeing on. And Please SHARE with fellow Nerds and welcome them into Nerd Nation! Podcast Producers Our Patreons The Roller Derby Betty, No One Trolls Like Gaston, Ambeeezeee, Professor Em, Master of Muggle Studies, Motor City Timmy T, Fact Check Paul, The Phoenix Fam and StellarGem Patreon Patreon.com/muchadoaboutnerding Instagram Much_Ado_About_Nerding Email nerdnation2020@gmail.com Sounder Webpage muchadoaboutnerding.sounder.fm YouTube and Selena. Thanks for listening and until next time stay Rad and NERDY ON!!!

Tasteless
Noomi Rapace | Strong Female Leads

Tasteless

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 39:48


Noomi Rapace (Lamb, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Prometheus) is a conduit for human experience in whatever project she's in, allowing viewers to come to their own conclusions about her characters in a way that makes every role she tackles a must-watch. We discuss the ambiguity of the parts she chooses, the honesty of Polaroids, and why Lamb came at such a perfect time in her life and felt like a homecoming. Plus, Noomi shares a lobster fact I haven't stopped thinking about. See A24's Lamb in theaters now - I loved it and I want to talk to everyone about it! Watch the trailer for Lamb: www.youtube.com/watch?v=hnEwJKVWjFM Follow Noomi on Instagram to see her exploits chronicled via Polaroids: www.instagram.com/noomirapace

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

This month, Craig T. Nelson mocks a little person! We watched Poltergeist, they're heeeeeeere! If you want to see Matthew and get a book of his signed, come by Tall Tale Books in Atlanta on 10/30, from 1-3pm Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will Poltergeist hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Brittany, Daniel, Matthew

The Retro Hour (Retro Gaming Podcast)
295: Terrible Fire: Turbo Charging Your Retro Systems - The Retro Hour EP295

The Retro Hour (Retro Gaming Podcast)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 86:58


Terrible Fire Github: https://github.com/terriblefire/ Dan's TF330 video: https://youtu.be/JMHKlWHd_YY Please visit our amazing sponsors and help to support the show: Bitmap Books https://www.bitmapbooks.co.uk/ We need your help to ensure the future of the podcast, if you'd like to help us with running costs, equipment and hosting, please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://theretrohour.com/support/ https://www.patreon.com/retrohour Get your Retro Hour merchandise: https://bit.ly/33OWBKd Thanks to our amazing donators this week: Geoff Owen - Beyond Farpoint Podcast, Rhys Clatworthy, Clyde Radcliffe, MCSH, Loukas Pour-Hashemi Join our Discord channel: https://discord.gg/GQw8qp8 Website: http://theretrohour.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theretrohour/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/retrohouruk Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/retrohouruk/ Twitch: https://www.twitch.tv/theretrohour Show notes:    Retro Bioshock: https://bit.ly/3F2ietp MSX The Fall of Prometheus: https://bit.ly/3kOnZTl Luigi found inside Dreamcast prototype: https://bit.ly/3mabkcR                                                                                Developer fixes 40 year old game: https://bit.ly/39KEqtR Raspberry Pi Pico handheld: https://bit.ly/3unNM80 

Myopia: Defend Your Childhood - A Nostalgic Movies Podcast

This week we watch Nic Cage have difficulty with Angelina Jolie handling his stick shift. We watched Gone in 60 Seconds, they all just want to have sex with cars, right? Join the Patreon (http://patreon.com/myopia)! There are tiers to that will help us keep doing what we are doing! (Each tier unlocks all lower tiers) What is patreon? It is our way of rewarding our biggest fans with additional stuff, like movie episodes, riffs, and our back catalog! Join now for additional stuff at $1, $3, $5, and $10! Or a one time $50 to pick your own flick! What do you unlock? The Alien Franchise: Alien, Aliens, Alien 3, Alien Resurrection, Prometheus, and Alien Covenant, the rest of Harry Potter: The Half Blood Prince, Hallows part 1 and 2, plus Silver Bullet, The Watchmen, The Lawnmower Man, Demolition Man, True Lies, Van Helsing, The 39 Steps, Baby's Day Out, The 13th Warrior, Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, The Thomas Crown Affair, Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery, and London Has Fallen! Not to mention movie riffs and much more to come! Also, because you love us, find us everywhere! Like Facebook! Or the Facebook Fan Group! Or Twitter! Or Letterboxd! Or the Fancy Website! We are also available wherever you are too! Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, TuneIn and Alexa, Podbean, Listen Notes, YouTube, everywhere! Coming soon to Pandora, iHeartRadio, and Deezer. How will Gone in 60 Seconds hold up? Host: Nic Panel: Nur, Daniel, Matthew