Podcasts about Iowa State University

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Public research university in Ames, Iowa, United States

  • 742PODCASTS
  • 1,353EPISODES
  • 39mAVG DURATION
  • 5WEEKLY NEW EPISODES
  • May 23, 2022LATEST

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Best podcasts about Iowa State University

Show all podcasts related to iowa state university

Latest podcast episodes about Iowa State University

Sadhguru's Podcast
Soil Scientist Dr. Richard Cruse Speaks to #SaveSoil

Sadhguru's Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 23, 2022 10:01


Dr. Richard Cruse – Soil Scientist, Professor in the Agronomy Department at Iowa State University, Director, Iowa Water Center and former President of the National Institutes for Water Resources, USA – speaks to #SaveSoil about the importance of soil health, and the instrumental role the #SaveSoil movement can play to restore soil health across the world. Save Soil, a global movement envisioned by Sadhguru, seeks to bring about a concerted, conscious response to impending soil extinction.Conscious Planet: https://www.consciousplanet.orgSadhguru App (Download): https://onelink.to/sadhguru__appOfficial Sadhguru Website: https://isha.sadhguru.orgSadhguru Exclusive: https://isha.sadhguru.org/in/en/sadhguru-exclusiveYogi, mystic and visionary, Sadhguru is a spiritual master with a difference. An arresting blend of profundity and pragmatism, his life and work serves as a reminder that yoga is a contemporary science, vitally relevant to our times.

Market to Market - The MtoM Podcast
Turkeys get a new home for research and teaching - Gretta Irwin

Market to Market - The MtoM Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 0:25


The Iowa turkey industry had a good week - first a center dedicated solely to the turkey industry and research was opened at Iowa State University. The state that's provided the official turkey of the White House now has a place to work at growing the industry both in and out of Iowa. Gretta Irwin, the executive director of the Iowa Turkey Federation discusses the differences between now and 2015 when it comes to HPAI and how fewer outbreaks of avian flu have been reported in the state in 2022.

KNOWN
LIFE COACH: Dreams and Teams that Shape a Life

KNOWN

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2022 33:26


In this episode of Known; we have a conversation with Linda Crum Executive Director at the OtterCares Foundation. Former Head Vollyball Coach at Iowa State University, Duke University, Butler University, St Ambrose University - LINKS: "Known" - pickup your copy today: https://www.known.fm/books Purchase Susanna's Books: https://sfaughtmon.com/?post_type=books Subscribe to the YouTube Channel:

Agriculture Today
1188—Long-Term Beef Supply Factors…Guidelines for Carefully Handling Cattle Semen

Agriculture Today

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 28:04


Beef Supply Drivers Handling Cattle Semen Quail and Pasture Burning     00:01:06—Beef Supply Drivers--Livestock economist Lee Schulz of Iowa State University provides this week's cattle market commentary:  he goes over what the USDA's latest World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates report said about international beef trade...and he gets into a new analysis he's done on the factors influencing the U.S. beef supply here in 2022, and which of those will have lasting impacts on supply over the next couple of years     00:12:07—Handling Cattle Semen--K-State beef reproduction specialist Sandy Johnson reminds cow-calf producers running an A-I program of the guidelines for handling beef semen before administering it...with the objective of preserving the viability of that product prior to and during insemination     00:23:06—Quail and Pasture Burning--On this week's wildlife management segment, K-State wildlife specialist Drew Ricketts goes over a new study of prescribed grass burning and the impact on quail nesting success         Send comments, questions or requests for copies of past programs to ksrenews@ksu.edu. Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Eric Atkinson and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast.   K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.

Gill Athletics: Track and Field Connections
#155: Jamie Pollard-Iowa State University Athletic Director

Gill Athletics: Track and Field Connections

Play Episode Listen Later May 16, 2022 57:02


Special guest this week as we welcome the Athletic Director of Iowa State University Jamie Pollard to the show. As a former track athlete himself (DIII national champion in 5000m), he gives us unique insight into coaching development. We get insider thoughts on skill development, leadership development, and more of an assistant and head track coach. He also gives us his unique opinion on the health of track and field on the collegiate level, how Iowa State supports and relies on the Cyclone Cross Country/Track and Field program for success, and more. Want to have an exploratory conversation about YOUR track equipment needs? Connect with us: Host Mike Cunningham on Twitter: @mikecunningham Email: sales@gillathletics.com Phone: 800-637-3090 Twitter: @GillAthletics Instagram: @GillAthletics1918 Facebook: facebook.com/gillathletics LinkedIn: linkedin.com/company/gillathletics/

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Briefing, May 14 and May 15

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 14, 2022 3:06


This is Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Saturday, May 14th and Sunday, May 15th. Graduation weekend is upon us for Iowa's universities, and the jubilant graduates will be greeted https://www.thegazette.com/weather/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=heres_your_daily_briefing_from_the_gazette&utm_term=2022-05-14 (with some much improved weather). It will be sunny in the Cedar Rapids area with a high near 85 degrees on Saturday. There will be a chance for rain Sunday morning into the early afternoon, but after 2 p.m. it should be partly sunny with a high near 70 degrees. Speaking of graduations, students are enthusiastic for the return of in-person celebrations at Iowa's universities after years of COVID-19 disruptions, even leading Iowa State to https://www.thegazette.com/higher-education/iowa-universities-resume-spring-in-person-commencement-thousands-expected/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=heres_your_daily_briefing_from_the_gazette&utm_term=2022-05-14 (roll out an additional ceremony to meet demand). In total, more than 11,500 graduates across the University of Iowa, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa campuses are expected to participate in dozens of commencement ceremonies Tears fell and tempers flared Friday in a Linn County Courtroom as family members https://www.thegazette.com/crime-courts/family-calls-killer-a-monster-for-taking-their-loved-one-and-her-unborn-child/?utm_source=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=heres_your_daily_briefing_from_the_gazette&utm_term=2022-05-14 (confronted the convicted killer of a mother and her unborn child).  Johnnie Osborne, 28, was sentenced to 50 years for the murder of 25-year-old Asia T. Grice and her baby in Cedar Rapids in 2020. Osborne only avoided the possibility of a life sentence by agreeing with the prosecution to plead guilty to the crimes. Keonna Smith, who was in the apartment at the time of the shooting, was also shot in the head; Osborne admitted he had intended to kill her as well but she survived with serious injuries. After emotional testimony,  Melvin Watson, the father of Asia Grice, started to approach Osborne, sitting at the defendant's table, but five Linn County sheriff's deputies intervened, and family members also asked him to stop. He returned to sit with family members in the courtroom. Some family members held a poster on their laps, with photos of Grice, during the sentencing. Osborne's family and friends were on the other side of the courtroom. A truck driver was killed Friday morning following a collision with a train operated by Iowa Interstate Railroad. The crash happened around 7:25 a.m. at the Vail Avenue crossing in Durant. The crossing has gates, but it is not known whether they were functioning at the time of the crash. The truck's driver was ejected in the crash. The driver's name is being withheld pending notification of relatives, the Iowa State Patrol said. The operator of the locomotive was not identified in initial crash reports. Durant is in Cedar County, about 40 miles east of Iowa City.

通勤學英語
每日英語跟讀 Ep.K363: About health - 睡前看螢幕不好與舉重好處多

通勤學英語

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 2:55


每日英語跟讀 Ep.K363: About health - Screen-Time Before Bed Can Disrupt Sleep   Digital screen time before bed can have a negative impact on the quality of your sleep. A US study found that as little as eight minutes of exposure to blue light keeps you mentally stimulated for over one hour, which tends to throw off the body's circadian rhythm or biological clock. 睡前花時間看數位螢幕會對你的睡眠品質產生負面影響。美國一項研究發現,只要暴露在藍光下短短8分鐘,就能讓你在1個多小時內保持精神興奮,這往往會擾亂身體的晝夜節律或生物時鐘。 Exposure to blue light suppresses the production of melatonin, a hormone that induces sleepiness. Melatonin release in the evening helps you relax before bedtime. Suppression of melatonin can cause you to stay up later and sleep less than you normally would. 暴露在藍光下會抑制褪黑激素的產生,褪黑激素是一種會導致嗜睡的激素。晚間釋放褪黑激素可幫助睡前放鬆。抑制褪黑激素會導致你熬夜,睡眠時間比平時少。 Seeing something right before bed that either makes you upset or happy can trigger a response that prolongs falling sleep, which consequently delays REM (rapid eye movement) sleep. These emotions can leave you staring at the ceiling for hours feeling wide awake. 睡前看到讓你心煩意亂或快樂的事情,會引發延長入睡時間的反應,從而延遲快速眼動(REM)睡眠。這些情緒會讓你盯著天花板看幾個小時,感覺完全清醒。   Next Article   Want to sleep better? Lift some weights 想要睡好點?練些舉重吧   Struggling to sleep? Put some muscle into your efforts by adding resistance training, otherwise known as weight training, to your weekly exercise routine. 難以成眠?將阻力訓練、也就是重量訓練,納入每週例行運動,再多試試看吧。 In fact, resistance training may even beat aerobic exercise in the race for best sleep aid, according to a new preliminary study presented Thursday at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology, Prevention, Lifestyle & Cardiometabolic Health Conference. 事實上,根據週四「美國心臟學會流行病學、預防、生活型態和心臟代謝健康會議」上發表的一份新的初步研究,以最能幫助睡眠來說,阻力訓練或許甚至比有氧運動還好。 "In our study, we found that resistance exercise appeared to go above and beyond aerobics or even a combined aerobic and resistance routine on several different sleep outcomes," said study author Angelique Brellenthin, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. 「我們在研究中發現,在數個不同的睡眠結果上,阻力運動比有氧運動、甚至是有氧加阻力運動的效果還要好」,研究報告作者、愛荷華州立大學人體運動學助理教授布雷倫森說。Source article: https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1509615 ; https://features.ltn.com.tw/english/article/paper/1509987

STEMming in Stilettos with Dr. Toshia
Meet Dr. Simone Soso: The Road Less Traveled; Tigers, HBCUs, STEM Equity and Equality

STEMming in Stilettos with Dr. Toshia

Play Episode Listen Later May 10, 2022 52:17


Episode Summary1. Dr. Soso is a badass. She has traveled the world using STEM as her guide. Her road is unlike anyone I've heard so far. From the zoo to the jungles of India. But that just goes to show you the power and reach of being in the world of STEM. 2. There is still a need for STEM exposure and opportunities in communities of color. We have to be invested in ensuring that our children have the same opportunities as all other children. 3. We know our children are brilliant and need the opportunity to showcase it. 4. We still need to provide opportunities for our college graduates. We have to hold companies accountable for the still dismal numbers of minorities on the payroll at ALL levels of the leadership pipeline. Dr. Simone Soso Bio.Dr. Soso is a Program Manager and Research Associate at the Quality Education for Minorities (QEM) Network. At QEM, she performs project management leadership of grants, development of grant proposals, outreach and recruitment of STEM experts to engage in workshop implementation for Minority Serving Institution (MSI) STEM faculty proposal development and training, and capacity building. Prior to joining QEM, she was an American Association for the Advancement of Science (Science and Technology Policy) Fellow at the National Science Foundation for two years. She had a placement with the NSF ADVANCE program where she was responsible for evaluating programs in the Education and Human Resources Directorate and presenting findings to policymakers, scientific professionals, and other stakeholders. Dr. Soso is the developer and former project manager of the National Science Foundation's STEM Diversity and Inclusion Video Exhibition Challenge (STEM DIVE). This NSF-wide initiative showcased the work of NSF-funded projects that focused on diversifying the STEM workforce. Dr. Soso has over ten years of experience in the development, implementation, evaluation, and data analysis of scientific-educational programs and research projects. Dr. Soso has worked on many projects focused on enhancing the recruitment, retention, sustainability, and career development of students traditionally underrepresented in STEM. Dr. Soso is a trained animal ecologist with expertise in lion and tiger scent-marking communication. She earned her B.S. degree in Animal Science from the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, an M.S. degree in Animal Health Science from North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, and a Ph.D. in Environmental Science from Iowa State University.Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/simonebsosophd Buzzsprout - Let's get your podcast launched! Start for FREEDisclaimer: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase, I may receive a commission at no extra cost to you.Support the show

smallfarmsustainability's podcast
Creating a Cutting Garden

smallfarmsustainability's podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 6, 2022 17:05


In this episode I visit with Cindy Haynes, Extension Horticulture Specialist and Associate Professor with Iowa State University, and we discuss options and necessities for a cutting garden!   The cutting garden handout mentioned in this episode can be found here.

DOOMED with Matt Binder
210: He Challenged Ben Shapiro to Live Debate. They Tried to Silence Him! (w/ Ben Schneider)

DOOMED with Matt Binder

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 65:04


You may have seen the recent viral clip of a young man challenging Ben Shapiro on "wokeism" at a Young America's Foundation event at Iowa State University. That man, recent grad Ben Schneider, joins DOOMED with Matt Binder to discuss. Ben talks how it went down, what the demographics of the event were, what the event was talking about, the right's infatuation with race, we listen to his "debate" with Ben Shapiro and comment on how it went, lessons to be learned for future students who challenge the right on college campuses, and more! On the patron half of the show: discussing the SCOTUS leak on the possible overturning of Roe v. Wade, a ridiculous informercial for Mike Huckabee's Trump book for kids, plus your questions, comments, and calls! (Episode from the 5/3/22 livestream show.) Support the show: http://www.patreon.com/mattbinder

The Thomistic Institute
Why You Can't Reverse-Engineer Human Beings: The Metaphysics of the Soul | Prof. Joshua Hochschild

The Thomistic Institute

Play Episode Listen Later May 5, 2022 43:51


This lecture was given on March 3, 2022 at Iowa State University. For more information on upcoming events, please visit our website at www.thomisticinstitute.org. About the speaker: Joshua Hochschild is Professor of Philosophy and Director of Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Mount St. Mary's University, where he also served six years as the inaugural Dean of the College of Liberal Arts. His primary research is in medieval logic, metaphysics, and ethics, with broad interest in liberal education and the continuing relevance of the Catholic intellectual tradition. He is the author of The Semantics of Analogy: Rereading Cajetan's De Nominum Analogia (2010), translator of Claude Panaccio's Mental Language: From Plato to William of Ockham (2017), and co-author of A Mind at Peace: Reclaiming an Ordered Soul in the Age of Distraction (2017). His writing has appeared in First Things, Commonweal, Modern Age and the Wall Street Journal. For 2020-21 he served as President of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.

Passion Struck with John R. Miles
Anne O'Neil on Why Life Like Sports Is a Strategy by Design EP 132

Passion Struck with John R. Miles

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 56:55


Anne O'Neil (@heyanneoneil) on our life like sports is a strategy by design. | Brought to you by Masterworks (https://masterworks.io/ - use code passion to start). Anne O'Neil is a former WNBA player for the Sacramento Monarchs and a Division 1 Academic and Athletic All-American at Iowa State University where she played for Bill Fennelly. She broke the Iowa High School State scoring record and was later inducted into the Iowa Girls Basketball Hall of Fame. Following a 12-year tenure in the athletic and healthcare industries, she took her expertise to Palo Alto Networks where she is a cyber transformational leader. She is also the host host of the Get Busy Livin podcast. Strategy by Design On the Passion Struck Podcast, Anne and I discuss how life, like basketball, is really strategy by design. And just as each play, makes a difference for each individual game, the same holds true for the moments that make up our daily activities. She believes that ferocity taught her how to read and know where to move her body ahead of time, where to pass the ball ahead of time, and where her teammates were going to be able to shine. Thanks Masterworks This episode of Passion Struck with John R. Miles is brought to you by Masterworks. 66% of Billionaires Collect Art, so Why Aren't You? Low Minimums, Simple and Exciting. You Can Use Art as an Alternative Investment to Diversify Your Portfolio. Blue-Chip Artwork. Go to https://www.masterworks.io/ and use code passion to start. Our Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/passionstruck Time Stamps 0:00 Announcements and Anne O'Neil Introduction 3:33 Discovering passion for basketball 6:13 Working to elevate her game 8:14 Leading the State of Iowa in scoring 10:41 The challenge of playing college sports 13:42 Developing the mindset on being the best 17:04 College transfer pool 18:54 How to build resilience in sports 23:00 Legacy of Bill Fennelly on women's college basketball 27:02 College vs being a professional athlete 31:00 Mentally preparing for a life after sports 34:00 How do you play aggressive yet under control? 38:37 Importance of a quality routine 41:52 Get Busy Livin podcast 45:30 Cybersecurity leadership 50:26 Lightening round of questions 54:36 Wrap up and synthesis FOLLOW ANNE O'NEIL *Website: https://www.anneoneil.co/ *Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/heyanneoneil/ *Podcast: https://www.listennotes.com/podcasts/get-busy-livin-anne-oneil-cqLRmXu8AV3/ *LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/heyanneoneil/ Links * Interview with Former SEAL Commander Mark Divine * Interview with NASCAR Driver Jesse Iwuji * Interview with Astronaut Chris Cassidy * Interview with Astronaut Wendy Lawrence * Interview with Astronaut Kayla Barron *Solo episode on work-life balance: https://open.spotify.com/episode/7AZksXySbYVoMPMuma5DpB?si=_VPv5sn3QBCq2pYVh-LXkg *Solo episode on overcoming burnout: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5keAXxjRs3Q8NKZYWBlPXS?si=N-nf0iQjThSzgsCAutPVPA  *Solo episode on how you stop living in fear: https://passionstruck.com/how-do-you-stop-living-in-fear/  Follow John on the Socials: * Twitter: https://twitter.com/Milesjohnr * Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/johnrmiles.c0m * Medium: https://medium.com/@JohnRMiles ​* Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/john_r_miles * LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/milesjohn/ * Blog: https://passionstruck.com/blog/ * Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/passion_struck_podcast/ * Gear: https://www.zazzle.com/store/passion_struck/   -- John R Miles is a serial entrepreneur and the CEO and founder of Passion Struck. This full-service media company helps people live intentionally by creating best-in-class educational and entertainment content. John is also a prolific public speaker, venture capitalist, and author named to the ComputerWorld Top 100 IT Leaders.    

Field Work
The Genius of Prairie Strips

Field Work

Play Episode Listen Later May 4, 2022 39:10


Farmers in 14 states have planted more than 14,000 acres of prairie strips to ease soil erosion. On this episode, Lisa Schulte Moore of Iowa State University explains the science behind planting native grasses and plants. “Prairie strips are oriented perpendicular to that flow of water,” she says. “It's really about slowing that water down, allowing it to infiltrate.”

The Innovative Mindset
Sally Shaver DuBois on how to keep your head above water and manage stress

The Innovative Mindset

Play Episode Listen Later May 2, 2022 48:22


Wellness pro and educator, Sally Shaver DuBois on how to manage your stress with her L.E.A.R.N. method. Sally Shaver DuBois is an educator, entertainer, professional speaker, and author of the book, “Keeping Your Head Above Water”. As a wellness professional, Sally has spent the last 30+ years helping people of all ages to live a healthy, active lifestyle. As a professional speaker, personal trainer, health and physical educator, certified laughter leader, and certified health coach, she has guided thousands of people to improve their lives Additionally, a certified laughter leader, Sally entertains audiences across the Midwest and around the USA. Silly Sally performs singing telegrams, balloon creations, original music, ventriloquism, and magic to audiences of all ages because she believes laughter truly is the best medicine! Sally did her undergraduate work at Iowa State University in physical education, health, and music. She has a master's degree from Minnesota State University in human performance and a master's degree from Iowa State University in curriculum and instructional technology. Connect with Sally https://www.sallyshaverdubois.com/ https://www.dolifewellnow.com/ https://www.facebook.com/dolifewellnow https://www.facebook.com/Silly-Sally-117306828280982 https://twitter.com/dolifewellsally   This episode is brought to you by Brain.fm. I love and use brain.fm! It combines music and neuroscience to help me focus, meditate, and even sleep! Because you listen to this show, you can get a free trial and 20% off with this exclusive coupon code: innovativemindset .* URL: https://brain.fm/innovativemindset Liking the Show? You can now get Innovative Mindset Merch! Get LIT! Grab the lightbulb logo on a bottle, hat, phone case, button, and more. Support the Podcast. Or join my brand new Coffee By The Water Club and get a bunch of extra goodies like bonus podcast episodes, art no one else sees, and music no one else hears! Connect with me. FB author page: https://www.facebook.com/IzoldaST IG: https://www.instagram.com/izoldat/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Izoldat LI: https://www.linkedin.com/in/izoldat/ Website: https://izoldatauthor.com/ Listen on These Channels Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts | Podbean | MyTuner | iHeart Radio | TuneIn | Deezer | Overcast | PodChaser | Listen Notes | Player FM | Podcast Addict | Podcast Republic | I'm thrilled that you're tuning in to the Innovative Mindset. Get in touch if you have questions or comments. *Affiliate link. If you purchase it through the above links and take the 20% off, I'll get a small commission.

ABL Live!
ABL Live! (4.30.22) US Ministry of Truth!

ABL Live!

Play Episode Listen Later May 1, 2022 181:30


In this episode of ABL Live, we covered a variety of topics including the Biden administration creating the "ministry of truth" also known as the "Disinformation Governance Board" to control the flow of information online, Terry Crews apologizing for his comments about Black Lives Matter that he made on Twitter nearly two years ago, Sage Steele sues her employer ESPN over discrimination and violating her freedom of speech, Buzzfeed publishing an article about 21 unwritten rules for black people, college bro attempting to label Ben Shapiro as "woke" at Iowa State University, and much more!

Talk of Iowa
Despite the cold, wet spring now is the perfect time to plant trees

Talk of Iowa

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 30, 2022


Charity Nebbe talks to Iowa State University horticulturist Jeff Iles about flowering trees. Iowa DNR Forrester Mark Vitosh and horticulturist Cindy Haynes answer questions about other plants and trees.

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Briefing, April 29

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 29, 2022 3:58


This is Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Friday, April 29. It will be warmer Friday but the chance for rain will remain. According to the National Weather Service there will be a chance for showers, with thunderstorms possible, after 10 a.m. in the Cedar Rapids area. The listed high is 65 degrees with mostly cloudy skies. Rain becomes even more likely Friday night, jumping from 40 percent to 90 percent probability, with new rainfall amounts between a quarter and a half an inch possible. The low should be close to the high temperatures earlier in the week, settling in at 56 degrees. Several petitions are circulating through the Iowa State University community opposing changes to its College of Liberal Arts and Sciences — specifically its history department — after administrators earlier this year announced $15 million in cuts by the 2026 budget year. The petition references Iowa State's recent decision to exit the prestigious Association of American Universities after 64 years, which the school did after criticizing the AAU ranking system — noting it favors “institutions with medical schools and associated medical research funding.” Also circulating are two separate petitions opposing proposals to eliminate the ISU Department of History's graduate programs. All of this comes as the university https://www.thegazette.com/article/iowa-iowa-state-liberal-arts-colleges-face-budget-woes-cuts/ (in February announced )a need to “right-size its budget in response to changing enrollment and student demand, as well as position the college for future success.” An Iowa City clinical psychologist Thursday said one of the Fairfield teens charged with killing a Spanish teacher with a baseball bat would benefit from juvenile court treatment and rehabilitation services — if moved out of adult court — but admitted there is no specific programming for homicide defendants. Psychologist Brenda Payne, who testified for the defense during a hearing to determine if the murder case against https://www.thegazette.com/crime-courts/fairfield-teens-charged-with-murder-argue-confidential-documents-shouldnt-be-made-public/ (Jeremy Goodale, 17,) should be transferred to juvenile court, said she conducted several tests to help form her opinion. She tested the teen's intellectual, executive, emotional and personality functioning. He is “bright,” has “above average” problem solving skills and no mental health issues. Goodale is the first of two teens seeking to have their cases transferred from adult court to juvenile court, where they could face lesser charges and penalties if convicted. Goodale and Willard Noble Chaiden Miller, 16, are charged with first-degree murder and conspiracy to commit a forcible felony in the killing of Nohema Graber, 66, the Spanish teacher at Fairfield High School. Her body was found in a park near the school in November. A 73-year-old man died Wednesday morning after a farming accident in rural Linn County, according to authorities. According to the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Stephen Jay Martin, of Springville, had been operating a field processor near the intersection of Bowdish Road and Whittier Road north of Springville when he stopped to make some adjustments to the equipment. Martin appeared to have slipped and fallen, causing an injury which resulted in his death. Martin's family discovered the incident and called law enforcement. Linn County deputies, sheriff's rescue, Central City Fire and Center Point Ambulance responded about 7:45 p.m. Next stop Baltimore for Tyler Linderbaum. The Ravens took the former Hawkeyes star center with the No. 25 pick in the first round of the 2022 NFL Draft. Thursday's selection marked the 19th time that an Iowa offensive lineman has been drafted in the Kirk Ferentz era.

Bright Side
What Will Happen to Your Body If You Walk Every Day

Bright Side

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 12:50


Walking is a totally free, easy exercise that requires little effort, and benefits not only your physical but also your mental well-being. If you're looking for a simple yet very effective way of losing weight and improving your overall health, walking is something just for you. People who are physically active throughout their life are much less prone to this disease than those who have a more sedentary lifestyle. And that's because they have more volume in their hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for verbal memory and learning. A daily half-hour walk helps avoid serious problems, like coronary heart disease to name one, by lowering high blood pressure and cholesterol levels and improving blood circulation. Because of better-quality and deeper breathing, some symptoms associated with lung disease can show significant improvement thanks to walking. Muscle tone and weight loss is also totally achievable through simple walking. Find your optimal pace, but don't break out into a jog. This sort of speed walking is low impact and doesn't require any recovery time, which means no sore muscles to keep you from getting out and walking the next day. The Arthritis Foundation recommends at least 30 minutes of moderate walking a day to reduce pain, stiffness, and inflammation in the joints. Building strong bones will help you prevent osteoporosis and reduce bone loss. Walking contributes to better blood circulation within the spinal structures, pumping important nutrients into the soft tissues and improving posture and flexibility, both of which are vital for a healthy spine. A group of researchers at Iowa State University worked with hundreds of college students. Walking changed their mood for the better, even though no one warned them it could do so. If you still don't feel motivated enough to start walking for your health, try joining a class or find a buddy who also wouldn't mind getting all the benefits of walking. Another idea could be to hire a personal trainer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Sunny Side Up Nutrition
Embracing Imperfect Parenting with Amee Severson

Sunny Side Up Nutrition

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 28:38


Anna Lutz and Elizabeth Davenport chat with Amee Severson, MPP-D, RDN, co-author of How to Raise an Intuitive Eater, about how a dearth of safe, inclusive resources for people raising children was one of the main inspirations for the book. Amee emphasizes how the conversations we have with kids about body image and food are less impactful than what they learn from watching the way we interact with food. We discuss: How perfection with parenting doesn't exist. The importance of modeling positive behaviors, but also ensuring that children know it's ok to fail. The importance of creating space for learning and growing. Advice for parents who want to give up the diet mentality but have a lot of unlearning to do. The importance of having a structured yet flexible eating schedule for kids. Things parents can start doing right away to help support their kids as intuitive eaters.   Links:  Prosper Nutrition and Wellness Sunny Side Up Nutrition Podcast  Lutz, Alexander & Associates Nutrition Therapy Pinney Davenport Nutrition Amee Severson is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist whose work focuses on body positivity, fat acceptance, and intuitive eating through a social justice lens. Amee focuses on providing safe and inclusive care for the LGBTQ+ community. Amee identifies as a queer and nonbinary. Amee holds a Bachelor's degree in Food and Nutrition from Montana State University, a Masters Degree in Professional Practice from Iowa State University, is a dietitian registered in the State of Washington, and is a Certified Intuitive Eating Counselor. Amee is the co-author of How to Raise an Intuitive Eater.

Southern Fried Philosophy
199a: Cereal or Milk w/ Special Guest Dr. Lucretia Berry

Southern Fried Philosophy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 25, 2022 90:26


This week on the Southern Fried Philosophy Podcast: Magic Man catches us up on his travels, we learn too much about the state of Iowa plus we address the age old question, do you put your cereal or milk in the bowl first? We're joined by special guest Dr. Lucretia Berry. Southern Fried Philosophy ****************************** Become an SFP Insider Today! Click the link to join us!    Music  SFP Intro - Lenny The Band YouTube subscribers Sponsors Watchman Cigar Level Up Logo Red Hill Brewing Crave Bath and Body   How you be durrin - Crave Bath and Body   Next week: Tim Emery   Southern Phrase Of The Week: Follow up/Discuss   Milk or cereal first Wacky News - Level Up Logo In the Pursuit of… Racial Understanding   Dr. Lucretia Berry is an antiracism curriculum specialist, course designer and author of What LIES Between Us - Fostering First Steps Toward Racial Healing, a TEDx speaker, and a writer for in(courage).me. She earned her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Iowa State University and her BA from South Carolina State University

Let's Talk Wrestling
Talking Wrestling with Willie Miklus

Let's Talk Wrestling

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 23, 2022 72:12


Willie's a flat-out stud! He competed at powerhouse programs Ballard Huxley and Southeast Polk in Iowa. He's a 4x state finalist and 2x state champ. He then went on to excel at the University of Missouri before finishing his college career back in the great state of Iowa at Iowa State University. He's a 4x AA, placing at both 184 and 197 lbs. He's currently an assistant coach at Michigan State University. I had a lot of fun with talking with Willie. Despite all the accolades, the guy is as humble as they come and just a great person. With that being said, sit back, relax and enjoy Willie Miklus!

Meatgistics Podcast: From Animal To Edible

Listen along as Jon and Austin review Jon's most recent adventure. A trip to Iowa State University for a short course in Dry & Semi-Dry Sausage. The guys also fry up a couple of types of bacon, give their opinions on home meal delivery services, and Jon gives an update to a very special list. Enjoy!https://waltonsinc.com/ | https://meatgistics.waltonsinc.com/

Here First
Friday, April 22nd, 2022

Here First

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022


A lead advocate for protecting Iowans who live in mobile homes says a bill aimed at addressing their concerns over fair housing won't help them. A new case of bird flu has surfaced in Iowa and it comes after the state hadn't seen any new cases of highly pathogenic avian influenza for two weeks. Plus, Iowa State University is leaving the Association of American Universities, an organization that includes the most prestigious research universities in the U.S.

The Gazette Daily News Podcast
Gazette Daily News Podcast, April 22

The Gazette Daily News Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 3:46


This is Stephen Schmidt from the Gazette digital news desk and I'm here with your update for Friday, April 22. We will be getting the wet part of spring some more on Friday, but at least now it will be joined by the warm part of spring. Showers and possibly a thunderstorm will visit the Cedar Rapids area, mainly before noon, then there will be a chance for showers and thunderstorms after noon. Some of the storms could produce heavy rainfall. The high temperature is expected to be 71 degrees, with a low clocking in at a balmy 61 degrees. Sixty-four years after joining the prestigious Association of American Universities — an invitation-only member group of North America's most elite comprehensive research universities — Iowa State University announced Thursday it's leaving the group. “The decision to end AAU membership is driven by Iowa State's commitment to its mission, strengths and impact,” according to the ISU Provost Office. “While the university's core values have not changed since joining the association in 1958, the indicators used by AAU to rank its members have begun to favor institutions with medical schools and associated medical research funding.” Iowa's Board of Regents, lawmakers and university executives — in appealing for state appropriations — have for years touted the state's position of having two AAU research universities, considering its modest population, at ISU and the University of Iowa. In pleading for legislative funding, regents, UI and ISU have in the past warned of the threat of losing AAU status — which comes with international prestige, helpful in recruiting both faculty and students, and access to AAU grants and funding. Cities will have fewer options to regulate where fireworks can be sold under legislation signed into law Thursday by Gov. Kim Reynolds, who approved more than two dozen measures. Under the new law, cities including Cedar Rapids and Iowa City will no longer be able to restrict firework sales to only certain zoning categories, like industrial, a regulation the cities made in response to citizen complaints and a rise in injuries. Republicans who called for the new measure said it stops cities from attempting to, in effect, ban fireworks sales. City officials said the law will make it more difficult to prevent fireworks from being sold in potentially dangerous locations. With COVID-19 activity on the rise in Eastern Iowa as a result of a new coronavirus subvariant, a local public health expert is again emphasizing the importance of vaccinations and other safety measures to protect others. Johnson County has seen elevated transmission rates and growing case counts in recent weeks as a result of BA.2, a subvariant of omicron that is rapidly spreading across the United States, according to Dr. Dan Diekema, epidemiologist and infectious disease specialist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Fortunately, Diekema said, the rate of increase in the community is not as steep as it was during the omicron surge, which peaked in mid-January. “I don't think anyone expects it to reach anywhere near the level's of the (omicron) surge we saw back in January, and in part, that's because the immune response from infection or from vaccination seems to be cross-protective between (omicron) and BA.2,” Diekema said. He added, “So we are seeing an increase, but it's not exponential. It's of concern, but not at the same rate that we saw with (omicron).”

New Books in Poetry
Romeo Oriogun, "The Sea Dreams of Us," Common magazine (Fall, 2021)

New Books in Poetry

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 36:00


Romeo Oriogun speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his poem “The Sea Dreams of Us,” which appears in The Common's fall issue. In this conversation, Romeo talks about his life as a poet in exile from Nigeria, and how that experience of exile appears in his poetry. He also discusses his writing process, the themes he often returns to in his work, and how growing up in Nigeria affects his use of language in poetry. Romeo Oriogun is the author of the 2020 poetry collection Sacrament of Bodies. A finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry, he has received fellowships and support from the Ebedi International Writers Residency, Harvard University, the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, the Oregon Institute for Creative Research, and the IIE Artist Protection Fund. An alum of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, he currently lives in Ames, where he is a postdoctoral research associate at Iowa State University. Read Romeo's poetry in The Common at thecommononline.org/tag/romeo-oriogun. Hear more from Romeo in this interview with Arrowsmith Press on YouTube. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She holds an MA in literature from Queen Mary University of London, and a BA from Smith College. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/poetry

New Books in Literature
Romeo Oriogun, "The Sea Dreams of Us," Common magazine (Fall, 2021)

New Books in Literature

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 36:00


Romeo Oriogun speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his poem “The Sea Dreams of Us,” which appears in The Common's fall issue. In this conversation, Romeo talks about his life as a poet in exile from Nigeria, and how that experience of exile appears in his poetry. He also discusses his writing process, the themes he often returns to in his work, and how growing up in Nigeria affects his use of language in poetry. Romeo Oriogun is the author of the 2020 poetry collection Sacrament of Bodies. A finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry, he has received fellowships and support from the Ebedi International Writers Residency, Harvard University, the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, the Oregon Institute for Creative Research, and the IIE Artist Protection Fund. An alum of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, he currently lives in Ames, where he is a postdoctoral research associate at Iowa State University. Read Romeo's poetry in The Common at thecommononline.org/tag/romeo-oriogun. Hear more from Romeo in this interview with Arrowsmith Press on YouTube. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She holds an MA in literature from Queen Mary University of London, and a BA from Smith College. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/literature

New Books Network
Romeo Oriogun, "The Sea Dreams of Us," Common magazine (Fall, 2021)

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 36:00


Romeo Oriogun speaks to managing editor Emily Everett about his poem “The Sea Dreams of Us,” which appears in The Common's fall issue. In this conversation, Romeo talks about his life as a poet in exile from Nigeria, and how that experience of exile appears in his poetry. He also discusses his writing process, the themes he often returns to in his work, and how growing up in Nigeria affects his use of language in poetry. Romeo Oriogun is the author of the 2020 poetry collection Sacrament of Bodies. A finalist for the Lambda Literary Award for Gay Poetry, he has received fellowships and support from the Ebedi International Writers Residency, Harvard University, the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research, the Oregon Institute for Creative Research, and the IIE Artist Protection Fund. An alum of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, he currently lives in Ames, where he is a postdoctoral research associate at Iowa State University. Read Romeo's poetry in The Common at thecommononline.org/tag/romeo-oriogun. Hear more from Romeo in this interview with Arrowsmith Press on YouTube. The Common is a print and online literary magazine publishing stories, essays, and poems that deepen our collective sense of place. On our podcast and in our pages, The Common features established and emerging writers from around the world. Read more and subscribe to the magazine at thecommononline.org, and follow us on Twitter @CommonMag. Emily Everett is managing editor of the magazine and host of the podcast. Her debut novel is forthcoming from Putnam Books. Her stories appear in the Kenyon Review, Electric Literature, Tin House Online, and Mississippi Review. She holds an MA in literature from Queen Mary University of London, and a BA from Smith College. Say hello on Twitter @Public_Emily. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

NINDS's Building Up the Nerve
S3E1: What is a mentor?

NINDS's Building Up the Nerve

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 22, 2022 41:42


The third Season of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke's Building Up the Nerve podcast helps you strengthen your mentoring relationships with tools and advice from both trainees and faculty. We know that navigating your career can be daunting, but we're here to help—it's our job!In the first episode of the season, we will set the stage by defining who a mentor is and discussing different types of mentoring relationships, and mentoring models.Featuring Claire Horner-Devine, PhD, Co-Investigator of BRAINS and Founder, Counterspace Consulting LLC; Fátima Sancheznieto, PhD,  Assistant Researcher, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR); and Corey Welch, PhD, Director, STEM Scholars Program, Iowa State University.ResourcesBroadening the Representation of Academic Investigators in NeuroScience (BRAINS): https://brains.uw.edu/ Society for the Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS): https://www.sacnas.org/ National Academies report on "The Science of Effective Mentorship in STEMM:" https://www.nationalacademies.org/our-work/the-science-of-effective-mentoring-in-stemm#sectionPublications Fátima Sancheznieto's TedxChicago talk "How to keep the next generation of brilliant scientists:" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EmwkDW3-99gThe Inigo Montoya Method: https://lifehacker.com/introduce-yourself-like-inigo-montoya-1840314386UC Berkeley Biology Scholars Program (mentioned by Dr. Corey Welch): https://bsp.berkeley.edu/ Transcript available at http://ninds.buzzsprout.com/.

Stats + Stories
Ecological and Environmental Stats for Earth Day | Stats + Stories Episode 228

Stats + Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 21, 2022 27:48


Earth day was launched in 1970 in the aftermath of several environmental disasters in the publication of Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring". It was designed to help raise awareness of environmental issues and has since grown into a global event. With this year's Earth Day taking out a particular urgency in light of the most recent UN Climate Report. But what goes into the scientific research that informs some this activism? What statistical tools are used to better understand the health of our environment. That's the focus of this episode of staffs and stories with guest Philip Dixon. Philip Dixon is a professor of statistics at Iowa State University. Dixon research interests include developing and evaluating statistical methods to answer interesting biological questions. Some of his current projects are developing non-parametric estimates of prediction distributions, modeling physical activity data, and developing model-based visualizations of species composition data.

Polygamer – A Podcast of Equality and Diversity in Gaming & Video Games
Polygamer #124: Cyndi Wiley, Iowa State University’s Digital Accessibility Lead

Polygamer – A Podcast of Equality and Diversity in Gaming & Video Games

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 20, 2022 64:27


Cyndi Wiley is the Digital Accessibility Lead for Iowa State University's Digital Accessibility Lab. Equipped with everything from screenreaders to Xbox consoles, the Lab helps students and faculty create, advocate for, and consume media that is accessible to users of all different abilities. In this interview, Cyndi and I chat about how disability is a […] The post Polygamer #124: Cyndi Wiley, Iowa State University's Digital Accessibility Lead first appeared on Polygamer - A Podcast of Equality & Diversity in Gaming & Video Games.

Southern Fried Philosophy
198: White People are Good People w/Special Guest Wendy McConnell

Southern Fried Philosophy

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2022 113:37


This week on the Southern Fried Philslophy Podcast: Erin is back for the finale of Fish Sandwich Madness. Producer Brian goes camping in the cold and Biggun wins Big Brother of the Year for the state of NC. We're joined by Special Guest Wendy McConnell to learn about the history of racisim in America. Southern Fried Philosophy ****************************** Become an SFP Insider Today! Click the link to join us!    Music  SFP Intro - Lenny The Band YouTube subscribers Sponsors Watchman Cigar Level Up Logo Red Hill Brewing Crave Bath and Body   How you be durrin - Crave Bath and Body   Next week: No Show   Southern Phrase Of The Week: Follow up/Discuss   Are you a woman? Fish Sandwich Bracket  Gilbert Godfrey passing, join Louie Anderson, Bob safety, norm mcdonald this year Wacky News - Level Up Logo   Florida woman finds real love with man whose photo was used in catfish plot In the Pursuit of… Racial Understanding   Next week: Dr. Lucretia Berry is an antiracism curriculum specialist, course designer and author of What LIES Between Us - Fostering First Steps Toward Racial Healing, a TEDx speaker, and a writer for in(courage).me. She earned her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Iowa State University and her BA from South Carolina State University In the Pursuit of… guests    Next week: we are having a week off and back on the 14th with In The Pursuit of Race Reconciliation

Agriculture Today
1168 – Price Comparison Between Popular Beef, Pork and Poultry Cuts … Upward Revisions to Kansas Net Farm Income

Agriculture Today

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 28:03


Price Comparison Between Popular Beef, Pork and Poultry Cuts Upward Revisions to Kansas Net Farm Income Extension Pond and Aquatic Resources   00:01:00 – Price Comparison Between Popular Beef, Pork and Poultry Cuts: Livestock economist Lee Schulz of Iowa State University reviews last week's generally favorable price action...and shares a price comparison he recently worked up between the most popular beef, pork and poultry cuts, and how beef demand remains strong albeit at a higher price than the competition   00:12:00 – Upward Revisions to Kansas Net Farm Income: K-State farm management economist Gregg Ibendahl talks about the revision that he has made to his forecast on final Kansas net farm income for 2021, as well as his NFI projection for 2022...both have been adjusted upward because of substantial developments in the grain markets since he first forecasted those numbers back in January   00:23:00 – Extension Pond and Aquatic Resources: K-State fisheries and aquatics specialist Joe Gerken talks about the Extension advisory services he provides for landowners with ponds or other aquatic resources     Send comments, questions or requests for copies of past programs to ksrenews@ksu.edu. Agriculture Today is a daily program featuring Kansas State University agricultural specialists and other experts examining ag issues facing Kansas and the nation. It is hosted by Eric Atkinson and distributed to radio stations throughout Kansas and as a daily podcast.   K‑State Research and Extension is a short name for the Kansas State University Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service, a program designed to generate and distribute useful knowledge for the well‑being of Kansans. Supported by county, state, federal and private funds, the program has county Extension offices, experiment fields, area Extension offices and regional research centers statewide. Its headquarters is on the K‑State campus in Manhattan.

On The Wing Podcast
PODCAST EP. 161: Iowa State U's Dr. Adam Janke on Netting Birds with Drones and Habitat Moneyball

On The Wing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 105:00


Host Bob St.Pierre is joined by Dr. Adam Janke, an assistant professor and extension wildlife specialist at Iowa State University, to talk about pheasant and quail research helping determine “where birds live on farms.” PF & QF's Director of Government Affairs Jim Inglis is also part of the conversation to explain how he uses Adam's scientific research in Washington, D.C. to create and improve agricultural policy for wildlife and natural resources. Episode Highlights: • The guys start the conversation with Dr. Janke drawing an analogy from the “Moneyball” concept used in baseball to habitat quality and wildlife population health evaluation. • Dr. Janke recounts his undergraduate project while studying at Ohio State University in which he lived with bobwhite quail over the course of two winters to learn about the bird's response to winter weather and habitat. • The group also talk about cover crops, using drones to capture & radio collar birds, and roadside surveying upland birds.

Student Affairs NOW
Larry Ebbers

Student Affairs NOW

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 13, 2022 53:47


Dra. Susana Muñoz interviews her dissertation advisor, Dr. Larry Ebbers, professor emeritus of Iowa State University, a pillar in the field of higher education. They discuss Dr. Ebbers' primary research area, community colleges. And, engage in great conversation about tenure and promotion, doctoral education, the challenges of the pandemic, and building communities of support in all institution types.

Here & Now
'Hive' tells one woman's story during Kosovo War; Cost of high-ethanol gas

Here & Now

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2022 40:43


The 2021 film "Hive" tells the story of one woman striving to support her family after her husband disappears in the Kosovo war. Writer-director Blerta Basholli and star Yllka Gashi join us. And, the Biden administration hopes to tackle rising gas prices by allowing the sale of high-ethanol gas during the summer months. Robert Brown, director of the Bioeconomy Institute at Iowa State University, explains what the change could mean.

Talk of Iowa
What to do before you mow your lawn this spring

Talk of Iowa

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 9, 2022


Host Charity Nebbe speaks with Iowa State University horticulturists Adam Thoms and Aaron Steil about lawn care.

New Books Network
The College Writing Center: A Discussion with Joseph Cheatle

New Books Network

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 8, 2022 59:30


Listen to this interview of Joseph Cheatle, Director of the Writing & Media Center at Iowa State University. We talk about how communication will change your life. Joseph Cheatle : "One of the typical traits of writing center tutors is that they are just really great. I don't know how else to describe it other than that they are often the best of the best at an institution in terms of their leadership, their vision, their work ethic, their desire for professional development. I mean, people who are writing center tutors, when they go out for job interviews, they often get asked about their writing center work, because people know that those are going to be good employees. So, there's a lot to be said for the students who come in and work at writing centers. Really these are just some of the best students at the institution: hard-working, ethical, interesting, and dedicated." Visit the Writing & Media Center. Watch Daniel edit your science here. Contact Daniel at writeyourresearch@gmail.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices Support our show by becoming a premium member! https://newbooksnetwork.supportingcast.fm/new-books-network

SuinoCast
#162 - Tomada de decisão baseada em evidências - Dr. Giovani Trevisan

SuinoCast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 51:03


De Xavantina para o mundo! Bati um papo com o Giovani Trevisan, professor e pesquisador da renomada Iowa State University. Giovani compartilhou muita informação sobre a utilidade de fluídos de processamento. Nunca pensei que a cauda e os testículos dos leitões de maternidade seriam de tão extrema utilidade em sanidade. Falamos sobre o polêmico tema da coleta de animais mortos em granjas e muito sobre como podemos tirar vantagens quando os laboratórios "conversam entre si" e geram informações valiosíssimas que ajudam a predizer surtos e padrões epidemiológicos. Não pude perder a oportunidade de pedir uma atualização da PRRS nos EUA e o que podemos aplicar do conhecimento desta doença nas doenças endêmicas no Brasil. Apesar de parecer ciência de foguete, foi uma conversa bem leve e descontraída. - Apresentação do convidado - Fluidos de processamento - Status da PRRS do EUA hoje, tempo de eliminação, prevalência e estratégias - Pontos aplicáveis para outras doenças - Coleta de carcaças - O que acontece em uma granja livre quando entra o PRRS? E em quanto tempo isso acontece? - Principais diferenças laboratoriais: da suinocultura Norte Americana vs. suinocultura Brasileira - Predição a partir de dados históricos é a chave - Devemos ou não compartilhar informações sanitárias dos nossos rebanhos? - Linhas de pesquisa - Status da Peste Suína Africana nos EUA hoje - Ídolos dentro da suinocultura: quais virtudes eles têm em comum - O que mais gosta de fazer nas horas vagas - O que ainda não fez na vida, mas tem vontade *Este episódio chega até você através do apoio das empresas: - Ceva - https://www.ceva.com.br/ - MS Schippers - https://schippers.com.br/ - Biorigin - https://www.biorigin.net/ - HIPRA - https://hipra.com/

The Lessons in Real Estate Show
Episode 96: $1M in Real Estate in 1 Year with Patrick Menefee

The Lessons in Real Estate Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 52:49


Very excited to have Patrick Menefee on the show. He is the founder and CEO of Invest DGP. He created the Invest DGP platform to give back to the community and help others the way he's been helped! Patrick grew up in Minnesota. He graduated from Ranger School in 2012 and spent time in Africa and Southwest Asia over his 6-year career as an Infantry Officer before joining corporate America. He started with small multifamily properties and quickly scaled from 8 properties and 20 units within 10 months of getting started. He was able to do this while working full time in the banking industry as a consultant with one of the Big Four, spending every week traveling and living out of a hotel. In August 2020 He shifted his primary focus to house flipping, and on October 30, 2020, decided to quit his well-paying full-time job to go into real estate full time. He currently runs and is scaling a house flipping business in the Charlotte, NC MSA. You can do real estate as an investor or as a full-time business. Patrick loves real estate and the business side of it so today, He shares the key lessons he learned about the business side of real estate, taking massive action, how he transitioned from real estate as a side hustle to a full-time business, learning from past mistakes, and how to go about finding the right people once you've made this decision. Tune in! If you would like to know more about real estate investing. Check our website pintocapitalinvestments.com. In this episode, we explore: -Guest Background -Military background and how he got into real estate -What made him take action -Own money or raise capital? -First two properties -Calling up a contractor -One of the main reasons people get into real estate on the side -Getting into hiring -Transition from real estate investor to a real estate business owner -Options as a CEO -One that looks out and away while the other one looks down and in -How to go about finding the right person -Partnerships Patrick was born and raised in Minnetonka, MN. After earning a business degree from Iowa State University he was commissioned as an Infantry Officer in the US Army. He graduated from Ranger School in 2012 and spent time in Africa and Southwest Asia over his 6-year career before joining corporate America as a consultant at a Big Four firm. Snapshot: 40:26 1. What is your number one failure in real estate? -Being too trusting. The worst deals were tied back to that. 2. What advice do you have for other military investors to be successful? -Systems. There are a ton of systems that are in place and you can learn from those. -Setting and enforcing standards. You need to have standards for everything you do in your business. 3. What inspired you to serve your country? -Sense of duty and honor -A neighbor who enlisted ahead of me. I saw him go do it and that was a very big inspiration for me. 4. What is your dream? -Build a legacy, a life. Leaving an impact on my family and for God. Connecting with the Guest: Website: https://www.investdgp.com/ LinkedIn Profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/patrick-menefee Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/investdgp/?hl=en Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/patrick.menefee.3 Email: patrick@investdgp.com Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxbnzkSXJD4lF4z_lTtqgvQ #realestate #multifamilyproperties #bankingindustry

Good Morning, HR
Principles of Executive Coaching

Good Morning, HR

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2022 40:40


In episode 40, Coffey discusses “career impact” coaching with Brad Smith, an experienced HR leader and executive coach. They discuss the great advice Brad gave Coffey almost 30 years ago; preparing for “career impact” conversations; creating a structure in which a coaching recipient can receive helpful feedback; the importance of including stakeholders in the coaching process; “amplifiers and dampers” in coaching individuals; the five boxes that need to be checked when considering coaching; “coaching is the belief that the answer lies within”; incentivizing employees to change behavior; “if you think about the money, you'll lose”; how coaching is only part of leadership development; and measuring the ROI of coaching.Good Morning, HR is brought to you by Imperative—premium background checks with fast and friendly service. For more information about our commitment to quality and excellent customer service, visit us at https://imperativeinfo.com. If you are an HRCI or SHRM-certified professional, this episode of Good Morning, HR has been pre-approved for half a recertification credit. To obtain the recertification information for this episode, visit https://goodmorninghr.com. About our Guest:Brad Smith has 41 years of experience in the employment industry as a retained executive search professional and as a vice president and senior consultant for Drake Beam Morin, Inc (DBM), a global career transition and executive coaching firm. Besides his transition practice, Brad works with a select number of executives who have specific career impact development needs. He also serves as Project Manager and company contact person on all coaching projects accepted by his firm.Brad has been recognized in Who's Who in Human Resources. Brad is past president and chairman of The Cowtown Executives Association, an executive networking and business referral group. He served for eight years as Vice President of Communications for the Fort Worth Human Resource Management Association. He was a member of the Fort Worth Chamber's Quality Workforce Commission as well as a member of the Board of Trustees for Hill School of Fort Worth. Brad is also a guest lecturer at the TCU Neeley School of Business: The BNSF Next Generation Leadership Program and The University of Texas at Arlington. He is also a mentor in the TCU Neeley Honors Program and executive coach to the Baylor University EMBA Program.Brad currently chairs the Tarrant County Senior Executive Group, an invitation only transition networking group for C-level executives.Brad is a veteran of the United States Air Force Intelligence Service where he was member of a special operations wing that conducted search and rescue missions for downed pilots in Laos and Viet Nam. He holds a B.S. degree in Business Administration from Iowa State University. Brad brings 41 years of total experience in career transition, executive coaching, executive search, management and marketing in a variety of industries.His diversified industry background includes retail operations and merchandising, health care, marketing, legal and general management. Brad's considerable experience in service industries gives him a unique perspective in developing and enhancing client relationships.He has a no-nonsense approach to the coaching profession that resonates well with both clients and organizations as well as a defined process that involves critical stakeholders.Brad is an excellent coach because he's old and has made a lot of mistakes.Brad Smith can be reached at https://bsmithcc.com or https://www.linkedin.com/in/bradsmith48/.About Mike Coffey:Mike Coffey is an entrepreneur, human resources professional, licensed private investigator, and HR consultant.In 1999, he founded Imperative, a background investigations firm helping risk-averse companies make well-informed decisions about the people they involve in their business.Today, Imperative serves hundreds of businesses across the US and, through its PFC Caregiver & Household Screening brand, many more private estates, family offices, and personal service agencies.Mike has been recognized as an Entrepreneur of Excellence and has twice been named HR Professional of the Year. Additionally, Imperative is included in the prestigious Best Places to Work in Texas list and has been named the Texas Association of Business' small business of the year.Mike is a member of the Fort Worth chapter of the Entrepreneurs' Organization and volunteers with the SHRM Texas State Council.Mike maintains his certification as a Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) through the HR Certification Institute. He is also a SHRM Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP).Mike lives in Fort Worth with his very patient wife. He practices yoga and maintains a keto diet, about both of which he will gladly tell you way more than you want to know.Learning Objectives: Conducting key conversations to ensure that your message is understand. Preparing for “career impact” coaching conversations. Evaluating the five key questions when deciding whether to proceed with a coaching effort. Measuring the return-on-investment on coaching.

WPKN Community Radio
Mary Swander Author, Dramatist - Digging in the Dirt

WPKN Community Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 6, 2022 35:20


My guest today is Mary Swander is an Author, Dramatist, Performer, Speaker, Teacher. An emerita Distinguished Professor of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Swander taught creative writing for thirty years at Iowa State University and She is the Executive Director of AgArts, a nonprofit designed to imagine and promote healthy food systems through the arts. She is here to talk to me about the many projects that keep her busy.

We All Want Clean H2O
Kevin Mason and Iowa's environmental history

We All Want Clean H2O

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 5, 2022 39:46


Dr. Kevin Mason, an Iowa State University graduate and a Professor of history at Waldorf University, talks to us about his innovative approaches engaging students and the public and his work on Iowa's environmental history, which ranges from videos to hands on activities to books and journal articles. This episode is in solidarity with Iowa State University's History department.     

Swine.It
#139 – Roundtable: What strategies should producers employ this summer to optimize profit? With Matt Wolfe, Dr. Matt Ritter, and Dr. Qingyun Li

Swine.It

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 35:20


For swine producers to optimize profits during the summer months, nutritionists need to be updating diets several months earlier as far as employing different nutritional and marketing strategies. In this episode, Dr. Matt Ritter, Matt Wolfe, and Dr. Qingyun Li discuss recent shifts in feed costs and market value for pigs this summer and how that may impact the strategies that producers employ on the farm. "

Fit + Vibrant You
282: How to Workout to Support Your Hormones with Debra Atkinson

Fit + Vibrant You

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 47:16


It's no surprise that your body will change through the decades and you might have noticed that what worked in the past is longer working for you. Before you throw in the towel, or try pushing HARDER, listen to this episode.  Your body has changed. It only makes sense that your workouts should too!  This week I've invited Debra Atkinson on the Fit + Vibrant You Podcast to share how to workout throughout menopause to have the vibrant energy  and strength you want, and deserve.   We cover:

Have You Herd? AABP PodCasts
Just a signature, Doc

Have You Herd? AABP PodCasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2022 38:29


How can veterinarians assist dairy farmers from only requesting a signature on the VCPR form in the FARM program to developing a culture of continuous improvement? In this episode, AABP Executive Director Dr. Fred Gingrich is joined by AABP member Dr. Corale Dorn to discuss the National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) Farmers Assuring Responsible Management (FARM) program.  Dorn discusses how she has implemented the tenets of the FARM program and included it as part of her billable services valued by her clients. Dorn graduated from Iowa State University in 2001 and is the owner of Dells Veterinary Services in Dell Rapids, S.D. Find out information about her practice at this link.  Dorn offers tips about completing the various checklists of the FARM program including identifying training opportunities during routine farm visits such as fresh cow protocols, euthanasia protocols, milking procedures and sick cow protocols and keeping the forms in your truck to sign off on them and include in the binder that is used by evaluators to ensure training is completed and protocols are updated. Dorn utilizes her team to assist with the services her practice provides to dairy and beef clients. She recommends veterinarians start with small bites and implement portions of the program during various times of the year and suggests that veterinarians consider becoming a second-party evaluator, so they are familiar with the audit process. She also discusses three models of charging for this service and incorporating it into your routine preventive medicine programs. By incorporating these protocols and procedures into your practice, veterinarians can move the FARM program beyond “just the signature”. Find out information about the NMPF FARM Program at this link. Resources that can be used by veterinarians and producers can be found in the FARM resource library found here.  AABP Guidelines and Position statements are used by NMPF FARM program and can be found under the About menu of the AABP website at this link. 

The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 03.31.22

The Gary Null Show

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 60:34


Eating two servings of avocados a week linked to lower risk of cardiovascular disease   Harvard School of Public Health, March 30, 2022    Eating two or more servings of avocado weekly was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, and substituting avocado for certain fat-containing foods like butter, cheese or processed meats was associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease events. Researchers believe this is the first, large, prospective study to support the positive association between higher avocado consumption and lower cardiovascular events, such as coronary heart disease and stroke. “Our study provides further evidence that the intake of plant-sourced unsaturated fats can improve diet quality and is an important component in cardiovascular disease prevention,” said Lorena S. Pacheco, Ph.D. in the nutrition department at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.”   (NEXT)   Exercise may reduce depression symptoms, boost effects of therapy   Iowa State University, March 30, 2022   Exercising for half an hour may reduce symptoms of depression for at least 75 minutes post-workout and amplify the benefits of therapy, according to two new studies led by researchers at Iowa State University. For the first study, the researchers recruited 30 adults who were experiencing major depressive episodes. The participants filled out electronic surveys immediately before, half-way-through and after a 30-minute session of either moderate-intensity cycling or sitting, and then 25-, 50- and 75-minutes post-workout. Those who cycled during the first lab visit came back a week later to run through the experiment again with 30-minutes of sitting, and vice versa. During the cycling experiment, participants' depressed mood state improved over the 30 minutes of exercise and consistently up to 75 minutes afterward. The improvement to anhedonia started to drop off at 75 minutes post-exercise, but still was better than the participants' levels of anhedonia in the group that did not exercise.   (NEXT)   Mindful People Often Have Better Blood Sugar Levels   Brown University, February 25, 2022   “Everyday” mindfulness is an awareness of your thoughts and feelings. And people who have it tend to have healthy glucose levels, new research shows. They also are less likely to be obese and they're more likely to believe they can change many of the important things in their life—two factors that scientists suspect may contribute to the healthy glucose levels. Their overarching hypotheses are that people practicing higher degrees of mindfulness may be better able to motivate themselves to exercise, to resist cravings for high-fat, high-sugar treats, and to stick with diet and exercise regimens recommended by their doctors. Participants with high levels of mindfulness were about 20 percent less likely to have type 2 diabetes, but the total number of people in the study with the condition may have been too small to allow for definitive findings.   (NEXT)   Being overweight linked to poorer memory   University of Cambridge (UK), March 26, 2022   Overweight young adults may have poorer episodic memory - the ability to recall past events - than their peers, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge, adding to increasing evidence of a link between memory and overeating. In a preliminary study published in The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, researchers found an association between high body mass index (BMI) and poorer performance on a test of episodic memory. Although only a small study, its results support existing findings that excess bodyweight may be associated with changes to the structure and function of the brain and its ability to perform certain cognitive tasks optimally. In particular, obesity has been linked with dysfunction of the hippocampus, an area of the brain involved in memory and learning, and of the frontal lobe, the part of the brain involved in decision making, problem solving and emotions, suggesting that it might also affect memory; however, evidence for memory impairment in obesity is currently limited.

For the Sake of the Child
Time to Shine

For the Sake of the Child

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2022 14:52


Our “Purple Up” series kicks off with an overview of MCEC's events in April celebrating Month of the Military Child. Use #MilKidStrong on social media to recognize a military-connected child in your community and share their story; #MOMC and #MonthoftheMilitaryChild for discussion throughout the month and #PurpleUp for promotion and celebration of Purple Up Day on April 14th in your area.  Show Notes: Month of the Military Child (MOMC) Digital Toolkit: https://www.militarychild.org/MOMC_Toolkit   Resources to Support Ukrainian Military Children & Their Families https://www.militarychild.org/resourcesukrainianfamilies   Hiring Our Heroes https://www.hiringourheroes.org/career-services/military-spouse-resources/     Bio: Lisa Witte  Lisa Witte is MCEC's Director of Marketing and Communications. A native of Iowa, she has lived the military lifestyle for over twenty years as her family has moved around to different Navy duty stations. Lisa has an extensive background in advertising and has worked at agencies on both the East and West Coasts on national brand accounts. At MCEC, she is responsible for promoting awareness of MCEC's services and communicating on behalf of the organization. She has a degree in Advertising from Iowa State University, and resides in San Diego, CA with her husband and two children.  

Your Brain on Facts
Fell on Black Days: Sunday (ep. 189)

Your Brain on Facts

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 29, 2022 34:46


(Get Surfshark VPN at https://surfshark.deals/MOXIE - Enter promo code MOXIE for 83% off and 3 extra months free!) T-shirt for Ukraine, all proceeds and matching donation to Ukraine Red Cross at yourbrainonfacts.com/merch There are four Sundays a month, but more than a dozen days we call "Black Sunday."  Here are three -- two forces of nature and one parade of schadenfreude. 02:42 Black Blizzard 12:45 Bondi Beach 24:42 Disneyland Quote reader: Vlado from It's Not Rocket Surgery Promo: Remnant Stew Links to all the research resources are on the website. Hang out with your fellow Brainiacs.  Reach out and touch Moxie on Facebook, Twitter,  or Instagram.  Become a patron of the podcast arts! Patreon or Ko-Fi.  Or buy the book and a shirt. Music: Dan Lebowitz,  Kevin MacLeod,  Want to start a podcast or need a better podcast host?  Get up to TWO months hosting for free from Libsyn with coupon code "moxie."   Every year, tens of millions people or so go through Denver International Airport, the fifth busiest in the country and in the top 20 busiest in the world.  That's a lot of bodies to get from hither to yon, so the airport relies heavily on Automated Guideway Transit System, a people-mover that connects all of the midfield concourses with the south terminal, providing the only passenger access to concourses B and C.  And in 1995, a day that will live in infamy for staff and passengers alike, the system failed.  They refer to that day as Black Sunday.  My name's…   So I said to myself the other day, you know what would make a good topic, days with colorful sobriquets, surely there are enough of those to write about.  In what they call a good problem to have, there are in fact, too many!  Most of the “black.”  So I'm starting with a few Black Sundays and if you thinks it's a fruitful area of discussion, I'll make it a series, maybe one a month.  I'd space them out because you don't hear about the planes that land and you don't call a day Black whatever if everything was chill.  As such, today's episode is two heavy topics and one packed with schadenfreude, so gauge how you're feeling today.,  I don't mind waiting – it's not how long you wait, it's who you're waiting for.  We're going to go heavy, heavy, light, as decided by folks in our Facebook group, the Brainiac Breakroom, where anyone can share clever or funny things they find; same goes to the ybof sud-reddit.   Speaking of social media, folks are starting to post pictures of themselves wearing their Russian Warship go F yourself shirts to raise money for the Ukraine red cross (url).  Thanks to them specifically and I want to send a sweeping cloud of thanks to people in other countries for taking in the refugees.  Speaking of refugees, there was a time when hundreds of thousands of Americans were refugees in their own country.  During WWI, wheat prices rose and farming in the open prairies of the great plains was an attractive proposition.  Homesteaders and farmers set up shop, ripping up or tilling under the native grasses that had evolved as part of that ecosystem, with long roots that both held onto lots of soil, but reached down far enough to reach water waaay below the topsoil, allowing it to better survive drought conditions.  But we don't like to eat those grasses, so they replaced it with shallow-rooted wheat.  The rain stopped falling in 1931, leaving instead a severe widespread drought that lasted the rest of the decade, eventually killed thousands of square miles of wheat fields.  No other crops, either, and nothing to feed livestock.  Without live plants to hold onto the topsoil, it blew away.  The prairie wind became a sandstorm and people's livelihoods blew away.  It got so bad, the dust clouds eventually reached the east coast and beyond.  At the same time, they had this Great Depression on, a real nuisance, you've seen the movies, Grapes of Wrath, Of Mice and Men, the other versions of Of Mice and Men, O Brother Where Art Thou (only time I enjoyed George Clooney), and dozens more.  The price of wheat [sfx raspberry] and people lost their jobs left right and center.  Many families were left with no choice but to pile whatever they still had left onto the family car and follow rumors of work, sometimes migrating all the way to California, where, even though they were regular ol' ‘Mericans, they were treated like foreign invaders.   Black Blizzard, American Dust Bowl, 1938   That's a broad-stroke quickie overview – and boy do I want to rewatch Carnivale for the fourth time (love me some Clancy Brown, rawr, I still would) – but we're here to talk about one day, a black Sunday, brought on by a black blizzard.  It's a blizzard but made up of dirt so thick, it blocks out the sun.  14 hit black blizzards hit in 1932, 38 in 1933, up to 70 by 1937 and so on.  The worst of it hit Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas.  The storms became so frequent that people could discern the origin of the storm by the color of its dirt – brown dust storms were from Kansas or Nebraska, gray from Texas, and red dust storms were from Oklahoma.    People tried to protect themselves from breathing the dust and cloth masks were the least of it.  They'd hang wet sheets over doorways and seal up windows, sometimes with a paste ironically made of wheat flour because that's what they could get. They'd rub petroleum jelly into their nostrils, anything to try to prevent the “brown plague,” dust pneumonia.  Constant inhalation of dust particles killed hundreds of people, babies and young children particularly, and sickened thousands of others.   1934 was the single worst drought year of the last millennium in North America, temperatures soared, exceeding 100 degrees everyday for weeks on much of the Southern Plains, absolutely *baking the soil.  When spring of 1935 rolled around, there was a whole lot more dry dirt ready to be thrown into the air.  After months of brutal conditions, the winds finally died down on the morning of April 14, 1935, and people jumped on the chance to escape their homes.  Hope springs eternal and people thought maybe it was finally over.   It was, of course, not over.  The worst was standing in the wings in full costume, waiting for its cue.  A cold front down from Canada crashed into warm air over the Dakotas.  In a few hours, the temperature fell more than 30 degrees and the wind returned in force, creating a dust cloud that grew to hundreds of miles wide and thousands of feet high as it headed south.  Reaching its full fury in southeastern Colorado, southwestern Kansas and the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles, it turned a sunny day totally dark.  Birds, mice and jackrabbits fled for their lives.  Have you ever heard the sound *one terrified rabbit makes?  I would not want to be on the ground while this was happening.  Domestic animals like cattle that couldn't get to shelter were blinded and even suffocated by the dust.   Drivers were forced to take refuge in their cars, while other residents hunkered down anywhere they could, from fire stations to tornado shelters to under beds if a bed was the closest you could find to safety.  Folksinger Woody Guthrie, then 22, who sat out the storm at his Pampa, Texas, home, recalled that “you couldn't see your hand before your face.” Inspired by proclamations from some of his companions that the end of the world was at hand, he composed a song titled “So Long, It's Been Good to Know Yuh.”  [sfx song] Guthrie would also write other tunes about Black Sunday, including “Dust Storm Disaster.”   The storm dragged on for hours and peoples' wits began to fray.  One woman reportedly thought the merciless howling wind blocking out the sky was the start of the Biblical end of the world – can't imagine how she arrived there-- contemplated killing her child to spare them being collateral damage in a war between heaven and hell.  By all accounts it was the worst black blizzard of the Dust Bowl, displacing 300,000 tons of topsoil.  That would be enough to cover a square area of .4mi/750 m on each side a foot deep.  “Everybody remembered where they were on Black Sunday,” said Pamela Riney-Kehrberg, a history professor at Iowa State University and the author of “Rooted in Dust: Surviving Drought and Depression in Southwestern Kansas.”  “For people on the Southern Plains, it was one of those defining experiences, like Pearl Harbor or Kennedy's assassination.”   The Black Sunday storm blew its dust all the way to the east coast, causing street lights to be needed during the day in Washington DC and even coating the decks of ships in the Atlantic ocean.  The next day, as the remnants of the storm blew out into the Gulf of Mexico, an Associated Press reporter filed a story in which he referred to “life in the dust bowl of the continent,” coining the phrase that would encapsulate a phenomenon, a place, and a time.  Inspired by the myriad tales of suffering that proliferated in Black Sunday's wake, the federal government began paying farmers to take marginal lands out of production. It also incentivized improved agricultural practices, such as contour plowing and crop rotation, which reduced soil loss roughly 65 percent. By then, however, many families had given up hope and ¼-⅓ of the most affected people fled the Southern Plains, never to return.  But in the win column, thanks to better agricultural management practices, the massive black blizzards never returned either. Bondi Beach, Australia, 1938   The phrase Black Sunday isn't exclusive to the US, of course.  My one sister's adoptive country of Australia has had their fair share as well.  Like Black Sunday from 1926, an especially bad day during an already disastrous bushfire season.  60 people were killed and 700 injured.  Or the Black Sunday bushfires across South Australia in 1955.  60 fire brigades and 1,000 volunteers were needed to get the fires under control.  Thankfully this time only 2 people died that time.     On the far side of the element wheel is the story of Bondi Beach, minutes east of Sydney, on a February Sunday in 1938.  Sydney had recently celebrated its 150th birthday, or sesqui-centenary, with a big old parade and events planned to last until April.  The city was a-bustle with visitors, many of whom joined the locals spending the hot, sunny day at Bondi Beach.     The sky was clear, but the sea was already acting a fool. A large swell was hitting the coast and lifeguards at Bondi were busy all day Saturday pulling people from the heavy surf, as many as 74 rescues in one hour.  Despite the heavy seas, beach inspectors gave a mayor of Amity-approved thumbs-up to opening the beach on Sunday, February 6.  Beachgoers started coming and coming and coming.  The morning started out relatively quiet for the lifeguards, but business got brisk, even as they tried to wave swimmers toward safer parts of the beach.  As the tide moved out, more and more people ventured out to a sandbar that ran parallel to the beach.  The crowd had grown to 35,000, enjoying the surf and sand.  Extra surf reels were brought out to the beach as they tried to keep pace with the ballooning battery of bathers.  A lifesaving reel is an Australian invention that was brilliant in its simplicity.  It was a giant reel of rope, with a belt or harness at the end, in a portable stand.  The life saver would attach the harness to his or her self then swim out to the struggling swimmer or surfer.  The lifeguard –and I am going to persist in saying the American lifeguard rather than the Australian lifesaver– then puts the rescuee in the harness and a lifeguard on the beach would reel them in.  The lifeguard in the water either accompanies that person back or goes on to rescue someone else.      Boat crews were out in the water dropping buoys to mark out a race course for weekly races held by and for the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club.  This would turn out to be as fortuitous as when a woman had a heart attack on a trans-atlantic flight, but there were 15 cardiologists on board, going to a conference.  At about 3.00 p.m. two duty patrols were changing shifts at the Bondi surf club and some 60 club members were mingling around waiting for the competition.    Suddenly, five tremendous waves crashed high onto the beach, one right after the other, in such quick succession that the water could not recede.  Even though most bathers were only standing in water up to their waists, they were thrown onto the beach, and pummeled by the following waves.  Then the water receded.  What goes up must come down and what comes in must go back out.  The backwash, which is the term for water on the beach finding its level and returning to the ocean, swept people who'd been nowhere near the water, including non-swimmers who never planned to get in the water, into the water.  The people on the sandbar were then swept further out.  The club recorded 180 people, but news reports at the time put the figure as high as 250 – 250 people now in need of rescue, panicking and thrashing in the surf.     All hands from the Bondi Surf Bathers' Life Saving Club lept into action.  Beltmen took every available line out, many went in without belts and held up struggling bathers.  Lifesaver Carl Jeppesen is said to have simply dived into the surf to rescue six people without the aid of a surf reel.  One of the main problems was not lack of assistance but too much unskilled help from the huge crowd on the beach.  One beltman, George Pinkerton, was dragged under water by members of the public trying to haul him in. He ended up in need of medical attention. Once the lines had been cleared and a certain amount of order restored, the lifeguards could get on with the job.  Thankfully there were people who *could help.  “I was co-opted into the situation because I was a strong swimmer and they put me on a line,'' said Ted Lever, just 16 at the time, a member of the Bondi Amateur Swimming Club who would soon be invited to join the renowned Bondi lifesaving club.    Even when the well-meaning public had been cleared from the lines to leave them in trained hands, there were still problems. The beltmen often found themselves swamped by swimmers seeking assistance. Some of them had to punch their way through a wall of distressed bathers to get to others in more danger.  One beltman spoke of being seized by five men who refused to let go.  “I was trying to take the belt to a youngster who was right out the back but I didn't get the chance.  As I went by, dozens yelled for help and tried to grab me.  I told them to hang on to the rope as soon as I got it out.  I didn't think I had a chance when they all came at me.  One grabbed me around the neck, two others caught me by one arm, another around the waist and another one seized my leg.  I hit the man who had me around the neck, managed to get him on his chin and he let go.  I had to do it; but for that, I would have been drowned myself.”   The boat was still out after laying the buoys but the crew were waiting for the race to start, but they were completely unaware of the chaos just off the beach.  Nobody thought to signal them, but even if they had, the boat could have posed a danger to people in the water with overactive waves and rip currents.   It was difficult to tell exactly how many people had been rescued during the course of that chaotic 20 minutes.  Rescued swimmers were brought up the beach by the dozens.  About 60 needed to be resuscitated to one degree or another.  Five people died, including one man who died saving a girl.   American doctor Marshall Dyer, there on vacation, helped resuscitate swimmers.  “I have never seen, nor expect to see again, such a magnificent achievement as that of your lifesavers,'' he said. ``It is the most incredible work of love in the world.''   There were inarguably many heroes on Bondi Beach that day, but the Lifesavers' club stance afterwards was that “everyone did his job.”  “It must be realised that though perhaps less spectacular, the work on the beach and in the clubhouse was just as necessary if not more so,'' he told a newspaper.  Instead of recognising individuals for their efforts the Surf Life Saving Association of Australia recommended the entire club for a special meritorious award.   Opening day of Disneyland, 1955   even a potential COVID outbreak or the measles outbreak they had a few years ago would pale in comparison to the disaster that was opening day at Disney.  Disneyland is known as the happiest place on Earth.  But when the park opened on July 17, 1955, the now-ubiquitous nickname was downright ironic.  Disney employees who survived the day referred to it as Black Sunday.  So opening day at Disney was a bit more like the Simpsons episode where they went to itchy and scratchy world. The opening day was meant to be a relatively intimate affair, by invite only, not for every Huey, Dewey and Lewey.  If you were friends and family of the employees, members of the press, and celebrities of the day, you received a ticket in the mail.  If you were everyone else, you bought a counterfeit ticket.  The park was only expecting 15,000 guests; 28,000 showed up, nearly doubled what they prepared for.  Well, what they meant to prepare for, we'll ride the teacups back around to that in a sec.  The counterfeit tickets might have been better than the legit ones, as those were only good for half the day, morning or afternoon, to spread the workload out more evenly.  The morning tickets had an end time of 2:30 pm, when, assumably, they figured people would see that and just say, oh, bother, my time is up, guess I'll leave then.  Nobody did that.  One is stunned.  You buy a ticket for a theme park, you're there all day.  So the morning people were still milling about when the afternoon people started showing up.  And then there were the people who started just sneaking in.  One enterprising self-starter set a ladder up against the outside fence and charged people $5 to climb it.  That's about $50 adjusted for inflation, many many times over for schlepping along a ladder that I like to think he nicked from his neighbor's yard.    A lot of things were not ready on opening day, within the park and without.  The Santa Ana Freeway outside turned into a 7 mile long parking lot.  The opening of the park essentially shut the freeway down.  There were so many people waiting so long, according to some media reports, there was rampant [] relief on the side of the road and even in the Disney parking lot.  Like the video for Everybody Hurts, if folks couldn't hold their water.  If you just flashed back to your life when that video came out, be sure to stretch before you mow the lawn and don't forget your big sun hat.     Today might think of a Disney park as being meticulously manicured and maintained.  Opening day, not so much.  Walt Disney tried to have everything ready on time, hustling his people to work faster, but there's only so much you can do.  So there were bare patches of ground, some areas of bare ground that had been painted green, weeds where the lawns and flowers were meant to be.  Weeds and native flora that they couldn't get rid of in time, they instead put little signs with the Latin name of the plant in the weeds, so it kind of looks like it was meant to be there.  Turn a liability into an asset, I always say.  Returning to the topic of bathrooms, there was a plumber's strike going on during construction; Walt basically had to decide between working water fountains or working toilets.  Florida heat notwithstanding, he chose to have the toilets working, and I'd say that was probably a good call.  If you've ever played theme park tycoon or any of those games now, you know that a lack of water fountains means people *have to pay for drinks now…  Or they would… if the park's concessions had been fully stocked.  The overabundance of people meant that the food and drink sold out completely in just a couple of hours.  Did I mention it was literally 100 deg freedom/38C that day?  The asphalt had been finished so close to opening that it began sticking to people's shoes.  Some people even claimed to have gotten their shoes completely stuck to the pavement on Main Street, where lots of people spent lots of time, because the rides, kind of a big deal at a theme park, they were not ready.  A number of rides, like Peter Pan's Flight, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Submarine Voyage, and the famous Flying Dumbo either broke down or never opened at all.   Disney's Black Sunday lasted for weeks.  A Stagecoach ride in Frontierland permanently closed when it became clear that they were as safe against rollovers as a Bronco II with a roof rack loaded with building supplies.  36 cars in Autopia crashed due to aggressive driving on the part of the patrons.  I'm starting to wonder if Disney ever met people.  Ironically, the ride was designed to help children learn to be respectful drivers on the road.  There were a number of live animals in a circus attraction, which was not great when a Tiger and a Panther escaped, which resulted in a furious death struggle on Main Street, USA.  Now that's an attraction you can't pay for, like Baghera vs Sher Khan, 8 years before The Jungle Book.  Like the park, the Mark Twain Riverboat was over capacity on opening day with over 500 people cramming onto the boat, causing it to jump its tracks and sink in the mud.  It took about half an hour to get it back onto the rail, and as soon as it pulled up to the landing, everyone rushed to one side of the boat to get off…. and tipped it over.  Thankfully, the water was shallow and there were no injuries.  There was, however, a gas leak inside Sleeping Beauty's Castle, which could have been a serious problem and prompted the closing of Adventureland, Fantasyland and Frontierland for a few hours because, whoopsie-doodles, Sleeping Beauty's Castle is on fire.  Well, trying to catch fire.  Reports vary as to how severe it actually was.  Walt was so busy handling the press that he didn't even learn about the fire until the following day.  That's how chaotic things were.     Disney was a shrewd and clever businessman, so he thought, I am opening this park. Let's make this into a big live television event.  He partnered with ABC, which had also helped provide nearly a third of the funding.  In return, Walt Disney would host a weekly TV show about what people could expect to see in Disneyland for the year before it opened.  So on opening day, Walt hosted a 90 minutes live TV special with Art Linkletter and future President Ronald Reagan.  90 million people tuned in to see the happiest place on Earth and that kind of ratings was no mean feat for the 50's.  The cameras showed all of the fun and excitement of Disneyland, completely obscuring all of the disasters and unhappiness that was actually happening.  But if you think the live broadcast would go off without a hitch, you may have pattern-recognition problems.  It was riddled with technical difficulties.  Parkgoers kept tripping over camera cables that snaked all over the park.  They were on-air flubs, mics that didn't work, people who forgot their mic *did work, and unexpected moments caught on camera, such as co host Bob Cummings caught making out with one of the dancers.  “This is not so much a show as is a special event,” Art Linkletter said during the broadcast.  “The rehearsal went about the way you'd expect a rehearsal to go if you were covering three volcanoes, all erupting at the same time and you didn't expect any of them. So from time to time, if I say we take you now by camera to the snapping crocodiles in adventure land and instead somebody pushes the wrong button and we catch Irene done adjusting her bustle on the Mark Twain. Don't be too surprised.”  And that's…. The train system is essential for the airport to function at its full capacity since it provides the only passenger access to Concourses B and C. In rare instances of the train system being out of service, shuttle buses have been used. While the system is highly reliable, one major system failure took place on April 26, 1998. A routing cable in the train tunnel was damaged by a loose wheel on one of the trains, cutting the entire system's power. The system was out of service for about seven hours. United Airlines, DIA's largest airline (who operates a large hub out of Concourse B), reported that about 30 percent of their flights and about 5,000 passengers were affected by the failure.     Sources: find sources for Disney https://libertystreeteconomics.newyorkfed.org/2013/11/historical-echoes-what-color-is-my-day-of-the-week/ https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://www.history.com/news/dust-bowl-migrants-california https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnEErB6sPRY https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1925%E2%80%9326_Victorian_bushfire_season https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Sunday_bushfires https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/black-sunday-1938-hundreds-washed-out-to-sea-on-bondi-beach-as-freak-waves-kill-five-injure-dozens/news-story/2f584af7365abc298d039d42e5f2ddf1 http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/159183/Bondis_Black_Sunday,_1938_rev.pdf https://bondisurfclub.com/the-club/history/black-sunday/ https://web.archive.org/web/20110927091319/http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0005/19553/Black_Sunday.pdf https://www.history.com/news/remembering-black-sunday https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/1000-mile-long-storm-showed-horror-life-dust-bowl-180962847/ https://alchetron.com/Denver-International-Airport-Automated-Guideway-Transit-System  

NotBasicBlonde Podcast
The Restart Roadmap - Rewire and Reset Your Career - Meet Jason Tartick

NotBasicBlonde Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2022 37:08


In this episode, my guest Jason Tartick shares clear action steps to help you define and achieve your vision of financial, professional, and emotional success. We are also discussing NFTs, investments, and what's the best way to invest, and his experience on Bachelorette. Guest Jason Tartick @jason_tartickis an entrepreneur, investor, speaker and the host of Apple's Top Charting Business Podcast “Trading Secrets”. After 10 years of working in Corporate Banking he took a detour into reality television to be a contestant on Season 14 of ABC's, The Bachelorette. Since then he has made several appearances on The ABC Network: Good Morning America, The Bachelor Season 23, Celebrity Family Feud, Listen to Your Heart, Live with Kelly & Ryan, The Bachelorette: Greatest Seasons Ever, Dancing with The Stars, and The Bachelorette Season 17. His business endeavors - coupled with his reality tv time has lead to a 1,200,000+ social media following. In addition he has landed co-hosting opportunities on Live from E!, Yahoo Finance & E! Daily Pop. He has been featured on The Today Show, The Ellen Tube, Fox News, CNN, People TV, Entertainment Tonight, E! News & The Ryan Seacrest Show. He and his fiancé Kaitlyn Bristowe, both starred in Brett Kissel's Music Video “Drink about Me” which received a Juno nomination. He's even been part of a WWE Match and was Formally Announced as the CO-Champion of the 24/7 WWE Belt. Prior to stepping into reality tv, Jason worked as a corporate banker for nearly ten years, earned his MBA in Accounting & Finance, and executed over $150,000,000 in lending transactions to mid market sized companies across the country. When the worlds of his Corporate Banking & Reality TV collided, Jason hung up the suit days to pursue his naturally charged entrepreneurial spirit. Since doing so he has become an investor in Evoke Foods & The Fintron Invest App. He has foun