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ESV: Daily Office Lectionary
January 21: Psalm 31; Psalm 35; Genesis 11:27–12:8; Hebrews 7:1–17; John 4:16–26

ESV: Daily Office Lectionary

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 12:17


2 Epiphany First Psalm: Psalm 31 Psalm 31 (Listen) Into Your Hand I Commit My Spirit To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David. 31   In you, O LORD, do I take refuge;    let me never be put to shame;    in your righteousness deliver me!2   Incline your ear to me;    rescue me speedily!  Be a rock of refuge for me,    a strong fortress to save me! 3   For you are my rock and my fortress;    and for your name's sake you lead me and guide me;4   you take me out of the net they have hidden for me,    for you are my refuge.5   Into your hand I commit my spirit;    you have redeemed me, O LORD, faithful God. 6   I hate1 those who pay regard to worthless idols,    but I trust in the LORD.7   I will rejoice and be glad in your steadfast love,    because you have seen my affliction;    you have known the distress of my soul,8   and you have not delivered me into the hand of the enemy;    you have set my feet in a broad place. 9   Be gracious to me, O LORD, for I am in distress;    my eye is wasted from grief;    my soul and my body also.10   For my life is spent with sorrow,    and my years with sighing;  my strength fails because of my iniquity,    and my bones waste away. 11   Because of all my adversaries I have become a reproach,    especially to my neighbors,  and an object of dread to my acquaintances;    those who see me in the street flee from me.12   I have been forgotten like one who is dead;    I have become like a broken vessel.13   For I hear the whispering of many—    terror on every side!—  as they scheme together against me,    as they plot to take my life. 14   But I trust in you, O LORD;    I say, “You are my God.”15   My times are in your hand;    rescue me from the hand of my enemies and from my persecutors!16   Make your face shine on your servant;    save me in your steadfast love!17   O LORD, let me not be put to shame,    for I call upon you;  let the wicked be put to shame;    let them go silently to Sheol.18   Let the lying lips be mute,    which speak insolently against the righteous    in pride and contempt. 19   Oh, how abundant is your goodness,    which you have stored up for those who fear you  and worked for those who take refuge in you,    in the sight of the children of mankind!20   In the cover of your presence you hide them    from the plots of men;  you store them in your shelter    from the strife of tongues. 21   Blessed be the LORD,    for he has wondrously shown his steadfast love to me    when I was in a besieged city.22   I had said in my alarm,2    “I am cut off from your sight.”  But you heard the voice of my pleas for mercy    when I cried to you for help. 23   Love the LORD, all you his saints!    The LORD preserves the faithful    but abundantly repays the one who acts in pride.24   Be strong, and let your heart take courage,    all you who wait for the LORD! Footnotes [1] 31:6 Masoretic Text; one Hebrew manuscript, Septuagint, Syriac, Jerome You hate [2] 31:22 Or in my haste (ESV) Second Psalm: Psalm 35 Psalm 35 (Listen) Great Is the Lord Of David. 35   Contend, O LORD, with those who contend with me;    fight against those who fight against me!2   Take hold of shield and buckler    and rise for my help!3   Draw the spear and javelin1    against my pursuers!  Say to my soul,    “I am your salvation!” 4   Let them be put to shame and dishonor    who seek after my life!  Let them be turned back and disappointed    who devise evil against me!5   Let them be like chaff before the wind,    with the angel of the LORD driving them away!6   Let their way be dark and slippery,    with the angel of the LORD pursuing them! 7   For without cause they hid their net for me;    without cause they dug a pit for my life.28   Let destruction come upon him when he does not know it!  And let the net that he hid ensnare him;    let him fall into it—to his destruction! 9   Then my soul will rejoice in the LORD,    exulting in his salvation.10   All my bones shall say,    “O LORD, who is like you,  delivering the poor    from him who is too strong for him,    the poor and needy from him who robs him?” 11   Malicious3 witnesses rise up;    they ask me of things that I do not know.12   They repay me evil for good;    my soul is bereft.413   But I, when they were sick—    I wore sackcloth;    I afflicted myself with fasting;  I prayed with head bowed5 on my chest.14     I went about as though I grieved for my friend or my brother;  as one who laments his mother,    I bowed down in mourning. 15   But at my stumbling they rejoiced and gathered;    they gathered together against me;  wretches whom I did not know    tore at me without ceasing;16   like profane mockers at a feast,6    they gnash at me with their teeth. 17   How long, O Lord, will you look on?    Rescue me from their destruction,    my precious life from the lions!18   I will thank you in the great congregation;    in the mighty throng I will praise you. 19   Let not those rejoice over me    who are wrongfully my foes,  and let not those wink the eye    who hate me without cause.20   For they do not speak peace,    but against those who are quiet in the land    they devise words of deceit.21   They open wide their mouths against me;    they say, “Aha, Aha!    Our eyes have seen it!” 22   You have seen, O LORD; be not silent!    O Lord, be not far from me!23   Awake and rouse yourself for my vindication,    for my cause, my God and my Lord!24   Vindicate me, O LORD, my God,    according to your righteousness,    and let them not rejoice over me!25   Let them not say in their hearts,    “Aha, our heart's desire!”  Let them not say, “We have swallowed him up.” 26   Let them be put to shame and disappointed altogether    who rejoice at my calamity!  Let them be clothed with shame and dishonor    who magnify themselves against me! 27   Let those who delight in my righteousness    shout for joy and be glad    and say evermore,  “Great is the LORD,    who delights in the welfare of his servant!”28   Then my tongue shall tell of your righteousness    and of your praise all the day long. Footnotes [1] 35:3 Or and close the way [2] 35:7 The word pit is transposed from the preceding line; Hebrew For without cause they hid the pit of their net for me; without cause they dug for my life [3] 35:11 Or Violent [4] 35:12 Hebrew it is bereavement to my soul [5] 35:13 Or my prayer shall turn back [6] 35:16 The meaning of the Hebrew phrase is uncertain (ESV) Old Testament: Genesis 11:27–12:8 Genesis 11:27–12:8 (Listen) Terah's Descendants 27 Now these are the generations of Terah. Terah fathered Abram, Nahor, and Haran; and Haran fathered Lot. 28 Haran died in the presence of his father Terah in the land of his kindred, in Ur of the Chaldeans. 29 And Abram and Nahor took wives. The name of Abram's wife was Sarai, and the name of Nahor's wife, Milcah, the daughter of Haran the father of Milcah and Iscah. 30 Now Sarai was barren; she had no child. 31 Terah took Abram his son and Lot the son of Haran, his grandson, and Sarai his daughter-in-law, his son Abram's wife, and they went forth together from Ur of the Chaldeans to go into the land of Canaan, but when they came to Haran, they settled there. 32 The days of Terah were 205 years, and Terah died in Haran. The Call of Abram 12 Now the LORD said1 to Abram, “Go from your country2 and your kindred and your father's house to the land that I will show you. 2 And I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you and make your name great, so that you will be a blessing. 3 I will bless those who bless you, and him who dishonors you I will curse, and in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.”3 4 So Abram went, as the LORD had told him, and Lot went with him. Abram was seventy-five years old when he departed from Haran. 5 And Abram took Sarai his wife, and Lot his brother's son, and all their possessions that they had gathered, and the people that they had acquired in Haran, and they set out to go to the land of Canaan. When they came to the land of Canaan, 6 Abram passed through the land to the place at Shechem, to the oak4 of Moreh. At that time the Canaanites were in the land. 7 Then the LORD appeared to Abram and said, “To your offspring I will give this land.” So he built there an altar to the LORD, who had appeared to him. 8 From there he moved to the hill country on the east of Bethel and pitched his tent, with Bethel on the west and Ai on the east. And there he built an altar to the LORD and called upon the name of the LORD. Footnotes [1] 12:1 Or had said [2] 12:1 Or land [3] 12:3 Or by you all the families of the earth shall bless themselves [4] 12:6 Or terebinth (ESV) New Testament: Hebrews 7:1–17 Hebrews 7:1–17 (Listen) The Priestly Order of Melchizedek 7 For this Melchizedek, king of Salem, priest of the Most High God, met Abraham returning from the slaughter of the kings and blessed him, 2 and to him Abraham apportioned a tenth part of everything. He is first, by translation of his name, king of righteousness, and then he is also king of Salem, that is, king of peace. 3 He is without father or mother or genealogy, having neither beginning of days nor end of life, but resembling the Son of God he continues a priest forever. 4 See how great this man was to whom Abraham the patriarch gave a tenth of the spoils! 5 And those descendants of Levi who receive the priestly office have a commandment in the law to take tithes from the people, that is, from their brothers,1 though these also are descended from Abraham. 6 But this man who does not have his descent from them received tithes from Abraham and blessed him who had the promises. 7 It is beyond dispute that the inferior is blessed by the superior. 8 In the one case tithes are received by mortal men, but in the other case, by one of whom it is testified that he lives. 9 One might even say that Levi himself, who receives tithes, paid tithes through Abraham, 10 for he was still in the loins of his ancestor when Melchizedek met him. Jesus Compared to Melchizedek 11 Now if perfection had been attainable through the Levitical priesthood (for under it the people received the law), what further need would there have been for another priest to arise after the order of Melchizedek, rather than one named after the order of Aaron? 12 For when there is a change in the priesthood, there is necessarily a change in the law as well. 13 For the one of whom these things are spoken belonged to another tribe, from which no one has ever served at the altar. 14 For it is evident that our Lord was descended from Judah, and in connection with that tribe Moses said nothing about priests. 15 This becomes even more evident when another priest arises in the likeness of Melchizedek, 16 who has become a priest, not on the basis of a legal requirement concerning bodily descent, but by the power of an indestructible life. 17 For it is witnessed of him,   “You are a priest forever,    after the order of Melchizedek.” Footnotes [1] 7:5 Or brothers and sisters (ESV) Gospel: John 4:16–26 John 4:16–26 (Listen) 16 Jesus said to her, “Go, call your husband, and come here.” 17 The woman answered him, “I have no husband.” Jesus said to her, “You are right in saying, ‘I have no husband'; 18 for you have had five husbands, and the one you now have is not your husband. What you have said is true.” 19 The woman said to him, “Sir, I perceive that you are a prophet. 20 Our fathers worshiped on this mountain, but you say that in Jerusalem is the place where people ought to worship.” 21 Jesus said to her, “Woman, believe me, the hour is coming when neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem will you worship the Father. 22 You worship what you do not know; we worship what we know, for salvation is from the Jews. 23 But the hour is coming, and is now here, when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for the Father is seeking such people to worship him. 24 God is spirit, and those who worship him must worship in spirit and truth.” 25 The woman said to him, “I know that Messiah is coming (he who is called Christ). When he comes, he will tell us all things.” 26 Jesus said to her, “I who speak to you am he.” (ESV)

Women Worldwide with Deirdre Breakenridge
Find Prosperity and Success This Year

Women Worldwide with Deirdre Breakenridge

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 26:03


It's a new year and for many of us, we're looking to make this year the most profitable and successful ever. But how do we do that? What do we do differently to create different results from years prior? Joining me to chat all about prosperity and success is Samantha Varner. Samantha focuses on helping other women find success and consistent profit in their businesses. She founded She Collective in 2018 to serve female entrepreneurs as a profit coach and money-making business creator.  It wasn't until she had to move three times, to three different countries, in quick succession that she realized the value of having and building her own business. Rather than having to obtain accreditation every single time she moved, her business would move and grow with her.  Listen as she shares why she's so passionate about helping women find and own their financial independence. It all starts with becoming financially aware and the first step to awareness is knowledge. Learn how to track your finances in a way that isn't burdensome and allows you to make sound financial decisions in your business and life.  Are you ready to find prosperity and success this year?  Show Notes: [01:45] Welcome back and get ready to learn about profitability from Samantha Varner.  [03:08] How did she get to the point of launching her business to help women in leadership?  [05:47] Did her background help her form her business and get it out there? [07:28] What blocks women from their prosperity?  [10:53] How do you become more financially aware?  [12:22] Learn the steps to creating consistent profitability.  [14:42] Has she had any AHA or UH OH moments that stuck with her?  [14:39] What inspires her to keep going and keep helping others? [20:38] Does she ever feel stressed or have to overcome challenges?  [23:17] Samantha shares what you can do to find your prosperity this year.  [24:40] Connect with Samantha.   Links and Resources: She Collective She Needs Grit Podcast Instagram Facebook YouTube FOLLOW ME AT: Website: https://www.deirdrebreakenridge.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/dbreakenridge/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DeirdreBreak... Twitter: https://twitter.com/dbreakenridge LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/deirdrebr… Email: deirdre@pureperformancecomm.com

Screaming in the Cloud
Find, Fix and Eliminate Cloud Vulnerabilities with Shir Tamari and Company

Screaming in the Cloud

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 33:53


About ShirShir Tamari is the Head of Research of Wiz, the cloud security company. He is an experienced security and technology researcher specializing in vulnerability research and practical hacking. In the past, he served as a consultant to a variety of security companies in the fields of research, development and product.About SagiSagi Tzadik is a security researcher in the Wiz Research Team. Sagi specializes in research and exploitation of web applications vulnerabilities, as well as network security and protocols. He is also a Game-Hacking and Reverse-Engineering enthusiast.About NirNir Ohfeld is a security researcher from Israel. Nir currently does cloud-related security research at Wiz. Nir specializes in the exploitation of web applications, application security and in finding vulnerabilities in complex high-level systems.Links: Wiz: https://www.wiz.io Cloud CVE Slack channel: https://cloud-cve-db.slack.com/join/shared_invite/zt-y38smqmo-V~d4hEr_stQErVCNx1OkMA Wiz Blog: https://wiz.io/blog Twitter: https://twitter.com/wiz_io TranscriptAnnouncer: Hello, and welcome to Screaming in the Cloud with your host, Chief Cloud Economist at The Duckbill Group, Corey Quinn. This weekly show features conversations with people doing interesting work in the world of cloud, thoughtful commentary on the state of the technical world, and ridiculous titles for which Corey refuses to apologize. This is Screaming in the Cloud.Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Redis, the company behind the incredibly popular open source database that is not the bind DNS server. If you're tired of managing open source Redis on your own, or you're using one of the vanilla cloud caching services, these folks have you covered with the go to manage Redis service for global caching and primary database capabilities; Redis Enterprise. To learn more and deploy not only a cache but a single operational data platform for one Redis experience, visit redis.com/hero. Thats r-e-d-i-s.com/hero. And my thanks to my friends at Redis for sponsoring my ridiculous non-sense.  Corey: This episode is sponsored in part by our friends at Rising Cloud, which I hadn't heard of before, but they're doing something vaguely interesting here. They are using AI, which is usually where my eyes glaze over and I lose attention, but they're using it to help developers be more efficient by reducing repetitive tasks. So, the idea being that you can run stateless things without having to worry about scaling, placement, et cetera, and the rest. They claim significant cost savings, and they're able to wind up taking what you're running as it is in AWS with no changes, and run it inside of their data centers that span multiple regions. I'm somewhat skeptical, but their customers seem to really like them, so that's one of those areas where I really have a hard time being too snarky about it because when you solve a customer's problem and they get out there in public and say, “We're solving a problem,” it's very hard to snark about that. Multus Medical, Construx.ai and Stax have seen significant results by using them. And it's worth exploring. So, if you're looking for a smarter, faster, cheaper alternative to EC2, Lambda, or batch, consider checking them out. Visit risingcloud.com/benefits. That's risingcloud.com/benefits, and be sure to tell them that I said you because watching people wince when you mention my name is one of the guilty pleasures of listening to this podcast.Corey: Welcome to Screaming in the Cloud, I'm Corey Quinn. One of the joyful parts of working with cloud computing is that you get to put a whole lot of things you don't want to deal with onto the shoulders of the cloud provider you're doing business with—or cloud providers as the case may be, if you fallen down the multi-cloud well. One of those things is often significant aspects of security. And that's great, right, until it isn't. Today, I'm joined by not one guest, but rather three coming to us from Wiz, which I originally started off believing was, oh, it's a small cybersecurity research group. But they're far more than that. Thank you for joining me, and could you please introduce yourself?Shir: Yes, thank you, Corey. My name is Shir, Shir Tamari. I lead the security research team at Wiz. I working in the company for the past year. I'm working with these two nice teammates.Nir: Hi, my name is Nir Ohfield,. I'm a security researcher at the Wiz research team. I've also been working for the Wiz research team for the last year. And yeah.Sagi: I'm Sagi, Sagi Tzadik. I also work for the Wiz research team for the last six months.Corey: I want to thank you for joining me. You folks really burst onto the scene earlier this year, when I suddenly started seeing your name come up an awful lot. And it brought me back to my childhood where there was an electronics store called Nobody Beats the Wiz. It was more or less a version of Fry's on a different coast, and they went out of business and oh, good. We're going back in time. And suddenly it felt like I was going back in time in a different light because you had a number of high profile vulnerabilities that you had discovered, specifically in the realm of Microsoft Azure. The two that leap to mind the most readily for me are ChaosDB and the OMIGOD exploits. There was a third as well, but why don't you tell me, in your own words, what it is that you discovered and how that played out?Shir: We, sort of, found the vulnerabilities in Microsoft Azure. We did report multiple vulnerabilities also in GCP, and AWS. We had multiple vulnerabilities in AWS [unintelligible 00:02:42] cross-account. It was a cross-account access to other tenants; it just was much less severe than the ChaosDB vulnerability that we will speak on more later. And a both we've present in Blackhat in Vegas in [unintelligible 00:02:56]. So, we do a lot of research. You mentioned that we have a third one. Which one did you refer to?Corey: That's a good question because you had the I want to say it was called as Azurescape, and you're doing a fantastic job with branding a number of your different vulnerabilities, but there's also, once you started reporting this, a lot of other research started coming out as well from other folks. And I confess, a lot of it sort of flowed together and been very hard to disambiguate, is this a systemic problem; is this, effectively, a whole bunch of people piling on now that their attention is being drawn somewhere; or something else? Because you've come out with an awful lot of research in a short period of time.Shir: Yeah, we had a lot of good research in the past year. It's a [unintelligible 00:03:36] mention Azurecape was actually found by a very good researcher in Palo Also. And… do you remember his name?Sagi: No, I can't recall his name is.Corey: Yeah, they came out of unit 42 as I recall, their cybersecurity division. Every tech company out there seems to have some sort of security research division these days. What I think is, sort of, interesting is that to my understanding, you were founded, first and foremost, as a security company. You're not doing this as an ancillary to selling something else like a firewall, or, effectively, you're an ad comp—an ad tech company like Google, we you're launching Project Zero. You are first and foremost aimed at this type of problem.Shir: Yes. Wiz is not just a small research company. It's actually pretty big company with over 200 employees. And the purpose of this product is a cloud security suite that provides [unintelligible 00:04:26] scanning capabilities in order to find risks in cloud environments. And the research team is a very small group. We are [unintelligible 00:04:35] researchers.We have multiple responsibilities. Our first responsibility is to find risks in cloud environments: It could be misconfigurations, it could be vulnerabilities in libraries, in software, and we add those findings and the patterns we discover to the product in order to protect our customers, and to allow them for new risks. Our second responsibility is also to do a community research where we research everyone vulnerabilities in public products and cloud providers, and we share our findings with the cloud providers, then also with the community to make the cloud more secure.Corey: I can't shake the feeling that if there weren't folks doing this sort of research and shining a light on what it is that the cloud providers are doing, if they were to discover these things at all, they would very quietly, effectively, fix it in the background and never breathe a word of it in public. I like the approach that you're taking as far as dragging it, kicking and screaming, into the daylight, but I also have to imagine that probably doesn't win you a whole lot of friends at the company that you're focusing on at any given point in time. Because whenever you talk to a company about a security issue, it seems like the first thing they're concerned about is, “Okay, how do we wind up spinning this or making sure that we minimize the reputational damage?” And then there's a secondary reaction of, “Oh, and how do we protect our customers? But mostly, how do we avoid looking bad as a result?” And I feel like that's an artifact of corporate culture these days. But it feels like the relationship has got to be somewhat interesting to navigate from your perspective.Shir: So, once we found a vulnerability and we discuss it with the vendor, okay, first, I will mention that most cloud providers have a bug bounty program where they encourage researchers to find vulnerabilities and to discover new security threats. And all of them, as a public disclosure, [unintelligible 00:06:29] program will researchers are welcome and get safe harbor, you know, where the disclosure vulnerabilities. And I think it's, like, common interest, both for customers, but for researchers, and the cloud providers to know about those vulnerabilities, to mitigate it down. And we do believe that sometimes cloud providors does resolve and mitigate vulnerabilities behind the scenes, and we know—we don't know for sure, but—I don't know about everything, but just by the vulnerabilities that we find, we assume that there is much more of them that we never heard about. And this is something that we believe needs to be changed in the industry.Cloud providers should be more transparent, they should show more information about the result vulnerabilities. Definitely when a customer data was accessible, or where it was at risk, or at possible risk. And this is actually—it's something that we actually trying to change in the industry. We have a community and, like, innovative community. It's like an initiative that we try to collect, we opened a Slack channel called the Cloud CVE, and we try to invite as much people as we can that concern about cloud's vulnerabilities, in order to make a change in the industry, and to assist cloud providers, or to convince cloud providers to be more transparent, to enumerate cloud vulnerabilities so they have an identifier just, like cloud CVE, like a CVE, and to make the cloud more protected and more transparent customers.Corey: The thing that really took me aback by so much of what you found is that we've become relatively accustomed to a few patterns over the past 15 to 20 years. For example, we're used to, “Oh, this piece of software you run on your desktop has a horrible flaw. Great.” Or this thing you run in your data center, same story; patch, patch, patch, patch patch. That's great.But there was always the sense that these were the sorts of things that were sort of normal, but the cloud providers were on top of things, where they were effectively living up to their side of the shared responsibility bargain. And that whenever you wound up getting breached, for whatever reason—like in the AWS world, where oh, you wound up losing a bunch of customer data because you had an open S3 bucket? Well, yeah, that's not really something you can hang super effectively around the neck of the cloud provider, given that you're the one that misconfigured that. But what was so striking about what you found with both of the vulnerabilities that we're talking about today, the customer could have done everything absolutely correctly from the beginning and still had their data exposed. And that feels like it's something relatively new in the world of cloud service providers.Is this something that's been going on for a while and we're just now shining a light on it? Have I just missed a bunch of interesting news stories where the clouds have—“Oh, yeah, by the way, people, we periodically have to go in and drag people out of our cloud control plane because oops-a-doozy, someone got in there again with the squirrels,” or is this something that is new?Shir: So, we do see an history other cases where probability [unintelligible 00:09:31] has disclosed vulnerabilities in the cloud infrastructure itself. There was only few, and usually, it was—the research was conducted by independent researchers. And I don't think it had such an impact, like ChaosDB, which allowed [cross-system 00:09:51] access to databases of other customers, which was a huge case. And so if it wasn't a big story, so most people will not hear about it. And also, independent researchers usually don't have the back that we have here in Wiz.We have a funding, we have the marketing division that help us to get coverage with reporters, who make sure to make—if it's a big story, we make sure that other people will hear about it. And I believe that in most bug bounty programs where independent researchers find vulnerabilities, usually they more care about the bounty than the aftereffect of stopping the vulnerability, sharing it with the community. Usually also, independent [unintelligible 00:10:32] usually share the findings with the research community. And the research community is relatively small to the IT community. So, it is new, but it's not that new.There was some events back in history, [unintelligible 00:10:46] similar vulnerabilities. So, I think that one of the points here is that everyone makes a mistake. You can find bugs which affected mostly, as you mentioned previously, this software that you installed on your desktop has bugs and you need to patch it, but in the case of cloud providers, when they make mistakes, when they introduce bugs to the service, it affects all of their customers. And this is something that we should think about. So, mistakes that are being made by cloud providers have a lot of impact regarding their customers.Corey: Yeah. It's not a story of you misconfigured, your company's SAN, so you're the one that was responsible for a data breach. It's suddenly, you're misconfiguring everyone's SAN simultaneously. It's the sheer scale and scope of what it is that they've done. And—Shir: Yeah, exactly.Corey: —I'm definitely on board with that. But the stuff I've seen in the past, from cloud providers—AWS, primarily, since that is admittedly where I tend to focus most of my time and energy—has been privilege escalation style stuff, where, okay, if you assign some users at your company—or wherever—access to this managed IAM policy, well, they'll have suddenly have access to things that go beyond the scope of that. And that's not good, let's be very clear on that, but it is a bit different between that and oh, by the way, suddenly, someone in another company that has no relationship established with you at all can suddenly rummage through your data that you're storing in Cosmos DB, their managed database offering. That's the thing to me that I think was the big head-turning aspect of this, not just for me, but for a number of folks I've spoken to, in financial services, in government, in a bunch of environments where data privacy is not optional in the same way that it is when, you know, you're running a social media for pets app.Nir: [laugh]. Yeah, but the thing is, that until the publication of ChaosDB, no one ever heard about the [unintelligible 00:12:40] data tampering in any cloud providers. Meaning maybe in six months, you can see a similar vulnerabilities in other cloud providers that maybe other security research groups find. So yeah, so Azure was maybe the first, but we don't think they will be the last.Shir: Yes. And also, when we do the community research, it is very important to us to take big targets. We enjoy the research. One day, the research will be challenging and we want to do something that it was new and great, so we always put a very big targets. To actually find vulnerability in the infrastructure of the cloud provider, it was very challenging for us.When didn't came ChaosDB by that; we actually found it by mistake. But now we think actively that this is our next goal is to find vulnerabilities in the infrastructure and not just vulnerabilities that affect only the—vulnerabilities within the account itself, like [unintelligible 00:13:32] or bad scoped policies that affects only one account.Corey: That seems to be the transformative angle that you don't see nearly as much in existing studies around vulnerabilities in this space. It's always the, “Oh, no. We could have gotten breached by those people across the hallway from us in our company,” as opposed to folks on the other side of the planet. And that is, I guess, sort of the scary thing. What has also been interesting to me, and you obviously have more experience with this than I do, but I have a hard time envisioning that, for example, AWS, having a vulnerability like this and not immediately swinging into disaster firefighting mode, sending their security execs on a six month speaking tour to explain what happened, how it got there, all of the steps that they're taking to remediate this, but Azure published a blog post explaining this in relatively minor detail: Here are the mitigations you need to take, and as far as I can tell, then they sort of washed their hands of the whole thing and have enthusiastically begun saying absolutely nothing since.And that I have learned is sort of fairly typical for Microsoft, and has been for a while, where they just don't talk about these things when it arises. Does that match your experience? Is this something that you find that is common when a large company winds up being, effectively, embarrassed about their security architecture, or is this something that is unique to Microsoft tends to approach these things?Shir: I would say in general, we really like the Microsoft MSRC team. The group in Microsoft that's responsible for handling vulnerabilities, and I think it's like the security division inside Microsoft, MSRC. So, we have a really good relationship and we had really good time working with them. They're real professionals, they take our findings very seriously. I can tell that in the ChaosDB incident, they didn't plan to publish a blog post, and they did that after the story got a lot of attention.So, I'm looking at a PR team, and I have no idea out there decide stuff and what is their strategy, but as I mentioned earlier, we believe that there is much more cloud vulnerabilities that we never heard of, and it should change; they should publish more.Nir: It's also worth mentioning that Microsoft acted really quick on this vulnerability and took it very seriously. They issued the fix in less than 48 hours. They were very transparent in the entire procedure, and we had multiple teams meeting with them. The entire experience was pretty positive with each of the vulnerability we've ever reported to Microsoft.Sagi: So, it's really nice working with the guys that are responsible for security, but regarding PR, I agree that they should have posted more information regarding this incident.Corey: The thing that I found interesting about this, and I've seen aspects of it before, but never this strongly is, I was watching for, I guess, what I would call just general shittiness, for lack of a better term, from the other providers doing a happy dance of, “Aha, we're better than you are,” and I saw none of that. Because when I started talking to people in some depth at this at other companies, the immediate response—not just AWS, to be clear—has been no, no, you have to understand, this is not good for anyone because this effectively winds up giving fuel to the slow-burning fire of folks who are pulling the, “See, I told you the cloud wasn't secure.” And now the enterprise groundhog sees that shadow and we get six more years of building data centers instead of going to the cloud. So, there's no one in the cloud space who's happy with this kind of revelation and this type of vulnerability. My question for you is given that you are security researchers, which means you are generally cynical and pessimistic about almost everything technological, if you're like most of the folks in that space that I've spent time with, is going with cloud the wrong answer? Should people be building their own data centers out? Should they continue to be going on this full cloud direction? I mean, what can they do if everything's on fire and terrible all the time?Shir: So, I think that there is a trade-off when you embrace the cloud. On one hand, you get the fastest deployment times, and a good scalability regarding your infrastructure, but on the other end, when there is a security vulnerability in the cloud provider, you are immediately affected. But it is worth mentioning that the security teams or the cloud providers are doing extremely good job. Most likely, they are going to patch the vulnerability faster than it would have been patched in on-premise environment. And it's good that you have them working for you.And once the vulnerability is mitigated—depends on the vulnerability but in the case of ChaosDB—when the vulnerability was mitigated on Microsoft's end, and it was mitigated completely. No one else could have exploited after the mitigated it once. Yes, it's also good to mention that the cloud provides organization and companies a lot of security features, [unintelligible 00:18:34] I want to say security features, I would say, it provides a lot of tooling that helps security. The option to have one interface, like one API to control all of my devices, to get visibility to all of my servers, to enforce policies very easily, it's much more secure than on-premise environments, where there is usually a big mess, a lot of vendors.Because the power was in the on-prem, the power was on the user, so the user had a lot of options. Usually used many types of software, many types of hardware, it's really hard to mitigate the software vulnerability in on-prem environments. It's really helped to get the visibility. And the cloud provides a lot of security, like, a good aspects, and in my opinion, moving to the cloud for most organization would be a more secure choice than remain on-premise, unless you have a very, very small on-prem environment.Corey: This episode is sponsored by our friends at Oracle HeatWave is a new high-performance accelerator for the Oracle MySQL Database Service. Although I insist on calling it “my squirrel.” While MySQL has long been the worlds most popular open source database, shifting from transacting to analytics required way too much overhead and, ya know, work. With HeatWave you can run your OLTP and OLAP, don't ask me to ever say those acronyms again, workloads directly from your MySQL database and eliminate the time consuming data movement and integration work, while also performing 1100X faster than Amazon Aurora, and 2.5X faster than Amazon Redshift, at a third of the cost. My thanks again to Oracle Cloud for sponsoring this ridiculous nonsense.Corey: The challenge I keep running into is that—and this is sort of probably the worst of all possible reasons to go with cloud, but let's face it, when us-east-1 recently took an outage and basically broke a decent swath of the internet, a lot of companies were impacted, but they didn't see their names in the headlines; it was all about Amazon's outage. There's a certain value when a cloud provider takes an outage or a security breach, that the headlines screaming about it are about the provider, not about you and your company as a customer of that provider. Is that something that you're seeing manifest across the industry? Is that an unhealthy way to think about it? Because it feels almost like it's cheating in a way. It's, “Yeah, we had a security problem, but so did the entire internet, so it's okay.”Nir: So, I think that if there would be evidence that these kind of vulnerabilities were exploited while disclosure, then you wouldn't see headlines of companies, shouting in the headlines. But in the case of the us reporting the vulnerabilities prior to anyone exploiting them, results in nowhere a company showing up in the headlines. I think it's a slightly different situation than an outage.Shir: Yeah, but also, when one big provider have an outage or a breach, so usually, the customers will think it's out of my responsibility. I mean, it's bad; my data has been leaked, but what can I do? I think it's very easy for most people to forgive companies [unintelligible 00:21:11]. I mean, you know what, it's just not my area. So, maybe I'm not answer that into that. [laugh].Corey: No, no, it's very fair. The challenge I have, as a customer of all of these providers, to be honest, is that a lot of the ways that the breach investigations are worded of, “We have seen no evidence that this has been exploited.” Okay, that simultaneously covers the two very different use cases of, “We have pored through our exhaustive audit logs and validated that no one has done this particular thing in this particular way,” but it also covers the use case, “Of, hey, we learned we should probably be logging things, but we have no evidence that anything was exploited.” Having worked with these providers at scale, my gut impression is that they do in fact, have fairly detailed logs of who's doing what and where. Would you agree with that assessment, or do you find that you tend to encounter logging and analysis gaps as you find these exploits?Shir: We don't really know. Usually when—I mean, ChaosDB scenario, we got access to a Jupyter Notebook. And from the Jupyter Notebook, we continued to another internal services. And we—nobody stopped us. Nobody—we expected an email, like—Corey: “Whatcha doing over there, buddy?”Shir: Yeah. “Please stop doing that, and we're investigating you.” And we didn't get any. And also, we don't really know if they monitor it or not. I can tell from my technical background that logging so many environments, it's hard.And when you do decide to log all these events, you need to decide what to log. For example, if I have a database, a managed database, do I log all the queries that customers run? It's too much. If I have an HTTP application—a managed HTTP application—do I save all the access logs, like all the requests? And if so, what will be the retention time? For how long?We believe that it's very challenging on the cloud provider side, but it just an assumption. And doing the discussion with Microsoft, the didn't disclose any, like, scenarios they had with logging. They do mention that they're [unintelligible 00:23:26] viewing the logs and searching to see if someone exploited this vulnerability before we disclosed it. Maybe someone discovered before we did. But they told us they didn't find anything.Corey: One last area I'd love to discuss with you before we call it an episode is that it's easy to view Wiz through the lens of, “Oh, we just go out and find vulnerabilities here and there, and we make companies feel embarrassed—rightfully so—for the things that they do.” But a little digging shows that you've been around for a little over a year as a publicly known entity, and during that time, you've raised $600 million in funding, which is basically like what in the world is your pitch deck where you show up to investors and your slides are just, like, copies of their emails, and you read them to them?[laugh]I mean, on some level, it seems like that is a… as-, astounding amount of money to raise in a short period of time. But I've also done a little bit of digging, and to be clear, I do not believe that you have an extortion-based business model, which is a good thing. You're building something very interesting that does in-depth analysis of cloud workloads, and I think it's got an awful lot of promise. How does the vulnerability research that you do tie into that larger platform, other than, let's be honest, some spectacularly effective marketing.Sagi: Specifically in the ChaosDB vulnerability, we were actually not looking for a vulnerability in the cloud service providers. We were originally looking for common misconfigurations that our customers can make when they set up their Cosmos DB accounts, so that our product will be able to alert our customers regarding such misconfigurations. And then we went to the Azure portal and started to enable all of the features that Cosmos DB has to offer, and when we enabled enough features, we noticed some feature that could be vulnerable, and we started digging into it. And we ended up finding ChaosDB.But our original work was to try and find misconfigurations that our customers can make in order to protect them and not to find a vulnerability in the [CSP 00:25:31]. This was just, like, a byproduct of this research.Shir: Yes. There is, as I mentioned earlier, our main responsibility is to add a little security rist content to the product, to help customers to find new security risks in their environment. As you mentioned, like, the escalation possibilities within cloud accounts, and bad scoped policies, and many other security risks that are in the cloud area. And also, we are a very small team inside a big company, so most of the company, they are doing heavy [unintelligible 00:26:06] and talk with customers, they understand the risks, they understand the market, what the needs for tomorrow, and maybe we are well known for our vulnerabilities, but it just a very small part of the company.Corey: On some level, it says wonderful things about your product, and also terrifying things from different perspectives of, “Oh, yeah, we found one of the worst cloud breaches in years by accident,” as opposed to actively going in trying to find the thing that has basically put you on the global map of awareness around these things. Because there a lot of security companies out there doing different things. In fact, go to RSA, and you'll see basically 12 companies that just repeated over and over and over with different names and different brandings, and they're all selling some kind of firewall. This is something actively different because everyone can tell beautiful pictures with slides and whatnot, and the corporate buzzwords. You're one of those companies that actually did something meaningful, and it felt almost like a proof of concept. On some level, the fact that you weren't actively looking for it is kind of an amazing testament for the product itself.Shir: Yeah. We actually used the product in the beginning, in order to overview our own environment, and what is the most common services we use. In order—and we usually we mix this information with our product managers, know to understand what customers use and what products and services we need to research in order to bring value to the product.Sagi: Yeah, so the reason we chose to research Cosmos DB was that, we found that a lot of our Azure customers are using Cosmos DB on their production environments, and we wanted to add mitigations for common misconfigurations to our product in order to protect our customers.Nir: Yeah, the same goes with our other research, like OMIGOD, where we've seen that there is a excessive amount of [unintelligible 00:27:56] installations in an Azure environment, and it raised our [laugh] it raised our attention, and then found this vulnerability. It's mostly, like, popularity-guided research. [laugh].Shir: Yeah. And also [unintelligible 00:28:11] mention that maybe we find vulnerabilities by accident, but the service, we are doing vulnerability itself for the past ten years, and even more. So, we are very professional and this is what we do, and this is what we like to do. And we came skilled to the [crosstalk 00:28:25].Corey: It really is neat to see, just because every other security tool that I've looked at in recent memory tells you the same stuff. It's the same problem you see in the AWS billing space that I live in. Everyone says, “Oh, we can find these inactive instances that could be right-sized.” Great, because everyone's dealing with the same data. It's the security stuff is no different. “Hey, this S3 bucket is open.” Yes, it's a public web server. Please stop waking me up at two in the morning about it. It's there by design.But it goes back and forth with the same stuff just presented differently. This is one of the first truly novel things I've seen in ages. If nothing else, you convince me to kick the tires on it, and see what kind of horrifying things I can learn about my own environments with it.Shir: Yeah, you should. [laugh]. Let's poke [unintelligible 00:29:13].[laugh].Corey: I want to thank you so much for taking the time to speak with me today. If people want to learn more about the research you're up to and the things that you find interesting, where can they find you all?Shir: Most of our publication—I mean, all of our publications are under the Wiz, which is wiz.io/blog, and people can read all of our research. Just today we are announcing a new one, so feel free to go and read there. And they also feel free to approach us on Twitter, the service, we have a Twitter account. We are open for, like, messages. Just send us a message.Corey: And we will certainly put links to all of that in the [show notes 00:29:49]. Shir, Sagi, Nir, thank you so much for joining me today. I really appreciate your time.Shir: Thank you.Sagi: Thank you.Nir: Thank you much.Shir: It was very fun. Yeah.Corey: This has been Screaming in the Cloud. I'm Cloud Economist Corey Quinn and thank you for listening. If you've enjoyed this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice, whereas if you've hated this podcast, please leave a five-star review on your podcast platform of choice along with an angry insulting comment from someone else's account.Corey: If your AWS bill keeps rising and your blood pressure is doing the same, then you need The Duckbill Group. We help companies fix their AWS bill by making it smaller and less horrifying. The Duckbill Group works for you, not AWS. We tailor recommendations to your business and we get to the point. Visit duckbillgroup.com to get started.Announcer: This has been a HumblePod production. Stay humble.

Fuel for the Sole
19 | Sugar and performance nutrition

Fuel for the Sole

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 38:20


In this episode of Fuel for the Sole, we answer Jamie's question about sugar. It's pretty common for runners to worry about their sugar consumption, so we're here to set the record straight. We discuss separating daily vs. performance nutrition and dive into: ✔️ The difference between added and natural sugars ✔️ Should we (runners) follow AHA and FDA guidelines for sugar intake ✔️ Myths about high fructose corn syrup and alcohol ✔️ Whether you should opt for real or artificial sugar ✔️ A whole lot more! Want to be featured on the show? Share your questions via the Anchor App (just click the 'message' button) or email us at fuelforthesolepodcast@gmail.com to be featured. This show is sponsored by @InsideTracker! For a limited time, InsideTracker is offering our listeners 25% off their entire store. Visit InsideTracker.com/fuel. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/fuelforthesole/message

The Uncurated Life Podcast
Which COLOR Am I?! The Color Code Personality Test | 145

The Uncurated Life Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 12:56


I'm continuing my personality test journey (with a healthy amount of skepticism) with the Color Code Personality Test! DISCLAIMER Colorful words may be used. don't be alarmed. NEWSLETTER https://view.flodesk.com/pages/61525a85337f1c2aacf52f6d Etsy Shop is open! https://www.etsy.com/shop/CGBPrints FIND ME ON ALL THE THINGS Patreon - https://www.patreon.com/cindyguentertbaldo YouTube - https://youtube.com/c/CindyGuentertBaldo Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/llamaletters/ Discord - https://discord.gg/Rwpp7Ww Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/llamaletters/ Website - www.cindyguentertbaldo.com STUFF I MENTIONED Color Code Test - https://www.colorcode.com/ Inquiries - cindy@cindyguentertbaldo.com   TRANSCRIPTION Hello everybody. It is the uncurated life podcast. I'm Cindy Guentert-Baldo. And today we are continuing my series on personality tests, especially from my point of view, as somebody who's kind of cynical and skeptical about personality tests. Although the last one, which was the Myers-Briggs test, kind of shocked me a little bit.   But we're moving on to a fun one today. One that's been requested. It's the colors, personality test. Now I find a few different versions of this online, but decided to go with the one that looked the quote most accurate, which is the color code test, which whew are you personality test. So allegedly it identifies both what you do and why.   And it separates you into four colors and this is pulled directly from the website. Reds need to look good, technically be right, and be respected. They are strong leaders and love challenges. Blues need to have integrity and be appreciated. They are focused on quality and creating strong relationships.   Whites need to be accepted and treated with kindness. They are logical objective and tolerant of others. Yellows need to be noticed and have fun. They love life, social connection and being positive and spontaneous. So that's basically the information here. Um, I don't have a lot of background information.   Like I said, it's sort of all over the place, but it is something like much like a lot of the other personality tests. They have stuff on the website saying, well, you could use this to build a better business or to build a better team or whatever, but I basically just want to take it and find out what they have to say.   So I'm at the website, www.colorcode.com. And I'm heading right over to the tab that says personality test. So when you get there, you have two options. There's the basic analysis, which is a quick and free way to sample the color code personality or. You can do the full analysis, which is a completely customized result, which is designed to fully analyze your personality.   Now I'm going to pay for it because I, uh, science, I guess I've been paying for the more advanced versions of all of these. And I don't know if I'm wasting money or not, but I'm going to write it off on my taxes. So there you go. This should give me a good report as well as a lot of personnel development shit, which I've gotten from the other ones too.   I'm not really worried about that. So I'm going to start taking my test and I will report back as soon as I'm done. All right. I'm done with the test. It's actually a very quick test and the questions are all, there's a series of like, you pick a word and then you, there's some statements you pick and it's all having to do with how you were as a child.   So I think that in and of itself, that to me makes me wonder how accurate this can be, because it's based on your own memory of being a kid. And I'm almost 42. So that was a while ago. Right. But let's, let's go and let's look at my results and it's. Fucking in depth personality test report on me. So let's go first and foremost to my main color.   Cause it gives you a main color in this report and a secondary color. And my main color, which is overall it's 64% is red. And then my secondary color is blue at 24%. And then the other two white and yellow are eight and 3%. So very much a red with a secondary blue. So let's go and read what it says about me as a red.   It says, congratulations, Cindy, your core color of red means you have the driving core motive of power.   This, this is a red, you need to look good technically to those whose opinions matter, your intellectual prowess is often admired and emulated. You're a born leader. You seek act action and are highly productive. You can be highly critical of those who, uh, dissatisfy your expectations. I agree with a lot of that.   You need to be right. Yes. And this, I think goes back to when I was a kid, I would say one of my main characteristics and my sisters will agree with this. I was, I was pretty bossy, bossy and impatient. And I know that there is some level of like patriarchy when it comes to telling little girls that they're bossy, but like, I was bossy.   Like I, I still kind of am actually. Anyway, it says that reds need approval in a way that is different from the other colors, yellows want approval from everyone around them, but it only matters to reds when it comes from people who are important to you, people who you respect. So I don't necessarily need approval from people.   I don't give a shit about. Tracks with me, it also says is a red that I can lack or have struggles with intimacy, like building intimate relationships, which is entirely true for me. So who knows, maybe I am a red let's look at my secondary color. So it says here that I have a blue, secondary color. There are advantages and disadvantages to that.   The major advantage is that people with a strong secondary color can naturally work to develop the positive traits of that color. In your case, Cindy, you should pursue the development of the strengths of the blue secondary color as they will make you even more effective as a person. The disadvantage of possessing a blue secondary color is that it challenges the aspects of your red core.   You may send mixed signals, which also tracks. One moment you'll act red. The other you'll act blue. This behavior can confuse people and make it difficult for them to know how you will react to any given situation. In other words, you may appear to be more inconsistent than would appear as somebody without a strong secondary color.   As a core red with secondary blue, there will never be a dull moment in your life. You possess one of the most complex personalities of all the color combinations. You face an intense internal struggle and often give mixed messages to those. With whom you interact, you can. Someone for making a mistake one minute, then feel guilty and offered to treat him or her to lunch.   The next you move forcefully through life, creating action and impacting others as you go. But when you feel those impacts might've been negative, your secondary blue personality leaves, you feeling very deep, remorse and guilt. Oh my God. Okay. That makes me feel called out. There was a day, the other day where cat really wanted to make whipped cream with the heavy whipping cream that we had in the fridge, like in the.   And I was like, no, I'm gonna use this for dinner and Catholic, but mom, we can always get more. You're not making it tonight. And I'm like, yeah, I want it now. Don't and I got super mad and then realized how ridiculous I was being and apologized and let Kat make the whipped cream. But like everybody in the house was looking at me like Cindy, you're fucking like all over the place.   And apparently this agrees with that. Now there's another section here in the paid for version where it gives you red needs, red wants than blue needs and blue wants. And what it suggests is that I circle the top two or three that are the most critical to. So let's take a look for red needs to be right, to be respected, to hide insecurities tightly, and to look good intellectually.   I would say that if I'm being real honest with myself, the most important ones to me are to be right. The most on that list to be right. And maybe till it good intellectually, if I'm being real honest, uh, for red wants reds, want to receive selective approval to please yourself, to lead others and to experience challenging adventure.   I would say from that list, if I was going to pick two, I would say to receive selective approval and to lead others now for the blue needs, they are to be good, morally, to be appreciated, to be understood and to receive acceptance. And I would say easily looking at that list that my top two needs there would be to be good morally, and to be appreciated.   And then for blue wants to reveal insecurities to enjoy security, to be autonomous and to please others. And from that list, I can again, easily pick two, and that would be to enjoy security and to be autonomous, no, here is a. Situation that, um, where it's based on some of the stuff you picked off of the test.   And so it tells you your strengths and limitations. So my red strengths are I'm motivated, pragmatic, productive, proactive, decisive, assertive action oriented, determined a leader and focused. My blue strengths are that I'm quality oriented and deliberate. My white strengths are that I'm self-regulated and inventive.   And my yellow strength is that I'm a creative thinker. My red limitations are that I'm selfish tactless, always right. Bossy and demanding. My sisters would be like, yup. And my blue limitations or that I can be judgmental. Self-righteous a perfectionist worry prone, overly sensitive, low self-esteem and unrealistic expectations.   My white limitations can be that I'm can be an indirect communicator. And my yellow limitations are that I can be naive and obnoxious again, all of this fields, but these were all things I picked. So it's not like they wouldn't feel right to me. Now there's one little section here that I want to touch on before.   I end this and that is there's a section towards the end that tells you about development tasks to consider as. And then they've got them for work personal and love. And I'm going to look in on the personal, because that's kind of my focus for this next year is to help bring my personal life back into like focus in my entire life as a whole.   So I'm going to look at these ones and I'm going to see what I can take away from them. It says here, I need to start enjoying living in the most. Yes. Being more introspective in how you impact friends and family. That's something I've been working on for a long time. I'll be real with you. Inviting people who live life differently into your life.   That would be kind of hard for me, but yeah. Um, I need to stop making all the decisions about how your friends should live your bare life. That one I actually don't think I do, but it's mostly because I've been really kind of persona. Non existence in my friends lives in recent years, but I have done that before.   Uh, stop being so rigid about completing tasks on your days off Jesus. Yes. And stop getting mad at your family when they disrupt your focus. Aha. Yes. My kids will be like cheering in the background, um, and then continue juggling a variety of interests in your life, which you do so well. I appreciate you think that personality test, but I'm not really feeling that way right now.   Sharing your gifts of vision with the community and challenging the status quo. So, yeah, I'm down for that. I'm down to do some of those things. So what do I think about this test? Well, like I think that it's, I think that it's been fairly accurate, but I also don't know exactly how. How much insight it can give when there really was only probably about 50 questions total, and they all had to do with how you felt you were as a kid, which again, the further you are away from being a kid, it feels like the, the less you remember, but it was an interesting little thing.   And I guess it'll be really interesting when I get to the end of this series and I start comparing all of these results against each other. Well, anyway, it was a fun test take. I can imagine you want to get all this information, but it could be real interesting to look at by just doing the free version.   So I'll leave it linked in the show notes in case you want to take it and share your results with me over on Instagram, tag me at Lama letters and your stories. I'd also love any suggestions on personalities to take in the future personality tests. I've got a few of them on my list currently that I haven't done yet.   Um, Clifton strengths actually is the only one I have. At the moment. So I would love some more suggestions for personality type tests. They don't have to be scientific. They can be fucking bunk as shit. Maybe even a Buzzfeed test. I don't know. Let me know in the comments around the comments, this is a fucking podcast.   Let me know, uh, over on Instagram at Lama letters, or you can let me know, um, from my emails, whatever you want to do anyway, in the meantime, Thank my patrons. They make this episode possible. They make all my episodes possible and you can talk to them over at www.patreon.com/cindyguentertbaldo. In the meantime, my friends, I hope you have a fantastic rest of your week, and I cannot wait to talk to you next time.   Thanks and peace out.  

Parallax by Ankur Kalra
EP 61: The Year 2021 in Review with Dr Sukh Nijjer — Top Trials in Heart Failure and Cardiac Surgery

Parallax by Ankur Kalra

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 53:30


In the second part of Parallax's review of 2021, Dr Sukh Nijjer, Interventional Cardiologist from Imperial College London, and Dr Ankur Kalra discuss key advances in the field of heart failure and cardiac surgery. SGLT2 inhibitors are proving to be the blockbuster drug of this decade: Sukh summarises and compares the learnings from DAPA-HF, Emperor-Reduced, and Emperor-Preserved. Next, Sukh highlights the data from SOLOIST-WHF that showed sotagliflozin to have beneficial effects on CV outcomes among patients with type 2 diabetes and HF. Additionally, they discuss how findings on finerenone (FIGARO-DKD) will shape the field. Sukh talks about the semaglutide and the STEP studies, an injectable medication that further expends cardiologist knowledge beyond their speciality. Ankur and Sukh reflect on how the advancement of this field shaped their own practices. 2021 was a busy year for cardiac surgery trials: Sukh and Ankur review the most pertinent data from the AVATAR randomised study presented at AHA 2021. Sukh interprets the outcomes and asks Ankur about his clinical experiences. Finally, they review the investigator led LAAOS III study that showed patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing cardiac surgery, left atrial appendage occlusion was superior to no occlusion. What were the top practice informing heart failure trials of 2021? What does the latest data say on current cardiac surgery practices? How will these findings inform patient care? Questions and comments can be sent to “podcast@radciffe-group.com” and may be answered by Ankur in the next episode. Guest @SukhNijjer, hosted by @AnkurKalraMD. Produced by @RadcliffeCARDIO. Brought to you by Edwards: www.edwardstavr.com

#VdS MillernTon #NdS
Nach dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

#VdS MillernTon #NdS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 39:19


Sun, 16 Jan 2022 06:05:53 +0000 https://fcsp.hamburg/podcast/476-vds-millernton-nds/447-202122_sp19_nds_erzgebirgeaue 51d7dd2475555e46ca56f93fc8e0dec5 FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue 2:2 +++ 0:1 Zolinski (17.Minute, Vorlage Owusu) +++ 1:1 Medic (30. Minute, Vorlage Smith) +++ 1:2 Trujic (72. Hochscheidt) +++ 2:2 Amenyido (90+3 Minute Vorlage Becker) +++ Zuschauer*innen: 1.724 Die Englische Woche starten wir mit einem glücklichen Unentschieden am Millerntor gegen Aue. Über das erste Heimspiel des Jahres 2022 gegen die Mannschaft aus Sachsen spreche ich mit Tobias vom Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Nachdem ihr euch unsere kurze Besprechung angehört habt, könnt ihr euch gerne noch hier den Kurzbericht des Spiels von Tim durchlesen - da ist ebenfalls die Ernüchterung über das Zustandekommen des Ergebnisses spürbar. Weiter geht's für den magischen FCSP in der Liga am Dienstag dem 18. Januar um 20.45 Uhr mit dem Heimspiel im DFB-Pokal gegen Borussia Dortmund und in der Liga am Freitag die Stadtmeisterschaft beim Verein von der Müllverbrennungsanlage. Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche 447 full FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue 2:2 no Aue,Erzgebirge Aue,FCSP,Sankt Pauli,MillerTon,2. Bundesliga,Fußball,Podcast,Saison 2021/2022,FC St. Pauli Casche Schulz

#VdS MillernTon #NdS
Nach dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

#VdS MillernTon #NdS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 39:19


Sun, 16 Jan 2022 06:05:53 +0000 https://fcsp-hamburg-vds-millernton-nds.podigee.io/447-202122_sp19_nds_erzgebirgeaue 51d7dd2475555e46ca56f93fc8e0dec5 FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue 2:2 +++ 0:1 Zolinski (17.Minute, Vorlage Owusu) +++ 1:1 Medic (30. Minute, Vorlage Smith) +++ 1:2 Trujic (72. Hochscheidt) +++ 2:2 Amenyido (90+3 Minute Vorlage Becker) +++ Zuschauer*innen: 1.724 Die Englische Woche starten wir mit einem glücklichen Unentschieden am Millerntor gegen Aue. Über das erste Heimspiel des Jahres 2022 gegen die Mannschaft aus Sachsen spreche ich mit Tobias vom Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Nachdem ihr euch unsere kurze Besprechung angehört habt, könnt ihr euch gerne noch hier den Kurzbericht des Spiels von Tim durchlesen - da ist ebenfalls die Ernüchterung über das Zustandekommen des Ergebnisses spürbar. Weiter geht's für den magischen FCSP in der Liga am Dienstag dem 18. Januar um 20.45 Uhr mit dem Heimspiel im DFB-Pokal gegen Borussia Dortmund und in der Liga am Freitag die Stadtmeisterschaft beim Verein von der Müllverbrennungsanlage. Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche 447 full FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue 2:2 no Aue,Erzgebirge Aue,FCSP,Sankt Pauli,MillerTon,2. Bundesliga,Fußball,Podcast,Saison 2021/2022,FC St. Pauli Casche Schulz

Drübergehalten – Der Ostfußball­podcast – meinsportpodcast.de
Nach dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

Drübergehalten – Der Ostfußball­podcast – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 39:19


FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue 2:2 +++ 0:1 Zolinski (17.Minute, Vorlage Owusu) +++ 1:1 Medic (30. Minute, Vorlage Smith) +++ 1:2 Trujic (72. Hochscheidt) +++ 2:2 Amenyido (90+3 Minute Vorlage Becker) +++ Zuschauer*innen: 1.724 Die Englische Woche starten wir mit einem glücklichen Unentschieden am Millerntor gegen Aue. Über das erste Heimspiel des Jahres 2022 gegen die Mannschaft aus Sachsen spreche ich mit Tobias vom Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Nachdem ihr euch unsere kurze Besprechung angehört habt, könnt ihr euch gerne noch hier den Kurzbericht des Spiels von Tim durchlesen - da ist ebenfalls die Ernüchterung über das Zustandekommen des Ergebnisses spürbar. Weiter gehts für den magischen FCSP in der Liga am Dienstag dem 18. Januar um 20.45 Uhr mit dem Heimspiel im DFB-Pokal gegen Borussia Dortmund und in der Liga am Freitag die Stadtmeisterschaft beim Verein von der Müllverbrennungsanlage. Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche

No Title
Nach dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

No Title

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 39:19


FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue 2:2 +++ 0:1 Zolinski (17.Minute, Vorlage Owusu) +++ 1:1 Medic (30. Minute, Vorlage Smith) +++ 1:2 Trujic (72. Hochscheidt) +++ 2:2 Amenyido (90+3 Minute Vorlage Becker) +++ Zuschauer*innen: 1.724 Die Englische Woche starten wir mit einem glücklichen Unentschieden am Millerntor gegen Aue. Über das erste Heimspiel des Jahres 2022 gegen die Mannschaft aus Sachsen spreche ich mit Tobias vom Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Nachdem ihr euch unsere kurze Besprechung angehört habt, könnt ihr euch gerne noch hier den Kurzbericht des Spiels von Tim durchlesen - da ist ebenfalls die Ernüchterung über das Zustandekommen des Ergebnisses spürbar. Weiter gehts für den magischen FCSP in der Liga am Dienstag dem 18. Januar um 20.45 Uhr mit dem Heimspiel im DFB-Pokal gegen Borussia Dortmund und in der Liga am Freitag die Stadtmeisterschaft beim Verein von der Müllverbrennungsanlage. Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche

Fußball – meinsportpodcast.de
Nach dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

Fußball – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 39:19


FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue 2:2 +++ 0:1 Zolinski (17.Minute, Vorlage Owusu) +++ 1:1 Medic (30. Minute, Vorlage Smith) +++ 1:2 Trujic (72. Hochscheidt) +++ 2:2 Amenyido (90+3 Minute Vorlage Becker) +++ Zuschauer*innen: 1.724 Die Englische Woche starten wir mit einem glücklichen Unentschieden am Millerntor gegen Aue. Über das erste Heimspiel des Jahres 2022 gegen die Mannschaft aus Sachsen spreche ich mit Tobias vom Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Nachdem ihr euch unsere kurze Besprechung angehört habt, könnt ihr euch gerne noch hier den Kurzbericht des Spiels von Tim durchlesen - da ist ebenfalls die Ernüchterung über das Zustandekommen des Ergebnisses spürbar. Weiter gehts für den magischen FCSP in der Liga am Dienstag dem 18. Januar um 20.45 Uhr mit dem Heimspiel im DFB-Pokal gegen Borussia Dortmund und in der Liga am Freitag die Stadtmeisterschaft beim Verein von der Müllverbrennungsanlage. Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche

TIKI TAKA – Der La Liga Podcast – meinsportpodcast.de
Nach dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

TIKI TAKA – Der La Liga Podcast – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 16, 2022 39:19


FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue 2:2 +++ 0:1 Zolinski (17.Minute, Vorlage Owusu) +++ 1:1 Medic (30. Minute, Vorlage Smith) +++ 1:2 Trujic (72. Hochscheidt) +++ 2:2 Amenyido (90+3 Minute Vorlage Becker) +++ Zuschauer*innen: 1.724 Die Englische Woche starten wir mit einem glücklichen Unentschieden am Millerntor gegen Aue. Über das erste Heimspiel des Jahres 2022 gegen die Mannschaft aus Sachsen spreche ich mit Tobias vom Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Nachdem ihr euch unsere kurze Besprechung angehört habt, könnt ihr euch gerne noch hier den Kurzbericht des Spiels von Tim durchlesen - da ist ebenfalls die Ernüchterung über das Zustandekommen des Ergebnisses spürbar. Weiter gehts für den magischen FCSP in der Liga am Dienstag dem 18. Januar um 20.45 Uhr mit dem Heimspiel im DFB-Pokal gegen Borussia Dortmund und in der Liga am Freitag die Stadtmeisterschaft beim Verein von der Müllverbrennungsanlage. Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche

Experimental Brewing
Episode 144 - A Gross Of Questions With Julia

Experimental Brewing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 61:49


Happy New Year and we're kicking things off with questions from you and our questions to Julia Herz, the new director of the American Homebrewers Association. Where does she see the AHA going and what did you all ask about fermentation? (More Q&A next episode!) Episode Links: Homebrewers Association: https://www.homebrewersassociation.org/ Patreon Remember even a buck is good for charity: http://www.patreon.com/experimentalbrewing Experimental Brew Store: https://www.experimentalbrew.com/store Episode Contents: 00:00:00 Opening & Our Sponsors 00:02:20 Announcements & Feedback 00:05:56 The Lounge - Julia Herz - Director of the AHA 00:39:04 Questions: Fermentation This episode is brought to you by: American Homebrewers Association Brewing America Country Malt Group Jaded Brewing Mecca Grade Estate Malt Wyeast Labs YCH Hops Interested in helping Denny and Drew with the IGOR program (aka help us run experiments!) - contact them at igor@experimentalbrew.com. We want more Citizen Science! In the meanwhile, subscribe via your favorite podcasting service (iTunes, etc). Like our podcast, review it - talk it up! If you have comments, feedbacks, harassments, etc, feel free to drop us a line at podcast@experimentalbrew.com. Follow us on Facebook (ExperimentalHomebrewing) or Twitter (@ExpBrewing). If you have questions you'd like answered in our Q&A segment, send an email to questions@experimntalbrew.com! Don't forget you can support the podcast on Patreon by going to http://patreon.com/experimentalbrewing This episode can be downloaded directly at http://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/www.experimentalbrew.com/sites/d... Podcast RSS Url: http://www.experimentalbrew.com/podcast.rss

Fußball – meinsportpodcast.de
Vor dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

Fußball – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 37:55


FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue Ein krachende Niederlage gegen Holstein Kiel zum Abschluss des erfolgreichen Jahres 2021 galt es in der kurzen Pause zu verdauen. Timo Schultz und sein Staff haben aber nicht nur daran in der Winterpause gearbeitet. Was für Schlüsse sie daraus gezogen haben und was sie für die Rückrunde planen, könnt ihr euch hier im Gespräch von Tim mit Timo Schultz anhören. Still empfehlenswert! Unser magischer FCSP startet am kommenden Samstag, den 15. Januar um 13.30 Uhr am Millerntor gegen den Tabellenvorletzten aus dem Erzgebirge in das Jahr 2022. Mein Gast in dieser Folge ist Tobias, seines Zeichen Mitglied des Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Wir sprechen über die bisherige Saison der Sachsen, über ihren furchtbaren Präsidenten und was Wintertransfers bringen sollen. Und hier noch ein Hinweis in eigener Sache: Wir haben eine Unterstützen-Seite. Und wenn ihr uns noch mehr Gutes tun wollt, dann bewertet ihr uns hier und hier. Vielen Dank! Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche

Drübergehalten – Der Ostfußball­podcast – meinsportpodcast.de
Vor dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

Drübergehalten – Der Ostfußball­podcast – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 37:55


FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue Ein krachende Niederlage gegen Holstein Kiel zum Abschluss des erfolgreichen Jahres 2021 galt es in der kurzen Pause zu verdauen. Timo Schultz und sein Staff haben aber nicht nur daran in der Winterpause gearbeitet. Was für Schlüsse sie daraus gezogen haben und was sie für die Rückrunde planen, könnt ihr euch hier im Gespräch von Tim mit Timo Schultz anhören. Still empfehlenswert! Unser magischer FCSP startet am kommenden Samstag, den 15. Januar um 13.30 Uhr am Millerntor gegen den Tabellenvorletzten aus dem Erzgebirge in das Jahr 2022. Mein Gast in dieser Folge ist Tobias, seines Zeichen Mitglied des Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Wir sprechen über die bisherige Saison der Sachsen, über ihren furchtbaren Präsidenten und was Wintertransfers bringen sollen. Und hier noch ein Hinweis in eigener Sache: Wir haben eine Unterstützen-Seite. Und wenn ihr uns noch mehr Gutes tun wollt, dann bewertet ihr uns hier und hier. Vielen Dank! Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche

TIKI TAKA – Der La Liga Podcast – meinsportpodcast.de
Vor dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

TIKI TAKA – Der La Liga Podcast – meinsportpodcast.de

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 37:55


FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue Ein krachende Niederlage gegen Holstein Kiel zum Abschluss des erfolgreichen Jahres 2021 galt es in der kurzen Pause zu verdauen. Timo Schultz und sein Staff haben aber nicht nur daran in der Winterpause gearbeitet. Was für Schlüsse sie daraus gezogen haben und was sie für die Rückrunde planen, könnt ihr euch hier im Gespräch von Tim mit Timo Schultz anhören. Still empfehlenswert! Unser magischer FCSP startet am kommenden Samstag, den 15. Januar um 13.30 Uhr am Millerntor gegen den Tabellenvorletzten aus dem Erzgebirge in das Jahr 2022. Mein Gast in dieser Folge ist Tobias, seines Zeichen Mitglied des Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Wir sprechen über die bisherige Saison der Sachsen, über ihren furchtbaren Präsidenten und was Wintertransfers bringen sollen. Und hier noch ein Hinweis in eigener Sache: Wir haben eine Unterstützen-Seite. Und wenn ihr uns noch mehr Gutes tun wollt, dann bewertet ihr uns hier und hier. Vielen Dank! Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche

No Title
Vor dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

No Title

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 37:55


FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue Ein krachende Niederlage gegen Holstein Kiel zum Abschluss des erfolgreichen Jahres 2021 galt es in der kurzen Pause zu verdauen. Timo Schultz und sein Staff haben aber nicht nur daran in der Winterpause gearbeitet. Was für Schlüsse sie daraus gezogen haben und was sie für die Rückrunde planen, könnt ihr euch hier im Gespräch von Tim mit Timo Schultz anhören. Still empfehlenswert! Unser magischer FCSP startet am kommenden Samstag, den 15. Januar um 13.30 Uhr am Millerntor gegen den Tabellenvorletzten aus dem Erzgebirge in das Jahr 2022. Mein Gast in dieser Folge ist Tobias, seines Zeichen Mitglied des Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Wir sprechen über die bisherige Saison der Sachsen, über ihren furchtbaren Präsidenten und was Wintertransfers bringen sollen. Und hier noch ein Hinweis in eigener Sache: Wir haben eine Unterstützen-Seite. Und wenn ihr uns noch mehr Gutes tun wollt, dann bewertet ihr uns hier und hier. Vielen Dank! Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche

#VdS MillernTon #NdS
Vor dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

#VdS MillernTon #NdS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 37:55


Thu, 13 Jan 2022 05:30:00 +0000 https://fcsp.hamburg/podcast/476-vds-millernton-nds/446-202122_sp19_vds_erzgebirgeaue bad2fd07da979739f39730ee860ad3b3 FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue Ein krachende Niederlage gegen Holstein Kiel zum Abschluss des erfolgreichen Jahres 2021 galt es in der kurzen Pause zu verdauen. Timo Schultz und sein Staff haben aber nicht nur daran in der Winterpause gearbeitet. Was für Schlüsse sie daraus gezogen haben und was sie für die Rückrunde planen, könnt ihr euch hier im Gespräch von Tim mit Timo Schultz anhören. Still empfehlenswert! Unser magischer FCSP startet am kommenden Samstag, den 15. Januar um 13.30 Uhr am Millerntor gegen den Tabellenvorletzten aus dem Erzgebirge in das Jahr 2022. Mein Gast in dieser Folge ist Tobias, seines Zeichen Mitglied des Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Wir sprechen über die bisherige Saison der Sachsen, über ihren furchtbaren Präsidenten und was Wintertransfers bringen sollen. Und hier noch ein Hinweis in eigener Sache: Wir haben eine Unterstützen-Seite. Und wenn ihr uns noch mehr Gutes tun wollt, dann bewertet ihr uns hier und hier. Vielen Dank! Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche 446 full FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue no Erzgebirge Aue,Aue,FCSP,FC St. Pauli,Auepodcast,MillernTon,Podcast,2. Bundesliga,Saison 2021/2022,Fußball Casche Schulz

#VdS MillernTon #NdS
Vor dem Spiel – FC Erzgebirge Aue (H) – Spieltag 19 – Saison 2021/22

#VdS MillernTon #NdS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 37:55


Thu, 13 Jan 2022 05:30:00 +0000 https://fcsp-hamburg-vds-millernton-nds.podigee.io/446-202122_sp19_vds_erzgebirgeaue bad2fd07da979739f39730ee860ad3b3 FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue Ein krachende Niederlage gegen Holstein Kiel zum Abschluss des erfolgreichen Jahres 2021 galt es in der kurzen Pause zu verdauen. Timo Schultz und sein Staff haben aber nicht nur daran in der Winterpause gearbeitet. Was für Schlüsse sie daraus gezogen haben und was sie für die Rückrunde planen, könnt ihr euch hier im Gespräch von Tim mit Timo Schultz anhören. Still empfehlenswert! Unser magischer FCSP startet am kommenden Samstag, den 15. Januar um 13.30 Uhr am Millerntor gegen den Tabellenvorletzten aus dem Erzgebirge in das Jahr 2022. Mein Gast in dieser Folge ist Tobias, seines Zeichen Mitglied des Zwei Gekreuzte Mikros-Podcasts. Wir sprechen über die bisherige Saison der Sachsen, über ihren furchtbaren Präsidenten und was Wintertransfers bringen sollen. Und hier noch ein Hinweis in eigener Sache: Wir haben eine Unterstützen-Seite. Und wenn ihr uns noch mehr Gutes tun wollt, dann bewertet ihr uns hier und hier. Vielen Dank! Viel Spaß beim Hören, bleibt gesund und immer schön AHA! // Casche 446 full FC St. Pauli - FC Erzgebirge Aue no Erzgebirge Aue,Aue,FCSP,FC St. Pauli,Auepodcast,MillernTon,Podcast,2. Bundesliga,Saison 2021/2022,Fußball Casche Schulz

Creative Business Party - Für Frauen, die ihr Business mit Herz und Mut rocken

Das Jahr ist angelaufen und irgendwie hatte ich diese Woche das Gefühl, dass so einigen die Auszeit eher mehr an Chaos, als totale Klarheit, gebracht hat.Volle Transparenz: bei mir war es auch nicht so krass entspannt, wie ich dachte. Was aber daran liegt, dass wir quasi mit einem Bein schon im Launch stecken, was ich die ganze ZEit im Hinterkopf hatte.Aber auch in der Community und unseren Kunden war das Thema „Mindset" diese Woche ganz weit vorne. Wir werden alle überall zugeballert mit „bei mir läuft's toll, hier der krasse Launch, da ein Aha, da crazy Urlaubsbilder (sogar in diesen Zeiten)"... wer da gerade selbst Chaos hat, will das eigentlich. nicht sehen.Ich bin für mehr „offen darüber sprechen, was auch mal schiefgeht" und ein „zugeben, dass es bei einem selbst auch mal sehr chaotisch sein kann". Es ist bei allen mal chaotisch. Egal, wie perfekt die schöne Instagram-Welt aussehen mag. Egal wie „weit" manch ein/e Experte/in schon sein mag. Jede/r hat Chaos. Und das ist gut so.Denn...1. zeigt es: Du bist nicht allein. Mir dir stimmt alles. Du bist gut so, wie du bist.2. startet genau dann, wenn Chaos ist, der Wachstumsprozess.Bist du schon beim 3-teiligen Live Training „Wie verkaufe ich meinen Onlinekurs erfolgreich?" angemeldet? Kostet 0 Euro und startet am 3. Februar >> https://byjohannafritz.de/live-training

Lochhead on Marketing
139 How To Inspire Legendary Marketing Work

Lochhead on Marketing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 11:22


On this episode, let's talk about how to inspire legendary creative marketing people to do their legendary creative marketing work. Welcome to Lochhead on Marketing. The number one charting marketing podcast for marketers, category designers, and entrepreneurs with a different mind. Letting Legendary Creative Marketing People Do Legendary Creative Marketing Work Years ago, I was the head of marketing for a red-hot internet company called Scient. We had engaged with a group of creative marketers, designers, and copywriters led by the legend himself, John Bielenberg. At the beginning of the project, this is what I said to him: “Look, I know you guys are standalone, in terms of the incredible legendary marketing creative you guys create. So what I'm asking you to do is go away, and design the most legendary piece of work you've ever done.” In this case, it was a brochure that will serve as “grenade”: it was the kind of piece that when you got it, you knew you got it, and you never forgot getting it. They did just that. So when they came back a week or two to present their work, I asked the question that I always ask, “Do you think what you're about to show us is legendary work?” John smiled and looked at me and said, “Yes, we do,” and he showed us this most legendary brochure that he created. Acknowledge Your Legendary Creative Marketing Team's Efforts Another thing to address is to let your creatives know that you are aware that their best works don't usually see the light of day. This is either due to poor follow-through by the higher-ups, or poor feedback from people who weren't involved in the project, but higher up the food chain. So acknowledge this and then tell them, that once they deliver a legendary creative marketing piece that will blow away everyone, you will fight tooth-and-nail for it to see the light of day. Once they do so, remind them to remind you to not fuck it up. The Takeaway So what's the lesson here? One, when you're talking to creative people about doing creative work, let them know you want them to do their most legendary work. Second, let them know that you also know that most of their most legendary work has never seen the light of day. This is because most of the companies they worked for or the clients that they had didn't have the courage to execute their legendary work. They didn't have the courage to say to them, once they presented truly legendary work, “Don't let us fuck this up.” Now, here's the other AHA about this. If you as a marketing leader/CEO/CMO get a reputation with the creative people in your company for A) inspiring it and asking them to do legendary work, and then B) with very few modifications, actually execute the legendary work, guess what happens the next time they have to do something creative. They know that you want their most legendary work. Also, they know that if they put the thinking and their heart and their soul and their blood, sweat, tears and whiskey into that work, that you are not going to be the leader who takes that legendary work and lets it get crushed and watered down so that it never sees the light of day. And when legendary creative people know that you want them to do their legendary work and that you're actually going to implement it, guess what? They're going to keep giving you legendary work. Bio Christopher Lochhead is a #1 Apple podcaster and #1 Amazon bestselling co-author of books: Niche Down and Play Bigger. He has been an advisor to over 50 venture-backed startups; a former three-time Silicon Valley public company CMO and an entrepreneur. Furthermore, he has been called “one of the best minds in marketing” by The Marketing Journal, a “Human Exclamation Point” by Fast Company, a “quasar” by NBA legend Bill Walton and “off-putting to some” by The Economist. In addition, he served as a chief marketing officer of software juggernaut Mercury Interactive. Hewlett-Packard acquired the company in 2006, for $4.5 billion.

Lead Sell Grow - The Human Experience
How to Give People a Purpose to Live and Prevent Suicide - With Ron Zaleski Founder of The Long Walk Home

Lead Sell Grow - The Human Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 59:47


Ron Zaleski walked across the country barefoot to raise awareness for Veterans Suicide. He's the author of The Long Walk Home and the CEO of The Long Walk Home, Nonprofit Organization.Ron joined us to share his story of going from being angry at the world to helping thousands of people prevent suicide. After leaving the military, Ron decided to never wear shoes. Mentally, he was in bad shape and kept everyone at a distance. After having a life-changing AHA moment, Ron realized that what he's doing isn't helping anyone and he decided to do something about it.He decided to raise awareness and prevent suicide in the veteran community. Ron's mission is different because he doesn't just focus on the veteran, he helps the entire family and anyone related to veterans.If you're a veteran or know one, The Long Walk Home, Nonprofit Organization, is looking for mentors who can help other veterans. Please visit their site and sign up to help those who lay their lives on the line for our freedom. www.TheLongWalkHome.orgIf you're not interested in being a mentor, please consider making a donation. Your generosity will help save someone's life. Thank you! www.thelongwalkhome.orgBe sure to connect with us in our Lead Sell Grow – The Human Experience Tribe Facebook group:https://www.facebook.com/groups/leadsellgrowDownload the FREE ebook that will help you connect with, and understand your buyers faster!Learn more about our services:www.TheGoalGuide.comImprove your sales and stay connected – Free Gifts Here https://shor.by/TheGoalGuide

FAR OUT: Adventures in Unconventional Living
FAR OUT #157 ~ What About Rest?

FAR OUT: Adventures in Unconventional Living

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 63:31


Listen and explore:The masculine and feminine as it relates to rest and workThe cultural differences in how we rest between Europeans and AmericansRest as a mindsetDifferent ways we restThe ways we struggle to restJulie-Roxane has an "Aha!" moment about her life on the podcastManaging interpersonal relationships with rest in mind"I'm so busy" - the introvert's defense mechanism The way you rest will depend on your personality and your lifestyleMentioned on this episode:FAR OUT #86 ~ Rest as a Revolutionary ActThe Free Birth Podcast: The Blood  Mysteries School with Kristin Hauser and Nancy LucinaConnect with us:Website: www.thefarout.lifeEmail us at info@thefarout.lifeWild Within @ www.thewildwithin.orgSupport this podcast:Discount link to purchase organic, raw ceremonial-grade cacao ethically sourced in Guatemala (a portion of proceeds support this podcast)Become a patron at: https://www.patreon.com/thefaroutcoupleMake one-time donation with PayPal (our account is aplambeck22@gmail.com)Leave a review on iTunes!Share this episode with a friend! :DCredits:Intro music: "Complicate ya" by Otis McDonaldOutro music: "Running with wise fools" written & performed by Krackatoa (www.krackatoa.com)

Inside the SPHL Podcast
Inside The SPHL Podcast Episode #12: Caleb Cameron

Inside the SPHL Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 80:51


Welcome to the Inside The SPHL Podcast, Field Pass Hockey's SPHL-centric podcast! This week James Hayes is joined by Macon Mayhem Defensemen/Forward Caleb Cameron, who was recently called up to the ECHL's Florida Everblades. The two discuss: Life in the game Winning back-to-back AHA championship in college Macon's struggles to this point in the season […]

Advancing Health
Ransomware Attack Victims Speak Out: Best Practices & Lessons Learned from Ransomware Attacks

Advancing Health

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 29:29


In this episode, John Riggi, AHA Senior Advisor for Cybersecurity and Risk talks to leaders of two AHA member hospitals who were victims of major ransomware attacks in the Fall of 2020. Adrienne Chase, Corporate Compliance and Risk Officer and Mandy Shelast, Vice President, Physician Services & Clinical Networks join us from Dickinson County Healthcare System in Iron Mountain, Michigan. John Gaede, Director of Information Services and Ronald Woita, Chief Nursing Officer & Vice President of Patient Care Services join us from Sky Lakes Medical Center, in Klamath Falls, Oregon. John Riggi previously interviewed them about lessons learned and best practices during the attack which they are willing to share on today's podcast. Now here's John to give the proper introductions.

Sincerely HER Podcast
Story | Ingrid Lill Discusses Visual Thinking, Business Storyboarding, and Finding Your Superpower

Sincerely HER Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 36:25


There is no better way to start the new year than by sharing with the world one of its best-kept secrets — the gem that is Ingrid Lill. She's the person you seek if you are trying to figure out your superpower. Through her Brand Storyboarding sessions, Ingrid uses her magic wand — her pencil — to help coaches, consultants and creatives find clarity. She makes it easy for you to see yourself and your business with fresh eyes by using visual thinking. Ingrid describes herself as a business coach with a pencil, but as you are about to learn from my candid conversation with her, she is so much more.   Show Notes: Interview with photos available on SincerelyHER.com.   [02:25] What is visual thinking? [03:55] Becoming a business coach with a pencil [06:01] Superpowers [07:12] Discovering graphic facilitation [09:35] Developed a framework called storyboarding [11:11] Inspiration from Donald Miller's StoryBrand method [11:50] Why you need a mirror and a visual anchor [13:52] Getting into the creative flow [16:14] No-No's [17:43] Mentorship [20:08] Talking to your clients [21:03] Making yourself visible [21:55] Not looking at too much stuff [23:53] What makes a great brand? [24:50] Finding your strengths [26:07] An “Aha!” moment [27:32] Attracting great people [28:13] Take the leap by starting small [29:51] Showing your work [30:51] Ignore mindset? [31:30] Don't ignore the number or your taxes [32:00] Doing the same things in 5 years [32:40] Why you need to “draw” your business [34:06] Not always sticking to the plan [35:30] Six feet   Connect with Ingrid: Website:  IngridLill.dk   Linkedin: @IngridLill   Like the show? Leave a positive review. Are my bite-sized notes helping you find clarity, get sh*t done, and win? If so, please subscribe and leave a review, and a 5-star rating.

Greater Than Code
265: Computer Science Education – Forge Your Own Path with Emily Haggard

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 52:52


00:54 - Emily's Superpower: Being a Good Teacher * Greater Than Code Episode 261: Celebrating Computer Science Education with Dave Bock (https://www.greaterthancode.com/celebrating-computer-science-education) * CyberPatriot (https://www.uscyberpatriot.org/) 06:24 - Online College Courses vs In-Person Learning / Emily's Community College Path * Network Engineering (https://www.fieldengineer.com/blogs/what-is-network-engineer-definition) * Virginia Tech (https://vt.edu/) * Guaranteed Transfer Programs (https://blog.collegevine.com/an-introduction-to-guaranteed-transfer-programs/) * Loudoun Codes (http://loudouncodes.org/) * Emily Haggard: My Path to Virginia Tech (http://loudouncodes.org/2020/09/23/path_to_va_tech.html) 11:58 - Computer Science Curriculums * Technical Depth * The Missing Semester of Your CS Education (https://missing.csail.mit.edu/) 19:28 - Being A Good Mentor / Mentor, Student Relationships * Using Intuition * Putting Yourself in Others' Mindsets * Diversity and Focusing On Commonalities * Addressing Gatekeeping in Tech * Celebrating Accomplishments * Bragging Loudly * Grace Hopper Conference (https://ghc.anitab.org/) * Cultural Dynamics Spread 38:24 - Dungeons & Dragons (https://dnd.wizards.com/) * Characters as an Extensions of Players Reflections: Dave: College is what you make of it, not where you went. Arty: Teaching people better who don't have a lot of experience yet. Mandy: “Empowered women, empower women.” Empowered men also empower women. Emily: Your mentor should have different skills from you and you should seek them out for that reason. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: MANDY: Hey, everybody! Welcome to Episode 265 of Greater Than Code. My name is Mandy Moore and I'm here with our guest panelist, Dave Bock. DAVE: Hi, I'm David Bock and I am here with our usual co-host, Arty Starr. ARTY: Thank you, Dave. And I'm here today with our guest, Emily Haggard. Emily is graduating from Virginia Tech with a Bachelor's in Computer Science this past December so, congratulations. She has a wide variety of experience in technology from web development to kernel programming, and even network engineering and cybersecurity. She is an active member of her community, having founded a cybersecurity club for middle schoolers. In her free time, she enjoys playing Dungeons and Dragons and writing novels. Welcome to the show, Emily. EMILY: Thank you. ARTY: So our first question we always ask is what is your superpower and how did you acquire it? EMILY: So I spent some time thinking about this and I would say that my superpower is that I'm a good teacher and what that means is that the people who come to me with questions wanting to learn something number one, my goal is to help them understand and number two, I think it's very important to make sure that whatever gap we have in our experience doesn't matter and that they don't feel that. So that they could be my 6-year-old brother and I'm trying to teach him algebra, or something and he doesn't feel like he is the 6-year-old trying to learn algebra. DAVE: I'll echo that sentiment about being a good teacher actually on two fronts, Emily. First of all, I am teaching your brother now in high school and just the other day, he credited you towards giving him a lot of background knowledge about the course and the curriculum before we ever started the class. So he seconds that you're a good teacher. And then listeners might remember, I was on a few weeks ago talking about my nonprofit and Emily was there at the beginning of me starting to volunteer in high schools. In fact, the way I met Emily, it was the fall of 2014. The first time I was volunteering at Loudoun Valley High School and one morning prior to class, there was going to be a meeting of a cybersecurity club. There were a bunch to the students milling about and there was this sophomore girl sitting in front of a computer, looking at a PowerPoint presentation of networking IP addresses, how the /24 of an IP address resolves and just all that kind of detail. Like very low-level detail about networking stuff and I was like, “Oh, that's interesting.” I wouldn't have expected a sophomore girl to be so interested in the low-level type of details of IP. And then the club started and she got up and started giving that presentation. That was not a slide deck she was reading; it was a slide deck she was creating. EMILY: Thank you. I actually remember that. [laughs] ARTY: So how did you acquire that superpower? EMILY: I think it was out of necessity. So going back to the story that David mentioned in high school, there was a cybersecurity competition called CyberPatriot that I competed in with friends and one year, all of a sudden, they just introduced network engineering to the competition. We had to configure and troubleshoot a simulated network and no one knew how to do that. So I took it upon myself to just figure it out so that my team could be competitive and win, but then part of the way that I learn actually is being able to teach something like that's how I grasp. I know that I've understood something and I'm ready to move on to the next topic is like, if I could teach this thing. So actually, I started out building all of that as a way to kind of condense my notes and condense my knowledge so that it'd stick in my head for the competition and I just realized it's already here, I should share this. So that's how I started there. Teaching network engineering to high schoolers that don't have any background knowledge is really hard. It forced me to put it in terms that would make sense and take away the really technical aspects of it and I think that built the teaching skill. DAVE: That relates to the club you started at the middle school for a CyberPatriot. How did that start? EMILY: That was initially a desire to have a capstone project and get out of high school a few weeks early. But I was sitting there with my friend and thinking about, “Okay, well, we need to do something that actually helps people. What should we do?” Like some people are going out and they're painting murals in schools, or gardening. It was like, well, we don't really like being outside and we're not really artistic. [chuckles] But what we do have is a lot of technical knowledge from all this work with CyberPatriot and we know that CyberPatriot has a middle school competition. So we actually approached the middle school. We had a sit down with, I think the dean at our local middle school. We talked about what CyberPatriot was and what we wanted to do with the students, which was have them bust over to the high school so we could teach them as an afterschool program. I guess we convinced him and so, a couple months later they're busing students over for us to teach. DAVE: Wow. And did they ever participate in competitions as middle schoolers? EMILY: Yes, they did. DAVE: Very cool. EMILY: Yeah. DAVE: Can you go into what those competitions are like? I don't think most of the audience even knows that exists. EMILY: Yeah, sure. So CyberPatriot, it's a cybersecurity competition for predominantly high schoolers that's run by the Air Force and you have a couple rounds throughout the year, I think it's like five, or so, and at each round you have 6 hours and you're given some virtual machines, which you have to secure and remove viruses from and things, and you get points for doing all of that. They added on network simulation, which was with some Cisco proprietary software, which would simulate your routers, your firewalls, and everything. So you'd have to configure and troubleshoot that as well and you would get points for the same thing. It builds a lot of comradery with all of us having to sit there for 6 hours after school and like, we're getting tired. It's a Friday night, everyone's a little bit loopy and all we've eaten is pizza for 6 hours. [laughs] DAVE: Well, that's a good jumpstart to your career, I think. [laughs] EMILY: Yes, for sure. MANDY: So while in college, I'm guessing that – well, I'm assuming that you've been pretty impacted by COVID and doing in-person learning versus online learning. How's that been for you? EMILY: I've actually found it pushes me to challenge the status quo. Online college classes, for the most part, the lectures aren't that helpful. They're not that great. So I had to pick up a lot of skills, like learning to teach myself, reading books, and figuring out ways to discern if I needed to research something further, if I really understood it yet, or not. That's a really hard question to ask actually is if you don't have the knowledge, how do you know that you don't have that knowledge? That's something I kind of had – it's a skill that you have to work on. So that is something I developed over the time when we were online and I've actually also done – I worked time for a year after high school and I took mostly online classes at the community college. Those skills started there, too and then I just built on them when I came to Virginia Tech and we had COVID happen. DAVE: Actually, I'd like to ask about that community college time. I know you had an interesting path into Virginia Tech, one that I'm really interested in for my own kids as well. Can you talk about that? EMILY: Yeah. So I, out of high school, always thought I'm going to – I'm a first-generation student. My parents did not go to college. They went to the military and grandparents before them. So I had always had it in my head that I am going to go and get that 4-year degree. That's what I want for myself. At the end of high school, I applied to Virginia Tech. I had a dream school. I wanted to go to Georgia Tech. They rejected me. Oh, well, that dream shot. I need to find something new. So I applied to Virginia Tech thinking it was going to be a safe bet. It's an in-state school, I was a very good student; they would never reject me and so, I applied for the engineering program and I was rejected. They did admit me for the neuroscience program, but it wasn't going to be what I wanted and I was realizing that I did not like either chemistry, or biology, so that would never work. And then at the same time, because of my work with CyberPatriot, I was able to get an internship in network engineering at a college not too far from where I lived. After I graduated high school, they offered me a job as a network engineer, which I took because my team was fantastic, I really liked my manager, and I was comfortable there. I took this job and I said, “Okay, I'm going to keep working on the college thing because it's what I always wanted for myself.” So I just signed up for community college and that was pretty tough working a full-time and doing community college until 11 o'clock at night and getting up the next day and doing it all over again. And from there, I decided that Virginia Tech was going to be the best option for me, just from a very logical perspective. I kind of thought Virginia Tech was a bit cult-y. I was never really gung-ho about going, but it made the most sense being an in-state school that's very well-known. I worked through community college and I applied to Virginia Tech again after 1 year at community college and they rejected me again. so I was like, “Oh no, now what do I do I?” And I realized I needed to make use of the guaranteed transfer program. One of the really cool things in Virginia at least is that a lot of the state schools have agreements with the community college, where if you get an associates with a specific GPA, you can transfer into that program and the university and your transfer's guaranteed, they can't reject you. So I was like, “Aha, they can't get rid of me this time.” Yeah, I did it and it's kind of a messy process. I actually went into that in a blog post on David has a nonprofit called Loudoun Codes. I wrote a blog post for his website and detailed that entire – being a transfer student is hard because there's a lot of credits that may not get transferred over because Virginia Tech is a little bit – all 4-year colleges are a little bit elitist in their attitude towards community college and they didn't take some of the credits that I had, which put me behind quite far, even though I had that knowledge, they said I didn't. So that added on some extra time and some extra summer semesters while I was at Tech. ARTY: Yeah. I did something similar with doing community college and then what you're talking about with the whole elitist attitude with the transfer and having a whole bunch of your credits not transferring and I'm definitely familiar with that whole experience. DAVE: Yeah. EMILY: And even now that I think about it, I remember community college, too. It's built for one specific type of student, which is great. I think they're really good at helping people who just weren't present, or weren't able to do the work and make the progress in high school. They're really good at helping those types of students. But as someone who did a whole bunch of AP classes, had a crazy GPA, they just didn't really know how to handle me. They said, “Okay, you've tested out of pretty much all of our math classes, but you are still lacking some credits.” So I had to take multi-variable calculus in community college in order to get credit to replace the fact that I tested out of pre-cal and which was kind of silly, but in the long run, it was great because I hear multi-variable calculus at Tech is pretty hard. But definitely, there's a lot of bureaucratic nonsense about college. Education is important. It's great. I've learned a lot of things, but there's still all these old ways of thinking and people are just not ready for change in college a lot of the time. The people who make decisions that is. DAVE: Well, I'd like to ask a little bit about the computer science curriculum that you've had and the angle I'm asking from when I worked at LivingSocial, I worked with one of the first group of people that had graduated from our bootcamp program and had transferred from other careers, spent 12 weeks learning software engineering skills, and then were integrated with a group of software engineers at LivingSocial. We would occasionally get into conversations about, well, if I learned to be a software engineer in 12 weeks, what do you learn in 4 years of college? So we started to do these internal brown bags that were kind of the Discovery Channel version of computer science. A lot of that material I've since recycled into the presentations I do at high school. But for your typical person who might have sidelined into this career from a different perspective, what's been your curriculum like? EMILY: I really like the parts of the curriculum that had technical depth because coming into it at my level, that's what I was lacking in certain areas. I had built the foundation really strong, but the details of it, I didn't have. The classes that Virginia Tech, like the notorious systems class and a cybersecurity class I have taken this semester, that have gone in detail with technology and pushed what I understood, those were my most valuable classes. There was a lot of it that I would've been happy without [laughs] because I'm not sure it will apply so much to my life going forward. I'm a very practical person. Engineer mindset; I don't want to worry about things that can actually be applied to the real world so much. So for me this semester, actually, it's been really challenging because I've taken a data structures and algorithms class where we're talking about NP complete versus NP hard, and what it would mean if we could solve an NP complete problem in polynomial time. It's really hard to care. It's really hard to see how that [laughs] helps. It's interesting from a pure math perspective, but coming into it as someone who was already in the adult world and very grounded, it feels like bloat. DAVE: Yeah. That stuff is interesting if you're are designing databases, but most of us are just using databases and that – [overtalk] EMILY: Right. DAVE: Stuff is all kind of baked in. EMILY: Yeah. DAVE: For the average person on a technical career path, we're far more interested in the business problems than the math problems. ARTY: I'm curious, too. There's also lots of stuff that seems like it's missing in college curriculum from just really fundamental things that you need to know as a software engineer. So did you have things like source control and continuous integration? I think back to my own college experience and I didn't learn about source control until I got out of college. [laughs] And why is that? Why is that? It seems so backwards because there's these fundamental things that we need to learn and within 4 years, can we not somehow get that in the curriculum? I'm wondering what your experience has been like. EMILY: So Virginia Tech, I think the CS department head is actually really good at being reflective because he requires every senior to take a seminar class as they exit. It's a one credit class; it's mostly just feedback for the school and I think it's really cool because he asks all of us to make a presentation, just record ourselves talking over some slides about our experience and the things we would change. That really impressed me that this guy who gets to make so many decisions is listening to the people who are just kind of peons of the system and what I said was that there are certain classes that they give background knowledge. Like there's one in particular where it's essentially the closest crossover we have with the electrical engineering department and it's really painful, as someone who works with software, to try and put myself in a hardware mindset working with AND gates, OR gates, and all that, and trying to deal with these simulated chips. It's awful and then it never comes back. We never talk about again in the curriculum and it's a prerequisite for the systems class, which has nothing at all to do with that, really. This segues into another thing. I've had an internship while I've been at Virginia Tech that's a web consultant role, or a development consultant role with a company called Acceleration. They run just a small office in Blacksburg and they have a really cool business model. They take students at Virginia Tech and at Radford, a neighboring school, and they have us work with clients on real software development projects. They pair us with mentors who have 5, 10 years of experiences, software consultants, and we get to learn all those things that school doesn't teach us. So that's actually how I learned Git, Scrum, and all that stuff that isn't taught in college even now and I went back to the CS department head and I said, “Replace that class with the class that teaches us Git, Scrum, Kanban, and even just a brief overview of Docker, AWS, and the concepts so that people have a foundation when they try to go to work and they're trying to read all this documentation, or they're asked to build a container image and they have no idea what it's talking about, or what it's for.” Yeah, going back to the original question, no, I didn't learn version control in college, but the weird thing is that I was expected to know it in my classes without ever being taught it because, especially in the upper level like 3,004 level, or 1,000 level classes, they have you work on group projects where Git is essential and some of them, especially the capstone project, are long-term projects and you really need to use Scrum, or use some sort of methodology rather than just the how you would treat a two-week project. Actually, it's interesting because David was my sponsor on my capstone project in college and he really helped my team with the whole project planning, sprint planning, and just understanding how Scrum and all that works and what it's for. DAVE: Yeah. I just shared a link that is a series of videos from MIT called The Missing Semester of Your Computer Science Education that talks about Git, version control and command line, using the back shell, stuff about using a database, how to use a debugger; just all that kind of stuff is stuff that you're expected to know, but never formally taught. ARTY: What about unit testing? EMILY: Okay. So that's an interesting exception to the rule, but I don't think they really carried it through, through my entire experience at Tech. So in the earlier classes, we were actually forced to write unit tests that was part of our assignments and they would look to see that we had – I think we had to have a 100% testing coverage, or very close to it. So that was good, but then it kind of dropped away as we went to the upper-level classes and you just had to be a good programmer and you had to know to test small chunks of your code because we'd have these massive projects and there would be a testing framework to see if the entire thing worked, but there was no unit testing, really. Whereas, at work in my internship, unit tests are paramount, like [laughs], we put a huge emphasis on that. ARTY: So earlier Emily, you had had mentioned teaching people that had no experience at all and the challenge of trying to be able to help and support people and learning to understand regardless of what their gap was in existing experience. So what are some of the ideas, principles, things that you've learned on how to do that effectively? EMILY: That's a really tough question because I've worked on building intuition rather than a set of rules. But I think a few of the major things probably are thinking about it long enough beforehand, because there's always a lot of background context that they need. Usually, you don't present a solution before you've presented the problem and so, it's important to spend time thinking about that and especially how you're going to order concepts. I've noticed, too with some of the best teachers I've had in college is they were very careful with the order in which they introduced topics to build the necessary context and that's something that's really important with complete beginners. The thing is sometimes you have to build that context very quickly, which the best trick I have for that is just to create an analogy that has nothing to do with technology at all, create it out of a shared experience that you have, or something that they've probably experienced. Like a lot of times analogies for IP addressing use the mailing service, houses on a street and things like that, things that are common to our experience. I guess, maybe that's the foundation of it is you're trying to figure out what you have in common with this person that can take them from where they are to where you are currently and that requires a lot of social skills, intuition, and practice, so. DAVE: That's a really good observation because one of the things I find teaching high school, and this has been a skill I've had to learn, is being able to put my mindset in the point of view of the student that I need to go to where they are and use a good metaphor analogy to bring them up a step. That's a real challenge to be able to strip away all the knowledge I have and be like, “Oh, this must be the understanding of the problem they have” and try to figure out how to walk them forward. EMILY: Yeah. DAVE: That's a valuable skill. EMILY: I think that's really rewarding, though because when I see in their eyes that they've understood it, or I watch them solve the problem, then I know that I did it well and that's really rewarding. It's like, okay, cool. I got them to where I wanted them to be. ARTY: Reminds me. I was helping out mentoring college students for a while and I hadn't really been involved with college for a really long time. I was working with folks that knew very, very little and it was just astounding to me one, just realizing how much I actually knew. That's easy to take for granted. But also, just that if you can dial back and be patient, it's really rewarding I found to just be able to help people, to see that little light go on where they start connecting the dots and they're able to make something appear on the screen for the first time. That experience of “I made that! I made that happen.” I feel like that's one of the most exciting things about software and in programming is that experience of being able to create and make something come to life in that way. Just mentoring as an experience is something, I think is valuable in a lot of ways beyond just the immediate being able to help someone things, like it's a cool experience being a mentor as well. EMILY: And I think it's really important, too as a mentor to have good mentors yourself. I was really lucky to have David just show up in my high school one day [laughs] and I've been really lucky consistently with the mentors in my life. In my internship that I mentioned, I worked with fantastic engineers who are really good teachers. It's difficult to figure out how to good teacher without having first had good teachers yourself and regardless of the level of experience I have, I think I will always want to have that mentor relationship so that I can keep learning. One of the things, too is a lot of my mentors are quite different from mine. Like I am a very quiet introvert person. I would not say I'm very charismatic. I would say David is the opposite of all those things. So wanting to build those skills myself, it's good to have a role model who has them. DAVE: Well, thank you for that compliment. EMILY: Yeah. MANDY: That's really interesting that you said to find mentor that's the opposite of yourself. I literally just heard the same thing said by a different person last week that was like, “Yeah, you should totally find someone who you want to be, or emulate,” and I thought that was really good advice. EMILY: I agree with that completely. There's a lot of conversation around diversity in computer science and that's definitely a problem. Women do not have the representation they should, like I've always gone through classes and been 1 of 3 women in the class. [chuckles] But I think one of the ways in which we can approach this, besides just increasing the enrollment number, is focusing on commonalities—kind of what I mentioned before— from the perspective of mentors who are different than their students. Maybe a male mentor trying to mentor a female student. Focusing on your commonalities rather than naturally gravitating towards people who are like you; trying to find commonalities with people who are different from you. I think that's important. From the student perspective, it's less about finding commonalities more about, like you said, finding the things you want to emulate. Looking at other groups of people and figuring out what they're good at and what things you would like to take from them. [laughs] So. DAVE: Yeah, that's been an interesting challenge I've noticed in the school system is that in the elementary school years, boys and girls are equally competent and interested in this material. By the time they get to high school, we have that 70/30 split of males versus females. In the middle school, the numbers are all over place, but in the formal classes, it seems to be at 70/30 split by 7th grade and I can't really find any single root cause that causes that. Unfortunately, I think I saw some stuff this week with Computer Science Education Week where students as young as first grade are working with small robots in small groups and there always seems to be the extrovert boy that is like, “It's a robot. I'm going to be the one that plays with it,” and he gatekeeps access to girls who are like, “It's my turn.” It's really discouraging to see that behavior ingrained at such a young age. Any attempt I try to address it at the high school level – well, not any attempt, but I feel like a lot of times I can come off as the creepy old guy trying to encourage high school age girls to be more interested in computer science. It's a hard place for me to be. EMILY: Yeah. I don't think you're the creepy old guy. [laughter] I think this is a larger topic in society right now is it's ingrained in women to be meek and to not be as confident, and that's really hard to overcome. That sounds terrible. I don't think people consciously do that all the time. I don't think men are consciously trying to speak over women all the time, but it it's definitely happened to me all over the place—it's happened at work, it's happened in interviews. I think getting over that is definitely really tough, but some of the things that have helped me are to see and celebrate women's accomplishments. Like every time I hear about Grace Hopper, it makes me so happy. I know one time in high school, David took a few other female students and I to a celebration of women's accomplishments and the whole thing, there were male allies there, but the topic of the night was women bragging loudly about the things that they've accomplished. Because that's not something that's encouraged for us to do, but it's something that it builds our confidence and also changes how other people see us. Because the thing is, it's easy to brag and it's saddening that people will just implicitly believe that the more you say you did. So the more frequently you brag about how smart you are, the more inclined people are to believe it because we're pretty suggestible as humans. When women don't do that, that subtly over time changes the perspective of us. We have to, very intently – I can't think of a word I'm trying to say, but be very intentional about bragging about ourselves regardless of how uncomfortable it is, regardless of whether we think we deserve it, or not. MANDY: I also think it's really important for women to also amplify other women, like empowered women empower women. So when we step up and say, “Look at this thing Emily did, isn't that cool?” EMILY: Yeah. MANDY: That's something that we should be doing to highlight and amplify others' accomplishments. EMILY: For sure. I've been to the Grace Hopper conference virtually because it was during COVID times, but that was a huge component of it was there would be these networking circles where women just talk about the amazing things that they've done and you just meet all these strangers who have done really cool things. It goes in both directions, like you said, you get to raise them up and also be encouraged yourself and have something to look forward to. ARTY: It sounds like just being exposed to that culture was a powerful experience for you. EMILY: For sure. ARTY: I was thinking about our conversation earlier about role models and finding someone to look up to that you're like, “You're a really cool person. I admire you.” Having strong women as role models makes it much easier for us to operate a certain way when we interact with other people, and stay solid within ourself and confident within ourself and not cave in. When all the examples around us of women are backing off, caving in, and just being submissive in the way that they interact with the world, those are the sort of patterns we pick up and learn. Likewise, the mixed gender conversations and things that happen. We pick up on those play of dynamics, the things that we see, and if we have strong role models, then it helps us shift those other conversations. So if we have exp more experience with these things, like the Grace Hopper conference and being able to go into these other that have a culture built around strong women and supporting being a strong woman, then you can take some of those things back with you in these other environments and then also be a role model for others. Because people see you being strong and standing up for yourself, being confident and they might have the same reaction to you of like, “Wow, I really admire her. She's really cool.” And then they start to emulate those things too. So these cultural dynamics, they spread and it's this subconscious spreading thing that happens. But maybe if we can get more experiences in these positive environments, we can iteratively take some of those things back with us and influence our other environments that, that maybe aren't so healthy. EMILY: Yeah. I agree. And I think also, it's important to be honest and open about where you started because it's easy, if you're a really confident woman walking into the room, for people to think you've always been that way. I think it's important to tell the stories about when you weren't, because that's how other people are going to connect with you and see a path forward for themselves. Definitely. I'll start by telling a story. I think it's just a million small experiences. I was a strong student in high school. I was very good at math. We had study halls where we'd sit in the auditorium and we'd all be doing homework, and students would often go to the guy in my math class who knew less than I did and ask for help. I would just sit there and listen to him poorly help the other students and mostly just brag about himself, and just be quiet and think about how angry it made me, but not really be able to speak up, or say anything. I'm very different now. Because of the exposure that I've had, I am much more quick to shut that down and to give a different perspective when someone's acting that way. MANDY: But how cool would it have been if that guy would've been like, “Don't ask me, ask Emily”? DAVE: That's a really important point because I hear women talk about this problem all the time and I don't think the solution is a 100% in the women's hands. I think that it's men in the room. My own personal experience, most of my career has been spent in government contracting space and, in that space, the percentage of women to men is much higher. It's still not great, but I think there's a better attempt at inclusion during recruiting. I think that there's a lot of just forces in that environment that are more amenable to that as a career path for women. And then when I started consultancy with my two business partners, Kim and Karen, that was an unheard-of thing that I had two women business partners and at the time we started it, I didn't think it was that big of a deal at all. But then we were suddenly in the commercial space and people thought it was some scam I was running to be a minority owned company and my partner was my wife, or I'd go into a meeting and somebody thought I brought a secretary and I was like, “No, she's an engineer and she's good, if not better than me.” It opened my eyes to the assumptions that people make about what the consulting rates even should be for men versus women and it's in that environment I learned that I had to speak up. I had to represent to be a solution to that problem. I think you can get in an argument with other guys where they aren't even convinced there's a problem to solve. They'll start talking about, “Oh, well, women just aren't as interested in this career path.” It's like, I've known plenty that are and end up leaving. EMILY: I think definitely having support from both sides has been really important because it is typically men in places of authority and to have them be encouraging and not necessarily forcing you into the spotlight, but definitely trying to raise you up and encourage you to speak out means a lot. ARTY: Yeah. I found most of the teams I've been on, I was the only woman on the team, or one of two maybe and early on, when nobody knows you, people make a lot of assumptions about things. The typical thing I've seen happen is when you've got a woman programmer is often, the bit is flipped pretty early on of that oh, she doesn't know what she's doing and stuff, we don't need to listen to what she says kind of thing and then it becomes those initial conversations and how things are framed, tend to affect a lot of how the relationships on the team are moving forward. One of the things that I learn as just an adaptive thing is I was really smart. So what I do, the first thing on the team I'd find out what the hardest problem was, that none of the guys could solve and figure it out, and then I would go after that one. My first thing on the team, I would go and tackle the hardest thing. I found that once you kick the ass of the biggest baddy on the yard, respect. [laughter] So I ended up not having problems moving forward and that the guys would be more submissive toward me, even as opposed to the other way around. But it's like you come into a culture that is dominated by certain ways of thinking in this masculine hierarchy, alpha male thing going on and if that's the dominant culture, you have to learn to play that game and stake yourself in that game. Generally speaking, in this engineering world, intelligence is fairly respected. So I've at least found that that's been a way for me to operate and be able to reset that playing field anyway. MID-ROLL: This episode is supported by Compiler, an original podcast from Red Hat discussing tech topics big, small, and strange. Compiler unravels industry topics, trends, and the things you've always wanted to know about tech, through interviews with the people who know it best. On their show, you will hear a chorus of perspectives from the diverse communities behind the code. Compiler brings together a curious team of Red Hatters to tackle big questions in tech like, what is technical debt? What are tech hiring managers actually looking for? And do you have to know how to code to get started in open source? I checked out the “Should Managers Code?” episode of Compiler, and I thought it was interesting how the hosts spoke with Red Hatters who are vocal about what role, if any, that managers should have in code bases—and why they often fight to keep their hands on keys for as long as they can. Listen to Compiler on Apple Podcasts, or anywhere you listen to podcasts. We'll also include a link in the show notes. Our thanks to Compiler for their support. ARTY: Well, speaking of games, Arty, one of the things that Emily mentions in her bio is playing Dungeons and Dragons and this is an area where as well as I know Emily from her high school years, this is not something I know much about Emily at all. So I'd like to talk about that. Play, or DM, Emily? EMILY: Both. But I really enjoy DMing because it's all about creating problems to solve, in my opinion, like you throw out a bunch of story threads. The way I approach things is I try actually, unlike a lot of DMs, I do not do a lot of world building for places my players haven't been. I pretty much, there are bright light at the center of the world and anything the light doesn't touch doesn't exist. I haven't written it and I don't really look at it that often. So I'm constantly throwing out story threads to try and see what they latch onto and I'll dive into their character backstory to see what they are more predisposed to be interested in. It's like writing a weekly web comic. You don't have necessarily a set beginning and end and you don't really know where you're going to end up in between, but you end up with all these cool threads and you can tie them together in new and interesting ways. Just seeing the connections between those and being able to change what you want something to be on the fly is really cool and just very stimulating mentally for me. So it's like a puzzle exercise the whole time and it is also an interesting social exercise because you're trying to balance the needs of each person. I feel like D&D allows you to know people on a really deep level, because a lot of times, our characters are just – that we're playing. I guess, I didn't really explain what D&D is; I just made an assumption that people would know. It's a tabletop role playing game where you make a character. You're usually heroic and you're going about on this adventure trying to help people solve problems and these characters tend to be just naturally an extension of ourselves. So you get to see all the things that subconsciously the person doesn't real about themselves, but that show up in their character. I think that's really cool. DAVE: So do you have a weekly game, or how often do you play? EMILY: I try to run a weekly game. College often gets in the way. [laughs] DAVE: How many players? EMILY: It ranges from 3 to 4, sometimes 5. It's really cool because it's also, most of them are people that I met during the pandemic. So we've played predominantly online and this is the way we've gotten to know each other. We've become really close in the year, or so since we started playing together through the game that I DM and through the game that one other person in the group DMs and it's cool. It's definitely a way to kind of transcend the boundaries of Zoom and of video calls in general. DAVE: Hmm. ARTY: How did you end up getting into that? EMILY: It was just a friend group in high school. Someone said, “Hey, I would like to run a Dungeon and Dragons game. Do you want to play?” And I said, “Oh, what's that?” I've always loved books and reading so it was kind of a natural progression to go from reading a story to making a story collaboratively with other people. So that just immediately, I had a connection with it and I loved the game and that's been a huge part of my hobbies and my outside of tech life ever since. DAVE: Yeah. I played D&D as a kid in the late 70s, early 80s, but my mom took all my stuff away from me when that Tom Hanks movie came out that started the whole Satan panic thing. So I didn't play for a long time until my own kids were interested after getting hooked on Magic. Seeing my own kids interested in D&D, the story building, the writing, the math that they had to do, like I don't know why any parent wouldn't encourage their kids to play this game. It's just phenomenal. The collaborative, creative, sharing, math; it's got everything. EMILY: Yeah. I'm an introverted person so it takes a lot to make me feel motivated to be in a group with other people consistently, but D&D does that and it does it in a way that's not, I guess, prohibitive to people who are naturally shy. Because you're pretending to be someone else and you're not necessarily having to totally be yourself and you're able to explore the world through a lens that you find comfortable. DAVE: That's really cool. EMILY: I guess, also, it kind of goes back to our conversation about teaching. Being a DM, a lot of my players are people who have not played before, or very, very new. Like, maybe they've read a lot about it, maybe they've watched them [43:18] shows, but they maybe haven't necessarily played. D&D does require a lot of math and there's a lot of optimization, like you can get very into the weeds with your character sheet trying to make the most efficient battle machine, whatever and that's not really always approachable. Especially when I started introducing my younger siblings to D&D, I used versions, D&D like games that were similar, but not quite D&D. Like less math, a very similar amplified character sheets so you're looking at fewer numbers, or fewer calculations involved just to kind of get the essence, because there's a few core concepts in D&D. You have six statistics about your character that they change a little bit between different types of role-playing games, but they're pretty universal, I think for the most part. It's constitution, strength, dexterity, wisdom, intelligence, and charisma. Once you kind of nail those concepts down and once a person understands what those skills are supposed to mean, that really opens the gates to understanding a lot more about the core mechanics of D&D outside of the spell casting stuff and all the other math that's involved. I think just simplifying the game down to that makes them fall in love with the narrative and collaborative aspect of the game, and then be more motivated to figure out the math, if they weren't already predisposed to that. DAVE: So if somebody were interested in picking up a game trying to figure it out, where would they start? EMILY: It really to depends on the age group. If you're going to play with high school students, I would definitely say if none of you have played before, then pick up a player's handbook, maybe a dungeon master's guide if you're going to DM, you've never DM before because it gives a lot of tips for just dealing with the problems that arise in a collaborative storytelling game. And then probably just a prewritten module so you don't have to worry about building your own story, because these modules are stories that are written by professional game developers and you can take pieces of them and iterate it on yourself so you don't have to start with nothing. But if you are going for a much younger audience, I can't remember off the top of my head what it was, but it's essentially an animal adventure game. It's very much D&D without using the word D&D because I think it's a different company, it's copyrighted, and whatnot. But you have these little cute dog characters and they're trying to defeat an evil animal overlord who wants to ruin the town festival. It's very family friendly, like there's no death like there is in regular D&D and it's just a chance to engage with the character creation aspect of it. MANDY: That's really cool. So we're about heading towards our time, but I really appreciate you coming on the show, Emily and I wanted to just ask you, if you could give any advice to young girls looking to get into tech, or software engineering, what advice would you give them? EMILY: I think don't be afraid to walk off the path. A lot of my life has been kind of bucking the prewritten path that a lot of people are told is the best one because it didn't work for me, or whatever reason, and I think it's important just to not be afraid of that and to be courageous in making your own path. MANDY: That's great advice. So should we head into reflections, everyone? Who wants to start us off? DAVE: I'll start with one. I mentioned that when asked Emily about her path into college, that I was interested in a similar path for my own kids. I had a really strange college path that I started out a music major, ended up a computer science major, and had a non-traditional path. I've always believed that college is what you make of it, not where you went. Where you went might help you get your first job, but from then on, it's networking, it's personality, it's how well you did the job. Talking to Emily about her path, just reinforces that to me and helps me plot a path for what I might have my own children do. I have triplet boys that are in 9th grade. So we're starting to think about that path and not only would a path through Virginia Community College save us a fortune, [laughs] it would also be a guaranteed admission into Virginia Tech, or one of the Virginia schools so it's definitely something worth to consider. So I appreciate that knowledge, Emily. ARTY: I've been thinking a lot about how we can better teach people that don't have a lot of experience yet. We've got so much stuff going on in this field of software engineering and it's really easy to not realize how far that this plateau of knowledge that we live in and work with every day to do our jobs, and how important it is to bring up new folks that are trying to learn. One of the things you said, Emily was about teaching is being able to find those shared things where we've got a common understanding about something—you used metaphor of male delivery to talk about IP addresses, for example. But to be thinking in those ways of how do we find something shared and be able to get more involved with mentoring, reaching back, and helping support people to learn because software is super cool. It really is! We can build amazing, amazing things. It'd be awesome if more of us were able to get involved and have that experience and having good mentors, having good role models, all of those things make a big difference. MANDY: I just love the conversation that we had about men and women in technology and for me, I love to reiterate the fact that empowered women empower women and I even want to take that a step further by saying especially right now in our field, empowered men also empower women. So I think that that's something that really needs to be said and heard and not perceived as like Dave said oh, he felt like the creepy guy encouraging girls, or women to get involved in tech. I think it's cool. Dave has personally, he's mentored me. He's gotten me more interested. I used to do assistant work and now I'm learning programming and it's because I've been encouraged to do so by a lot of different men in the industry that I've been lucky to know. DAVE: Well, thank you, Mandy. You certainly have a who's who of mentors. MANDY: I am very, very lucky to know the people I know. DAVE: I'm quite honored to even be named on that list of people you know. [laughter] EMILY: I think the thought I keep coming back to is one that I've mentioned, but didn't really crystallize in my head until this morning when I was preparing for this recording is, I listened to David's interview and I thought about like, “Oh wow, he did really well on the podcast, all these things that I wish I did.” It really crystallized the idea that your mentor should be different from you and should have skills you don't, and you should seek them out for that reason. Mentors tend to be the people that I run into and I haven't really thought about it that way before, but that gives me a different perspective to go out and intentionally seek out those people. That definitely gives some food for thought for me. [laughs] MANDY: I love intentionally seeking out people who are different from myself in general, just to learn and get perspectives that I might have never even thought of before. But with that, I guess we will wrap up. Emily, it's been so nice having you on the show. Congratulations and best of luck on your exams. I know being – [overtalk] DAVE: I can't believe you took the time to do this with your exams coming up. MANDY: I know! EMILY: I'm procrastinating as hard as I can. [laughter] MANDY: But it's been so nice to have you on the show. Dave, thank you for coming and being a guest panelist and Arty, it's always wonderful to host with you. So I just wish everybody a happy new year and we'll see you next week! Special Guests: Dave Bock and Emily Haggard.

Success IQ
182 - Meredith Kallaher: Digital Advertising Expert

Success IQ

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 33:35


About my guest: Meredith Kallaher is a self-professed podcast addict when she heard Rick Mulready, of The Art of Paid Traffic, say “Facebook ads are simple. They are all about the numbers,” everything for Meredith Kallaher just clicked. An A-Ha moment, maybe? Her CPA and 6 years with PricewaterhouseCoopers combined with her social media marketing expertise has uniquely prepared Meredith to help businesses execute and implement successful social media advertising campaigns. “I love numbers,” Meredith thought as Rick explained that successful ad strategies required Managers to understand the lifetime value of a customer for a business, compare that to the related acquisition cost by evaluating target audience sizes, cost per lead, return on ad spend, and click-through rate percentages. “EASY” said all the creative CPA's in the room! Our Sponsors: SalesflareSalesflare is the perfect CRM for any small or medium-sized B2B business that wants to make more sales with less work. The CRM fills out itself, by synchronizing with your email, calendar, phone, social media, ... and organizes all this data for you. Its email integration is unrivalled. It's instant, imports email signatures, tracks your emails on opens and clicks (with linked website integration), and brings your CRM right in your inbox. Start making sales simpler. Use Salesflare's automation features and enjoy its simplicity. Setting it up only takes minutes. visit https://www.salesflare.com (Salesflare) and get 20% Discount for 3 months with the code: SUCCESSIQ

The Credibility Nation Show
Purpose Beyond Profit with Timothy Morgan (CNS 219)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 5, 2022 6:39


In this episode, Timothy Morgan talks about purpose beyond profit: Marketing that makes a difference in the community by giving. He is a marketing expert, coach, consultant, founder, and CEO of Giver Marketing where he implements a basic marketing system, a simple and effective marketing strategy, to increase revenue and serve growing organizations. Timothy's passion is to get the word out for causes, companies, and leaders through marketing with a mission to bring awareness to meaningful and socially conscious organizations that are making a difference in local communities and beyond. His superpower is generating qualified appointments for coaches, consultants, advisors, brokers, and community leaders doing good in the world. If you're tired of deploying marketing that doesn't work and ultimately wants to add value as a socially conscious business, consider reaching out to Timothy Morgan by visiting his websites https://www.givermarketing.com/ and https://www.linkedin.com/in/coachtimothymorgan/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

Daily Astrology with Markus Barrington
Deep emotional aspects. Clever communications and big AHA moments

Daily Astrology with Markus Barrington

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 10:07


Deep emotional aspects. Clever communications and big AHA moments

Marketer of the Day with Robert Plank: Get Daily Insights from the Top Internet Marketers & Entrepreneurs Around the World
833: Have Meaningful Customer Surveys and Conversations to Create Meaningful Ideas with Darshan Mehta

Marketer of the Day with Robert Plank: Get Daily Insights from the Top Internet Marketers & Entrepreneurs Around the World

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 25:45


How are great ideas created? Many times, ideas come from the thought of two people or even multiple people just having a conversation over a cup of coffee. As entrepreneurs, these are the conversations that we should look for. Engaging in conversations with other people can give you that “Aha!” moment. But how exactly can we engage in those types of conversations? Listen to this episode to know more! Darshan Mehta of iResearch is going to talk about how you can create meaningful conversations. Stay Tuned! Resource dm@iresearch.com (Email)iRESEARCH (Official Website) Darshan Mehta (LinkedIn)

The Credibility Nation Show
Bringing Your Greatness Back with Marc Jospitre (CNS 218)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2022 6:32


In this episode, Marc Jospitre talks about bringing your greatness back by pulling it out from you. He is a mindset expert for business leaders and entrepreneurs, a seasoned insurance coach, and also a keynote speaker. Marc is helping result-eeking individuals and companies worldwide to increase their results quickly providing tools for high-performance jumps. Through the teaching of a precise methodology and the study of the human mind, Marc instills effective ideas and habits (Paradigm Shift). When you ask yourself “have I not achieved what I wanted in life?”, consider reaching out to Marc Jospitre through his LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/marc-jospitre-94a38015/ or visit https://www.marcjospitre.com/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The Korean Beauty Show Podcast
AHAs, BHAs and PHAs Decoded

The Korean Beauty Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 17:32


When it comes to acids, you've probably seen a few acronyms popping up over and over – AHAs, BHAs and PHAs.     Today, we're jumping in to take a look at the three most common types of acids and how to use them in your routine.      Episode Summary:    Exfoliants have come a long way since your first apricot scrub. While exfoliating has always been a big part of skincare routines, these days the chemicals are taking the spotlight  What do all they mean? AHA, BHA and PHA are the most common types of acids used in skincare today. If you're using acids in your products, chances are it's one of these three.   AHAs Alpha Hydroxy Acids (AHA) are the original gangster of skincare acids.   Naturally found in fruits, water-soluble AHAs such as lactic or glycolic acids gently melt away dead skin cells. They also stimulate the cell regeneration process, making for great anti-ageing benefits. They are also perfect for drier skin.   AHAs can benefit pigmentation, help to even out skin tone, preserve moisture and even reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.   Try: COSRX AHA Whitehead Power Liquid and Commleaf AHA Green Tea Peeling Liquid.   BHAs Beta Hydroxy Acids (BHA) are a gentler alternative to AHAs.    Salicylic acid is the most commonly used BHA today. Containing many of the same benefits as AHAs, the fat solubility of BHAs dissolve oil and makes them effective on blocked pores, blackheads, whiteheads and acne.   BHAs also have anti-inflammatory properties and soothe redness. Try: Benton Aloe BHA Skin Toner, COSRX Natural BHA Skin Returning A-Sol and ISNTree Clear Skin BHA Toner       PHA The new kid on the block, Poly Hydroxy Acids (PHAs) work similarly to AHAs in that they also melt away dead skin cells.   What makes PHAs different is that their molecules are larger. This means they take longer to work, which makes them perfect for light exfoliation on very sensitive skin. They are even recommended for sensitive or easily irritated skin. For mature skin types, PHA is also a good option as it helps preserve collagen levels.   Want to try all three together?! Try SOME BY MI's cult-favourite AHA BHA PHA line!  Practical Tips   Stay Sun Safe! It probably goes without saying, as you should already be using a high SPF product in your skincare routine, but if you want to introduce acids, then SPF is essential. Acids can work wonders with exfoliation, but they do make your skin more sensitive to the skin, so be religious about reapplying as well.    Make sure you don't overdo it on the acids.    Combining them can cause irritation, so if you are prone to dry skin, sensitivity or redness, stick to just one. On the other hand, if you have oily skin, combining BHAs and AHAs may be safe and even beneficial.   A word of caution though – if you notice any redness, sensitivity, or excessive dryness, that's a sign to slow down with your acids. Cut back to using them 2-3 times a week and alternate between your acids.   If you're layering them, start with your BHA first.  Think of layering acids like double cleansing – start with your oil-soluble BHA first, and then move onto your AHA.   BHAs are typically formulated to be a pH of 3.5 and AHAs have to be formulated at a pH of under 4.  You'll want to use your BHA product first, not only because  BHAs are lower in pH but also because they are oil soluble and AHAs are not. What to do if you liked this week's episode - AHAs, BHAs and PHAs Decoded   Don't forget to subscribe to the podcast so you never miss another episode Today is the last day to go into the running to win a $100 AUD STYLE STORY Gift Voucher. All you need to do is leave your review for the podcast.  Resources for Today's Episode  K-Beauty Alpha H Liquid Gold Dupe  Skin Acids Decoded How to Layer Acids    See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Circulation on the Run
Circulation January 4, 2022 Issue

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 3, 2022 26:39


Please join author George Dangas and Associate Editor Brendan Everett as they discuss the article “Colchicine in Cardiovascular Disease.” Dr. Carolyn Lam: Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. We're your co-hosts. I'm Dr. Carolyn Lam, Associate Editor from the National Heart Center and Duke National University of Singapore. Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome, everyone, to 2022. I'm Dr. Greg Hundley, Associate Editor, Director of the Pauley Heart Center at VCU Health in Richmond, Virginia. Carolyn, oh, we're starting off the year with a twist on the feature article. It's a review article on colchicine and cardiovascular disease. But before we get to that, how about we grab a cup of coffee and jump into some of the other articles in the issue? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Absolutely. The new year is starting off with a bonanza issue. This first topic is so important. We know that various non-invasive, intermittent rhythm monitoring strategies have been used to assess arrhythmia recurrences in atrial fibrillation ablation trials. But the question is, what is the frequency and duration of non-invasive rhythm monitoring that accurately detects arrhythmia recurrences and approximates the atrial fibrillation burden derived from continuous monitoring using the gold standard, implantable cardiac monitor? Now to answer this question, investigators Jason Andrade and colleagues from the Montreal Heart Institute, who looked at the rhythm history in 346 patients enrolled in the CIRCA-DOSE trial. They reconstructed the rhythm history using computer simulations and evaluated event-free survivals, sensitivity, negative predictive value, and AF burden in a range of non-invasive monitoring strategies including those used in contemporary AF ablation trials. Dr. Greg Hundley: Ah, very interesting, Carolyn. So what did they find? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Detection of arrhythmia recurrence following ablation was highly sensitive to the monitoring strategy employed between trial discrepancies and outcomes, in fact, may reflect these different monitoring protocols. Binary efficacy outcomes, such as time to AF recurrence, appeared to underestimate the true impact of catheter ablation on the burden of atrial arrhythmia. The most commonly performed intermittent rhythm monitoring techniques, like short duration 24- or 48-hour ambulatory Holter, they do miss a substantial proportion of arrhythmia recurrences and significantly overestimate the true AF burden in patients with recurrences. So based on measures of agreement, serial long-term, that is four seven-day or two 14-day intermittent monitors accumulating at least 28 days of annual monitoring provide estimates of AF burden that are comparable with the implantable cardiac monitor. However, implantable cardiac monitors outperform intermittent monitoring for arrhythmias and should be considered the gold standard for clinical trials. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice, Carolyn. It sounds like a lot of clarification on monitoring of AF burden. Well, my first paper comes to us from Dr. Prabhakara Nagareddy from The Ohio State University, The Wexner Medical Center. Carolyn, acute myocardial infarction results in an overzealous production and infiltration of neutrophils in the ischemic heart, and this is mediated in part by granulopoiesis induced by the S100A8/A9 NLRP3, IL-1 beta signaling axis in injury-exposed neutrophils. In this study, Carolyn, the investigators evaluated a hypothesis as to whether IL-1 beta is released locally within the bone marrow by inflammasome prime and reverse migrating neutrophils. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Ah, okay. So what did they find, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley: Okay, Carolyn. In response to myocardial infarction, the NLRP3 inflammasome prime neutrophils upregulated CXCR4 and reverse migrated to the bone marrow, where they adhered to adhesion molecules like P-selectin on the bone marrow endothelial cells. Second, Carolyn, in the bone marrow, the inflammasome prime neutrophils released IL-1 beta through gasdermin-dependent conduit pores without undergoing the mandatory pyroptosis. Third, genetic and/or pharmacological strategies aimed at limiting reverse migration of inflammasome prime neutrophils to the bone marrow or release of IL-1 beta, both suppressed granulopoiesis and improved cardiac function in mouse models of myocardial infarction. So Carolyn, therefore, strategies aimed at targeting specific signaling pathways within the neutrophils or reducing retention of the inflammasome prime neutrophils in the bone marrow may provide novel avenues to regulate inflammation and improve cardiac outcomes. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Wow, neat, Greg. Thanks for explaining that so nicely. Well, the next paper deals with my favorite topic, heart failure with preserved ejection fraction of HFpEF, and this time looks at mechanisms of sinoatrial node dysfunction. The investigators, led by Dr. Cingolani from Smidt Heart Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, sought to investigate the role of the intrinsic pacemaker on chronotropic incompetence in HFpEF. They performed extensive sinoatrial node phenotyping, both at baseline and after stress in the well-characterized Dahl salt-sensitive rat model of HFpEF. These rats exhibited limited chronotropic response associated with intrinsic sinoatrial node dysfunction, including impaired beta-adrenergic responsiveness and an alternating leading pacemaker within the sinoatrial node. Prolonged sinoatrial node recovery time and reduced sinoatrial node sensitivity to isoproterenol were confirmed in the two hit mouse model. Adenosine challenge unmasked conduction blocks within the sinoatrial node, which were associated with structural remodeling. Finally, single-cell studies and transcriptomic profiling revealed HFpEF-related alterations in both the membrane clock or iron channels and the calcium clock of the spontaneous calcium release events. Dr. Greg Hundley: Wow, Carolyn, lot of really interesting data here. So what were the clinical implications? Dr. Carolyn Lam: Yeah, it's a really great study. Two models of HFpEF-consistent result in an important topic. Basically, here at the take-home messages. Provocative testing can be valuable to elicit functional abnormalities to facilitate HFpEF diagnosis and considering the exceptionally high clinical and epidemiologic convergence between AFib and HFpEF, sinoatrial node dysfunction may underlie the development of abnormal atrial rhythms in HFpEF. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice, Carolyn. More information on HFpEF, again, one of your favorite subjects. Next, we're going to turn to a paper from Dr. Jian Li from the Peking Union Medical College Hospital. Carolyn, doxycycline has previously been demonstrated in a retrospective study to be associated with greater survival in patients with light chain AL amyloidosis. Therefore, Carolyn, this group prospectively compared the efficacy of bortezomib, cyclophosphamide, dexamethasone, or cyclophosphamide B or D, and cyclophosphamide B or D combined with doxycycline for cardiac amyloidosis. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Cool. So what did they find, Greg? Dr. Greg Hundley: Carolyn, this was a multi-center, open-label, randomized controlled trial, and 140 patients underwent randomization. The primary outcome was two-year progression-free survival. Progression-free survival was defined as the time from randomization to death, hematologic progression or organ progression, and that's the heart, the kidney, or the liver. And so Carolyn, these investigators in this trial demonstrated that doxycycline combined with cyclophosphamide B or D failed to prolong progression-free survival or cardiac progression-free survival compared with cyclophosphamide B or D alone in patients with cardiac AL amyloidosis. So Carolyn, a negative study that's quite informative and a very nice editorial that accompanies this article pertaining to future directions for management of AL cardiac amyloid. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Indeed important. Thank you. And there are other important papers in today's issue. There's a Research Letter by Dr. Pfeffer on the impact of sacubitril/valsartan versus ramipril on total heart failure events in the PARADISE-MI trial. Dr. Greg Hundley: Great, Carolyn. In the nail bag, boy, I've got a big list today. First, Dr. Churchwell has an AHA update on the need for policy change to improve maternal cardiovascular health. Next, Dr. Piazza has a Perspective piece on expanding the role of coronary CT angiography in interventional cardiology. There's an ECG challenge from Dr. Yarmohammadi entitled “Dancing Bundles with Stable Sinus Rhythm.” And next, we have our own Darren McGuire who, in this issue for all of 2021, is really recognizing our outstanding reviewers. And we want to thank all the listeners and everyone that reviews for us in this journal. Such an important feature and aspect to the publication of the wonderful articles that we receive. And then finally, there are some highlights from the circulation family of journals. Well, Carolyn, how about we get on to that feature discussion and learn more about colchicine and its use in cardiovascular disease. Dr. Carolyn Lam: Let's go and a Happy New Year, again, everyone. Dr. Greg Hundley: Welcome listeners to this January 4th feature discussion. This week, we're deviating a little bit because we are going to have an author discuss one of our in-depth reviews. As you know, we select those occasionally where they're is a topic that's very relevant in cardiovascular medicine and an investigator or team of investigators or authors will put together a very nice review of a topic. This week, we're going to talk about colchicine, and we have with us Dr. George Dangas from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and our associate editor, Dr. Brendan Everett, who manages this paper and he is from Brigham and Women's Hospital. Welcome, gentlemen. George, we'll start with you. George, why colchicine? Can you tell us a little bit about mechanism of action? Tolerability? Why would we want to use this particular agent in patients with cardiovascular disease? Dr. George Dangas: Thank you very much for the opportunity to join this interesting podcast. Colchicine is indeed an interesting drug. It's been around for centuries, in all honesty. In general, I would say it's a mild anti-inflammatory and in general, it's rather well tolerated. We'll go into those perhaps a little bit later. The precise mechanism is actually interestingly not quite defined. It may have a few ways to act by blocking perhaps the chemotaxis of the leukocytes or the adhesion of the leukocytes or the ability to release their granules, et cetera, but there isn't a specific major one that is targeting. Perhaps, it's targeting more than one mechanism in a mild way, and I think that goes into each utility, as well as the absence of the major side effect that might limit it. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. So you started to mention the word utility, so maybe let's go through some clinical indications, or clinical uses perhaps rather than indications, can you tell us a little bit about its use in individuals with pericarditis? Dr. George Dangas: I think this is where it started to enter the cardiovascular field because we all recognize that pericarditis is an inflammatory disease and inflammation of the pericardium of different reasons perhaps. And anti-inflammatory drug is rather fitted to treat an inflammatory disease and besides, it's not like we had any other drug, in all honesty. Clearly, recurrent pericarditis might be treated with steroids for example, but steroids is not something any cardiologist would jump as a first line and give high doses and all that. Colchicine made its way to pericarditis like acute or recurrent pericarditis, post-cardiac cardiology syndrome, restless syndrome or the specific post-cardiac surgery, major inflammation. And indeed has a daily dosage perhaps with some loading dose or double the daily dosage or something initially and then we give it for a prolonged period of time in order to suppress. I would say this is a reasonable choice rather than jumping to the steroid. And of course, you reserve the steroid for the, I would say, more severe or more recurrent cases. I think everybody understands this type of activity. There've been quite a few clinical studies in this aspect. Again, in the absence of a competitor, I think it's a winner in this area. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. And then, how about atrial fibrillation? Are there uses of this colchicine in patients with atrial fibrillation? Dr. George Dangas: Well, again, it's very interesting that a lot of atrial fibrillation, it may be in some ways inflammatory in origin. And quite frankly, we had an interesting [inaudible 00:14:50] clinical trial in American Heart Association in 2021. I'd like to point out here, the study that postoperative atrial fibrillation was mitigated when, during cardiac surgery, there was a slicing of the posterior pericardial. This allowing the inflammation in some ways that's related there. To me, that was a very interesting observation, though I related to colchicine because it validates the fact that there is something inflammatory in pericardial that related with the postoperative atrial fibrillation. So along these lines, let's go back to colchicine, Afib, and postop Afib, and post-ablation I would say patients. Again, there are risks of some inflammation and that's where the theory of a mild, rather well-tolerated, anti-inflammatory might come in. And there's been few studies, not a large definitive study, but several studies that are the, I would say, component with interesting results with colchicine in these patients. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Another area of cardiovascular disease that's emerging literally with some demonstrable results using colchicine is the realm of ischemic heart disease. Can you walk us through some of the utility myocardial infarction or maybe even post-percutaneous coronary artery intervention? Dr. George Dangas: Again, the hallmark in this type of diseases, cardiovascular disease or coronary heart disease, is the hallmark of role of inflammation in this disease. And we know very well from the studies of the C-reactive protein, importance is a marker of inflammation. Very, very important in the CAD as well as in even the treatment with the antibody canakinumab a little bit earlier in the CANTOS trial a few years earlier at the very high level inhibited inflammation had a benefit and colchicine comes in maybe a milder anti-inflammatory about this agent, but at the same time with significantly less cause and significantly better recognition among the clinicians and a lot less, I would say, tolerability problems or issues are less unknowns. And I think that's where it comes in. The difficulty has been that whenever you go to cardiovascular, the cardiovascular, I would say coronary artery disease specifically, ACS and all that, the level evidence required for the doctors to believe in a therapy is very different than the areas we discussed before where there's little bit of a pericardial disease, for example, not that many drugs, all of a sudden, coronary artery disease, the bar is so high, and that's where the difficulty has been. There've been several studies. They've been interesting results with some benefits, particularly due to the decrease in inflammation and the secondary prevention, one can say. That is really the hallmark of where it aims to benefit in the secondary prevention, but there hasn't been one massive study with clearly superb results. I would say adequately powered single study that is missing in some ways. But several studies have been, again, very, very encouraging, but we learned that there's no much point if loading a lot of doses of high doses of colchicine, and it's a little bit better, again, when you aim with a daily dose towards reduced recurrences, particularly if you started early after an acute event. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well, listeners, we're going to now turn to our associate editor, Dr. Brendan Everett, from Brigham and Women's Hospital. Brendan, you have a lot of papers come across your desk. First and foremost, what attracted you to this particular article? Dr. Brendan Everett: Well, thanks, Greg. And kudos to George and his team for putting together a really nice paper. It's great to have this kind of paper come into my inbox. That's specifically because colchicine, I think, has exploded as a really important novel therapy even though the therapy itself is perhaps hundreds of years old, as you heard George say a moment ago, but its role in treating cardiovascular diseases has really begun to emerge rapidly. I think there's a tremendous amount of enthusiasm for other ways to treat our patients who have really a recalcitrant cardiovascular disease, whether that's pericarditis, atrial fibrillation or I think, importantly, ischemic heart disease, because that's such a common disease and something where we're always looking for new ways to help patients live longer with fewer recurrent events. And so this paper I thought did a really good job of capturing the existing evidence for these conditions and some others and giving us a sense of where the strengths of that evidence lay and where the weaknesses were. I thought particular strength was in the tables where the authors laid out each of the trials and the results of the trial, their endpoints, where the benefit was potentially. And also importantly, where risks were seen because I think that's one of the really important questions that remains open with respect to colchicine therapy when we begin to talk about using it in a vast population of people with stable ischemic heart disease or post-myocardial infarction ischemic heart disease. Dr. Greg Hundley: Brendan, tell us a little bit about those risks. Dr. Brendan Everett: I'd be happy to do that. I want to emphasize before I dive in that I think the benefits that George has laid out are important, and I don't want to overshadow what the major trials have seen. But I think the thing that it is at least a little bit of the fly in the ointment, if you will, for colchicine in ischemic heart disease is that a couple of the large trials have shown an increased risk of non cardiovascular mortality or bad non-cardiovascular outcomes. And that's of concern, I think, as we saw in the CANTOS trial, which was the monoclonal antibody trial for canakinumab that George mentioned earlier, there was an increase in infection-related mortality. And so whenever you use an anti-inflammatory drug, you're worried about whether or not you're blunting other compensatory mechanisms that the body has to protect against infection and other diseases. I think it's likely that these findings are the play of chance, but we don't know for sure. For example, in the COLCOT trial, which I think is probably the largest and most interesting trial, which was designed and run in Canada, there was a slightly higher level of pneumonia in patients who got active therapy as compared to placebo. And then, two of the trials that were published more recently including LoDoCo2, which was a trial of about 5,000 patients run in the Netherlands and Australia. There was actually a marginally increased risk of non-cardiovascular mortality. That didn't reach statistical significance, but it was awfully close, and I think it gave people some concern. And then, there was also the COPS trial. Again, all these are really outlined in wonderful detail in the manuscript where there was a slight increase of total death and non-cardiovascular death. These events are few, but they're in a direction in two trials, and so they make people a little bit worried. I think the other thing that I noticed was the high prevalence of myalgia as a side effect. I think, Greg, you're always interested in the clinical implications and yesterday I was in clinic and saw a young patient who had had pericarditis. He had been prescribed colchicine by his primary care physician, and he literally couldn't stand and walk up straight because of the amount of abdominal pain he had, which was unusual. To be honest, I've given colchicine to a hundred patients at least, and none of them have had that profound of a side effect, but it's at least worth considering that some patients will not tolerate the therapy because of adverse effects. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Well, in just 30 seconds or so, for each of you, first George and then Brendan. George, balancing some of the efficacy and then some of the concerns, what do you see is the next studies to be performed really in this sphere of research? Dr. George Dangas: This is a great question. And indeed, the concerns one can say or the issues, I would say, regarding this drug, are indeed real because any drug that suppresses inflammation has this risk. There are two ways one can address those. One is with term administration. You don't prescribe it as an annuity forever, but you prescribe it in a three- to six-month or one-month or try to control the time. I think this is done in clinical practice, in all honesty. I don't think that people are prescribing colchicine for life. Same way when we prescribe statins, for example. On the other hand or from investigational point of view, I think the two sets of information we need and, in all honesty, when you investigate issues regarding mortality or these are rare events, there's only one. You need a very large trial or a very large register. A very large trial preferably and colchicine being an often genetic drug, funding sources are rather limited, but we have NIH chipping in with some funding periodically and that might really be needed. So I want to outline that in the last table of our very large, I would say large table of our manuscript but were very happily outlined many ongoing trials. There are, in atrial fibrillation, three coronary artery disease. One in PCI and two in stroke. Something we didn't touch up again. But again, there's the question of inflammation in stroke. I think there's a lot of work ongoing. Perhaps you can see some meta-analysis, again, in order to get a handle of those risks, but at a rather low rate. It's just a difficult thing to come around. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very good. Brendan, anything to add? Dr. Brendan Everett: I would just add I agree a hundred percent with George just said. I think the only missing piece there is heart failure, which I think is and many have shown that there's an inflammatory component to heart failure, whether it's heart failure with reduced ejection fraction or preserved ejection fraction. And the timing of when that intervention might be, whether it might be before the development of symptoms or because there's a lot of trials out there that have struggled with this question and have unfortunately failed to show any benefit, I would just encourage the listeners of the podcast to look at this paper because it's a really marvelous compilation of the evidence for what is a really hot topic in cardiovascular medicine, a really important topic for a lot of the reasons that George mentioned. It's just very well done and comprehensive. Again, kudos to the authors for making such a great effort at putting something together that has a lot of clinical relevance, I think, and also points the way forward for research as you ask, Greg. Dr. Greg Hundley: Very nice. Well, listeners, we want to thank Dr. George Dangas from Icahn School of Medicine in Mount Sinai and our own associate editor, Dr. Brendan Everett from Brigham and Women's Hospital for bringing us this data pertaining to colchicine benefits, as we know in acute and recurrent pericarditis, but also emerging indications related to post-procedural atrial fibrillation or coronary artery disease. And really, colchicine's targeting of cardiovascular inflammation is being helpful in those alleviating those processes. Well, on behalf of Carolyn and myself, we want to wish you a great week, and we will catch you next week on the run. Dr. Greg Hundley: This program, this copyright of the American Heart Association 2022. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more, please visit ahajournals.org.

The Credibility Nation Show
Being Where You Are Expected To Be with George Donald Miller (CNS 217)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2021 7:36


This episode features George Donald Miller who is an executive coach, life coach, mentor, and motivational speaker. He talks about being in the right place where you are expected to be while having happiness and satisfaction on what you have. He coaches and trains in social, and emotional intelligence, helping small business owners and startups get out of their own way. He is an activator, coaching emerging leaders in a variety of professions and communities. He also works with teams to bring together vision, innovation and character, in the service of sustainability and meaning in business and the marketplace. If somebody in your network, you heard them say at some time in their life I'm not unhappy or I'm not where I need to be or is there something else in life, you should reach out to George Donald Miller at https://www.linkedin.com/in/coachgmiller/ or georgedonaldmiller.com.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

A Rational Fear
Best Sketches of 2021 — Cash For Comment

A Rational Fear

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 30, 2021 59:31


tv new york women google australia new zealand australian china summit ceo america head speaking apple christmas god earth myanmar college uk world house nasa texas president renaissance hawaii strange donald trump gosh chucky internet melbourne united states borders north korea press white house planet earth fantastic portuguese lan abc air force one emperors ernie trolls microsoft adam sandler virgin father morrison glasgow blessed myspace defense swiss cost commonwealth steel guys canberra walk parliament catholic santa claus labour cancel new south wales spanish civil war angus olympic games foxtel sooner premier disgusting wilco joe biden southeast asian sketches prime minister bing rupert greatest shut statistics jesus christ david attenborough rupert murdoch minister pentecostal catholics qr john singleton parliament house digit fisa ps channel nine asio accountability earthlings bill gates boomer daily mail liberal aha sec news corp gabby mps jenin gst jon lovitz arctic monkeys mark zuckerberg solitaire personally tata barnaby public service rugby union deputy prime minister thank god amen paladin corona tom ballard areas bingbing gary moore australian government attorney general qantas sky news darrow jonestown dan murphy virginia gay sincerely high court herald sun net zero west gate bridge task force yahweh latham chem national party graham kennedy daily telegraph boston consulting group new journalism ndis liberal party half price scott morrison gilad anzacs peter dutton pps bhp werribee nbn harvey norman melbourne comedy festival mark latham lmp wallabies triple x alan jones virgin australia wilker pds kangaroo island barnaby joyce astrazeneca keulen ilitch mike walsh australian bureau lnp bondi beach angus taylor transcribed nazi party dan ilic environment minister anthony kelly jake brown christian porter morison mosman dawood unknown speaker lgs robert menzies white lotus lord jehovah coronavirus ted hamilton covid-19 pfizer covid brittany higgins
ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible
December 29: Psalm 149; Job 39–40:5; Isaiah 63–64; Revelation 20

ESV: Digging Deep into the Bible

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 11:57


Psalms and Wisdom: Psalm 149 Psalm 149 (Listen) Sing to the Lord a New Song 149   Praise the LORD!  Sing to the LORD a new song,    his praise in the assembly of the godly!2   Let Israel be glad in his Maker;    let the children of Zion rejoice in their King!3   Let them praise his name with dancing,    making melody to him with tambourine and lyre!4   For the LORD takes pleasure in his people;    he adorns the humble with salvation.5   Let the godly exult in glory;    let them sing for joy on their beds.6   Let the high praises of God be in their throats    and two-edged swords in their hands,7   to execute vengeance on the nations    and punishments on the peoples,8   to bind their kings with chains    and their nobles with fetters of iron,9   to execute on them the judgment written!    This is honor for all his godly ones.  Praise the LORD! (ESV) Pentateuch and History: Job 39–40:5 Job 39–40:5 (Listen) 39   “Do you know when the mountain goats give birth?    Do you observe the calving of the does?2   Can you number the months that they fulfill,    and do you know the time when they give birth,3   when they crouch, bring forth their offspring,    and are delivered of their young?4   Their young ones become strong; they grow up in the open;    they go out and do not return to them. 5   “Who has let the wild donkey go free?    Who has loosed the bonds of the swift donkey,6   to whom I have given the arid plain for his home    and the salt land for his dwelling place?7   He scorns the tumult of the city;    he hears not the shouts of the driver.8   He ranges the mountains as his pasture,    and he searches after every green thing. 9   “Is the wild ox willing to serve you?    Will he spend the night at your manger?10   Can you bind him in the furrow with ropes,    or will he harrow the valleys after you?11   Will you depend on him because his strength is great,    and will you leave to him your labor?12   Do you have faith in him that he will return your grain    and gather it to your threshing floor? 13   “The wings of the ostrich wave proudly,    but are they the pinions and plumage of love?114   For she leaves her eggs to the earth    and lets them be warmed on the ground,15   forgetting that a foot may crush them    and that the wild beast may trample them.16   She deals cruelly with her young, as if they were not hers;    though her labor be in vain, yet she has no fear,17   because God has made her forget wisdom    and given her no share in understanding.18   When she rouses herself to flee,2    she laughs at the horse and his rider. 19   “Do you give the horse his might?    Do you clothe his neck with a mane?20   Do you make him leap like the locust?    His majestic snorting is terrifying.21   He paws3 in the valley and exults in his strength;    he goes out to meet the weapons.22   He laughs at fear and is not dismayed;    he does not turn back from the sword.23   Upon him rattle the quiver,    the flashing spear, and the javelin.24   With fierceness and rage he swallows the ground;    he cannot stand still at the sound of the trumpet.25   When the trumpet sounds, he says ‘Aha!'    He smells the battle from afar,    the thunder of the captains, and the shouting. 26   “Is it by your understanding that the hawk soars    and spreads his wings toward the south?27   Is it at your command that the eagle mounts up    and makes his nest on high?28   On the rock he dwells and makes his home,    on the rocky crag and stronghold.29   From there he spies out the prey;    his eyes behold it from far away.30   His young ones suck up blood,    and where the slain are, there is he.” 40 And the LORD said to Job: 2   “Shall a faultfinder contend with the Almighty?    He who argues with God, let him answer it.” Job Promises Silence 3 Then Job answered the LORD and said: 4   “Behold, I am of small account; what shall I answer you?    I lay my hand on my mouth.5   I have spoken once, and I will not answer;    twice, but I will proceed no further.” Footnotes [1] 39:13 The meaning of the Hebrew is uncertain [2] 39:18 The meaning of the Hebrew is uncertain [3] 39:21 Hebrew They paw (ESV) Chronicles and Prophets: Isaiah 63–64 Isaiah 63–64 (Listen) The Lord's Day of Vengeance 63   Who is this who comes from Edom,    in crimsoned garments from Bozrah,  he who is splendid in his apparel,    marching in the greatness of his strength?  “It is I, speaking in righteousness,    mighty to save.” 2   Why is your apparel red,    and your garments like his who treads in the winepress? 3   “I have trodden the winepress alone,    and from the peoples no one was with me;  I trod them in my anger    and trampled them in my wrath;  their lifeblood1 spattered on my garments,    and stained all my apparel.4   For the day of vengeance was in my heart,    and my year of redemption2 had come.5   I looked, but there was no one to help;    I was appalled, but there was no one to uphold;  so my own arm brought me salvation,    and my wrath upheld me.6   I trampled down the peoples in my anger;    I made them drunk in my wrath,    and I poured out their lifeblood on the earth.” The Lord's Mercy Remembered 7   I will recount the steadfast love of the LORD,    the praises of the LORD,  according to all that the LORD has granted us,    and the great goodness to the house of Israel  that he has granted them according to his compassion,    according to the abundance of his steadfast love.8   For he said, “Surely they are my people,    children who will not deal falsely.”    And he became their Savior.9   In all their affliction he was afflicted,3    and the angel of his presence saved them;  in his love and in his pity he redeemed them;    he lifted them up and carried them all the days of old. 10   But they rebelled    and grieved his Holy Spirit;  therefore he turned to be their enemy,    and himself fought against them.11   Then he remembered the days of old,    of Moses and his people.4  Where is he who brought them up out of the sea    with the shepherds of his flock?  Where is he who put in the midst of them    his Holy Spirit,12   who caused his glorious arm    to go at the right hand of Moses,  who divided the waters before them    to make for himself an everlasting name,13     who led them through the depths?  Like a horse in the desert,    they did not stumble.14   Like livestock that go down into the valley,    the Spirit of the LORD gave them rest.  So you led your people,    to make for yourself a glorious name. Prayer for Mercy 15   Look down from heaven and see,    from your holy and beautiful5 habitation.  Where are your zeal and your might?    The stirring of your inner parts and your compassion    are held back from me.16   For you are our Father,    though Abraham does not know us,    and Israel does not acknowledge us;  you, O LORD, are our Father,    our Redeemer from of old is your name.17   O LORD, why do you make us wander from your ways    and harden our heart, so that we fear you not?  Return for the sake of your servants,    the tribes of your heritage.18   Your holy people held possession for a little while;6    our adversaries have trampled down your sanctuary.19   We have become like those over whom you have never ruled,    like those who are not called by your name. 64   Oh that you would rend the heavens and come down,    that the mountains might quake at your presence—2   7 as when fire kindles brushwood    and the fire causes water to boil—  to make your name known to your adversaries,    and that the nations might tremble at your presence!3   When you did awesome things that we did not look for,    you came down, the mountains quaked at your presence.4   From of old no one has heard    or perceived by the ear,  no eye has seen a God besides you,    who acts for those who wait for him.5   You meet him who joyfully works righteousness,    those who remember you in your ways.  Behold, you were angry, and we sinned;    in our sins we have been a long time, and shall we be saved?86   We have all become like one who is unclean,    and all our righteous deeds are like a polluted garment.  We all fade like a leaf,    and our iniquities, like the wind, take us away.7   There is no one who calls upon your name,    who rouses himself to take hold of you;  for you have hidden your face from us,    and have made us melt in9 the hand of our iniquities. 8   But now, O LORD, you are our Father;    we are the clay, and you are our potter;    we are all the work of your hand.9   Be not so terribly angry, O LORD,    and remember not iniquity forever.    Behold, please look, we are all your people.10   Your holy cities have become a wilderness;    Zion has become a wilderness,    Jerusalem a desolation.11   Our holy and beautiful10 house,    where our fathers praised you,  has been burned by fire,    and all our pleasant places have become ruins.12   Will you restrain yourself at these things, O LORD?    Will you keep silent, and afflict us so terribly? Footnotes [1] 63:3 Or their juice; also verse 6 [2] 63:4 Or the year of my redeemed [3] 63:9 Or he did not afflict [4] 63:11 Or Then his people remembered the days of old, of Moses [5] 63:15 Or holy and glorious [6] 63:18 Or They have dispossessed your holy people for a little while [7] 64:2 Ch 64:1 in Hebrew [8] 64:5 Or in your ways is continuance, that we might be saved [9] 64:7 Masoretic Text; Septuagint, Syriac, Targum have delivered us into [10] 64:11 Or holy and glorious (ESV) Gospels and Epistles: Revelation 20 Revelation 20 (Listen) The Thousand Years 20 Then I saw an angel coming down from heaven, holding in his hand the key to the bottomless pit1 and a great chain. 2 And he seized the dragon, that ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, and bound him for a thousand years, 3 and threw him into the pit, and shut it and sealed it over him, so that he might not deceive the nations any longer, until the thousand years were ended. After that he must be released for a little while. 4 Then I saw thrones, and seated on them were those to whom the authority to judge was committed. Also I saw the souls of those who had been beheaded for the testimony of Jesus and for the word of God, and those who had not worshiped the beast or its image and had not received its mark on their foreheads or their hands. They came to life and reigned with Christ for a thousand years. 5 The rest of the dead did not come to life until the thousand years were ended. This is the first resurrection. 6 Blessed and holy is the one who shares in the first resurrection! Over such the second death has no power, but they will be priests of God and of Christ, and they will reign with him for a thousand years. The Defeat of Satan 7 And when the thousand years are ended, Satan will be released from his prison 8 and will come out to deceive the nations that are at the four corners of the earth, Gog and Magog, to gather them for battle; their number is like the sand of the sea. 9 And they marched up over the broad plain of the earth and surrounded the camp of the saints and the beloved city, but fire came down from heaven2 and consumed them, 10 and the devil who had deceived them was thrown into the lake of fire and sulfur where the beast and the false prophet were, and they will be tormented day and night forever and ever. Judgment Before the Great White Throne 11 Then I saw a great white throne and him who was seated on it. From his presence earth and sky fled away, and no place was found for them. 12 And I saw the dead, great and small, standing before the throne, and books were opened. Then another book was opened, which is the book of life. And the dead were judged by what was written in the books, according to what they had done. 13 And the sea gave up the dead who were in it, Death and Hades gave up the dead who were in them, and they were judged, each one of them, according to what they had done. 14 Then Death and Hades were thrown into the lake of fire. This is the second death, the lake of fire. 15 And if anyone's name was not found written in the book of life, he was thrown into the lake of fire. Footnotes [1] 20:1 Greek the abyss; also verse 3 [2] 20:9 Some manuscripts from God, out of heaven, or out of heaven from God (ESV)

30 Minutes to President's Club | No-Nonsense Sales
Playbook 8: Running a Killer Demo

30 Minutes to President's Club | No-Nonsense Sales

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 34:48


Every 10th episode, we tear down one topic. This is how to run a killer demo. Download the 30MPC Cold Calling Battlecard.======================Four Actionable Takeaways: * Show the 20% of your features that solve 80% of the problems.* Always prep for who is in the room, what they want to see, and the objective of the call.* Show as few screens as possible in the demo, go right into the “Aha” moments, and ask questions.* Control the room by setting expectations upfront and directing excessive questions to future calls.======================Outreach: Efficiently and effectively engage prospects to drive more pipeline, close more deals: https://click.outreach.io/30mpc======================Gong: Improve your win rates, clone your best sellers: gong.io/30mpc======================Vidyard: Free Screen Recording and Video Creationists: https://www.vidyard.com/30mpc======================Dooly: Instantly stop your CRM suffering: https://refer.dooly.ai/30mpc-page/======================Skipio: The Sales Rep's Playbook for Texting in the Sales Process: https://www.skipio.com/30mpc======================Focus Areas: DemoSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

The Credibility Nation Show
How To Avoid Failing Projects with Ken Judy (CNS 216)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2021 7:24


In this episode, Ken Judy, Chief Operating Officer at Stride Consulting, talks about how to avoid failing software projects by understanding what the leader really wants to achieve. He is also an executive manager, coach, product owner, and developer. Ken and his team seek first to understand what success looks like and what keeps you up at night. Then, they will embed and work alongside you to create a customized solution that results in the right approach for you. If you've got a software project and you fall into that 70 to 90% that is #Failing in some way or another and you want to reach out to stride, you should consider reaching out to Ken Judy by visiting www.stridenyc.com or https://www.linkedin.com/in/kenjudy/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The Credibility Nation Show
Transforming Career Professionals Globally with Marie Zimenoff (CNS 215)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2021 6:52


In this episode, Marie Zimenoff talks about transforming career professionals globally with human approach and innovative trends. She is a speaker, leader, entrepreneur, trainer, coach, careers industry advocate and counselor, and CEO of Career Thought Leaders Consortium where she provides tools that build credibility and increase effectiveness convening with thought leaders to track global influences on employment, job search, and career management. Marie understands that dedicated professionals in the careers field need and crave first-class support, training, and innovation. She merges vision and best practice training to elevate the career industry worldwide. If you want to be up to speed on trends and best practices in the career services industry, consider reaching out to Marie Zimenoff by visiting her websites https://www.careerthoughtleaders.com/ and https://www.linkedin.com/in/mariezimenoff/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

Circulation on the Run
Circulation December 28, 2021 Special

Circulation on the Run

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2021 28:19


In this week's edition of Circulation on the Run, Dr. Amit Khera introduces the new Social Media Editors to our Circulation listeners. Please welcome Dr. Vanessa Blumer, Dr. Pishoy Gouda, Dr. Xiaoming (Ming) Jia, Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre, and Dr. Sonia Shah to Circulation. Dr. Amit Khera: Welcome to Circulation on the Run, your weekly podcast summary and backstage pass to the journal and its editors. I'm Amit Khera, Associate Editor from UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, and Digital Strategies' Editor for Circulation. And today I have the privilege of sitting in for your usual host, Dr. Carolyn Lam, and Dr. Greg Hundley. Well, two times a year, we really have a special issue, there's no print issue for Circulation in the summer and here in that holiday time. So, fortunately, we get to use this for really whatever we want to do. Dr. Amit Khera: And today we have a very special issue. A few months ago, we transitioned over from a prior social media editor team that was Jainy Savla Dan Ambinder, and Jeffrey Hsu. We were able to recruit a fantastic group of new social media editors. You probably have seen their work behind the scenes, but you've not gotten to meet them personally. So, today I have the privilege of introducing you to our new social media editors. This group of five, that's been working for several months and we get to know them a little bit. Get to hear a little bit about their perspective on social media from fellows in training, and also what they've learned so far in their few months in working with Circulation. So, I'm going to go one by one and introduce you. And first I want to introduce you to Dr. Vanessa Blumer. Vanessa, tell us a little bit about yourself. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: Thank you so much, Dr. Khera, it is such an honor to be here. And I've had so much fun the months that I've been working for Circulation, it's truly just a privilege to work alongside this talented group. So I'm Vanessa Blumer. I am originally from Caracas, Venezuela, born and raised there, did all of my medical training back home. That included medical school, a year of rural service, or rural medicine. Then I actually did residency training in Venezuela as well. It wasn't really in my plans straight away to come to the US, but a little bit due to the political situation that we all know that Venezuela's going or suffering, I decided to come to the US. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: I did residency in the University of Miami, Jackson Memorial hospital, which I loved. Stayed there for a chief year. And then after that came to Duke University to do cardiology fellowship. I'm currently a third year cardiology fellow at Duke, doing a year of research at the DCRI, which I am enjoying a lot, and will be doing heart failure next year. I will be going to Cleveland Clinic for a year of advanced heart failure. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, you've had quite a journey, Vanessa, and congratulations, I think your match was relatively recently. So, we're excited to see where your career takes you from here and appreciate your contribution so far. Now I'm going to introduce you to Pishoy Gouda. Pishoy Tell us a little bit about yourself.     Dr. Pishoy Gouda: Morning, Dr. Khera. My name is Pishoy. I have had the privilege of doing my medical trading all over the world. I was born here in Toronto and moved to Edmonton where I mostly grew up. Since then, I traveled to Galway Ireland where I spent six years to do my undergraduate medical training. Hopped over a short flight and did my Masters in Clinical Trials in the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine before returning to Canada to start my residency training. Got to work with some amazing people in Calgary while I completed my internal medicine training, and then finally returned home to Edmonton where I am in the last few months of my adult cardiology training. Dr. Pishoy Gouda: Next year, I'm really excited to start my interventional cardiology training, which is going to be really exciting. Some of my interests, working with social media, wearable technology so working with this great group has been really awesome. Dr. Amit Khera: Thank you Pishoy. Obviously lots of travels from you as well, and we definitely appreciate your expertise and interest in social media and in technology. It's been very valuable. Next someone who's closer to my backyard. Ming Jia. Ming, welcome. Dr. Xiaoming (Ming) Jia: Hello from Houston, and thank you Dr. Khera. So, it's been a great opportunity to be involved as a social media editor for Circulation. So I'm a current cardiology fellow at Baylor College of medicine in Houston, Texas. Was originally born in China, and grew up in sunny Florida. I did my medical training in Florida as well, and then moved over to Houston, Texas for residency, and now wrapping up my last year in general fellowship. Next year, I'll be staying in Houston at Baylor for interventional fellowship. Then, hopefully after that career in interventional cardiology, but as well as preventional cardiology as well, I tended to actually interest in both interventional and preventional cardiology. Dr. Amit Khera: Very cool. I know you and I were talking about this right beforehand, how that nexus of the two fields and just some of your interest in a lot of the research you've done so far. So again, offering a unique and different perspective, which we appreciate so, welcome, Ming. Next, Peder Myhre. Peder, welcome. Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre: Thank you so much, Dr. Khera. This is Peder Myhre from Norway, all the way across the pond. And it's such a great honor to be part of this podcast, which I've been a big fan since it started a couple years ago and where Carolyn Lam has been doing with it, it's been really amazing. And I've actually been promoting it to everyone I know with any kind of interest in cardiology. My position in training right now is that I'm in the last year of cardiology training and I'm also doing a 50% post-doc at the University of Oslo with Professor Torbjørn Omland as a mentor. And as a part of my training, I was one year at Harvard University at Brigham Women's Hospital to do research with Professor Scott Solomon's group a couple of years ago. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, we appreciate your affinity and now you get to be on the podcast. That's pretty exciting as well. I should say, each of you is linked to an outstanding Associate Editor at your home institution. And so we're glad you have that mentorship as well there too. And speaking of someone at home institution, someone who I've known for a very long time, Dr. Sonia Shah. Sonya, introduce yourself, please.   Dr. Sonia Shah: Thank you, Dr. Khera. No, just to echo what everyone has said already, it truly has been an honor and a privilege to work with this awesome team. And it's been a lot of fun along the way. So I'm Sonia Shah. I'm a third year cardiology fellow at UT Southwestern in Dallas, Texas. Originally from Central Florida, actually. And then did my undergrad medical school training in Chicago and then went out to the West Coast for my residency training was out at Stanford and now I'm loving being in Dallas. So it's been a lot of fun. So I particularly have an interest in women's cardiovascular health and advanced imaging. And so currently looking for jobs now. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, I can say you've been a star fellow and have a really incredible and unique skillset. And, so we look forward to seeing what your career brings and certainly you've brought a lot to our podcast. And we'll talk more about that in just a bit, since you are longest standing social media editor currently. Well, I want to now dig in a little bit and you all again, I want to thank you for what you've done for the last several months. I certainly have learned a lot from you. We've had some discussions as a group about, thoughts about social media and how social media works. Dr. Amit Khera: And so maybe we'll start with the sort of existential question about, why social media? What is the value for journals, if you think about Circulation, but really any journal. What does social media bring? And again, you all have a unique perspective as largely fellows in training and Vanessa, maybe I'll go back to you a little bit about, why social media? What's the point of relevance about all this work that you're doing? Dr. Vanessa Blumer: Yeah. Thank you so much, Dr. Khera. I think that's a great question. And I do think that that's a question that we ask ourselves every day as we're doing this. I think the way that the medical literature has been evolving, it's been evolving in a way of social media and people are consuming more and more social media daily. I think in my own daily life, I discover articles that I'm interested in through social media a lot more than I used to before. And I also discover that I'm interested in particular articles, the way that they are transmitted in social media or the way that they're presented in social media. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: So I think we're reinventing ourselves and reinventing the way that we present to the public, the articles that we have in Circulation, so that people want to read our articles or want to read the articles that authors are doing such a great job at putting together. So I think, we are coming up with creative ideas every day and it's part of what we discuss as a group of how do we present this so that people want to read the articles and discover all the hard work that authors are putting together through different social media platforms. Because we know that people consume not just one social media platform, but several. So I think there's huge potential in social media if we use it in the right way. Dr. Amit Khera: Yeah. I think your points well taken. I know we're going to talk a lot about Twitter today, but as you pointed out, there are other media as well. That's just in the sort of main, I guess, currency and in the medical and cardiovascular literature. And you mentioned value to authors and one thing you mentioned, which I'll transition a little is about the way things are presented, help you get interested in them. And so that gets to the art of the tweet. Something we've talked about a little bit and, there's a little bit of on the job training, if you will. And we've talked about is there a gold standard in terms of what makes a good frankly, a medical journal tweet. Well, Ming, what do you think? You've been toiling over this for a few months now and tell us what you think is helpful in a medical journal tweet in terms of achieving the goals that Vanessa mentioned. Getting an audience interested in reading these articles is really doing justice for the authors to transmit their research. Dr. Xiaoming (Ming) Jia: Great question, Dr. Khera, and this is something that, as a social media editor, I'm still learning. So for me, writing a concise tweet is very important. Trying to get that essence of a entire study into a very limited number of characters. Obviously having a great figure that highlights the key findings of a study is also very important as well. Now at the same time, I think the most effective posts though, are those that serve as a hook for the paper. So, while we want are tweet to stand on their own. I think the most effective tweets helped to entice the audience to want to read a little bit more and go and read the entire manuscript. So certainly there is a art and skillset in terms of writing these effective posts. Dr. Amit Khera: Yeah. You certainly bring up some key points, right? So being concise, one by definition and but two is, there are tweets that sometimes can go on and on and that comes into using some interesting hashtags and some shortcuts. But I think your point about innuendo, enticing, not giving away the whole story, but just enough to get people to want to read more. And I think that that is an art. Dr. Amit Khera: And I've certainly seen as you all have done this more and more about how your own writing and tweets have evolved. Pishoy, we've talked a little bit about, all of you are researchers, you've all done some great research, about thinking about social media, sort of a research area. Again, since there's no gold standard about what's a great tweet, just thinking about it more of a discipline as we do any other area that we want to explore scientifically. What are your thoughts about, how do we figure out more, learn more about what makes a great tweet? Dr. Pishoy Gouda: Yeah. Evidence based tweeting is something that I've been interested in. Everything that we do, we want to make sure that we do it well and that we do it effectively and the same goes with social media posts. So what works, what raises interactions with our content. And that's something that other disciplines and advertising have been doing all the time and we should be doing the same as well. If our goal is to increase interactions with our content, then we want to make sure that we are doing it in the most evidence based way. And we've learned a few things. We know that cardiologists and individuals in medicine in general have been using Twitter much more frequently as a way to consume in both your medical and research content. Dr. Pishoy Gouda: So what makes a post great and what increases its interaction and the bottom line is we don't really know. We have a few studies and a few small randomized controlled trials that have been done that give us some insight. We know that vigor, that tweets that include images might pull readers to them a little bit more. But you know what exactly works. We have a lot of observational data, but we don't have a lot of high quality data that gives us the answer to this question. So what we've learned so far is use images, use links. If you can use graphical abstracts, that seems to help as well. But, it's something that we're continuously looking at and we're really excited to put together some new evidence coming up soon in the future. Dr. Amit Khera: Evidence based tweeting. I like it. As you and I have discussed, my predecessor Carolyn Fox had a randomized trail called Intention-to-Tweet using Circulation and then a follow-up study to that. So we hope to do also some good high quality research about social media and what works. Well, that gets to who's your audience, right? I always like to think about when you start something, who's your audience. And there could be lots of people. I think probably our strike zone is researchers, scientists, clinicians, of course, there's lots of lay individuals too, that are paying attention on social media. One thing that's different about Circulation than some other journals is this melding of basic science and clinical science. Some journals are all basic science and all clinical science and Circulation's both. Dr. Amit Khera: And I mean, frankly, that's posed an interesting challenge for this group. None of you are, including myself, are card carrying basic scientists, if you will. So we've had to translate those articles. And I would consider that both a challenge, but also an opportunity because, if we're speaking to a basic science audience, of course we may have one tone we use, but we want this basic science. I think that's the purpose of Circulation is basic science applicable to the clinician and clinical researchers. So, translating that's been a real opportunity. And Peta, maybe I can ask you about that opportunity of translating basic science for clinical researchers and clinicians. Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre: Yes. I completely agree. And I've learned so much from this job as a social media editor to really try to get the essence out of a basic science paper and the translational outlook for clinicians. Because all of the papers that are basic science that at least I came across in Circulation also have a clinical implication and a translational side of it. And I think when we read these papers and try to sum it up in one tweet, we want to keep the most important essentials of the basic science, but also extend it to clinicians so that they understand in what setting and what this can potentially mean in the future. So for me, that's the biggest challenge when we review basic science papers, but it's also perhaps the part of this job that I learn the most. Dr. Amit Khera: Yeah. I agree. I think we're all learning a lot. I've certainly learned a lot by delving in deeper into the basic science papers and figuring out how to translate them appropriately. And I think this really highlights, as you mentioned, what Dr. Hill our Editor in Chief, his feeling is basic science papers in Circulation all have to have important clinical implications. That's the benchmark, if you will. So I think we've seen that shew in terms of what papers have come across for you all. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, I'm looking now at our longest standing social media editor, Sonya Shaw, she started a few months before as sort of a transition because we certainly wanted someone in place that could help bridge between the old and the new. And Sonya, you've had a decent amount of experience now with two editorial teams. Tell us what you've learned so far by working as a social media editor at Circulation. What are some of the observations you've had and some of the things you've learned in this space? Dr. Sonia Shah: Yeah, certainly. So I think a couple things. I think my ability to accurately and concisely convey the important key points from each journal has definitely improved. But I think the other unique thing, unique perspective that we gain as social media editors is getting to actually see the behind the scenes workings of how the journal works and how papers are put together and accepted. And so I think it's been interesting to see how papers are being analyzed and the teamwork that's required by the Associate Editors and the Editors and making sure to do each paper justice and properly evaluate it. So I think that's been a really cool experience. It certainly has improved my ability to write when I try to think of, what are the key points I want to include. And how to convey information in a way that will be appealing to journals. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, thank you for that. We take this job very seriously, as you all have in that point about doing each paper justice, because you've seen, one, from the author's perspective about how much work they put in and you've been an author before and want to make sure that we appropriately appreciate that. And then also the Associate Editors, there are hours and hours of work for each paper. So even though it comes out, maybe in a few characters in a tweet, we appreciate all that's going behind it. And I'm glad you've gotten to see that process through. Ming, maybe I can come back to you. What have you learned so far by working in Circulation for the last few months? Dr. Xiaoming (Ming) Jia: I do want to echo what Sonya just said in terms of really getting a glimpse of the behind the scenes work is quite amazing. The amount of work and coordination it takes to get a paper from publication to promotion. And, we don't really get that exposure as a author for a manuscript or even as a peer reviewer. So, that part has definitely been a great learning experience. On the other side, I do find it interesting that ever since taking on this role as a social media editor, my way of writing has changed as well. So, trying to be more efficient, getting key points across and really being concise and focused in my manuscript writing. So that's been very helpful from a personal level as well. Dr. Amit Khera: We're very thankful for that. I think we always want this to be bidirectional where you all are contributing in meaningful ways. But that the goal here with fellows in training in this role, social media editors. But for you all to be learning something as well. So I'm glad that that has occurred. And we'll talk more about that in just a few minutes. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, we have a couple of international social media editors and this is my intention. We want to make sure we have a diverse group of social media editors. By background, by thought, by location. And, one way that the beauty of that is again, we get different perspectives. I guess the downside is time zones. We were just joking before, as we were starting this podcast about some of us are very early in the morning and one of our social media editors unfortunately is always late at night when we have our meetings. Peta, tell us a bit about unique observations from an international perspective. You said you've been following Circ for a while, but tell us, from your perspective in Europe, the social media process and how you see it. Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre: Thank you so much. And it's actually been a really transformation for me from before I spent my year in Boston to after. Because I really learned the potential of using social media and especially Twitter to stay updated and get the latest papers and thoughts from experts in the field. And I remember before I went there, I was often very frustrated that it was so inconvenient to get across important papers that was within my field of interest. Because all the journals were not longer sent in paper to our hospital and the websites were confusing. Dr. Peder Langeland Myhre: So when Dr. Vaduganathan at the Brigham & Women's Hospital introduced me to Twitter, that really was an eye opener for me. And, ever since that, 90% of the papers that I read I first see on Twitter. Because that's the first place, the people that are within my field, publish it or tweet it. And also I'm able to, you follow a certain amount of scientists and physicians and they have the same interest as you. So it's also, most of it is relevant for what I want to read. So it's really been a revolution for me to start to use Twitter and social media for medical and scientific purposes. And not only for friends and family. Dr. Amit Khera: Yeah. I think it's some great points. One, is even simplistically just be able to access articles, which we don't always appreciate, from people from around the world. And then obviously what many can, is follow people that have similar interests and amazing to see sort of how different people consume the literature. And for you Twitter being your entry point, I guess, for how you do that, which is I'm sure many, many people do the same. And we have another international editor you met earlier. Pishoy, tell us your perspective. And obviously you're in Canada now and have moved many places. What's your perspective from an international perspective, looking at social media? Dr. Pishoy Gouda: Coming to work at Circulation, I expected a very niche editorial board, but what I'm really finding out is boy, does it take a village. And it is people from all over the world. And it really hits home that collaboration and research has become a global phenomenon. And to be able to do art well and to appropriately represent researchers from across the world. We have an editorial board and team that is global and it really does take a village to take a paper from submission all the way through the publication team, starting from the authors to the peer reviewers, editors. But then the entire post-production team, which is behind the scenes and don't get a lot of glory, but they do a lot of the heavy lifting to make sure that, the research that's submitted gets in front of readers. And that's something that I hadn't really thought of before. And it's been really interesting to see how that process unfolds. So that's definitely been eye opening for me. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, I appreciate what you said about, when it takes a village and I would be remiss if I don't always call out Augie Rivera, who is the engine and mastermind behind Circulation, who's helping us do this podcast today and every week. But the other part is the international workings I think many may not appreciate. We have editorial board meetings every other week at very different time zones on purpose because we have people in Europe and in Asia and in Africa. And as you know, Dr. Lam who's the main podcast editor is in Singapore. Dr. Amit Khera: So, this is by intention. It really gives us a wonderful international perspective. And so we're so glad to have you two as part of our international team. Well, I think that's a great transition, a little bit to just talking about fellows in training and involvement in journals for Circulation perspective, and from the AHA, I should say, getting fellows in training involved in cardiovascular research, the editorial process, this is something that's really important to us and something we continually strive to find new ways to do. So, Vanessa, I'm going to come back to you. I know, not just at Circulation, but I know at other journals you've had some responsibilities. Tell us a little bit of what you tell other fellows in training about getting involved in journal activities. How to, and what's the benefit. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: Thank you so much Dr. Khera. I think this is such an important question. First my recommendation is, get involved in one way or another. I think there's different ways of getting involved as simple as just start reviewing articles. And the reason I say this is as I aspire to become an academic, a well-rounded academic cardiologist, I think my involvement with journals has just made me a much better researcher, a much better academic cardiologist. It's made me, I think, Sonya said this so well, it's made her a better author. It's made me a better writer. So I think it compliments what you do just so much better. I think you're better at what you do when you see the behind the scenes and you understand what happens in scholarly publishing. So I think there's different ways of getting involved. I know that Circulation has many and then probably a good way is to reach out. Dr. Vanessa Blumer: I know that people can reach out to us and we can probably guide them along the way, but different journals have different ways of getting involved. But I think if you want to start, one way is start reviewing. You learn a lot through the review process in itself on how an article is structured. And there's some journal that have a little bit more of a mentorship approach towards reviewing. And, that's also a good way starting out. When we start off as residents, we get some papers get in our inbox to review and we really don't necessarily know how to approach it. So maybe a mentorship approach to it is a good way to start. But overall, I would just say, start getting involved. I think it's a great experience. Personally, I have learned so much from it and I think I'm just a better academic cardiologist because of it. Dr. Amit Khera: Thank you for that. And I think your point about just find ways to get involved. And I think our challenge is to continue to facilitate ways for trainees, fellows in training and others to get involved. But I think that that first step in finding maybe a mentor of your institution that could help guide you would be important. And I'm going to finish with Sonya. I'm going to come back to you. You've not only had the social media editor window for quite some time. Being at Circulation, you get to see behind the curtain perhaps more than others because, Circulation is such a big part of what we do at UT Southwestern. And, we've had this Fellow Reviewer Program where you've been able to participate in reviews and things like that. From your perspective, maybe telling the fellows in training, listening out there about getting involved in journal activities, the value that you've seen and how to do so. Dr. Sonia Shah: Yeah, I think that's a really important question. At the end of the day, the ability to read and interpret and take away the major conclusions and properly interpret a study is a skill. And so I think the more you do it, certainly the better you get at it. And being part of a journal being on the reviewer end, being on the end where you're creating social media posts is really an opportunity to develop and refine that skill. And so to all the fellows out there who are interested, regardless of whether you want to do academic cardiology or not, it is an important skill, even in the future, to be able to read and properly interpret studies. So I highly recommend it. I find for me, I've definitely learned a lot through the process and have certainly improved. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, there you have it, our five social media editors. First, I want to thank you all for your contributions to Circulation. You're an incredibly bright group as everyone learned about. I have future leaders in cardiology. And we're very fortunate to have you contributing to Circulation and to our authors and readers. So thankful to have you as part of Circulation and look forward to working with you and innovating and coming up with some creative, new ways to think about social media and ways to transmit research for journal. Dr. Amit Khera: Well, I think there you have it. Again, I'm Amit Khera. I'm associate editor and standing in this week for Carolyn Lam and Greg Huntley, who will join you again next week. So thank you for joining us for Circulation on the Run. Dr. Greg Hundley: This program is copyright of the American Heart Association 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American Heart Association. For more visit ahajournals.org.

Freely Filtered, a NephJC Podcast
Freely Filtered 040: Double CLICK for BP control in CKD stage 4

Freely Filtered, a NephJC Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 25, 2021 73:51


The Filtrate:Joel TopfSwapnil HiremathJennie Lin (who was only there because her plans got boxed by covid)Jordy CohenJosh WaitzmanSpecial Guest:Rajiv Agarwal (@AgarwalRajivMD)Editor:Joel TopfShow Notes:NephJC discussion of CLICK: http://www.nephjc.com/news/click4chlorthalidone CLICK Visual abstract: http://www.nephjc.com/news/2021/12/7/the-click-visual-abstract Hawthorne effect: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawthorne_effect A nice discussion run in periods in clinical trials: http://www.nephjc.com/news/run-in-period The ABCD trial Agarwal used to describe the need for a beta blocker to enroll in the trial, but it looks like a review article https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/12574784/ Canadian trial showing that atenolol did as well as evidence based beta blockers: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31495887/ Associated editorial by Agarwal: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31578572/ Meta-analysis of dose-response relationships for hydrochlorothiazide, chlorthalidone, and bendroflumethiazide on blood pressure, serum potassium, and urate by Mark A Peterzan https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22547443/ HCTZ vs Chlorthalidone compete to the death: VA CSP Study No. 597: Diuretic Comparison Project https://www.research.va.gov/programs/csp/597/default.cfm Effectiveness versus Efficacy Trials: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK44024/ Foundation on Apple TV+: https://www.indiewire.com/2021/09/foundation-review-apple-tv-plus-sci-fi-adaptation-1234666972/ The Expanse on Amazon Prime: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Expanse_(TV_series) The Beatles: Get Back on Disney+: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Beatles:_Get_Back School of chocolate on Netflix: https://www.themarysue.com/school-of-chocolate/ And Just Like That... on Disney+: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/And_Just_Like_That... Past-president of AHA forced to make a statement about the Sex and the City episode: https://twitter.com/NMCardioVasc/status/1471627453885997068 https://twitter.com/NMCardioVasc/status/1471817955344371717 Chris Noth is a bad guy and how Peloton dealt with this. https://variety.com/2021/digital/news/peloton-deletes-chris-noth-ad-sexual-assault-allegations-1235135264/ Apply for the NSMC Social Media Internship: https://www.nsmc.blog

The Credibility Nation Show
Scale Up Your Business by Getting the Right People in Place with Dan Goodwin (CNS 214)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 24, 2021 7:16


In this episode, Dan Goodwin talks about covering your assets to compete and crush results in today's economy. He is an entrepreneurial leader, business owner, coach, certified mentor, consultant, teacher, conference keynote speaker, and president/CEO of Our Connected Lives and CYA Consulting where he leads entrepreneurs as they grow their business from startup to stability and preparing for scale-up and funding opportunities. Dan helps entrepreneurs work through the scale-up process, specifically through vetting people processes as they move themselves and their businesses to the next level. If you've been in business for a couple of years and are now ready to scale up, consider reaching out to Dan Goodwin by visiting his website https://www.linkedin.com/in/dgoodwinus/ or email dan@cyaconsulting.services.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The Credibility Nation Show
Understanding Organizational Inefficiency with Lee Henson (CNS 213)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2021 7:35


This episode features Lee Henson, the founder and president of Agile Dad. He is also a Certified Scrum Trainer (CST), Project Management Professional (PMP), motivational speaker, coach, and a mentor. He talks about understanding organizational inefficiency to gain the best certification possible. Lee's 15 years of experience spans a broad array of roles and responsibilities. His unique blend of real-world experience in various roles combined with the ability to drive home complex concepts in an easy to understand manner make him an amazing coach to get any team best focused on project related initiatives. If you're running a company that has #OperationalInefficiency, you should consider reaching out to Agile Dad. Reach out to Lee Henson by visiting his website at www.agiledad.com or through LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/leehenson/.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company. Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

Fit Friends Happy Hour
Ep 230: Client Spotlight Interview with Dr. Jennifer Hartwell

Fit Friends Happy Hour

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 44:01


Today, we're sitting down with my dear friend and client, Dr. Jennifer Hartwell! Dr. Hartwell is a trauma and critical care surgeon in Indianapolis. She and her husband have four children ages 12-21. Listen in as she opens up about her journey to food freedom. In this episode, Dr. Hartwell is discussing: -The tone around nutrition and movement in her family growing up -How her relationship with food and her body shifted as she entered college and the medical field -What prompted her to seek out a dietician -Her experience working with me. She's covering everything from her biggest AHA moments to the most challenging parts of her intuitive eating journey -- especially when it came to releasing food rules. Dr. Hartwell's story is sure to inspire you to give yourself GRACE and understand that healing your relationship with food and your body isn't something that happens overnight. It's a journey that takes time, support, and work, but It's SO worth it, and her story is a testament to that. Connect with Dr. Hartwell: http://www.traumamom4.com/ Connect with Katie: Book a free strategy call | www.katiehake.com/schedule Discover your eating style with this free quiz | www.katiehake.com/quiz

The Credibility Nation Show
Navigating Your Business Through This New Norm with Kimberly Carlson (CNS 212)

The Credibility Nation Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2021 7:20


In this episode, Kimberly Carlson, President of AppWorks, talks about figuring out how to navigate your business through this new norm based on the market and what is coming your way versus what already hit you. She is also a mentor, speaker, creative consultant, and business analyst.Kimberly works with companies to help them identify, clarify, and articulate their hurdles and goals enabling them to forge a path to success. She is passionate about helping them develop and implement actionable steps and infrastructures so they can navigate their way through this new norm based on market trends and what hurdles are coming their way versus what has already hit them. If you're a business that is struggling with “What next?” and has been a brick and mortar you're entire life and all of a sudden that has gone away, you should reach out to Kimberly Carlson via https://www.consultingkimberly.com or https://www.linkedin.com/in/KimberlyACarlson.Mitchell Levy is the Global Credibility Expert at AHAthat, the first AHA leadership (Thought Leadership) platform on the market for thought leaders, experts and companies to unleash their genius to the world. His passion is helping entrepreneurs, business owners and C-Suite Executives get known as thought leaders & become best-selling authors with the AHA platform. He is an accomplished entrepreneur who has created 20 businesses in Silicon Valley including four publishing companies that have published over 800 books. Mitchell is an international best-selling author with 60 business books, has provided strategic consulting to over 100 companies, has advised over 500 CEOs on critical business issues, and has been chairman of the board of a NASDAQ-listed company.Visit https://www.credibilitynation.com to learn more about the Credibility Nation community.Visit https://www.ahathat.com/author to learn how you can become an Amazon best-selling author in 4 months.

The Cabral Concept
2144: Macro Balancing in Shake, Dried Fruit, Human Design Systems, Bad Fats, Fasting & Muscle Gain, Accelerated Heart Rate with Meals (HouseCall)

The Cabral Concept

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2021 24:16


Thank you for joining us for our 2nd Cabral HouseCall of the weekend! I'm looking forward to sharing with you some of our community's questions that have come in over the past few weeks… Let's get started!    Lara: Hi, dr. Cabral :) This podcast is my favourite thing of the day.. I listen to it while preparing my lemon water and smoothie in the morning :) Which brings me to my question(/-s).. I usually make a huge smoothie with everything you can think of (frozen berries, leafy greens, protein powder and then lots of herbs and spices, mushroom powders, ginger & turmeric root, etc. It comes out pretty big so I started freezing half of it for the days I don't have the time to make it.. does freezing & then defrosting destroy all the good benefits of all these ingredients which are blended together? My second question about it is, even though I eat quite a big bowl of it, I still feel quite hungry and shaky after it.. like I don't have energy in my muscles to do any real movement or exercise.. that feeling sometimes stays with me for most of the day or until I eat something solid (which usually makes me feel bloated or uncomfortable in the stomach).. is this weird, considering I do use healthy fats and proteins and carbs in the smoothie (and it's a really big amount of it)? Thank you so much for your answers and everything you do.. much love to you, your family and everyone in this community.. Lara: Hi, dr. Cabral :) One more smoothie related question: I usually eat an apple after my smoothie.. is that ok or should I eat an apple before the smoothie? And how much time before or after? I usually also have some DRIED berries every day (blueberries, cranberries, goji berries, etc.) I remember you've said dried fruit isn't the best, but I'm not sure why.. is it the same for dried berries? Thank you so much.. again :) Anonymous: Hi, dr. Cabral! I've been a listener for a year and a half now and enjoy all the different types of shows you do. Since you are really into Ayurveda and spirituality of sorts, I was wondering if you have heard of Human Design yet? It is a holistic self-knowledge system combining astrology, the I Ching, Kabbalah and Vedic philosophy. It would be really interesting if you would do an episode about it or maybe even an interview with an expert on it.. I've only heard about it last Christmas but since then met lots of people that found great help in knowing themselves better through it, alleviating conditioning by society and overall starting to accept themselves better because of understanding oneself. Including me. Hope you find it interesting. Thank you for sharing your knowledge with us. Darren: Good day Dr. Cabral. I got excited when I saw CNN with the news headline "Eating fat can lower stroke risk, study says, as long as it's the right kind" https://edition.cnn.com/2021/11/09/health/fat-stroke-risk-wellness/index.html but got disappointed as the article went on. The American Heart Association director & senior scientist went on to promote liquid vegetable oils corn oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil, soybean oil, which are high in polyunsaturated fatty acids, and monosaturated like canola oil. How does one tell their family, coworkers, clients and friends to stay away from those plant based oils when the AHA, of all people, are promoting them? Darren: Hey Dr. Cabral. I've been wondering, do you still maintain your weekly fast since you've embarked on the muscle gaining journey or do you put it on hold to attain that current goal? Also have you noticed any drastic pros or drawbacks since you began? Keep up great work. Anonymous: What's the reason for accelerated heart rate after meals? No change in diet. All the same. I've started experiencing heart palpitations and accelerated heart rate and sometimes even twitches after my meals. Even with smoothies. It happens the moment I put something in my stomach. Really weird. Thank you for tuning into this weekend's Cabral HouseCalls and be sure to check back tomorrow for our Mindset & Motivation Monday show to get your week started off right! - - - Show Notes & Resources:  http://StephenCabral.com/2144 - - - Dr. Cabral's New Book, The Rain Barrel Effect https://amzn.to/2H0W7Ge - - - Join the Community & Get Your Questions Answered: http://CabralSupportGroup.com - - -  Dr. Cabral's Most Popular At-Home Lab Tests: > Complete Minerals & Metals Test (Test for mineral imbalances & heavy metal toxicity) - - - > Complete Candida, Metabolic & Vitamins Test (Test for 75 biomarkers including yeast & bacterial gut overgrowth, as well as vitamin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Mood & Metabolism Test (Discover your complete thyroid, adrenal, hormone, vitamin D & insulin levels) - - - > Complete Stress, Sleep & Hormones Test (Run your adrenal & hormone levels) - - - > Complete Food Sensitivity Test (Find out your hidden food sensitivities) - - - > Complete Omega-3 & Inflammation Test (Discover your levels of inflammation related to your omega-6 to omega-3 levels)

The Beauty Brains
Does Sweet N Low affect Hair color - and more beauty questions - episode 284

The Beauty Brains

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 17, 2021 30:29


On today's show, Valerie and Perry answers questions about...Is a two step peel more effective than a self-neutralizing peel?Does Sweet and Low help desensitize the scalp?What makes a product or ingredient more likely to clog your pores and how do you test comedogenicity in a lab? Does the acid from AHA deactivate retinol?What is the deal about scientific skincare?Valerie's ingredient company - Simply IngredientsFour Ways to Ask a question -1. Become a patron and ask through there. These get top attention.2. You can record your question on your smart phone and email to thebeautybrains@gmail.com3. Send it to us via social media (see links below)4. Submit it through the following form - Ask a questionSupport the Beauty BrainsThe Beauty Brains are now on Patreon! If you want to support the show Patreon is the best way to do it. This will help keep the show going and avoid any of those pesky advertisements that I find so maddening in other podcasts that I listen to. Thank you to all of our Patrons!Social media accountson Instagram we're at thebeautybrains2018on Twitter, we're thebeautybrainsAnd we have a Facebook pageBe Brainy about your Beauty!Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/thebeautybrains?fan_landing=true)

The David Knight Show
Thr 9Dec21 Universal Flu/Covid Vax Being Developed NOW Using Humanized Mice

The David Knight Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 181:39


* The universal flu/Covid vaccine is being developed now using humanized mice created by organ harvesting from live babies. Research moved to small Canadian town to escape funding prohibitions. Reporter Julianne Collorafi, FetalIndustry.com, connects the dots on the China/US/Canada operation* Bill Gates pulls out his crystal ball and predicts what will happen in 2022 with his plandemic* Suffocating asthma sufferers thrown under totalitarian steamroller by British Medical Association and Asthma charities prioritize obedience over health.* NZ pastor defies jab mandates and $15,000 fine and confronts police sent to “educate” him* Dan Crenshaw lies about the “Immunization Infrastructure” Bill giving $400 million funding to track vaccinations* Biden's vaccine mandate loses again — this time in the Senate with 2 Democrats joining Republicans* Hillary takes her therapy session public, reading her “victory” speech for 2016TOPICS by TIMECODE2:05 Asthma Charity Suffocates Patients on Govt Orders. Disregarding asthma suffers & pushing masks that don't stop the virus because govt said so. A picture of what the “medical profession” has become.9:35 Doctor Fired After He Refused to Kill with Remdesavir. He developed a safe, effective treatment protocol the saved 90% of those hospitalized — until hospital demanded he use Remdesavir. His first 7 Remdesavir patients ALL died. He fought the hospital with a lawsuit. Here's what happened…28:16 After Twitter called American Heart Association a dangerous site for reporting jab adverse effects, the AHA is back with MORE info. Nearly ALL cases of myocarditis for those less than 21 yrs old are from vaccine.39:40 FDA says it needs 75 yrs to produce WarpSpeed docs about testing (up from 55 yrs they said they needed a couple of weeks ago). They approved the drug in just over 100 days1:15:42 Bill Gates pulls out his crystal ball and predicts what will happen in 2022 with his plandemic 1:22:12 $15,000 Fine? Pastor Will NOT Shut Church or Get Jab. WATCH: Jacinda Arden is giddy with power and says vaccinations and boosters will never end. But NZ pastor defies jab mandates and $15,000 fine and confronts police sent to “educate” him. 1:31:14 Hillary takes her therapy session public, WATCH her read her “victory” speech for 20161:35:23 Dan Crenshaw lies about the “Immunization Infrastructure” Bill giving $400 million funding to track jab compliance1:42:29 Trump's bump stock ban moves to Supreme Court2:01:24 Universal Vax Being Developed NOW with Humanized Mice. To escape regulation, scientists have fled the country. Fauci “Holly Grail” vax being created by harvesting organs from live babies. Reporter Julianne Collorafi, FetalIndustry.com, connects the dots on the China/US/Canada operation2:40:25 Biden racks up ANOTHER loss on his mandates. This time in the US Senate where 2 Democrats joined all Republicans to stop OSHA mandate. What happens next?2:52:51 Update on Salvation Army & vaccine mandate.Find out more about the show and where you can watch it at TheDavidKnightShow.comIf you would like to support the show and our family please consider subscribing monthly here: SubscribeStar https://www.subscribestar.com/the-david-knight-showOr you can send a donation throughZelle: @DavidKnightShow@protonmail.comCash App at:  $davidknightshowBTC to:  bc1qkuec29hkuye4xse9unh7nptvu3y9qmv24vanh7Mail: David Knight POB 1323 Elgin, TX 78621

The Scathing Atheist
460: Vulgantuan Edition

The Scathing Atheist

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 9, 2021 90:00


In this week's episode, Joel Osteen cashes out, the Fox News Christmas tree in NYC burst into flames and spontaneous commentary, and Tom and Cecil will bring too much vulgarity to fit in a mere 60 minute episode. --- To make a per episode donation at Patreon.com, click here: http://www.patreon.com/ScathingAtheist To buy our book, click there: https://www.amazon.com/Outbreak-Crisis-Religion-Ruined-Pandemic/dp/B08L2HSVS8/ To check out our sister show, The Skepticrat, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/the-skepticrat To check out our sister show's hot friend, God Awful Movies, click here: https://audioboom.com/channel/god-awful-movies To check out our half-sister show, Citation Needed, click here: http://citationpod.com/ To check out our sister show's sister show, D and D minus, click here: https://danddminus.libsyn.com/ To hear more from our intrepid audio engineer Morgan Clarke, click here: https://www.morganclarkemusic.com/ --- Guest Links: Hear more of Tom and Cecil here: https://dissonancepod.com/ Hear more of Thomas and Andrew here: https://openargs.com/ Check out Rocks for Brains on YouTube: https://youtube.com/c/RocksForBrains --- Headlines: Utah throttles assistance to force people into church programs (diatribe) https://www.propublica.org/article/utahs-social-safety-net-is-the-church-of-jesus-christ-of-latter-day-saints-what-does-that-mean-if-youre-not-one A plumber found envelopes full of cash in the walls of Joel Osteen's megachurch: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/03/a-plumber-found-envelopes-full-of-cash-in-the-walls-of-joel-osteens-megachurch/ Richard Dawkins Urges People to Sign “Declaration” Opposing Trans Rights: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/01/richard-dawkins-urges-people-to-sign-declaration-opposing-trans-rights/ AHA announces new leader:  https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/01/the-american-humanist-associations-new-leader-embodies-a-shift-in-the-movement/ David Barton says the 2nd Amendment gives us the right to own a nuclear weapon: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/04/david-barton-the-second-amendment-gives-us-the-right-to-own-a-nuclear-weapon/ Conspiracy Theorist Anna Khait Says Mark Taylor Is ‘Literally a Pawn of the Devil Himself': https://www.rightwingwatch.org/post/conspiracy-theorist-anna-khait-says-mark-taylor-is-literally-a-pawn-of-the-devil-himself/ Couple of great candidates for the Herman Cain award: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/02/evangelical-eric-metaxas-who-told-people-dont-get-the-vaccine-has-covid/ and https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/12/06/joshua-feuerstein-who-said-jesus-made-vaccines-unnecessary-now-has-covid/ and https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/11/30/marcus-lamb-whose-christian-tv-network-spread-covid-lies-has-died-of-covid/ --- This Week in Misogyny: SCOTUS signals the end of Roe: https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/courts_law/mississippi-abortion-case-supreme-court/2021/12/01/367004a6-52b4-11ec-9267-17ae3bde2f26_story.html Pastor resigns after endorsing spousal rape during sermon: https://friendlyatheist.patheos.com/2021/11/24/pastor-resigns-after-telling-men-the-best-person-to-rape-is-your-wife/ Controversy around PP fundraiser at Catholic college: https://religionnews.com/2021/11/18/loyola-marymount-students-protest-university-over-its-handling-of-planned-parenthood-fundraiser-backlash/