Podcasts about Running Start

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  • 70PODCASTS
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Best podcasts about Running Start

Latest podcast episodes about Running Start

Grounded with Dinée Dorame
Episode 30 - Alisa Meraz-Fishbein, University of Colorado Student-Athlete & Albuquerque High Alumna

Grounded with Dinée Dorame

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 61:00


“Don't see your athleticism or your competitiveness as a negative. In our society, when women are seen as driven or passionate or athletic, that can be seen as a negative. It's so important to accept who you are and take advantage of it, see it as a gift…” Alisa Meraz-Fishbein is a current sophomore running Track and Cross Country and majoring in Journalism at the University of Colorado-Boulder. Like me, she's an alumna of Albuquerque High School and was coached by my dad, Doug Dorame. In high school, Alisa had three-straight top-10 finishes at the NM State Cross Country 5A Championships, including a third-place finish as a junior. She was also a member of the 1,600-medley AHS relay team my dad coached a few years ago, which broke the state record (4:11.10) with Alisa running the 800m anchor leg. In this conversation, we catch up about Alisa's recently launched podcast, Running Start, as well as life as college student-athlete during a pandemic. She's had to adjust to so many things over the past year– from solo training to staying social while not being physically on campus. Now, she's back in Boulder ready for year two! She shares with us her advice for aspiring collegiate runners and gives us some tips on how she stays organized, uninjured, and mentally focused.   In This Episode: Oiselle | Running Apparel for Women Oiselle's Women Run the Vote 2.0 Virtual Relay Alisa Meraz-Fishbein – University of Colorado XC Profile Running Start Podcast, Episode 1 - Sage Hurta Grounded Podcast, Episode 14 - Beth Wright I'll Have Another with Lindsey Hein Podcast Let's Run Track Talk Podcast This American Life Podcast Red Oaks | Season 1 (on Amazon Prime)   Follow Alisa Meraz-Fishbein & Running Start Podcast: Instagram: @alisamfish Twitter: @alisamfish Listen to Running Start Podcast   Follow Grounded Pod: Instagram: @groundedpod Twitter: @groundedpod Facebook: facebook.com/groundedpodwithdinee   Subscribe, Listen, & Review on: Spotify | Apple Podcasts | Soundcloud | Stitcher   Music by Jacob Shije (Santa Clara Pueblo, NM). This podcast was made possible through the Tracksmith Fellowship Program.

The Tom Ferry Podcast Experience
A Running Start into ‘22 | Mindset Monday

The Tom Ferry Podcast Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021 0:55


It's mid-August – the so-called “dog days” of Summer – but the things you're doing right now are actually setting you up for how you'll begin 2022. So it's no time to let up. Check out today's Mindset Monday and figure out if you want to deal with benefits or consequences of your actions to start the new year.

Locked On Patriots - Daily Podcast On The New England Patriots
Running Start: Breaking Down the Patriots Victory over Washington in Preseason Game One — 8/13/21

Locked On Patriots - Daily Podcast On The New England Patriots

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 14, 2021 31:37


The New England Patriots defeated the Washington Football Team, 22-13 on Thursday evening, giving them their first preseason victory since August 9, 2019. Host Mike D'Abate breaks down the action from Foxboro, including the standout performances from quarterbacks Mac Jones and Cam Newton. Lastly, he gives his thoughts on rookie running back Rhamondre Stevenson and what it means for his future in New England. Support Us by Supporting Our Sponsors: Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. ButcherBox ButcherBox is offering our listeners 2 five-ounce lobster tails and 2 ten-ounce ribeyes for free in your first box! You can only get this special deal when you sign up for a new membership at ButcherBox.com/LOCKEDON. StatHero StatHero, the FIRST Ever Daily Fantasy Sportsbook that gives the PLAYER the ADVANTAGE. Go to StatHero.com/LockedOn for 300% back on your first play. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Twitch Playbook: Tips for Twitch Streamers
128 - Stream with a Running Start

The Twitch Playbook: Tips for Twitch Streamers

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 6:42


Avoid unnecessary accountability in order to retain your creativity. www.twitchplaybook.com

Revenue Collective Podcast
Ep 94: Running Start-Up Sales w/ Michelle Pietsch

Revenue Collective Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2021 35:11


Ep 94: Running Start-Up Sales with VP Revenue at Dooly, Michelle Pietsch Part of the "Thank God it's Monday (TGIM)" series hosted by Tom Alaimo.

Spiritual Transformation Series
Get A Running Start

Spiritual Transformation Series

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2021 4:21


Today’s podcast is entitled, “Get A Running Start.” This is the second part in our series a podcast looking at some pointers for our Christian lives from the track and field sport of pole-vaulting.

Fraternity Foodie Podcast by Greek University
Jeannie Burlowski: Finish Undergrad Debt-Free, Get a Running Start Getting Your Grad School Paid For

Fraternity Foodie Podcast by Greek University

Play Episode Listen Later May 19, 2021 43:41


Today we have with us Jeannie Burlowski. Jeannie is a full-time academic strategist, podcast host, and sought-after speaker for students ages 12–26 and their parents and grandparents. Her writing, speaking, and podcasting help parents set their kids up to graduate college debt-free and move directly into careers they excel at and love. Her work has been featured in publications such as The Huffington Post, USA Today, Parents Magazine, and US News and World Report, and on CBS News. In episode #153 of the Fraternity Foodie Podcast, we find out what is an academic strategist, and the biggest debt-free college strategies don’t involve money at all—they involve thoughtful exploration of CAREER GOAL early on. “Clarify the bullseye on the target,” Burlowski says, “before you take aim and shoot.” This episode provides clear guidance on how an academic strategist suggests students do that. To sign up for Jeannie's newsletter: http://www.bit.ly/helpfulnewsletter Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=br7VefUzdIw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=br7VefUzdIw

No Pix After Dark Podcast
EP 117: Women's History Month Continues ft Allie Curtis

No Pix After Dark Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 19, 2021 63:10


EP 117 Women’s History Month Continues ft Allie Curtis. Aaron and Allie discuss Syracuse University , Ted Talks she has done, standing up for Women rights. How she loves being in the Army and how she was Miss Rhode Island in 2015. Contributors Ivan Martin and M.A.I  Alexandra Curtis served as Miss Rhode Island 2015 and was named a Quality of Life award finalist at Miss America 2016 for her platform “Leading Ladies: Equipping Young Women With the Skills to Lead.”In 2019 she represented Rhode Island at Miss Earth USA, focusing her advocacy on environmental sustainability through plant-based living. She represented Rhode Island again at Miss Earth USA 2020 and won the title of Miss Earth USA Eco.     Curtis has been a featured speaker at several major conferences and events including Running Start’s Young Women’s Political Leadership Summit and the New England Women's Policy Conference. For her work with "Leading Ladies" she was honored at the 10th annual Young Women to Watch Awards, was named on Rare’s 2016 Under 40 List, and Girl Scouts of Southeastern New England's 2018 Leading Women of Distinction. She continues her platform work as a speaker at local schools and universities. Curtis is a two time TEDxSpeaker, with talks titled “Leading Ladies: Why Representation Matters" and "Daring Daily: The Power of Practicing Courage."   Curtis holds a B.A. in Political Science and Public Relations from Syracuse University, a Master of Public Affairs from Brown University, a Master of Science in Administration of Justice and Homeland Security from Salve Regina University, and an A.A. focused on Emergency Management from Community College of Rhode Island. She is currently pursuing a certificate in Plant Based Nutrition from Cornell University. ​ In March 2017 Alexandra enlisted in the Rhode Island Army National Guard as a Human Resources Specialist. In fall 2019 she commissioned into the Field Artillery as a Second Lieutenant after completing Officer Candidate School. She currently serves full-time in Public Affairs.      Through her advocacy, she remains dedicated to bringing young women into fields where women have been historically underrepresented.    Sponsors: Zeke's Coffee  www.zekescoffee.com                                 Indu Wellness  www.induwellness.com                                     Maggies Farm  www.maggiesfarm.com                                 FoundStudio Shop  www.foundstudioshop.com                                 Charm Craft City Mafia  www.charmcitycraftmafia.com               Siena Leigh https://www.sienaleigh.com                Fishnet.     www.eatfishnet.com    

Federal Drive with Tom Temin
The committee to reform the House itself is off to a running start in the 117th Congress

Federal Drive with Tom Temin

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 12, 2021 17:41


The Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress is something of an odd duck. It has 50-50 party membership. Members of the two parties sit among one another. They don't seem to bicker. Now the committee has held detailed hearings on its agenda in the 117th Congress. Joining the Federal Drive with an update, committee chairman and Washington representative Derek Kilmer (D-WA).

In The Moment podcast
88. Urban Native Education Alliance with Megan Castillo: Billy Frank Jr. Day

In The Moment podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 49:42


In 2016, Treaty tribes from across the Puget Sound region came together on March 9 to celebrate the first Billy Frank Jr. Day. The annual environmental day honors the work of Nisqually tribal member Billy Frank Jr., who was a lifelong environmental leader and treaty rights activist, especially tribal fishing rights. Now, JJ, Lailani, and Kayla—members of the Urban Native Education Alliance’s Clear Sky Youth Leadership Council—talk with Town Hall Program Manager Megan Castillo about their efforts to have the day officially recognized by Seattle Public Schools as Billy Frank Jr. Day. Their proposal asks SPS to formally set aside the day for all SPS students and staff to learn, celebrate, and engage in civic service to commemorate the life, legacy, and enduring spirit of the inspirational Billy Frank Jr. Join us for this important episode—and stay in the know about what’s happening in this moment at Town Hall Seattle. Jazell Jenkins (JJ) is a descendant from the Unangax̂ tribe and uses she/her pronouns. Jenkins is a sophomore and honors student at Ingraham High School. She strives to become a stronger advocate and activist for victims of sexual harassment and assault. Some of her hobbies include meditation, reading, crystals, spiritual practices, and outdoor activities. She has been an intern with UNEA since October 2020. Kayla Harstad is Turtle Mountain Chippewa and Assiniboine Sioux. Harstad is a junior at Ingraham High School and a Running Start student at North Seattle College. She plans to attend college in California to become either a life coach or a body positivity activist. Some of Harstad’s hobbies include playing basketball, painting, and baking. She has been an intern with UNEA since August 2020. Lailani Norman is Blackfeet, Chippewa, Iroquois, Matis, and Cree. Norman is passionate about participating in traditional and cultural events and learning traditional teachings. She feels it is critical for Indigenous youth, especially those living in an urban setting, to learn their cultural traditions so that they are able to carry on these teachings to the generations to come. Some of Norman’s hobbies include playing volleyball and making art. She has been an intern with UNEA since September 2020. Clear Sky is a Native youth-centered and directed program designed to empower students through education, culture, and tradition. Clear Sky student intern leaders serve as a strong voice advocating for social justice and equity in education. Clear Sky’s efforts to amplify Native youth visibility, voice, and vision is a powerful example of success when Indigenous students lead the way. Sarah Sense-Wilson (Oglala) serves as the elected Chair for the Urban Native Education Alliance (UNEA). Sense-Wilson is committed to strengthening the urban Native community through tireless advocacy, organizing, and networking both within the Native community and greater King County area. She is a Washington State licensed Mental Health Counselor, and has worked in the chemical dependency field for over 17 years. Megan Castillo (Tlingit) joined the Town Hall team in 2017 as Social Media Coordinator, later becoming Community Engagement Manager and in 2020 took on the role of Program Manager. From 2017 -2019, Castillo co-produced, with partner April Jingco, two seasons of the Growing Girls podcast—a chat show covering a wide range of topics from house plants to holistic care. Originally from Lihue, Hawaii, Castillo graduated from Seattle University with a degree in Digital Design and Art History. In addition to working for Town Hall, Castillo is a miniature artist and dollhouse historian. Urban Native Education Alliance (UNEA) website: https://urbannativeeducation.org/  Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

In The Moment Podcast
88. Urban Native Education Alliance with Megan Castillo: Billy Frank Jr. Day

In The Moment Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 8, 2021 49:42


In 2016, Treaty tribes from across the Puget Sound region came together on March 9 to celebrate the first Billy Frank Jr. Day. The annual environmental day honors the work of Nisqually tribal member Billy Frank Jr., who was a lifelong environmental leader and treaty rights activist, especially tribal fishing rights. Now, JJ, Lailani, and Kayla—members of the Urban Native Education Alliance’s Clear Sky Youth Leadership Council—talk with Town Hall Program Manager Megan Castillo about their efforts to have the day officially recognized by Seattle Public Schools as Billy Frank Jr. Day. Their proposal asks SPS to formally set aside the day for all SPS students and staff to learn, celebrate, and engage in civic service to commemorate the life, legacy, and enduring spirit of the inspirational Billy Frank Jr. Join us for this important episode—and stay in the know about what’s happening in this moment at Town Hall Seattle. Jazell Jenkins (JJ) is a descendant from the Unangax̂ tribe and uses she/her pronouns. Jenkins is a sophomore and honors student at Ingraham High School. She strives to become a stronger advocate and activist for victims of sexual harassment and assault. Some of her hobbies include meditation, reading, crystals, spiritual practices, and outdoor activities. She has been an intern with UNEA since October 2020. Kayla Harstad is Turtle Mountain Chippewa and Assiniboine Sioux. Harstad is a junior at Ingraham High School and a Running Start student at North Seattle College. She plans to attend college in California to become either a life coach or a body positivity activist. Some of Harstad’s hobbies include playing basketball, painting, and baking. She has been an intern with UNEA since August 2020. Lailani Norman is Blackfeet, Chippewa, Iroquois, Matis, and Cree. Norman is passionate about participating in traditional and cultural events and learning traditional teachings. She feels it is critical for Indigenous youth, especially those living in an urban setting, to learn their cultural traditions so that they are able to carry on these teachings to the generations to come. Some of Norman’s hobbies include playing volleyball and making art. She has been an intern with UNEA since September 2020. Clear Sky is a Native youth-centered and directed program designed to empower students through education, culture, and tradition. Clear Sky student intern leaders serve as a strong voice advocating for social justice and equity in education. Clear Sky’s efforts to amplify Native youth visibility, voice, and vision is a powerful example of success when Indigenous students lead the way. Sarah Sense-Wilson (Oglala) serves as the elected Chair for the Urban Native Education Alliance (UNEA). Sense-Wilson is committed to strengthening the urban Native community through tireless advocacy, organizing, and networking both within the Native community and greater King County area. She is a Washington State licensed Mental Health Counselor, and has worked in the chemical dependency field for over 17 years. Megan Castillo (Tlingit) joined the Town Hall team in 2017 as Social Media Coordinator, later becoming Community Engagement Manager and in 2020 took on the role of Program Manager. From 2017 -2019, Castillo co-produced, with partner April Jingco, two seasons of the Growing Girls podcast—a chat show covering a wide range of topics from house plants to holistic care. Originally from Lihue, Hawaii, Castillo graduated from Seattle University with a degree in Digital Design and Art History. In addition to working for Town Hall, Castillo is a miniature artist and dollhouse historian. Urban Native Education Alliance (UNEA) website: https://urbannativeeducation.org/  Presented by Town Hall Seattle. To become a member or make a donation click here. 

Empowered Publicity
How Thoughtfulness and Specificity Can Give Your Business A Running Start

Empowered Publicity

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 25, 2021 32:18


As an accredited genealogist, Laurie Hermance-Moore is an expert on helping her clients build their family’s legacy, ensuring that stories are uncovered and captured for future generations. Whether she is solving difficult research problems or helping her clients to expand on what they already know, Laurie discovers and clarifies how families came to be. When [...] The post How Thoughtfulness and Specificity Can Give Your Business A Running Start appeared first on Amanda Berlin -- Communication Strategy and Business Consulting.

Podheriya
Supporting Women with Susannah Wellford - Ep 10

Podheriya

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 19, 2021 38:44


In this episode, Akanksha speaks with Susannah Wellford, CEO and Founder of Running Start, an organization that amplifies the voices of young women and train them to run for public office. She has travelled around the world speaking with young women everywhere and makes sure their voices are heard. Listen to hear them discuss the roles of women in leadership, gender balance in politics, and inspiring young women and girls! Keep listening, keep being inspired.... --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/podheriya/message

Lady Wave
She Should Run!

Lady Wave

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 3, 2021 46:02


Doesn't matter if you are a Democrat, Republican, Libertarian, Independent, or Whosie Whatsit....This one is for you! This week on Lady Wave we tackle the often-controversial topic of why representation matters for women no matter your party lines. Women make up nearly 51% of the population and and yet we hold an abysmally low number of positions in our government. We have to change this! But how? Well, women supporting women running for office is a good start and we are gonna chat all about it. We also deliver you a Heat Wave that doubles down on the importance of representation in power positions...think free period products for all brought to you by none other than a badass female leader! Now if that doesn't get you going, we don't know what will. #ladywave

Wilson County News
New club off to a running start

Wilson County News

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 2, 2021 0:22


St. Hedwig's Tradition Elementary School Running Club is off to a good start, with members practicing speed drills in the gymnasium. Even Principal Karen Kopeck joined the club!Article Link

Be Authentic Zone
1566: STOP RUNNING. START FIGHTING!

Be Authentic Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 28, 2021 3:33


On this episode of Authentic Daily Positivity: STOP RUNNING! START ATTACKING your problems! BE A FIGHTER!

Sylvia & Me
Alyse Nelson: President, CEO & Co-Founder Vital Voices Global Partnership, Using Their Power to Empower

Sylvia & Me

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2021 40:12


The Power to Empower is key to the mission of Vital Voices Global Partnership and Alyse Nelson. For more than 20 years Alyse has worked for the organization. A Co-Founder, Alyse started as Vice President and Senior Director of Programs. Then in 2009 she took over as President and CEO.  Under her leadership, Vital Voices expanded their reach to serve over 18,000 women leaders, across 182 countries. 'One of the things I've learned along the way is that a person's path to leadership is rarely planned out perfectly - it's an experience that begins with a conviction to do something.' - Alyse Nelson Women are Rising Women are rising and their voices are being heard. Vital Voices searches the world for women leaders with daring vision for change and partner with them to make that vision a reality. Vital Voices makes sure that women have the power to empower. And we just witnessed the inauguration of the First Female Vice President of the United States, Kamala Harris! Meet Alyse Prior to Vital Voices, Alyse served as deputy director of the State Department's Vital Voices Global Democracy Initiative. She worked with the President's Interagency Council on Women at the White House. Alyse is a Member on the Council on Foreign Relations and serves as a Board Member of Running Start, RAD-AID and Black Trans Femmes in the Arts Collective. She is on the Advisory Board of Chime for Change and Global Citizen. Newsweek Magazine named her one of the 150 Women Shaking the World. Fortune Magazine featured Alyse as one of the 55 Most Influential Women on Twitter. Apolitical named her as one of the 100 Most Influential People in Global Gender Policy. Alyse's work has been honored with awards such as the Tribeca Disruptive Innovative Award and foreign Policy's Citizen Diplomat of the Year award. Alyse is the author of the best-selling book Vital voices: The Power of Women Leading Change Around the World. She is the editor of Vital Voices: 100 Women Using Their Power to Empower. Alyse received her MA from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. She also has a BA from Emerson College. This week, a conversation with Alyse and it couldn't be more timely. Women and voices, power and empowering. It all started at a conference in Beijing Finding her passion Women have always had a voice - now they're being heard The search for women leaders with a daring vision How women lead differently The obstacles and barriers for women leaders What makes a leader Women tackling the world's greatest challenges The commonalities of women leaders The power of listening The 4 ways to measure a leader's impact Leaders and starting off locally Righting the wrong

Path For Growth with Alex Judd
Stop Running, Start Owning with Bryan Miles Co-Founder of BELAY & Own Not Run

Path For Growth with Alex Judd

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2021 64:31


Bryan Miles is a successful entrepreneur, husband, father, backpacker, mountain climber, mentor, and writer. In addition, he’s the Co-Chair and Co-Founder of BELAY. He and his wife, Shannon, are proud Co-Owners. Bootstrapping their business with no outside funding, the company has generated over $100M in revenues since its beginning and has exploded to over one thousand team members – all of whom work from home. Without an office, BELAY has graced the Inc. 5000 list six times and was awarded the number one spot in Entrepreneur Magazine’s Best Company Culture and been featured in several top-tier media outlets over the years.Additionally, outside of BELAY, Bryan & Shannon own a craft brewing company (NoFo Brew Co) and they own an advisory company that helps successful business owners own their companies, not run them (Own Not Run).This week Bryan joins Alex in a conversation that revolves around the idea that ego creates followers, but stewardship creates leaders. If you want to grow, you have to learn to trust others enough to delegate responsibility, if you want to start owning your business, you need start doing the things that only you can do. Bryan: Instagram, LinkedInBelay: Instagram, LinkedInOwn Not Run: Instagram, LinkedInNoFo Brew Co: InstagramResources mentioned in this episode: Book: Leadership On The LineWorkout: 1500 Remember to Rate, Review, Subscribe, and Share! Sign up for the newsletter Join us on Instagram and Facebook

What’s on Krista’s Mind
Running Start, Switching Majors, and College is a Scam ft. Karina Luna

What’s on Krista’s Mind

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2021 21:39


In this week's episode, I am joined with Karina as we reflect on our running start experience and discuss the challenges of figuring out a post high school plan. We share our struggles on finding the right major that suits you and how scary it can be to switch majors when you realize it's not what you want to do anymore. We advice people to expect the best when you follow your own path but also prepare for the worst because nothing will ever go as expected.

Hacks & Wonks
Student Inequality in Seattle

Hacks & Wonks

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 10, 2020 31:14


2020 has changed education forever - and has exacerbated inequalities already present in our education system. In this re-broadcast of an interview with Seattle Times education reporter Dahlia Bazzaz, Crystal and Dahlia delve into how inequality in Seattle Public Schools impacts students, and provide context for our current education landscape. A full text transcript of the show is available below, and on the Hacks & Wonks blog at https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com/post/inequality-in-seattle-public-schools. Find the host, Crystal Fincher on Twitter at @finchfrii and find today's guest, Dahlia Bazzaz, at @dahliabazzaz. More info is available at officialhacksandwonks.com. Articles referenced: Reactions to Seattle schools chief Denise Juneau's resignation are mixed by Dahlia Bazzaz, Hannah Furfaro, and Joy Resmovitshttps://www.seattletimes.com/education-lab/reactions-to-seattle-schools-chief-denise-juneaus-resignation-are-mixed/  Schools confront ‘off the rails' numbers of failing grades by Carolyn Thompsonhttps://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/northwest/schools-confront-off-the-rails-numbers-of-failing-grades/   Seattle's wealth boom and disparity, as told through its public schools by Dahlia Bazzazhttps://www.seattletimes.com/education-lab/seattles-wealth-boom-and-disparity-as-told-through-its-public-schools/  Find more work by today's guest, Dahlia Bazzaz, at https://www.seattletimes.com/author/dahlia-bazzaz/ Full Transcript:   Lisl Stadler, Producer: [00:00:00] Inequality in Seattle Public Schools has been a hot topic for some time, but never more so than now. Just this week, the superintendent of Seattle Public Schools, Denise Juneau, announced her departure amid calls for her resignation from community activists claiming she has contributed to worsening inequality in Seattle Public Schools.   This happens amid the district's ongoing struggle to manage the emergency that is education during COVID-19. In this episode of Hacks and Wonks, Crystal speaks with Seattle Times education reporter, Dahlia Bazzaz, and discusses the effects of income inequality on education. When this was recorded in late 2019, prior to the pandemic, student inequality was already a problem. Now, schools face record numbers of failing grades as students struggle with distance learning, particularly low-income students, English language learners, and disabled students. Seattle Public Schools struggle with inequality is not going away. For up-to-date and more in-depth information about the Seattle education landscape from today's guest, follow her on Twitter at, @dahliabazzaz. That's @dahliabazzaz, or find her work in the Seattle Times.   Crystal Fincher: [00:01:28] Welcome to Hacks and Wonks. I'm your host, Crystal Fincher. On this show, we don't just talk politics and policy, but also how they affect our lives and shape our communities. As we dive into the backstories behind what we read in the news, we bring voices to the table that we don't hear from often enough.   Before Hacks and Wonks, I hosted the show, The Fifth Estate, which dealt with similar themes and stories. This episode was initially recorded for The Fifth Estate at KVRU 105.7 FM in the Rainier Valley in Seattle.   Public schools are involved in every issue we face as a society. If you spend a few minutes just Googling Seattle education news, you see reporters, commentators and community members struggling with issues from substance abuse to hate crimes to safely dealing with anti-vaxxers. Our education system has to deal with it all.   Some facts about Seattle Public Schools. They teach 53,627 students and it includes 104 schools with over 5,800 educators and 8,961 full-time staff. One out of every 5 SPS students come from non-English speaking backgrounds and 1 out of every 10 are English language learners. Almost 1 out of every 20 students is experiencing homelessness. That's about one per class. There are 154 countries of origin among students, speaking 155 languages and dialects.   Today, we talk to Seattle Times reporter Dahlia Bazzaz, who has written articles on almost every education issue in our area. In this conversation, we focus on the changing demographics within Seattle. Just as our city has been gentrifying, so has our school system. Where does that leave students whose families are struggling with the rising cost of living in Seattle? How do schools meet the needs of students - sometimes in the same schools whose family situations range from affluence to homelessness. This is one of many conversations we'll have about education on Hacks and Wonks as it's of such vital importance to our society.   Thank you for joining us.   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:03:37] Thank you for having me again.   Crystal Fincher: [00:03:38] Just starting out with the composition of the district now - it has changed. Gentrification is certainly an issue. The district isn't separate from that - looking at the amount of students who are in poverty - has declined in the district. And a lot of people might just look at that and go, Hey, things are great, things are wonderful. There are fewer students in poverty. But that's not the whole story, is it?   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:04:03] It's actually not, yeah. So I wrote a story a few days ago that charted time since 2009 and it looked at the declining poverty rate over that past decade. And over even in the last six years, the number of students receiving free and reduced lunch declined by 16%, which is pretty significant. And I got a lot of feedback when I wrote that story, about, What if it is just economic mobility? What if a bunch of students did actually rise out of poverty, because the time period does span recovery from the great recession. But when I looked at the racial demographics that have changed at the district in that timeframe, it became very clear to me that it is a result of gentrification. So that decline in the poverty rate coincides with a decline in the number of students of color in the district. And students of color make up 88% of students in poverty at Seattle Public Schools. At the same time, you also have a surge of white students, a surge of 25% in the last decade.   And so it was pretty clear to me, and it was pretty clear to some folks at the district who were talking to me when I had seen that chart - I was floored by it, although I shouldn't have been. And so, a lot of families are getting pushed out and it has to do with the rising cost of raising kids here and the rising cost of living here. So economic mobility might be some of it, but it's certainly not all of it. I would say most of it is gentrification.   Crystal Fincher: [00:05:48] Absolutely. And this has been part of a larger conversation we've been having in the cityand we've seen it ourselves. We've seen the Central District, which started out as a Black area because Blacks weren't allowed to go anywhere else, but had been known as that. And it has changed - largely because of the same types of factors that you saw in the work that you just did - where it's really an issue of displacement. We've all seen it with our own eyes. We've all seen people of color, oftentimes, being displaced further south. And a lot of areas that were traditionally, predominantly areas of color now are no longer. The district actually has ways that they can influence or manage or work within that. How have they been doing that?   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:06:40] So there are a variety of ways that the district influences the larger gentrification of the city. And one of them is through their drawing of school boundaries. And so for the most part, these school boundaries have reinforced the divide between the North and South of the city, which is caused by these racist housing covenants. And so, one of the things that the district has tried to do - they had a five-year plan that they just approved recently, and it focuses on students farthest away from educational justice, and with a specific focus on African-American male students , 40% of whom attend schools in Southeast Seattle. So they've selected a group of about a dozen schools and they want to focus on literacy for the first year and want to pull more resources, do more community partnerships, have more culturally responsive teaching at those schools, hire more teachers of color, to focus in on the population of students of color who have, who are remaining in the city for the time being.   So I talked to a school board member, Brandon Hersey, who represents South Seattle and he works in Federal Way. He's a teacher down there and he said the issues that Seattle are dealing with are kind of interesting because Federal Way has gotten a lot of the families that Seattle has pushed out. And he said, in Federal Way, we're dealing with a lot of these issues because we have a high poverty, lots of students of color in our district. And in Seattle, the challenge there is trying to maintain that diversity in the district, and keep those students of color around and thriving. And so there's an inherent power imbalance when you have more affluence coming into the district. Because then those measures to try and maintain the diversity, and this is what district officials are telling me, are harder to defend, or they're harder to convey. And so they're trying to find ways to communicate - this focus is beneficial for the whole system.   Crystal Fincher: [00:08:56] So I mean to put it pretty bluntly, affluent white people are resistant to diversity in their schools. Because there's an association in a lot of their minds between lower quality schools and a lower quality education and the presence of people of color. It's been an issue, much like the issue of zoning overall, and more affluent, single family neighborhoods are resistant to more density and more different people being in their community. The same resistance is there in the schools that they attend and they're very vocal about that. And so there's been a large amount of affluent white people moving in who don't have diversity as a priority for their kids and their families. And it just makes addressing the issue even harder.   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:09:55] It does. And it also, it stratifies the needs that they have to meet. One district official told me that, at the same time that we're getting a lot of affluence coming into the district, we're also seeing poor students become poorer. So there was a recent surge in homeless students being served at the district. And I wouldn't say this is a sight you would see very often because of the way that the city is stratified by race and income. But in some schools, for example, I think the example given was, it was a school in the Central Area that sort of border, I believe it's an elementary school. It has a homeless shelter nearby, and then it's also sort of in the gentrified Central District. And so you have some students, this is a school board member telling me this image, you have some students getting dropped off in front of this school in taxis and they're either homeless or they're foster kids. And then in the back parking lot, you see a Tesla. And so the spectrum of needs that the district has had to serve and concentrate on is really divided. So that makes for some interesting political divides for which schools and which areas of the district are going to get money and resources for their schools.   Crystal Fincher: [00:11:21] Right. And we've seen for a long time, this has been a long-standing discussion about the disparity in resources that schools in the South End versus schools in the North End have typically received. It's been predominantly skewed towards kids on the North End for decades. And so the district has an initiative to potentially try and do something about that and make it more equitable.   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:11:51] Yeah, they've experimented in recent years with a sort of equity - they call it an equity lens or an equity scoring or tier. There are a lot of different, there's a lot of different terminology, but essentially what it breaks down to is that they have a list of these projects that they want to get done in the schools and it can range from maintenance to major reconstruction. Rainier Beach, for example, is due for a major renovation or new school. And so what they've started to do is look at the demographics of the schools that are on the project lists and trying to move them up. And so that's what they've tried to do recently, but there's also been criticism in the most recent round of when they were trying to decide how to spend some construction tax money. There was some criticism of their methodology for deciding that. But they're trying to address it. But there are some other issues that you can't really address with a construction levy like the disparity in teacher experience across the district.   So North End schools or schools with more affluent student bodies tend to have teachers with more experience. And that's pretty true across the country. The turnover at Title I schools, or schools with a high number of low-income students, tend to have higher turnover. Research suggests it's because it's a lack of administrative support sometimes. And so that directly affects the quality of education.   Our South End schools are offering really great programs. I don't want that to come across as those schools are of poor quality in any way, but it does create instability when you have teacher turnover at a higher rate. And then coupled with that, South End schools tend to have lower enrollment than schools in the North End, or at least that's according to what the district says. And so every year we see some sort of adjustment where, for example, a school like Rainier Beach will lose one or two instructors.   Crystal Fincher: [00:13:59] Right. And we've seen protests about that - about South End schools bearing the brunt of staff changes and that instability, because of those enrollment differences. Those enrollment differences aren't happening in a vacuum. Those are people who've been displaced, effectively, and who are no longer in the city. It's not like they just disappeared, but they can no longer afford to live there, because we've all seen what's happened with housing prices.   So when you have an area that's been disproportionately hit by increases that are unsustainable for people who live there - I mean, we're talking doubling of rents and a number of situations. And salaries and wages certainly have not doubled. And the cost of living is increasing and more than just housing costs. So they're losing students and a lot of times the more affluent people replacing them are not participating in the public school system. And so we're seeing enrollment decrease there. And all of the challenges that come with that, in terms of more instability, more inexperienced teachers, fewer resources available, fewer parents there for PTAs and fundraisers, if they're even available to do that in the first place. So a lot of the advantages that we see in some other areas of the city just don't exist there. And there really is no - there hasn't traditionally been an effort to account for that and to make that disparity lessen and look at a more equitable share of resources, but it sounds like they're actually looking at doing that now.   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:15:52] I think as a result of focusing on African-American male students, you have to focus on South End schools. And we don't know what the result of this focus is going to be. All I have is what they're trying to do, some of the programs they have, but this is the first year of their five-year plan. So there's not really much I can report back about how successful these measures are.   Crystal Fincher: [00:16:18] You're listening to Hacks and Wonks with your host Crystal Fincher on KVRU 105.7 FM.   We're joined today by Dahlia from the Seattle Times who has done an excellent job of reporting on education here in the city and state from a variety of different angles. I encourage you to read more of her work to get a better idea of just what's going on. So we were just talking about some things that are happening in the district that they're trying to address. What else do they have going on in the district?   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:16:56] I mean that strategic plan is essentially most of what they talk about now. I mean, that's the lens through which they're making all of their policy decisions. They say, how is this going to affect students, and this is their phrase - farthest away from educational justice. And so those initiatives cover a broad cross-section of things. And things that are identified as really important to keeping students of color engaged in the school system, things that they've failed to do thus far - getting students of color reading by third grade, having a teachers' staff that reflects the diversity of their students.   Crystal Fincher: [00:17:36] Which actually increases the academic performance of students. When they have a teacher that looks like them, they do better.   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:17:45] Yeah. I mean, teacher expectations factor into a lot of how successful students are in the long run. Because if you have, if you have a teacher, and this is shown to be somewhat correlated with race, if you have a teacher that is, that shares your racial background, their likelihood of being referred to college or enjoying a wide variety of academic opportunities is much higher. And students of color are facing a teacher force that is largely white women.   Crystal Fincher: [00:18:18] I am the mother of a son who is now in his twenties, but certainly, what you were just talking about resonated with me and so many other parents of color in districts where, if we came upon a challenge - I mean, there's one situation I remember where my son was having a challenge in one particular subject. And so we wanted to be proactive and, Hey, it looks like he's starting to have a challenge. What can we do to - is there extra time, extra support, extra tutoring, what programming, what resources are there? And being met with almost shock that I was interested in intervening and an expectation almost that he would struggle.   I will never forget that they said, "Well, at least he's not failing." And so if it - there's a reason why I remember that clearly. And so it's - if the expectation for some kids is just not failing while other kids are being talked to about college and beyond and other opportunities, which you see filter through to programs like Running Start or advanced placement classes or the gifted programs. I know there's an impression that parents and kids get from teachers and school administration - that they're more invested in some kids, some types of kids, than they are with others.   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:19:49] That community disenfranchisement that Seattle has dealt with is something that they want to address, that's something that they've, that's sort of their cultural responsiveness part of their strategic plan. And again, we're in the first year, I don't know how successful that is, but that's something that the district has been aware of for decades .   Crystal Fincher: [00:20:13] Well, and I will say it absolutely has been a problem for decades and major problem for decades. And it is heartening to see them attempt to tackle it, because we've certainly heard talk about the problem for a long time and ideas. But now that something is actually in place and in process, and we'll see where it leads and some parts of it may work well and other parts may not, but at least we're trying something and can retool as we go and learn lessons and make things better. But I think it is time for action in all facets of education for all kids, especially kids who need it most, whether they're immigrants, or non-English speakers, or kids of color, or foster kids, or kids from low-income households, that they are viewed as kids just the same as everyone else - full of the same kind of potential that everyone else has. And so I am happy to hear that that's happening from the district and I'm looking forward to reading your coverage on how that proceeds.   And so one thing that I just mentioned that you've written about recently is talking about how the gifted program is administered. And I guess I probably have a personal opinion on this too, as a kid who went through a gifted program. It just never actually seemed to me that it was that the kids were extraordinary.   Speaking in just my experience, I can't speak for Seattle, but they just taught in a much more relevant way and made connections that they weren't making in other ones. And I'm not saying that your kids are not gifted. There are tons of wonderfully talented kids, but I think it is interesting to consider that maybe if they looked at expanding that type of opportunity to more kids, to different types of kids, that they might potentially see the same kind of achievement by expanding, by looking beyond what they typically view as being gifted or talented or being full of potential. That that is typically looked a very specific way and has typically not looked other specific ways. And I think that's misguided and I'm happy to see that they're at least considering changing that, but it also looks like they're in the middle of that consideration and we don't know what's going to happen with that.   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:22:47] Yeah. I mean, it's very much in flux right now. To give some folks some background, Seattle Public Schools has had a gifted program since about the 1960s. And that came with a wave of national recognition that there are some students that need to be grown and invested in and nurtured in a different way than other students. It really comes out of the space race. And so it all starts with intelligence testing. And districts like Seattle start piloting these programs where they administer IQ tests to students. And they then use a cutoff - they say 98 percentile and above get to be in this particular program. And they experiment with how to accelerate these students maybe one year or two years of instruction. And over time, and this is sort of a unique thing for Seattle, although a few other districts had tried it - in the 1970s and 80s, as the district was trying to racially integrate schools with bussing, they used gifted programs to try and attract white families to predominantly Black and Brown schools in the district because they had identified that these gifted programs were really popular with white families.   And so there's part of the history that Seattle is dealing with - it includes that sort of racial integration part of their gifted program, or the sort of roots there. And so as a result, there's the current model that Seattle Public Schools uses to deliver gifted instruction - is a cohort where students attend schools in separate classrooms. Students who are designated as gifted - in separate classes as the rest of the general school population.   So you have schools like in Washington Middle School, or Garfield High School, or Thurgood Marshall Elementary School - I'm talking about Central District and South End schools because that's where the divide becomes more obvious, but you'll have classrooms of predominantly Black and Brown students who are in the gen ed population - that's how they're referred to. And then you'll have the HCC, the highly capable cohort students who are predominantly white and Asian in these schools. And the reason I gave that history bit is that a lot of the same schools that were targeted to have gifted programs are the same schools that have these cohorts today. And they have separate classes just like that historical bussing initiative worked. And so the district has said, Okay, we're going to try to do away with these cohorts. We still have to deliver services for gifted students under state law - that's a requirement - but we want to have these gifted services delivered in a way where they're integrated with the rest of the general education population at the school. And that's caused quite a bit of uproar. There's a lot of debate about whether the cohort, these self-contained is what they call them, self-contained cohorts where all the gifted students are in one place, whether they're necessary to ensure that student's needs are met. And so a lot of the pushback has been around well, Can you still offer the same level of academic service if you get rid of this? And so that's - I think that the district believes that it's part of their plan to address students farthest away from educational justice - to remove this cohort model because it sort of steeped in that larger bussing problem.   Crystal Fincher: [00:26:41] 'Cause that's where it originated and it still looks just like that.   Dahlia Bazzaz: [00:26:44] This structure, for sure, yeah. And so that's been one of the largest debates for the district, I would say, in the last decade or so. And it's really bubbling up now and they just had a task force bring together a bunch of recommendations for how the district could reform its practices and the district is expected to issue a proposal for how to reform in the spring of next year.   Crystal Fincher: [00:27:13] Well, we will definitely be keeping our eye on that one too. And I'm sure there will be a lot of heated and colorful conversation from parents and other stakeholders involved in that. But I'm glad they're having the conversation - very happy you gave us that history, because that's important to know similar to the redlining conversation.   So many conversations that we're having in Seattle about where things originate and how they still look the same, but it's easy for a lot of people to forget how they came to be that way. So again, sincerely appreciate your work and you joining us today.   Thank you for listening to Hacks and Wonks. Thank you to KVRU 105.7 FM in Seattle, where we record this show. Our chief audio engineer is Maurice Jones Jr and our Producer is Lisl Stadler. If you want more Hacks and Wonks content, go to https://www.officialhacksandwonks.com, subscribe to Hacks and Wonks on your favorite podcatcher, or follow me on Twitter @finchfrii. Catch you on the other side.   All opinions on Hacks and Wonks represent only the opinion holder and in no way represent the opinions and beliefs of KVRU as a whole.

SBCC Vaquero Voices
Episode 10 - Noel Gomez, Chelsea Lancaster, Christina Lomeli, Ismael Paredes Ulloa

SBCC Vaquero Voices

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 18, 2020 93:38


Mentioned in this episode:EOPS - https://www.sbcc.edu/eopscare/Guardian Scholars - https://www.sbcc.edu/guardianscholars/CalWORKS - https://www.sbcc.edu/calworks/SPARC (Single Parents Arriving Ready for College) - https://www.sbcc.edu/eopscare/sparc.phpRunning Start - https://www.sbcc.edu/eopscare/runningstart.phpMole Ranchero - https://hispanickitchen.com/recipes/mole-ranchero-de-costillita/Milanesa - https://www.mexicoinmykitchen.com/milanesa-recipe/Cesar's Place - https://www.yelp.com/biz/cesars-place-santa-barbaraMexican Rice - https://tastesbetterfromscratch.com/authentic-mexican-rice/Molletes - https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/molletes-51138200El Sitio - https://www.elsitiorestaurantsb.com/Bicycling - https://santabarbaraca.com/itinerary/popular-bike-trails-in-santa-barbara/Strava - https://www.strava.com/Water Dancer - https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/550171/the-water-dancer-by-ta-nehisi-coates/Ta-Nehisi Coates' Black Panther - https://ta-nehisicoates.com/graphic-novels/Between the World and Me (Show) - https://www.hbo.com/specials/between-the-world-and-meEl Centro - https://sites.google.com/view/elcentrosb/homePod Save the People - https://crooked.com/podcast-series/pod-save-the-people/Nice White Parents - https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/30/podcasts/nice-white-parents-serial.htmlPumpkin Cookies - https://lovelylittlekitchen.com/soft-pumpkin-cookies/   

STUDENTSFORABETTERFUTURERADIO
ROSEMARY BECCHI FIGHTING FOR NEW JERSEY FAMILIES

STUDENTSFORABETTERFUTURERADIO

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 30, 2020 60:00


Cisco and Falzon Hour Broadcast in Politics Call in to speak with the host: Cisco Acosta, Mark Falzon, and guest (845) 262-0988 Join us on Thursday October 29, at 9:00 pm eastern time, with our guest, 11th Congressional District ROSEMARYBECCHI. Rosemary Becchi is a leading tax policy lawyer and consultant who works as a Strategic Advisor and Counsel at Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, where she specializes in tax and financial services matters. Rosemary began her career in the public sector at the IRS as an attorney and advisor before moving on to the majority staff of the U.S. Senate Finance Committee as tax counsel. As a candidate for Congress, Rosemary brings valuable, first-hand experience in both public policy and the law. She has spent her career working on the front lines of policy and regulatory matters, developing collaborative relationships with key leaders in both chambers of Congress, the Treasury Department, the Securities Exchange Commission, the Federal Reserve Board and other federal and state agencies as well as industry and trade associations. Rosemary also has been a political advocate both on the national and local level. She has authored multiple commentary pieces on tax and financial services issues. She has served in a leadership role of the Tax Coalition, including serving as the chair. Most recently, Rosemary was Chairman of the Board of Running Start, an organization dedicated to getting more women elected to public office. Rosemary is also the New Jersey Chair for Maggie’s List. Topics for discussion:   Mikie Sherrill, The impact of Covid on New Jersey families and business, Affordable Care Act. Show Writer: Doreen Finkle Show Sponsor: Studentsforabetterfuture.com  

Becoming Bulletproof with Tracy O'Malley
85: Handling the Curveballs Life Throws at You with Nicole DeBoom

Becoming Bulletproof with Tracy O'Malley

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2020 72:45


You bonked. When you’re going, going, going and all of a sudden you have no more energy, can’t take another step and are lying on the ground...you bonked.You didn’t eat enough, drink enough, or pace yourself. You bonked...and it hit you like a brick wall.But here’s the thing: You have to bonk to figure out what your bonking signs are in order to offset the bonk next time.How this relates to suffering If you’ve never suffered, the first time you do you have no perspective on it—and it’s brutal. However, sadly, the more suffering you go through, the more comfortable you get in this state of mind knowing you WILL come out of it.It’s important to point out that there’s a fine line between the sabotaging related to suffering (as in you’re intentionally suffering because it’s the only way you’ve found to move forward) and the embracing of suffering when it happens. The former is toxic, the latter is a pathway to healing. Don’t get too comfortable While a level of comfort is necessary when it comes to suffering, you never want to get too comfortable in this state. Getting comfortable in a world of suffering is dangerous. What’s more, no one wants to be around someone who’s suffering all the time—that person’s energy is difficult and can suck all of the other energy right out of the room.The other side of sufferingAfter battling the suffering associated with alcoholism, Nicole went on to become a triathlete, get sober, found Skirt Sports, and today is a wife, mother, founder & CEO, leading the non-profit Running Start and hosting the Run This World with Nicole DeBoom Podcast. Hear more about her incredible journey in this episode.Quotes:3:42It’s how we handle the curve balls, and square up on those curve balls and knock them out of the park that really makes all the difference.7:43 (Nicole)I like knowing that on the other side of suffering can be something better than you ever imagined.10:27There’s a fine line between the sabotaging related to suffering and the embracing of the suffering.12:57 (Nicole)For me, the blackout part of drinking happened fairly early in my life and continued all the way through until I finally stopped drinking in my 30’s.25:20 (Nicole)I had to go through kind of, really sort of a physical body rock bottom, and after that I respected my body more.36:10 (Nicole)Our whole life really revolved around Tim’s success and making sure he was set up for success and I was sort of along for the ride.42:00 (Nicole)[I took 2020] one mile at a time. Just like one day at a time. 42:22 (Nicole)Everything has a life cycle. We, as humans, have a life cycle. Businesses have a life cycle.55:11 (Nicole)We don’t walk this world alone. When we walk the world alone, we suffer more.1:04:13 (Nicole)Sometimes it’s okay to just float in the water, not try to go forward...sometimes you have to turn into it instead of trying to ride a wave out of it.

Viking 360
Off to a Running Start

Viking 360

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2020 34:56


This weeks episode features a breakdown of the Viking football victory at Buckhannon last friday night, as well as interviews from a couple of the stars of that game Kadin Hall and Katie Lawrence.  Also hear from the new leader of the Pride of Jackson County Eric Staats.  Freshman Ellie Hosaflook shares her thoughts on the first win of her High School Career.  This weeks Football Hall of Fame inductee Matt Parsons joins the podcast to talk about what Ripley Football means to him. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/brian-johnson9/support

The Tribe
Get a Running Start

The Tribe

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2020 19:29


Velocity partner Dave Whichard interviews Ken George and Todd Hausberger on what it takes to have a fast start in sales right out of the gate.

Will Run For...
5. Tom's Time

Will Run For...

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2020 87:42


Diana, Erin, Michael and Tom are back in our final episode of our host introductions! This week we hear about how Tom spent his most of his life "fitness adjacent" until he fell in love with running and what it's done for him. Also find out who gave us 5 star reviews, what we run for and a news update from our Will Run For Community! (that's you guys!). We review the results from last week's This or That poll, which listeners had some pretty strong opinions about, before getting to our newest segment that has Michael all worked up as he Tussles with Tom! Come laugh with us as we share our running experiences and talk about everything from our favorite beer runs to our chafing nightmares. Tell us what YOU run for... Email us or leave a voice memo at WillRunForPodcast@gmail.com Find us on Facebook and Instagram @WillRunForPodcast Tag your pictures and stories @WillRunForPodcast and help grow our community. Something good! Running Start - https://runningstart.org/ Into the Unknown - Making of Frozen II - https://www.disneyplus.com/series/into-the-unknown-making-frozen-2/6PWutGrMQzCI Tacos El Tio - Medford - https://tacoseltio.com/ Black Flag Brewing - https://blackflagbrewingco.com/

Active Towns
Run This World w/ Nicole DeBoom

Active Towns

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2020 64:58


In this episode, John catches up with Nicole, a former professional triathlete, Ironman Triathlon champion, founder of Skirt Sports and the non-profit Running Start, and host of the fabulous Run This World Podcast.

Arroe Collins
James And Harris From NBC's World Of Dance

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 18, 2020 11:58


When NBC’s “World of Dance” returns for its fourth season (10 p.m. Tuesday, May 26), two Seattle-area teens will be among the competitors showing off their moves. James Ades, of Kent, and Harris Weiskopf, of Bellevue, who met about five years ago through the Allegro Performing Arts Academy in Kent, will compete for a $1 million grand prize. Hosted by Scott Evans with judges Jennifer Lopez, Derek Hough and Ne-Yo, the new season of “World of Dance” completed filming just prior to the COVID-19 pandemic that shut down Hollywood production. Ades and Weiskopf originally auditioned via video last September at the start of their junior years of high school. Ades was at Kentlake High School and Weiskopf was registered at Sammamish High School while attending classes through the Running Start program at Bellevue College. The teens had danced together before “World of Dance” but usually on larger group competition teams, not as a duo, for a specific reason: “Us together is nonstop goofing off and having fun and pulling each other’s chains,” Ades says. He credits Allegro instructor and choreographer Patrick Pulkrabek with putting the two together for “World of Dance.” “He saw an opportunity and we took it and we became a duo,” Weiskopf says. After their first audition submitted on video, the pair were invited to audition in-person in Los Angeles. “We really were going in at 100%,” Weiskopf says. “Not only is it crazy to think we had this opportunity, but it’s also our future and could impact our lives for the rest of our careers. We were in it to win it.” Once notified they’d made it to the next stage, the pressure began to mount. “Crap, this is awesome, this is amazing, but the other half of me was like, the world is going to see me dance, I better be my best. I have to be like a trained athlete,” Weiskopf says. “Dance is my life,” Ades adds. “This is my chance to put myself out there.” Described as contemporary dancers on “World of Dance,” Ades says their trainer is a ballet choreographer so they aimed to be versatile, working on a fusion of styles as they spent five hours a day in the dance studio for two months before “World of Dance” began shooting its new season early this year.

Arroe Collins
James And Harris From NBC's World Of Dance

Arroe Collins

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2020 11:58


When NBC’s “World of Dance” returns for its fourth season (10 p.m. Tuesday, May 26), two Seattle-area teens will be among the competitors showing off their moves. James Ades, of Kent, and Harris Weiskopf, of Bellevue, who met about five years ago through the Allegro Performing Arts Academy in Kent, will compete for a $1 million grand prize. Hosted by Scott Evans with judges Jennifer Lopez, Derek Hough and Ne-Yo, the new season of “World of Dance” completed filming just prior to the COVID-19 pandemic that shut down Hollywood production. Ades and Weiskopf originally auditioned via video last September at the start of their junior years of high school. Ades was at Kentlake High School and Weiskopf was registered at Sammamish High School while attending classes through the Running Start program at Bellevue College. The teens had danced together before “World of Dance” but usually on larger group competition teams, not as a duo, for a specific reason: “Us together is nonstop goofing off and having fun and pulling each other’s chains,” Ades says. He credits Allegro instructor and choreographer Patrick Pulkrabek with putting the two together for “World of Dance.” “He saw an opportunity and we took it and we became a duo,” Weiskopf says. After their first audition submitted on video, the pair were invited to audition in-person in Los Angeles. “We really were going in at 100%,” Weiskopf says. “Not only is it crazy to think we had this opportunity, but it’s also our future and could impact our lives for the rest of our careers. We were in it to win it.” Once notified they’d made it to the next stage, the pressure began to mount. “Crap, this is awesome, this is amazing, but the other half of me was like, the world is going to see me dance, I better be my best. I have to be like a trained athlete,” Weiskopf says. “Dance is my life,” Ades adds. “This is my chance to put myself out there.” Described as contemporary dancers on “World of Dance,” Ades says their trainer is a ballet choreographer so they aimed to be versatile, working on a fusion of styles as they spent five hours a day in the dance studio for two months before “World of Dance” began shooting its new season early this year.

Playlist Profiles
Empowering Voices & Creating Change with Ewurama Appiagyei-Dankah

Playlist Profiles

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2020 36:39


Welcome back to Playlist Profiles! Today I am joined by the incredible Ewurama Appiagyei-Dankah, who serves as Campus Sexual Assault Coordinator for the State of Michigan's Division of Victim Services and was this past year's #ILookLikeAPolitician Ambassador for Running Start, a nonpartisan nonprofit that trains and inspires young women to run for office. Ewurama's Playlist: The Knife - Maggie Rogers New Apartment - Ari Lennox Alright - Kendrick Lamar Instagram: @playlistprofilespodcast Playlist Profiles - The Spotify Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/cas603/playlist/22uHAkrD6HGq1ucqORaBtv?si=qeGNherOQAadlF4NK46RNw Intro and Outro song: Roads of Gold - Doubleday --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/playlistprofiles/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/playlistprofiles/support

Intentional Performers with Brian Levenson
Coronavirus Special Panel: Mentoring/Coaching Vulnerable Populations

Intentional Performers with Brian Levenson

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2020 77:10


Thanks for joining us for today’s panel on Mentoring and Coaching Vulnerable Populations. I have been fortunate to chat with over 150 remarkable people on my Intentional Performers Podcast. These people have overcome adversity, thought deeply about leadership, and have setup intentional lives for themselves to perform at their best. The coronavirus has created challenges for so many throughout the world and it is my hope that these panel discussions will help those in need. While everyone on the panel has tremendous expertise, I also want to note that what we are going through is truly unprecedented and there may be questions that the panelists don’t have the answer to. That’s ok. This isn’t designed to give you the answer to every question you have, instead, it’s designed to have you think deeply about how you can handle this challenging time. Bio’s Below. Jamion Christian Jamion Christian, who architected a perennial Northeast Conference title contender at Mount St. Mary’s and turned Siena into one of the nation’s most improved teams in 2018-19, is in his first season as men’s basketball head coach at George Washington University. Hired to lead his alma mater at the age of 29, Christian led Mount St. Mary’s to two NEC Tournament Championships and NCAA Tournament appearances in 2014 and 2017. He guided the Mount to 101 wins and a winning record in conference play all six seasons, the only school in the conference to achieve that feat. Twitter: @JamionChristian David Shapiro David Shapiro is CEO of MENTOR: The National Mentoring Partnership, the national organization unifying and elevating the youth mentoring field through expertise, advocacy, and recruitment. For more than 13 years, he has dedicated his career to driving equity through the power of relationships and is a servant leader for the mentoring movement. His thought leadership and movement-building expertise has been recognized by Social Impact Exchange, the Stanford Social Innovation Review, and Grantmakers for Effective Organizations. He is a husband, father, and mentor. Twitter: @dshapMENTOR Website: https://www.mentoring.org/ Jordan Steffy Jordan Steffy is the Founder & CEO of Children Deserve a Chance Foundation and the Co-Founder and CEO of Box4 Mentor. Continuously inspired and grateful to his own mentors, Steffy works tirelessly to pair high-aspiring young people with high-performing mentors to enable both to build a more successful and inclusive society. IG: @Jordan_Steffy Website: https://attolloprep.org/ Susannah Wellford Over the last two decades, Susannah Wellford founded two organizations designed to raise the political voice of young women in America. In spring 2007, Susannah founded Running Start to inspire young women and girls to pursue political leadership. To date, Running Start has trained over 15,000 young women to run for elected office. Running Start furthers the work begun by the Women Under Forty Political Action Committee (WUFPAC), which Susannah cofounded in 1999 and led for five years. Susannah speaks frequently around the country about the importance of involving more young women in politics. She has also lectured about politics to international groups from dozens of countries. Twitter: @SusannahWDC Website: https://runningstart.org/

The 425 Show with Nicole Mangina
Snoqualmie Valley Community Network

The 425 Show with Nicole Mangina

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2020 26:49


Laura Smith is the Executive Director for the Snoqualmie Valley Community Network. Laura has more than 20 years of experience in the non-profit sector and has been with the Snoqualmie Valley Community Network since 2005. Laura has been an active community leader on the eastside for many years, which includes board and volunteer roles with Rotary Club of Duvall, Executive Constantine's Healthcare Leadership Circle, King County's Mental Health and Drug Dependence Advisory Council, the Snoqualmie Valley Healthy Community Coalition, and the King County Human Services Alliance. Laura holds a Bachelors of Arts degree in English and Secondary Teaching from Colorado State University and a Masters in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado. Laura is a graduate of Leadership Eastside and gets her energy from community collaboration and working with youth. Laura resides in Duvall with her husband and two children. Her son is currently enrolled in the Running Start program at Bellevue College and her daughter is currently attending Cedarcrest High School.

Alternative Talk- 1150AM KKNW
The 425 Show w/ Nicole Mangina - 03 - 31 - 20 - Snoqualmie Valley Comm. Network

Alternative Talk- 1150AM KKNW

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2020 26:52


Laura Smith is the Executive Director for the Snoqualmie Valley Community Network. Laura has more than 20 years of experience in the non-profit sector and has been with the Snoqualmie Valley Community Network since 2005. Laura has been an active community leader on the eastside for many years, which includes board and volunteer roles with Rotary Club of Duvall, Executive Constantine’s Healthcare Leadership Circle, King County’s Mental Health and Drug Dependence Advisory Council, the Snoqualmie Valley Healthy Community Coalition, and the King County Human Services Alliance. Laura holds a Bachelors of Arts degree in English and Secondary Teaching from Colorado State University and a Masters in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Colorado. Laura is a graduate of Leadership Eastside and gets her energy from community collaboration and working with youth. Laura resides in Duvall with her husband and two children. Her son is currently enrolled in the Running Start program at Bellevue College and her daughter is currently attending Cedarcrest High School.

What Makes A Woman Podcast-Weekly Conversations With Women Who Share Their Secrets To Success
S2, E26 Rina Shah Brings Women Into Leadership Positions In Politics And Business #convoswithliana

What Makes A Woman Podcast-Weekly Conversations With Women Who Share Their Secrets To Success

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2020 43:41


A political adviser and social entrepreneur based in Washington, DC, Rina has been nationally-recognized as a political insider and astute businesswoman. Prior to launching Rilax Strategies – a government and public affairs practice – she served as a senior staffer to two Republican Members of U.S. Congress. Her expertise includes speech-writing, building winning strategies for political campaigns at all levels of government, and serving as a government and public affairs consultant to a wide-range of domestic and international corporations, including start-up ventures. She is the creative force behind LoomUS, a civic renewal initiative launching in the summer of 2020. She is a Co-Founder of Women's Public Leadership Network and Catalyst PAC. She is a fervent advocate for electing and appointing more women to positions at all levels of U.S. government; as such, she is currently an Adviser to "VoteRunLead"and "Running Start" as well a Board of Directors member for "RepresentWomen" and "Republican Women for Progress." She offers analysis and commentary each week on MSNBC and Al Jazeera Media Network, and she is a senior panelist on PBS' "To The Contrary" news program -- the only all-women news Sunday show in the nation. Rina was elected as a Delegate from Washington, DC to the RNC 2016 Convention; however, due to anti-Trump remarks she made in the national media, her local party and the convention's credentials committee unjustly denied her access to be seated on the convention floor. Before an independent tribunal within the Republican National Committee ruled in her favor and subsequently reinstated her as a Delegate, Rina's controversial story was highlighted multiple times in publications ranging from Politico to The Washington Post. She most recently served as Chief Spokesperson and Strategic Adviser for 2016 Independent presidential candidate Evan McMullin. Rina was a 2019 Aspen Ideas Festival Scholar and belongs to the American Enterprise Institute's Leadership Network as well as the Meridian International Center's Global Leadership Council. She is the proud daughter immigrants from Uganda and India, and is a native of West Virginia. Rina and her husband reside in the Washington, DC area with their daughters. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/liana-zavo/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/liana-zavo/support

Recipes for Good Living
Coming Home - Jessica Grounds

Recipes for Good Living

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2020 54:29


Jessica Grounds shares her journey on making the decision to leave the politically-charged Washington DC after living and working for over a decade, and return to her childhood home. She takes us through the decision making process and the impact she hopes it will make on her family. It is a story of family, faith and working to make a difference in the world. Jessica has been recognized as one of the leading women in politics and as an advocate for women in the workplace. She is the co-founder of Running Start and Mine the Gap. Jessica is married and she and her husband have a daughter who is 2 years old.

Sean Burke Show
Innovative education for our kids...at a statewide level

Sean Burke Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 15, 2019 51:48


Is the way we educate our children outdated? Are there better ways, without throwing it all out and starting over? Today I interview Chris Reykdal, the Superintendent of Public Instruction for the State of Washington. He's the top guy in the state over public education. And we talk about Running Start, where juniors and seniors in high school actually take classes at community colleges, paid for by the high school. I also ask him about home schooling, and how the state integrates them into the public system. And I directly ask him if the very system he oversees needs fundamental change - you might be surprised at his answer. A candid conversation about how one state is innovating their approach to educating kids. Produced by Tracey Andruscavage.

The Stokecast
72: Nicole Deboom's Epic Entrepreneurial Epiphany (The Evolution of Skirt Sports)

The Stokecast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2019 88:19


Nicole Deboom is the Founder and CEO of Skirt Sports, a former professional triathlete, host of the Run This World podcast, founder of the Running Start nonprofit, a wife and a mom. How does she have the time? Tune in to find out. Also discover how Nicole continues to evolve both personally and professionally with business pivots that feel more akin to a startup than a 15 year old apparel company, and the confidence factor to tackle any tough challenge ahead. Show notes: https://exploreinspired.com/nicoledeboom Hosts: Jonathan Ronzio, Emily Holland Editor: Chris Plante Presented by: Explore Inspired

Intentional Performers with Brian Levenson
How to Build Confidence and Empower Underdogs with Susannah Wellford

Intentional Performers with Brian Levenson

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2019 69:46


Susannah Wellford joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Over the last two decades, Susannah has founded two organizations designed to raise the political voice of young women in America. The one that she will really talk about today is “Running Start” which she started to encourage young woman and girls to pursue political leadership. Susannah will talk about her relationship with politics starting from a young age, and how she came up with this idea of “Running Start” which to date has trained over 15,000 young women to run for elected office.  Susannah is a big believer in underdogs, she wants to empower underdogs, and she’ll explain why that is so important to her. In this episode, they discuss what her childhood was like (4:20), what her family dynamics were like (7:00), her experience being bullied in 7th grade (11:10), being laid off in her 30’s (13:00), the vision she had for herself from a career standpoint (15:00), how to improve women’s lives in the workforce (19:40), why she was interested in politics (24:10), who saw the potential in her (28:00), the differences often found in men and women leaders (30:00), how she started Running Start (35:30), how you build confidence (36:40), self-talk and confidence (40:00), how to cultivate better self-talk (46:00, the difference in men and women wanting to be the #1 vs. #2 (50:30), what success looks like with Running Start (54:00), her vision for Running Start 10 years from now (59:20), the diversity on her team (1:00:00), how to get young women to step into power and be leaders (1:04:40), and her perspective on all women schools (1:05:40) Thank you to Susannah for coming on the podcast.  We encourage you to check out https://runningstart.org/ and they have programs for high school students, college students, and young professionals. You can also find Susannah on Twitter @SusannahWDC. Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers. Thanks for listening. -Brian

Cassiopeia Station
Victor Argon - Terrestrial attraction

Cassiopeia Station

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 29, 2019 58:31


1.Introduction 01:21 2.Ways of Civilizations (2002 version) 04:17 3.Sunset over Earth 05:39 4.Sunny Rain 04:21 5.Unterwater Tunnel 04:17 6.Running Start 04:13 7.Typhoon 05:34 8.Minbari Snow 05:31 9.Acceleration (1998 version) 03:42 10.Conveyor 04:31 11.In the Flight 03:51 12.Two Systems 06:54 13.Earth's Attraction 04:19 credits released September 18, 2002 The first album Complex Numbers. Music: Frol Zapolsky, Victor Argon, Ilya Pyatov, Alexander Osinski. Text: Victor Argon, Ilya Pyatov. Vocals: Natalia Mitrofanova. The link to the site of the "Complex Numbers" (including Victor Argonov Project) and this album http://complexnumbers.ru/ --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/podcast-cd8c8e8/message

GatorCast
Get a Running Start on Your Education

GatorCast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2019 37:13


Running Start is a dual credit program that allows local high school juniors and seniors to take college classes, tuition-free, while earning their high school degree. In this episode, listeners will learn more about the benefits of the program, as well as the resources available to help students succeed during their studies. greenriver.edu/gatorcast facebook.com/greenrivercollege instagram.com/greenriverc twitter.com/greenrivercc youtube.com/greenrivercollege

Vital Voices Podcast
The Skills: A Conversation with BBC Journalist Mishal Husain and Allyson Carpenter

Vital Voices Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 26, 2019 20:55


Listen in as Vital Voices partnered with sister organization, Running Start, to host a live book party for BBC journalist Mishal Husain. Mishal's new book The Skills: From First Job to Dream Job—What Every Woman Needs to Know, and her leadership lessons are the topic of this conversation, led by Running Start fellow, and Washington, D.C.'s youngest-ever elected public official, Allyson Carpenter.   To learn more about Vital Voices, visit www.vitalvoices.org Invest in women, improve the world.   Production Credits: Producer: Christi Owiye Writer: Lizzie Kubo Kirschenbaum Assistant Producer: Ryland N. Staples Host: Alyse Nelson   Music Credit: On My Way Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Playlist Profiles
Claudia Marconi - From Venezuela to the Hill

Playlist Profiles

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2019 46:16


Claudia Marconi was born Miami, FL and grew up in Caracas, Venezuela. Living in Venezuela made her want to study politics to help developing countries find democracy. After graduating from Rutgers University she got a fellowship with Running Start, a non-partisan organization that empowers young women to run for office. As Congressional Fellow she interned for Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi. Now, Claudia works on the Hill continuing her career in politics, and learning as much as she can to use it for when she becomes a Member of Congress. Claudia's Playlist: 1. More Than This - Roxie Music 2. Dear Madam Barnum - XTC 3. Then She Appeared - XTC --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/playlistprofiles/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/playlistprofiles/support

The Shameless Mom Academy
344: Nicole DeBoom: Mother, Runner, Visionary, Feminist

The Shameless Mom Academy

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2019 56:23


Born and raised in the Chicago suburbs, Nicole DeBoom was a standout swimmer, qualifying for the 1988 Olympic Trials and later graduating from Yale University. She decided to pursue the sport of triathlon, and a lucky seat assignment introduced her to her future husband, Tim DeBoom (who would later become a 2-time Hawaii Ironman World Champion), on a flight to the 1995 Triathlon World Championships. Nicole started racing professionally in 1999, racking up countless podium finishes. During the final stage of her racing career in 2004, Nicole created and introduced something that had never been done before – the very first running skirt. Shortly afterward, Nicole went on to launch Skirt Sports with the mission of helping women find inspiration, confidence, and courage through the transformative power of running and fitness. Today, Skirt Sports is a national women’s apparel brand offering a full line of products that fit real women’s bodies and support their busy running lives. Currently, you can find Nicole chatting with customers at the Skirt Sports Boulder flagship store, helping women change their lives through her non-profit organization Running Start, interviewing visionaries for her popular podcast Run This World and chasing around her 7-year-old girl, Wilder. Nicole’s energy is as big and dynamic as her racing career.  I think you’re going to love this conversation as much as I did! Listen in to hear Nicole share: How she went from being a professional athlete who didn’t want kids to have a daughter that completely changed her sense of identity How she adapted to NOT doing it all Her evolution from a professional athlete into a working mom with a mission (and the shift in identity when you no longer workout 3 times a day) Her mission in building a company that makes athletics and working out more feminine and more accessible to women of all abilities and body types What inspired her to start a nonprofit and the impact it’s had on other women Links mentioned: Connect with Nicole Shop Skirt Sports Use the code SHAMELESS20 for a discount Check out Running Start Nicole’s Podcast: Run This World Facebook: @nicoledeboom Instagram: @nicoledeboom Thank you to our sponsors: Lola: Get organic cotton tampons and other hygiene products delivered right to your door. To get 40% off all subscriptions, go to Lola and use the code SHAMELESS40 at checkout. Instacart: Get your groceries delivered to your door! Save $10 off your first order at Instacart or on the Instacart mobile app when you use the promo code SHAMELESS10 at checkout.

Paul Adamson in conversation
Surmounting barriers for women to run for political office

Paul Adamson in conversation

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 24, 2019 19:22


Susannah Wellford, CEO and Founder of Running Start, a non partisan non profit organisation training young women to run for political office, talks to Paul Adamson about the barriers women face when seeking a career in politics and how these can be surmounted.

Unpacking with BelaKharma
Episode 15: Unpacking with BelaKharma

Unpacking with BelaKharma

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 14, 2019 25:14


& We are BACK!  Back together, that is.  In today’s episode, Bela & Kharma chat and unpack about Running Start’s Young Women to Watch Awards and organization, Valentine’s Day, Black History … The post Episode 15: Unpacking with BelaKharma appeared first on belakharma.com.

Sippin and Conversations with Buddha & Babi
Season 1 Finale - December 19, 2018

Sippin and Conversations with Buddha & Babi

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2019 56:02


Topic: Giving Your Fucks Up!! 33 weeks of shows this season!! Giveaway Winner Announced - Butter Bliss Body package Running Start 2019 with Bobby Be Inspires and others! --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/buddhababi/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/buddhababi/support

Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler
HOW TO GET A RUNNING START FOR THE NEW YEAR! CJ Liu & Michael Sandler

Inspire Nation Show with Michael Sandler

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 31, 2018 62:48


If you've ever wanted more success and happiness in the New Year, then do we have step back and get a running start show for you. Today we'll talk about stepping back, gaining perspective, getting lost, and letting the answers chase you down. That plus we'll talk about coasting in on fumes, taking time to recharge, setting intention with the solstice…going inward with the darkness…the power of reframing Nausea, Cyclops action, sleeping with Goggle's, college happiness and love, elk in the backyard, JUMPING MADNESS, and what in the world 2 mountains for the price of one, has to do with anything!!! Topics Include: What does winter darkness have to do with setting ourselves up for success? What's it mean to stop and go inward for the New Year? How do we envision the New Year ahead? What's important to think about for the New Year? What's the challenge with New Year's resolutions? What's wrong with using willpower and grit to change your life? What is a New Year's theme??? What's the importance of taking a pause if you can? What it means to have the answers chase you do? How can we set intention for the New Year? What are tests that can help us understand ourselves better? What does it mean to wait for things to chase you down? How do we discern what's ego and what's not? What it means to get a banner from the Universe to help you decide? What's the importance of reflecting back on the year gone by? What's the importance of dreaming of the future? What does it mean to do healing from 2018 (and how can Emotion Code and EFT Tapping help)? What's it mean to “get light” for the New Year? To find out more about group coaching with Michael Sandler and Jessica Lee visit: InspireNationUniversity.com What can we learn to help us for the New Year from Peter Wohlleben and “The Secret Lives of Trees” What's the importance of “non-activity time” for the New Year? For More Info Visit: FireItUpWithCJ.com. And for free meditations, weekly tips, stories and similar shows visit: www.InspireNationShow.com

Christy Wright's Business Boutique
Ep 63: Wrap Up the Year and Finish Strong

Christy Wright's Business Boutique

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2018 70:36


It’s exciting to plan for the future, set fun goals, and dream big for your business, but you also need to figure out how you’ll reach those goals. If you don’t know where you are, it’s hard to know how to get to where you want to be. Today, I want to talk about how you can assess and evaluate where your business is right now so you can see the path to where you want to be in 2019. Make sense? Great! Let’s get started. End of the Year Business Review Organizing and evaluating the major projects you did in 2018 is a great first step toward planning for 2019. Start by creating four columns and sorting projects into these four categories: right, wrong, missing and confused. RIGHTWhat worked well? What was a huge success or helped you gain momentum? These are things that you want to maximize, amplify, and do more of next year. WRONGWhat didn’t work? Did you have a setback or a challenge? Did some of your results disappoint you? If so, it’s okay! Making mistakes shows you are taking risks and pushing the limits. The important thing is that you learn from your experiences and stop spending time on these things. MISSINGWhat opportunities were overlooked? Was there something you should have done, but didn’t? Maybe it was something you didn’t know you should do at the time, but you know now. These are things you are going to add. CONFUSEDWhat needs a little more explanation or better processes? Was there something you had to help customers or your team understand multiple times? These are the things you should clarify. This is a great exercise for your business as a whole, but I’d also recommend you do this for the main areas of your business: sales, marketing, operations, money, team and time management. Evaluating your business’s strengths and weaknesses will help you finish the year strong and start the new year even better that last year. Related: Ep 61: Learning From Failure: How to Dust Yourself Off and Move Forward How to Wrap Up the Year and Finish Strong with John Felkins John Felkins is one of our very own Entreleadership Executive Coaches here at Ramsey Solutions. John is on a mission to help business leaders reach their maximum potential. He guides leaders and small-business owners to cut through white noise and helps them make real progress on their journey to becoming the best, most accomplished version of themselves. John Felkins started his professional life as a project management engineer and realized his passion was actually coaching and consulting. After creating a consulting firm, he went to an Entreleadership event, fell in love with the principles, then quickly joined the Entreleadership team to help launch the highly successful Entreleadership coaching program. In this episode, John Felkins and I discuss how to work in your sweet spot and how to wrap up the year and finish strong. We talk about: Why it’s important to use your gifts with your work and not force yourself to do a job that doesn’t come naturally The main things you need to identify and assess in your business before the year ends Practical questions to ask yourself to end the year strong The metrics to know now in order to improve your business next year Knowing your business vitals and why that’s important for your profit and loss Identifying the actual cost of doing business, so you can make adjustments to improve in the future Why putting your phone down will help you avoid distractions and serve your customers better Related: How to Stay Focused and Eliminate Distractions in Your Business Get a Running Start on Your Year We all know the holidays are a crazy busy time of year. Before you know it, it’s January, and you aren’t sure how to start tackling all those New Year’s goals you set for your business. You still have a few days to get your plans in place, so figure out where you want to be and break down what you need to do to reach that goal. Don’t wait—get started now! #AskChristyWright One of my favorite parts of this podcast is hearing directly from you. Give me a call on my toll-free line at 844.944.1074. You might hear your question on a future episode! Staying Focused on Your Business When Life Happens and Guilt Creeps In Life happens. There’s no avoiding it. Medical bills come unexpectedly, your schedule fills up, and tasks become overwhelming. We’ve all felt the pain of balancing our passion for our business with our daily responsibilities. Even though we know it’s crazy, sometimes guilt creeps in. What is the pain point here? Is it that you have some debt to pay off and you feel guilty about quitting your full-time job to start your business? If you can make enough money to take care of your family, be available for them, and do work that allows you to use your gifts, that’s winning. Guilt be gone. Related: The Truth About Work-Life Balance Making Plans for Customer Relationship Management When leads come to us, we need to follow up with them in a timely manner, but doing this manually is exhausting. Finding a platform you trust to automate and manage your leads is crucial for you to grow and scale your business. Whether it’s email leads signing up for a free resource or a form where people are wanting to give you their information because they need your service, every lead deserves attention and managing those leads is critical. I can’t say it enough. We recommend Infusionsoft because we know them, we use them, and we trust them. No matter what customer relationship management platform you choose, make sure it is easy to understand and easy to use. You don’t need more headaches; you need help. Make customer relationship management a part of your 2019 planning. 1:23 End of Year Business Review 19:17 How to Wrap Up the Year and Finish Strong with John Felkins 52:51 #AskChristyWright 66:12 Challenge to Choose Your Focus Daily During the Holiday Season Resources Get Christy's Year-End Review Worksheet by filling out the form here! Order the new 2019 Business Boutique Goal Planner with the code BBPLANNER at BusinessBoutique.com/Planner and receive Christy’s Setting Goals video that you can watch right now! Sponsors Our friends at Infusionsoft help you manage your customers and your business all in one place. If you’re ready to organize your contacts, automate your emails, generate leads and turn those leads into sales, Infusionsoft can help you! Get started now with a free trial by visiting InfusionsoftNow.com/ChristyFree. Check out our friends at Volusion. You can set up your online store and start selling your products within minutes. It’s that easy. Sign up for your FREE 14 day trial at Volusion.com/BB. If you have a success story you would like to share with the Business Boutique community, email me at podcast@businessboutique.com. New podcast episodes are available every other week.

More Than a Pretty Face
Us v. Them...?

More Than a Pretty Face

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2018 55:38


This week I have the pleasure of speaking with the incredible Susannah Wellford. Susannah is the President and Founder of Running Start, a nonprofit and non partisan organization that trains young women to run for office. Susannah has had an amazing career from working on health care issues in the Clinton White House to becoming a lawyer. She also started the Women Under Forty Political Action Committee (WUFPAC) before transiting to founding Running Start. Being part of an activist household since birth, Susannah fondly remembers being taken to protests and having parents that actively engaged in social justice. She knew from a young age that she too wanted to be a social justice advocate. In this episode we discuss Susannah’s trajectory into the political sphere and what she believes a true politician should look like. We discuss power v. people and how it helps or hinders us in life. We talk about her dreams of disrupting the current political system and putting young women at the forefront. She believes that to live in a better world we have to dare to make change and if we don’t try we’ll never see progress. Susannah doesn’t believe we should see everything as an ‘us v. them’ mentality but rather look as each other as people. So listen to this eye opening episode with an incredible lady!Links for Running Start!Facebook: Running StartTwitter/ Instagram: @runningstart Website: https://runningstartonline.org/Connect with Us!Facebook: More Than a Pretty FaceTwitter/ Instagram: @prettyfacelady3Email: prettyfacewomen@mtapfpodcast.comMerch: MTAPF Merch

Le vital corps Salon
#0052: Jessica Grounds on creating women leaders + the gender diversity rubber meeting the workplace road

Le vital corps Salon

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 23, 2018 83:15


Are you someone who's ever looked at leadership in your government, workplace, or organization and thought, “Well, hot damn, I don't see a lot of women in the ranks of leadership up in here.” If this is you or now I’ve got you thinking about this, then I have a guest for you this week. Meet Jessica Grounds. Jessica Grounds has been busting her rump in Washington D.C. since the age of 22. She has founded and led multiple organizations across both the public and private sectors to advance women in leadership. Today, we're going to learn all about the strategic gender-inclusive, bipartisan work she's doing with Mine The Gap, an organization on a mission to create gender-inclusive environment for companies, organizations, and businesses. You’ll also hear Jessica pull wisdom from her own experiences as the founder and former Executive Director of Running Start. She helps us more fully understand the barriers facing women in the workplace today and beyond. Additionally, we touch on the topics of sexism, gender diversity in the workplace, and balancing work and life as a new mother. Plus, Jessica offers practical and realistic steps we can all take within our own organizations to encourage leadership among women - starting right now.   The midterm elections are coming up here in the United States, so I felt like this was such an important conversation to have right now. The work Jessica is doing is so timely, but also so important beyond the midterm elections. I hope you agree. Now, get listening! For all of my American listeners, get out and vote on November 6th. Sign up for reminders and polling from Vote.org. Prepare yourself with ballot information at BallotReady. Check out the full show notes for this episode at: https://www.vitalcorpswellness.com/blog/lvcs-0052-jessica-grounds  

Run This World with Nicole DeBoom
108 - Beth Shields Finally Made Herself a Non Negotiable Priority

Run This World with Nicole DeBoom

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2018 60:40


Beth Shields woke up one day and realized that she needed to commit to herself or she would not be here much longer. She hit send on the Running Start application and showed up to the first meeting – barely. We often say showing up is the hardest part. I’m not sure I fully subscribe to that philosophy. I believe it’s important. It’s the first step. But you need to keep going. You need to shift your mindset, tell yourself that you CAN do it, and then you need to follow through – again and again and again. Today Beth Shields is just a year from her first 5k. She has a special magic quality about her. She is so much more of an inspiration for other women than she will ever let herself take credit for. Her journey is far from over; it takes time, determination and constant reminders that self-love must win. But she has momentum on her side. And it’s affecting not only her personal life but also her career. Beth has become the biggest single sponsor that Running Start has ever had in her commitment to give back to a program that helped change the trajectory of her life in such a positive way. So let me say that if you are looking to buy or sell a house in Colorado, call Beth because she is giving Running Start $500 for every closing so other women can find the courage to change their lives too. Today we talk about: Making the decision to change your life The shame and guilt that follow in the wake of sexual assault Having babies and losing your identity along the way Why judging others sucks #stopthejudging The importance of support: husbands, families, community Raising healthy kids who feel comfortable communicating openly with their parents. The magic pill? Spend time with them. Real life vs "your social media highlight reel" Running Start: How one program can truly change the trajectory of your life Giving back: Beth is the biggest sponsor to date of Running Start - donating $500 per real estate closing through ReMAX Nexus! Beth Shields is one of the most genuine people I’ve ever known. I could never have predicted when I met her that one day I would be interviewing her for my podcast and that she would be helping so many others who don’t believe that they can change their lives. Her message to you is this: You CAN change your life. It starts with believing in yourself. To reach Beth, you can find her on Facebook and Instagram. If you reach out, she will be there for you. And let’s commit right now to #stopthejudging - I love this new slogan. Did you hear what she said about her husband? He’s her best friend because he never judges her, no matter what is going through her head. This is when the magic happens. When we can create a world of no judgment, where we love and support each other’s journeys. And finally, don’t forget about Beth if you are moving here – if you work with her, you help other women who so deeply need support. I will leave you with this thought from Beth. You need to become your own non negotiable priority. You are valuable and you are worth it. Now let's get out there and Run This World!

UUAC Sherborn
Sometimes Faith Needs a Running Start

UUAC Sherborn

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2018 22:51


Sunday, September 16, 2018. "Sometimes Faith Needs a Running Start," a sermon by Rev. Nathan Detering

Run This World with Nicole DeBoom
101 - Katy Blakemore Evans is Not Your Typical Triathlete

Run This World with Nicole DeBoom

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2018 78:45


I have known Katy Blakemore (now Evans) since she was 15 or 16 years old; a distance swimmer on the Longmont Redtails Swim Team where I was a coach before I started racing professionally. Katy was the hardest-working kid on the team, she was incredibly talented, and while she wasn’t the best swimmer in the world, she managed to will her way into walking on to Stanford’s Swim Team. I knew from the early days that she would probably become a triathlete someday. She just somehow had the mental fortitude to be great in a sport that requires so much sacrifice plus she was also a really strong runner :) I recently volunteered at the Boulder Ironman. I don’t even keep track of what pros are racing anymore, I was there to support my nonprofit Running Start, so when the leaders started running by, I almost missed Katy until I heard her voice calling for ice. MY Katy Blakemore was in 3rd place at the time, and running stronger than anyone ahead of or behind her. She finished the day in 2nd place, just a couple minutes behind the winner; she was gaining with each stride. In today's episode we talk about how truly amazing and disappointing it is to finish that close to 1st. It’s rare that I get to interview someone I’ve known from adolescence through to major life milestones as an adult. I really enjoyed catching up with Katy and learning how she moved through her life using sport and family as a foundation for many of the decisions she made. Today we talk about: Swimming Growing up in a household with two very loving (and in love) parents Stanford: How she got onto the team and what she brought to the team Legendary coach Richard Quick, "I believe in believing in belief." Delayed gratification & the Training to Glory ratio The Peace Corps in Guatamala: Why we do what we do Her dad Kit's early death due to cancer Being a school teacher - Scaffolding is a thing I'd never heard of! Katy's path to triathlon stardom Getting married & becoming a mama & racing like a rockstar less than a year later! And so much more! After I interviewed Katy, Tim said, “I heard you two laughing in there. It sounded like a fun one.” He couldn't be more right! If you gain anything from this episode, it would be Katy’s final nugget. So beautiful in it’s simplicity: "Do your best. Have fun." Katy is brilliant, charismatic, thoughtful, and practical. I’m so proud of the path she has chosen to take in this world. Please be sure to follow her on Facebook and cheer her along. Because I kind of think that “when Katy wins, we all win!”

HealthInvestor Podcasts
A running start

HealthInvestor Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 24, 2018 17:20


Social care consultant Sara Livadeas tells HI-Pod about the guide she has created, sponsored by Care England, that aims to help new care homes succeed.

Move With Radiance
Nicole DeBoom on Sobriety

Move With Radiance

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 12, 2018 66:43


This week on the podcast I am bringing you an amazing interview/conversation with Nicole DeBoom. Last week I released an episode about my recent journey in sobriety which was sparked by this honest and very candid conversation with Nicole.We get curious.. About our identities through drinking, why we drank, what we were searching for through drinking, and how we decided it was time to give it up altogether. We talk about coping mechanisms, suppressing emotions, redefining who you want to be, and in Nicoles words:“Accepting who you are, accepting the shit you did, (good bad or ugly) with whatever emotions are tied to it, accepting it and realizing that *you are not alone.* So no matter what you did in the past that you may feel ashamed about, embarrassed about, sad about, proud of, whatever, someone else out there is sharing those same feelings and has trumped you. We are not alone, you have not done the worst thing in the world or the best thing in the world, we are here together.”A little about Nicole: Born and raised in the Chicago suburbs, Nicole was a standout swimmer, qualifying for the 1988 Olympic Trials and later graduating from Yale University. She decided to pursue the sport of triathlon and started racing professionally in 1999, racking up countless podium finishes. During the final stage of her racing career in 2004, Nicole created and introduced something that had never been done before – the first running skirt. Shortly afterward, Nicole went on to launch Skirt Sports with the mission of helping women find inspiration, confidence and courage through the transformative power of running and fitness. Today, Skirt Sports is a national women’s apparel brand offering a full line of products that fit real women’s bodies and support their busy running lives. Currently, you can find Nicole chatting with customers at the Skirt Sports Boulder flagship store, helping women change their lives through her non-profit organization Running Start, interviewing visionaries for her popular podcast Run This World and chasing around her 6-year-old girl, Wilder.This episode is just two people sharing our lives, our struggles, our vulnerabilities, our learnings. And it goes to show that connection stems from humanness. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do.Connect with Nicole:Nicoles websiteNicole InstagramSkirtsports websiteNicoles PodcastNicoles Sobriety TalkAdditional Resources:Hang out with me on Instagram (@stephaniedankelson)Newsletter SignupIf you are interested in being a guest on my podcast, email me at hello@stephanie-dankelson.com

Building Infinite Red
Experience or Education?

Building Infinite Red

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 5, 2018 55:27


In this episode of Building Infinite Red, we talk about the importance of education and experience when starting out in software development and how things change when you move from making your products to running your business. From books and online resources to bootcamps and higher education programs, Jamon, Ken, and Todd share their stories, insights, and opinions for every level of professional. Show Links & Resources Lambda School Austin Allred on Twitter Epicodus Airtable Episode Transcript TODD WERTH: Today's topic is education. I actually don't recall what this topic's about. Ken, do you recall? KEN MILLER: Yeah. Well, it's this question that kind of comes up periodically about developers and CS degrees and that kind of thing. I think there was a Twitter thread a little while back in Jamon's feed, because Jamon's feed is the only feed that matters. TODD: That's a fact. Yeah. KEN: Yeah, do you remember who that was, Jamon? JAMON HOLMGREN: Yeah. The question was, "I have 10 years experience developing sites, but I have no formal education. What are your thoughts on experience versus education? Been thinking of getting a front end development tech degree from Treehouse, but I'm not sure if it's worth the time and money." Yeah. That is a question that does come up fairy regularly. KEN: For that specific question, I think the answer is no, it's probably not worth it, right? If you have 10 years of experience, and you're going to go take basically a practical degree, don't bother. JAMON: Right. KEN: But there are definitely nice things about getting a real CS degree, but getting a job is not necessarily the best reason to do it. JAMON: Right. KEN: If that make sense. TODD: I would totally agree with that. Well, just to start out, the three of us, Jamon nor I have finished college, nor do we have any CS degrees. I learned to program on my own when I was a child, probably started when I was 12. And then I started programming professionally when I was about 24, and then I learned basically on the job. Ken went to Harvard and got a CS degree there. Jamon, you are similar to me, right? JAMON: I was pretty similar to you, yeah. TODD: Yeah. So what I usually tell people, A, now, when I'm hiring people and I'm not representative of everyone, so it's quite a bit different, I do a cursory glance of their resume, maybe. That's less relevant to me than what they can do. In my opinion, developers is a portfolio job, which means the work you've done is hugely more important than any kind of education. Now, obviously if you do have a CS degree, I do find people want CS degrees, they understand some concepts that you maybe don't use day-to-day, and when they do come up, they have a much better understanding of that. Sometimes it's easier to teach them new ideas, because they have the analogy in their mind already. So it's definitely worth it. I would say, my short answer and I'd love to expand on this further in this podcast, but my short answer is you need to learn what you need to learn in order to produce work product, which means develop software, develop websites, develop apps. And everyone has a different way of learning. For some people, school is the best way. For me, school always bored the hell out of me to be honest, and it wasn't the best way for me, but there's no exact right way for everyone. It's just however it works best for you. JAMON: Yeah. And I think that part of this is how much access and opportunity you have, because certainly college is one fairly proven path toward gaining an opportunity to access the job market, to get enough skills that you're hireable out of the gate, and then to access the job market and actually get a little bit of exposure, whether it's through an internship or something like that. So that plays into this as well, if your dad was a software engineer or something, and he has contacts that you can talk to and maybe get some opportunities, then maybe you don't need that, maybe you don't need to go down that road. But there are few other factors here as well. Some of them are personal goals, like what type of programming, like Todd was saying, what type of programming you want to do, how much debt you're willing to take on, how much you can take on. And then also, in some cases, very specific cases, the prestige of the university can be a factor because it certainly opens doors for Ken that Todd and I don't have. TODD: I do want to interject real quick before you jump in, Ken. Going to university has many, many benefits that have nothing to do with getting a job, and those are a super valuable if you have the opportunity. They're worth it. But specifically about a job is what I was talking about. KEN: As a life experience, college is great. If you have the opportunity, you should probably do it. Getting a job as a programmer per se is not a good reason to go to college in my opinion. Now, if what you want to do is get a job at Google, or one of the places that is well-known for preferring CS graduates, especially from elite schools, then you should do that, you absolutely should do that. You're going to have a much, much, much harder time doing that. But also, more to the point, Google has I think fairly reasonable case for it in certain ways, because they are actually dealing with the high level intense CS concepts more than your typical programmer job. TODD: Correct. KEN: Now, I think where the problem comes in the market is that if Goggle does it, then we should do the same thing and then we'll be successful like Google. And the vast majority of companies out there do not need that. And I can also definitely tell you, from my own experience, from the people that I've watched, is that getting a CS degree, they're teaching you the fundamentals of how computers work. In Harvard's case especially. They're very much on the theory stuff. But even a more typical CS degree is very much about the background, the hopefully unchanging fundamentals, and not so much how do you design a build system. Todd? TODD: Yeah. I want to rant a little about a CS degree. CS, I'm sure all of you know is computer science. It is really that, it's computer science. Scientists don't make things. They discover things, and they ponder about things. For example, a physicist and a chemist may work together to make some sort of new alloy, but they're not going to design an airplane. That's what engineers do. If you get a computer science degree, you learn the science of computers. You could actually get a computer science degree, and correct me if I'm wrong Ken, and not learn to program at all. KEN: That would be pretty rare. You do have to know some programming in order to do a lot of the things that they teach you- TODD: But you could do like abstract programming that doesn't actually work. Like, say you're developing an algorithm. It's not- KEN: Yeah. I would say that would be pretty atypical, but there's definitely classes that don't require a lot of coding. TODD: I'm exaggerating to make a point. KEN: Some of it is straight up math. Yeah. TODD: Right, which is different than engineering. KEN: Well, and a good engineer should understand the science obviously. Yeah. JAMON: And I think one of the things to know is that, in my career certainly, and I'd like to hear from both you, Todd and Ken, I haven't noticed a huge market difference between the software engineers that I work with that have degrees, versus those that do not. I often don't know which of them have degrees and which do not. It's not always a strong correlation between their ... or it hasn't been a strong correlation in my career with performance. I think there's some characteristics that are positives for people that come from a CS degree background versus others who maybe come from a bootcamp background, or Todd and myself maybe learned out of a book basically and experience, but in my experience it's not something that is ... there may be differences, but they're not significant. TODD: I think it depends on the situation. When you teach people you notice it more. For experienced people, people who have a decade under their belt, no, there's no different. For new people, someone who comes out of school with a CS degree will understand concepts, and I think it's easier to teach them to be honest, in that way. Real quick, I personally started ... well, I started programming privately, but that was just me programming games and that kind of stuff, stuff I enjoyed personally. But professionally, I started building software. So I started out as a builder, a maker, over the years formed myself into an engineer, and then during that, got interested in the CS stuff and learned that stuff too. So I got to the same result, just in a different path. KEN: That's totally true. You can absolutely learn all this stuff on your own later if you're that kind of person. I think what the reliance on CS degrees doesn't really take into account, is that 90% of programming out there is essentially business automation, for a loose definition of business, but it's basically business automation. I mean, yes, okay, there's sort of a sector on high performance computing, or scientific simulations. Honestly, the one that in some ways benefits the most from formal education, believe it or not, is games, because there you need the linear algebra and the harder math, and your performance constraint in ways that mean you're more likely to be coming up with novel algorithms than you are in your typical business program. Jamon? JAMON: It's surprising how rare it is to encounter those types of situations in typical applications, like mobile applications and web. You just don't really run into it. KEN: Right. So, the kind of people who are going to excel at your, like I said, very typical business automation, style programming, user interface design, et cetera, et cetera, are actually going to be people who sometimes were not computer people before, because they're going to have more connection and empathy with the target users. And that ends up making more of a difference to the success of software projects in many cases than your facility with the computer itself. TODD: Yeah. Let me give you a real example from myself, because I started out very practical, and then later got interested in the CS concepts and stuff. Just purely for my own interest and stuff, and that did help to a point in my engineering career, but I did a project circa 2001 or something like that, and we would display, as a website, and we would display a map for the user, and they click somewhere else on the map and we had to calculate, based on the pixel difference between where we knew they were and where they clicked, the difference in direction and distance from the original spot. Now, this required spherical geometry, and the earth actually is not a sphere. It's a little bit like a football actually, to a slight extent. In this case, someone who had a more CS background may have jumped into this easier. I actually had books on my shelf, like college algebra, and college geometry and stuff like that, and I would review these things. And I learned how to do it. It was a successful project and it was very fun, but that's an example because I came from a practical place I had to look that up. Now, on the flip side, I've worked with people with PhDs in computer science, and no offense, bless their hearts, but they would work for two weeks and accomplish literally nothing. And then you'd ask them, "Was that done?" They were like, "I didn't know it was urgent." Well, it was an hour task. That's two weeks ago. And I think they're on a different academic time, because they spent so many years in school, it's just a difference. KEN: Which is, again, not to denigrate the usefulness of them. They're just useful in very specific circumstances and not as general programmers. Jamon? JAMON: I kind of see it as, to use an analogy, like when you're lifting weights, if you lift weights in a way that is very functional, they call it functional, where it's almost like you're lifting a box or ... yes, Todd? TODD: Jamon, for our listeners who may not be familiar with this concept, can you explain what lifting weights is? JAMON: It is this theoretical thing that supposedly some people do. TODD: Can you do it inside of your own home? JAMON: I do now. I built a gym actually. But yes, you lift weights for health. And one of the ideas is that you do this sort of functional strength, where it's something that actually builds up the muscles for lifting boxes, and carrying children, and moving things. So it's very much like you're doing those types of movements, but just with heavier weights. It just makes you stronger in those ways. And then there's other things where you're isolating specific muscles in a way that you would never really do in a day-to-day basis. And university can sometimes be more like that, where you are exercising those muscles, you are making them stronger, but you're not doing it in a way that necessarily replicates what you do in real life. And I think both are necessary. If you just do functional strength training, it will get you so far, but you won't ever hit certain muscles because, like we talked about intense performance or whatever, you might not actually be using those aspects of your brain in a day-to-day basis. But they are good to have for when you need them. So I think that's a decent analogy of what we're talking about here. I think that one of the criticisms that I've had of some of the higher education programs, is that they don't do particularly great job of replicating the real world of what people will actually be doing once they actually get into the job market. You can create a binary tree algorithm, but can you move this button over four pixels to the right? Which is often your first task when you get to work. TODD: Yeah. And I would say that it really depends on the person. In an idea world, if money is no constraint, time is no constraint, yeah, of course I would love to go to university and stuff. But on the flip side, I'm a very practical person and I like to build things, I like to make things. So maybe I went for a few years, but maybe if I would have went that route I wouldn't liked it as much. I would have preferred to just jump in and start getting things done. I think for me ideally was 18, I started doing it, actually doing it for three or four years, and then go to university for maybe two years, and enjoy learning all the concepts I didn't learn. That would have probably been pretty cool for me. JAMON: I realized we're kind of leaning more heavily on the criticism side of this, but one of the criticisms of universities is that they optimize for rewards, like extrinsic rewards. Like, I got this degree, I got this piece of paper, or I did what was necessary to get an A. Where learning to accomplish something to actually expand your mind is a little bit of a different thing. When I started my business I needed to build a website, I had a website to build, and I didn't know how to do it. For me, when I was learning from a book, it was very, very applicable. Like, okay, in order to make a menu, I need to know how to do these things, and it was very, very applicable. Very, very directly applicable. KEN: Well, I'm going to make the positive case ... TODD: Please. KEN: ... for going in and doing it. One is, fair or not, it does open doors. TODD: Correct. KEN: Especially if you're in a good program, but even if you're not, it is used as a hiring filter in a lot of places. I think it's wrong but it's true. That's the very practical sort of level. But to be honest, there's definitely things that I learned there that can save you trouble. I mean, I think they said that what makes a 10x programmer is that they know what not to program. So for example, even the theory class. The theory, computability theory, computational complexity, these sorts of things are more valuable than you might think in certain ways. For example, you're at your start-up. Your boss says, "I want the optimal route to plan on this map. I want to be 100% guaranteed the best route." And you can say, "That's the traveling salesman problem, and it's actually a known hard problem," for example. And it's the kind of thing where it can steer you away from harder problems and towards easier problems. And in engineering frequently what you want to do, you're like, "Let's find a good heuristic instead of trying to solve this optimally." JAMON: It may not give you the answer, but it will give you a framework around the problems that are out there, and the classes of problems that are out there. KEN: Yeah. TODD: Yeah. And I really appreciate that from people who have a higher education than myself. While people were talking, I was thinking of this story. I interviewed for this job, and this guy was asking me technical questions, as they do, and he was a young guy at the time. I was probably 34, he was probably 10 years younger than that or more. And he asked me a question. I don't remember what it was the exact question, but basically he wanted me to accomplish a task, and what he was looking for is how I would technically approach this problem. But I've been an engineer for a long time, and I know what's really important, and I know it makes a 10 times engineer, which is often not actually programing that. So I started off by challenging the fact that he even needed this at all. And logically, he didn't, and he couldn't really explain why he would, so I gave him additional other options that would make this application or this software work much better. Not the answer that he was looking for. But it was the real answer. I used to say a saying all the time. I don't say it much anymore, which is, "There is no code as fast as no code." So in this case, I was just removing his entire problem from him. KEN: I would say it can help you avoid reinventing certain wheels, which might mean that you don't get some amazing solution, because you weren't ignorant enough to know that it couldn't be done. Everyone loves those stories, but 99% of the time that's not how the story goes. And in fact, to the point, I don't know if we're ready to segue into the business conversation we probably we will in a minute, but none of us have any business education. And I'm starting to wonder if it would be worth it to go get like an EMBA or something, so that we're not reinventing so many wheels. I don't know if we're ready for that conversation yet. Jamon, you wanted to say one more thing? JAMON: I have a bunch of other things to say, but I'll intersperse them here. I think that one of the things ... well, Todd actually alluded to this earlier, but the network that you get from going to university for four years with often some of the same people throughout, you get to know them, you do projects together, they have opportunities. A lot of them go on to be quite successful. And being connected to those people in that way is something that lasts for a lifetime. And that's definitely something that should not be undervalued. That's a big advantage, that's something that I did not have. In fact, the only way for me to access a network like that was through ... well, I shouldn't say the only way, but the way that I accessed a network like that was through open source later. TODD: It's true. There's a lot of overeducated crappy engineers doing very well out there. It's true. KEN: It is true. TODD: I mean, it is really true. CHRIS: I was just going to add too, it's fascinating when we have this conversation today. It seems like it's been increasingly becoming more popular to question whether to go to school, or rely upon the tool. So what is it about today that allows us to even question the path forward, that maybe we weren't able to in the past? KEN: We're going to queue that clip from Silicon Valley now. TODD: Yeah. I think it has nothing to do with our particular industry, or development, or any of that stuff. I think it's just because the cost of university education is so extreme right now, that you naturally have to question if it's worth such a huge burden. It wasn't that way for me in the early '90s. I could work and pay for my own college at that time, which I did. That's not possible these days. JAMON: I'm going to agree and disagree with Todd there. I think the cost is definitely a factor, but I also think that this industry is a big factor in that we don't have ... my brother-in-law is a mechanical engineer. He couldn't just go and start mechanical engineering. He can't go out there and just do that. TODD: He could. It's just governed by law. JAMON: Yeah. You have to be a licensed engineer. It's a very- TODD: But there's no reason he couldn't do that if it wasn't for laws. JAMON: There may be a path to becoming a mechanical engineer that doesn't involve university, but it's very hard. I at least know of an architect that did it without going to university and getting a degree. But that is something ... we have a lot of these professional, professions actually have degrees that sort of ... they're barriers to entry. And in order to get through that, the accepted path is to go through universities. Ours does not have that. We can start building websites, or building whatever, just by convincing someone to pay us to do that. KEN: I think there's two points actually. One is part of the disconnect between mechanical engineers and software engineers is that when mechanical engineers fail, people die. JAMON: That's true. KEN: In many cases. That's sometimes true for software engineers too, but it's more true with mechanical engineers. And as a result- JAMON: My brother-in-law works at a plant where if he screws up, there will be hydrogen peroxide blowing miles high in the air. KEN: Yeah. So the stakes are often higher. JAMON: Yes. KEN: But also, if you want to be a serious chemical engineer, there's a lot of capital requirements for any of the things that you're doing, apart from the safety concerns, and that's very real. You're not just going to work on your own because you can't get them, whereas the capital requirements for being a software engineer are extraordinarily low. The access to education materials is extraordinarily high. And you can just try in almost literally anything that you can find out there for education material, you can try with a $500 computer. So there's so many things about the technology world that are in many ways unprecedented, and that's why you're seeing this massive sea change in the economy as it starts to take over more and more of it. And one of our missions here is to help more people in more places be part of that. So getting the message out that although CS degrees are helpful if you have the opportunity, go ahead and do it if it interests you, but it's not necessary if you just want to be part of this. JAMON: Yeah. And one of the things that is very apparent, is that there's a lot more resources available now online for learning. You don't have to go to college to get the education because it's often on YouTube, or you can look through GitHub. There's all these resources, there's online courses. These are things that are very valuable, and they're self-driven. When I first started wanting to learn Objective-C and building iOS apps, I bought an iPad 2 and I went to iTunes U and started watching the Stanford courses on there, and following along with those. So I was able to basically watch Stanford lectures for free, and follow along, and do what they were doing. That was tremendously valuable to me. And all of those resources are very interesting. What's very interesting also is that very few people actually take advantage of this. Everybody with an internet connection essentially has access to these, to the same thing I did. TODD: Which is pretty much everyone in the United States at least. JAMON: Right. And yet, it's a very tiny fracture of a percent that actually take advantage of that. TODD: Well, I would like to, for those of you who have this question and don't have a lot of opportunity for various reasons to go to university, I would give you my kind of recommendation. I forget who said this, I'm not going to attribute it to anyone because I don't remember who it was, but if you want to be a writer, write. If you want to be a poet, write poetry. When you've written a million words, you're a writer. When you've written 100,000 words, you're a writer. You have to write. You'd be amazed how many people want to do something and actually don't do it. In our industry, it's very possible to be a very successful software engineer by just doing it. But even, we mentioned mechanical engineering which does have some legal constraints for sure. But I don't know if anyone's ever seen the movie October Sky. It was in the late '90s. It was about a NASA engineer called Homer Hicksam (Homer Hickam) I think. He was a son of a coal miner and he loved rocket engineering. And he just did it, and he did it, and he did it, and he did it, and eventually without ever having an education, he did it for NASA, and he was a very famous and successful engineer at NASA. So, I don't recommend that route for such things, but it is possible. And I don't care who you are, or what profession you're in, if you just spend a crap load of time doing it, you're going to rise above everyone else. Another great story I have, I read this book. It was about this guy who was really into etymology. Entomology, not etymology which is the study of the origins of words. Entomology, which is the study of insects. He came from a very poor family, and he was in Alabama, and he got into the University of Alabama for biology. I believe he got a scholarship because he couldn't afford it, but the day one he showed up, he went to the head of the biology, the college or probably ... I don't know what it was, but wherever the college of biology is. Ken will correct me. This shows my education here. Anyways, he went up to the head and he said, "For the last two years I've been cataloging the ants of Alabama." And no one had ever done this. So on day one he was put in charge of something very important at the university because of this, simply because he just did it. He didn't ask permission. He just did it. So if you want to become a developer, regardless if you have the opportunity to go to school or not, you just have to start developing. Get into open source, publish stuff, start creating your portfolio and just do it. I'm not going to recommend this at all, but if you dropped out of high school at 16 and started programming and put a lot of work into it, by the time you're 18, 19, you're going to have a high paying job. That's a fact. Don't do that, kids, but- JAMON: Yeah. If Cedric's listening to this, stay in school. TODD: But you totally could do this, but it does require a lot of ... a lot of times people go to the university and those kind of paths because they don't have the kind of internal- KEN: And by the way, if you're that person, you probably already know. TODD: I don't necessarily think so, because- KEN: I mean, if it's flowing out of you so much that you just can't stop doing it basically, that's usually the kind of person who makes it that way. TODD: I agree, but I think- JAMON: Well, that was me at that age for sure. TODD: I think a lot of those people don't know that it's possible, because they don't have an example of it being possible. JAMON: That's exactly right, and that was actually me at that age. At 16 I was coding every day. Every day I would go home and that's what I would do. I mean, I'd do homework on the bus. I didn't do it at home. I coded at home. But I had no role models that were programmers. Well, I had one but he worked in San Francisco and he had been to college, and I thought that was the path. So I didn't really have that sense. And I was doing some pretty complex games and stuff, and figuring things out on my own because I didn't have internet at that time. TODD: Yeah. Well, back in my day I had a book budget, because the only way to learn was from books. There was nothing online, because there wasn't online. I had a book budget where hopefully I could buy a book every couple of months, add to my collection. But anyways, if you get nothing else and you're aspiring to be a developer, I give you permission just to do it. JAMON: Another option is code bootcamps. We actually have at least one, maybe a few others that have been to bootcamps here at Infinite Red, and we found them to be quite valuable for getting people up to speed on frameworks, on languages, on sort of the technical skills, and just getting the familiarization and understanding that they can learn these things. Often it doesn't teach them everything, but it gets them the confidence that they need to move forward with it. I think bootcamps are definitely an option, and there's many good ones. We've worked with Epicodus here in Portland, and there's others as well. KEN: They're especially helpful I think for people who have some kind of technical or quantitative background but just need to learn to code. JAMON: Right. KEN: Per se. Yeah. JAMON: Yeah. It's a good way if you're switching to a second career, or something like that. Another one that I'm actually a really big fan of is Austen Allred's Lambda University. Now, this one's got a really unique model. It's a little more intense than a bootcamp I think. It's a fairly solid higher education option. They have a lot of success stories coming from it. But one of the really unique things that Austen's doing there is they do not charge tuition upfront. Essentially they will take a percentage of your income if you make above, I think it's $60,000 or something a year. Once you get a job that's above $60,000 a year, they'll take 17% of it for up to two years, and there's a cap. Like, $30,000 or something. TODD: That's amazing. I love that. JAMON: Yeah. And if you never get a job in that range, then you never pay it back. The debt is forgiven. TODD: That's a really cool idea. I love that. JAMON: Yeah. Yeah. It really is great. And apparently the financial model's been working for his university. It's an online one so it's very accessible and they're actually finding that they have a much more diverse student body because of the fact that someone who doesn't have a lot of means, doesn't have a lot of support, they can go to school online, they don't have to pay anything upfront. They're even good about trying to support them financially during the time that they're in the university. It's a really great model. I'm a big fan. Lambda School or Lambda University I think it's called. TODD: We'll put that in the show notes. JAMON: Yeah. And Austen's doing a good job with that. He also, if you follow him on Twitter, he's got some really great thoughts on education. I like what he tweets about. TODD: Yeah. I guess in summary there's many ways to get there. If you are a maker, like I always was ... even when I was a kid I constantly made things, I think my path might be an interesting idea. If you have the means to go to university, by all means do it for sure. If it's going to be a huge financial burden, I would definitely give it some serious thought before incurring that burden. CHRIS: I'm curious how you approach education "Once you make it." What does it look like on a daily basis to learn new things, be challenged by new things, or even challenge the people that you work with as well? JAMON: All you need to do is listen to this podcast religiously. TODD: It sounds ridiculous but it's absolutely true. Continuing education. That's a good one. Truthfully, for a software engineer, if you can't teach yourself every day, you're going to have trouble because whatever you knew last year ... I've been doing this for 22 years and I think that number changes every time I say it. I started in '96 so whatever that comes up to. JAMON: We're software engineers. We're not very good at math. TODD: Yes. That's a fact. But you have to learn new stuff. The stuff you worked on two years ago is not what you're working on today. It's constantly learning new stuff. Now, you learn certain patterns and certain ideas that you use over and over again, and you start as you get a lot of experience you start realizing how we're kind of just redoing the same thing over and over for the last 40 years. JAMON: Yeah. Ken, didn't you do an exercise where you learned a whole bunch of languages, and you wrote the same program several times? KEN: Yeah. It was fun. I had fun with it, and then it literally burnt me out of programming for a long time. JAMON: How many did you do? KEN: I got through ... I don't know. 20 or 30. JAMON: Wow. Yeah, so that's what Todd's talking about, is this sort of recurring theme that you see over and over. KEN: Yeah. And after a while it was just like, it was the same approach over, and over, and over, and over. JAMON: It became a lot easier to learn your 20th and 21st and 22nd. Yeah. KEN: Yeah. I always recommend people learn three or four languages, just for their own edification. A lisp, a low level of imperative language, C, C++, even Java, a dynamic language like Ruby or Python. JAMON: And then something like Haskell or Elm or something. KEN: Or actually something like Prolog or Erlang is actually probably more interesting than ... Haskell's great, but more interesting than that because it really makes you think about it in a different way. If you learn those, you can learn anything at that point. JAMON: I think one of the things that really helps me is I have this insatiable curiosity about concepts and computer science. I love reading about it, I'm on Twitter a lot and that's a good place to source new information. You can watch videos. Other people learn in different ways. I know one of our engineers will troll through GitHub. He'll actually jump into a package.json file which we- TODD: I don't know if, "Troll" is the right word, but yeah. JAMON: Well, trolling as in fishing. And he'll look at the dependencies of a particular well known thing, and look at what they use, and then go look at those and see how people code. It's a very cool way to learn. Other people, they'll learn by pairing with other programmers, they'll learn obviously by experience. Some people read books. We have one of our- TODD: Watch videos. JAMON: Yes, watching videos. One of our developers decided to learn ... this is Darin Wilson. He decided to learn Ecto, which is the database layer for Elixir. He decided to learn that by writing a book about it. And apparently that's been quite educational for him. He's learned a ton in teaching. TODD: Yeah. Don't do that, kids. It's a lot of work. That's kind of a lot about software engineering and that kind of stuff, but we're also, on the other side ... and we probably lost all the entrepreneurs by now, so I guess we should do this first. But on the other side is education when it comes to being an entrepreneur, running your own small business, running a larger business, that kind of stuff. JAMON: I learned first I would say by watching my dad. He was a small business owner, so I learned some basics there. I did know quite a few small business owners, and I did talk to them. I would go out to coffee with them or whatever, and just ask them questions. But it was very much a learn as I go type of a situation, learn as I had to. How do you do payroll? I had no idea. I hired a bookkeeper who taught me how to do payroll and did most of it, which was nice. How do you market? I had no idea. That was a whole thing that I had to learn. How do you do sales? I mean, I just plopped myself in front of people and tried to do the best I could, and tried to learn from it. That's probably not the way I would recommend going though. TODD: We did engineer our sales process by the way. JAMON: Once we merged companies, then Todd and I started doing sales together, and we had a much more engineery approach to it. It was good. Actually have a feedback loop, and we would try to build our experience over time. I have read some business books, I've watched some business videos, but for whatever reason software engineering, education has always been more ... I guess got more traction with education on that side. With business stuff that always seems so abstract and not directly applicable. KEN: I'm definitely at a point where I'm feeling like I could use some formal education honestly. The MBA is not what it used to be in terms of guaranteed high paying work. Even elite MBAs are not what they used to be in that regard. But I wouldn't downplay the value of the network building that they bring. But what they can't teach you, what no school could teach you, is what it's like to stare at your bank account and wonder if you're going to make payroll this month and how you handle that. I mean, it might mean that you know a good banker who can help you, but it doesn't teach you what that feels like. It can teach you about negotiation, but it doesn't teach you how to actually sit at a table with somebody who's got a lot more money and power than you. There's a reason that even regular business schools prefer that you go out and work some place for a little while before you go there. And I think that the EMBA route, if you're going for formal education, is probably a pretty good one, because then you have really embedded yourself. You have a very felt experience of what these things are like, so when you go to that negotiation class, or that finance class, or whatever, you get it. It's going to land someplace for you emotionally, that it wouldn't for a kid out of school. JAMON: What's an EMBA? KEN: Executive MBA, meaning a lot of the business schools will offer these programs frequently, nights or weekends, even at a high level, so it's right where you as a person who already runs a business can go and fill in your skillset. TODD: Interesting. KEN: And hobnob with other people like you. Yeah. And they're not cheap. TODD: Yeah, that makes sense especially if they're geared towards executives. My path was way too long. So, if you want to do it fast don't take my path, but this is my third company and I feel like I finally became a business person on my third company. That's a long time, and that wasn't three companies in three years. That was three companies in 15 years. I definitely wouldn't go my route. I think one of the things ... I mean, there's different aspects of business, right? Ken alluded to some of them. Financing, super important. If you're not making money, if you're not negotiating good deals with your vendors, or employees or whatever, if you're not keeping it cashflow where you can pay payroll, you're sunk, so that's very important. The other thing is, your management and leadership skills. As you grow, you're going to have a team, so that's very important. That's not something you super easily learned from a book. I think even things like accounting theory ... Ken, I don't know if you want me to share this story. Well, I'll just say it and we can cut it if you don't want it. This is kind of a funny story. When Ken and I first started this business, this was my third, but this was Ken's first business. And we were going over our accounting and he was telling me all about accounting theory, and he knew it very well, but I don't remember what it was, but it was something like I said, "We should get our P&L," and you had no idea what that was. It's a profit and loss report. KEN: I don't think that that was what it was. I don't think that's what it was. I don't remember what it was, because I knew what a P&L is. TODD: Maybe it was AR, account receivable? It was something very basic. KEN: Well, we had a long running argument about cash verus accrual accounting as I recall. TODD: Right. So regardless of what it was, and I don't mean to insult Ken whatsoever, but that's actually not uncommon. My wife's an accountant and she was trained at university for that and then she worked as a corporate accountant for a long time and worked her way up to a fairly high level. The day-to-day, just like in programming, you learn the concepts but once you hit the real world, the real world's so much different than anything. And I think that's true with a lot of ... KEN: I'll go into that. I was like, "I think we should do accrual accounting," and Todd's like, "I don't think so." I'm like, "Well, no. I really want to be able to ..." the benefit of accrual accounting is that you can see profit versus cashflow and it sort of gives you more information, but it's way more work, way more work. And if you haven't done it, you don't know that, so we are still a cash accounting. JAMON: Yes. TODD: Is it more work, Ken? KEN: What, accrual? TODD: Yeah. KEN: Much. TODD: Is it way more work? KEN: Much, much, much more work. Yeah. And that's something I don't really like very much. JAMON: One of the things I did well when I started my business was I forced myself to do a monthly budget. And I was doing this for my personal life too, so I just used the same skills I had there to do a budget for the business, which was much easier because I wasn't buying diapers there generally. There wasn't quite as many transactions- TODD: There's a joke in there somewhere. JAMON: Yes. There weren't as many transactions and stuff. But it was actually really great because I was able to keep a very close eye on where we were in a cash basis obviously, and then I did have accounts receivable system that I could look at to see what kind of money would be coming and do some forecasting and stuff. We've carried that forward to some extent here at Infinite Red doing the budgeting. We got away from it for a little while, but we're going to be going back and do it because it has been very helpful, even though you in some way feel like you're doing kind of double entry. TODD: Yeah. I think, gosh, business education and experience, you really have to have both. You have to study in some form, and you have to have experience. It's really challenging to be honest, compared to something more straightforward like becoming a designer or an engineer, just because it's very nebulous and very human oriented for sure. JAMON: And there's so many ways to do a business right, and there's many, many, many more ways to do it wrong. If you just follow a formula, that's not necessarily going to work. There's a lot of variables in business. TODD: And people tend to do things the way that they're comfortable with, or the way they're familiar with. It's kind of funny. My wife, she's actually a small business person now, but she's an accountant by trade as I mentioned. In accounting, they use spreadsheets to a ridiculous amount. And when I say ridiculous amount I mean they're super familiar with spreadsheets, very advanced spreadsheets, so if there is a task, they throw a spreadsheet at it. Now, as a programmer, my first thought was database. So, my first company, I did my accounting like a database, which probably wasn't great but it's what I understood. And that's what people do, they apply. So my wife Heather and I, sometimes I've went there and said, "That's cool, but you know, if we use a database this will be much easier." And I set her up with a great product called Airtable, and she switched from a spreadsheet for that particular thing to the database, and she loves it. And then looking at some of her spreadsheets, for example, as a programmer, if I needed a particular report for finances, I would assume I'd make a report and I would use a system to make a report and stuff. But for her it's super common to extract data from multiple sources, stick it into a pre-made spreadsheet and have the spreadsheet be the report. This is what accountants do all day. It seems more manual, but it's actually faster and more convenient. So as a person who's not educated, maybe not educated in starting a small business, or taking a long route like we do, you'll find that you're doing things that you know how to do. It may not be right, but you kind of get them done. And it's good to look, at some point, when you have time, to look how the professionals do it, so you can do it more efficiently. KEN: Well, and I want to piggyback on that, which is that one of the harder things that we've learned is to do some things manually, that there's real value in doing things manually and personally, and not trying to automate it. Like Todd says, when we think we need a report, the first we're going to go like, "Hm. We should write a report so we don't have to do it ourselves over and over again." Wrong. Wrong, unless you're- JAMON: We need the education- KEN: Unless you're Ford, unless you're a massive company that has already a very dialed in process, automating as a small company is sometimes counterproductive. Not only does it take a long time, a big time upfront, but then you are locked in and can't change it. You can, but now all changes are expensive. And two, there's real value to human eyes going and looking at the stuff and compiling it. And that was very hard for me to learn because, like a lot of people, I got into computers because I'm lazy, and I wanted the computer to do all the work for me. But there's no substitute for human eyes on the problem, in many cases. TODD: It's funny, because we're all engineers and designers, the way we do reports at work is we have an artificial intelligence chat bot in Slack that produces the reports for us. That's such an us way of doing things, it's hilarious. JAMON: If it's okay, before we wrap up here, I'm going to bring this back to universities for a second. I think this is actually a really important thing to get across to people who are considering that path. If your state offers ... here in Washington State it's called Running Start, but essentially the ability to go into a small community college that's nearby your high school, and get your first two years done for free. The K-12 system actually pays for your college, for the first two years. That's really helpful, and there's really no reason not to do that. That's a great way to get started. Secondly, if you are going to go to a university, unless it's something like Harvard, or maybe Stanford, you should really avoid private universities, especially for-profit universities. Those are really terrible. You really don't want to go that direction. KEN: Well, I want to draw a very clear distinction between private and for-profit. JAMON: Yes, of course. KEN: There's a lot of very good private schools. If you can afford them, go for it. A lot of them are really great, great education. for-profit schools completely different. JAMON: Todd and Ken, I'm not sure if you know this, but one of the things that ... well, you do know this. One of the things that for-profit universities do is they prey on disadvantaged students and stuff. They'll go and sign them up. And they actually did that at my school and I was actually signed up and accepted to one of these universities, which would have been an incredibly expensive education. I'm not sure what the quality would have been, but very, very expensive. And I backed out, but for a while I was thinking this is what I'm going to do. I'm going to go to this university for a computer science degree. And you just need to stay clear of them. It's not worth it. They're often predatory, they're just bad. TODD: Not to be confused. One thing I want to do mention is ... sorry to interject, Jamon. The Code Academies are for-profit also, but those- JAMON: Yeah. That's much different though. TODD: That's different. KEN: Yeah. We're not going to mention any of the names of the for-profit universities, because we don't want to get sued, but ... JAMON: They're bad, yes. KEN: They're bad. JAMON: But there're a lot of really great state universities they can go to. A really great way to go is to do ... your Running Start type program for two years and then go for the next two years at a state university and you can get a degree. And it's honestly relatively inexpensive. CHRIS: One of the things that I would love to add, regardless of what you do, whether you're an engineer, or a designer, or a founder of a company, one of the best ways to learn is actually to teach what you know to other people. TODD: Good point. CHRIS: So that when you don't understand something, you're going to dive in to learn it so that you can explain it to someone else, and that's where oftentimes I found that theory and practical knowledge combine and multiply. TODD: I think that's fantastic. I would totally agree. I've taught a handful of programmers throughout my career, from nothing into professionals, and nothing teaches you like teaching. It was a big boon. As for business education, we talked about that as a combination of education, however you get that, and experience. But if you want to be an entrepreneur, there is absolutely no excuse. Today is Tuesday when we're recording this. You can go down right no, go to Costco if you don't have a Costco card go to Walmart, buy bottled waters. They're really cheap. You're going to get 24 pack, whatever, for whatever it is. So basically you're paying pennies for each bottle. Go down to the beach, or wherever in your local town where people hang out, and sit there and sell bottled waters for about 30 minutes. KEN: Until someone calls the police on you for not doing it with a permit. TODD: Correct. That's why the time thing. But you can sell. When someone's out running, or they're with their kids at the park, you can sell one of those bottled waters for $2. You bought it for 15 cents, you sold it for $2. Congratulations. You are now a business person. And it just goes up for there, and the truth is, a lot of people who want to start a business, they really want to want to start a business, they don't actually want to start a business. So I always recommend to people, do the bottled water test. If that's very unpalatable to you, you're probably not ready. Doesn't mean you won't be ready, but you're probably not ready to start that small business yet. Little advice from your uncle Todd. JAMON: I don't think I would ever go to the beach and sell bottled water unless I had to. KEN: I don't think I would do that either. TODD: People like really successful in sales people and stuff like say Mark Cuban, he did this kind of stuff. But from a young age he was a business man and his job was to find things that he'd get for X and sell for a multiple of X. And he would do anything. He would go door to door. KEN: If you're already a programmer or designer, go get yourself an LLC and put your shingle out as a one person consulting firm. It's not the same quite as business, but it gives you a little bit of a flavor for it. It takes you down that road a little bit. That was certainly what did it for me. TODD: Don't work for free. KEN: Yeah. Don't work for free. TODD: Whatever you do, don't work for free. Everyone will try to get you to work for free. Don't do it. No free bottles of water. KEN: That's a whole another conversation. TODD: Except for the cop who's arresting you for permits. KEN: Yeah. TODD: Give him a few- KEN: What if I just slipped you one of these bad boys, officer? TODD: This fine, fine water could be yours. KEN: On that note, thanks for listening everybody. JAMON: See you next time. TODD: Yes, thank you. This was Todd, and this is Jamon. No, that's not Jamon. This is Jamon- JAMON: Thank you. This ... KEN: I had a great stopping point, and Todd just had to keep talking. You just had to keep talking. TODD: Ken, I'm not the kind of person who has to have the last word. KEN: Yes, you are. TODD: I'm really not. That's funny. I'm going to stop recording.

Chicks Who Give a Hoot
Episode 37- Sara Blanco

Chicks Who Give a Hoot

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2018 38:57


Sara Blanco has always been interested in women’s empowerment and has become especially passionate about women’s political leadership since joining Running Start, which is a nonpartisan organization that supports the young women who will shape tomorrow’s world by addressing the absence of equal representation in the halls of government. She has had the opportunity to speak to audiences large and small about women in politics and appreciates the small nonprofit experience of wearing many hats and doing every kind of work. In this episode, Sara is sharing how Running Start is making politics accessible to women, the importance of women representation in government, the reasons that women are discouraged from running for office, and how the current political climate has resulted in women running for public office in record numbers. 00000298 00000297 0000CA81 0000CA81 00031168 00031168 00007EC4 00007EB5 00005F4E 00005F4E

Letters to My Daughter
12: How is Your Communication?

Letters to My Daughter

Play Episode Listen Later May 31, 2018 12:54


How is your communication? Do you regularly use the language of inclusion or do you use your words to marginalize certain people? These are important questions to consider, and they can make a huge difference in your relationships and in your business.   Rollo May, an influential 20th century psychologist, said simply and accurately: “Communication leads to community, that is, to understanding, intimacy, and mutual valuing.”   What you’ll hear in this episode:   When you feel marginalized, sidelined, or just not quite included The example of my youngest daughter in dealing with her high school as she finishes up her high school degree AND a two-year college program Her journey has required grit, self-determination, and self-motivation The problem: when she needs to communicate with the high school, she and the other “Running Start” students are not the norm and don’t need the hand-holding that the other students do---so they are marginalized She and the others are spoken to with non-inclusive, condescending language How do we wade through this non-inclusive language that marginalizes women? For example, why use the word “mankind” when we refer to humanity (Doesn’t that marginalize women?) Often, we communicate with a lack of empathy If we take the time to listen and focus on the feelings of the one who is listening, our language will change Why I believe it is the responsibility of the communicator to communicate with the language that you intend and in a way that it can be received correctly How the same thing happens in business and the customer WILL go somewhere that they are seen, heard, and NOT marginalized “If I feel marginalized by someone’s language, then I’m not likely to want to hear more of what they have to say.” What are YOU saying? Is our communication open, welcoming, and inclusive? Can we continue in a dialogue of family and friendship, or is it just the language of commerce and cold, hard cash? Be sure your language is such that includes ALL people! 

She Said / She Said
Giving aspiring young women political leaders a “Running Start” (Episode #8)

She Said / She Said

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 4, 2018 42:48


There are many factors that impact a woman’s decision to seek elected office. One may simply be that she hasn’t been introduced to the possibility or told, “You can and should do this.” If you talk to Susannah Wellford, the CEO and founder of a non-partisan, non-profit called “Running Start,” she will tell you that […] The post Giving aspiring young women political leaders a “Running Start” (Episode #8) appeared first on She Said / She Said.

Free Food for Thought
Susannah Wellford

Free Food for Thought

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 27, 2018 25:23


“Make sure your education is opening your mind to new ways of thinking about things and that you will get a chance to be with people who oppose your values and the ways you think about things. I really do think that progress in this country will come from getting together because we are so polarized right now.“ - Susannah Wellford on Free Food for Thought Melanie and Shivani sit down with Susannah Wellford, founder of Running Start, to talk about reaching across the ideological aisle and empowering young women both inside and outside of the classroom.

Keep The Promise Ministries, Inc. - Video Sermons by Pastor Buddy Chapman
#044 - Stop Running, Start Believing and Begin Living.

Keep The Promise Ministries, Inc. - Video Sermons by Pastor Buddy Chapman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2017 61:21


Psalm 34:8. Taste and see that the Lord is good; blessed is the one who takes refuge in Him. Psalm 139:7, Psalm 34:8, Rom 12:2, John 14:1, John 3:18, 1Timothy 1:7, Psalm 33:20-22.

Keep The Promise Ministries, Inc. - Sermons by Pastor Buddy Chapman
#332 - Stop Running, Start Believing and Begin Living.

Keep The Promise Ministries, Inc. - Sermons by Pastor Buddy Chapman

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 5, 2017 61:20


Psalm 34:8. Taste and see that the Lord is good; blessed is the one who takes refuge in Him. Psalm 139:7, Psalm 34:8, Rom 12:2, John 14:1, John 3:18, 1Timothy 1:7, Psalm 33:20-22.

Through the Noise
#306 Susannah Wellford of Running Start on Training Girls for Political Office

Through the Noise

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2017 46:18


Susannah Wellford is the President & Founder of Running Start, an organization with an unusual mission -- to get girls and young women ready and excited about running for office. They start working with girls that are just 14, before they are jaded, and show them the ropes of how it's done. Many girls and young women are passionate about helping people through politics but are often hesitant because there are so rarely people in those roles that look like them. Running Start empowers these young women of all political leanings to use their voice and they have trained 12,000 so far. With only five (bipartisan) staff, the organization is able to train about 2500 per year and we can't wait to see what they do. Don't miss this episode for inspiration and hope for the future, and some clever ideas about making your annual events more memorable. Bio: Susannah Wellford has worked for the past 18+ years to raise the voice of young women in politics. As President of Running Start she trains high school and college young women from around the country in how and why to run for political office.  

Two Pint PLC
008 Postsecondary, Posthaste

Two Pint PLC

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2017 44:43


Camden Hanzlick-Burton joins us from Washington to discuss the effects of high school students earning college credit before they graduate. Washington has Running Start, Kansas has dual enrollment, and many other states have similar programs. Some new and more detailed measures of Running Start outcomes (How Much of a “Running Start” Do Dual Enrollment Programs Provide Students?) indicate there may be some problems with the program and how it is impacting student achievement. Then we turn to elementary education to consider how teacher perceptions of technology shape tablet usage and impact on student learning (Exploring the use of educational technology in primary education: Teachers’ perception of mobile technology learning impacts and applications’ use in the classroom). We drink Oak Aged Yeti, a whiskey-infused imperial stout from Great Divide Brewing Co.

Everything is Awesome with Jeff and KC
Episode 106: My Brain is a 93 Geo Metro ft Taylor Bonzer

Everything is Awesome with Jeff and KC

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2017 130:38


In which Jeff & KC welcome internet superhero Taylor Bonzer to the studio to talk about the important issues of the day, as well as to reveal all sorts of personal growth and discovery; Taylor's name came about in a strange way; what up, Earpuds?; swearing has become an issue; Redwall is a place for forest animals with swords; the uncle in Home Alone is a jerk; life is too short; Jeff goes to the TBTL picnic; Dave Barry and Patrick McManus; Taylor had a blog; putting lipstick on a pig; Terra Crux in Tacoma gets a shoutout (what up, Terra Crux!); Running Start saves lives; studying architecture in a small town; Taylor eyes the world of writing graphic novels; we talk instrumental figures in art; Taylor mentions Addie, his sister (shout out, Addie!); Taylor's pretty good at decorating; Taylor's theory on the best way to use medication for ADHD and depression; some sufferers are Newtons, he is not; KC also has a theory; should there be an all-female Lord of the Flies?; Jeff drenches his pillows; and more!   Closing Song: "6/10" - dodie   Plugs   September 23 - Dockyard Derby Dames, Season 12 at Pierce College, 5 pm, Steillacoom, WA September 24 - Last Call Comedy Showcase,7 pm, Copper Door September 27 - Liz Czechs Out - Comedy Underground, Seattle September 28th - Stupid Dumb Show, Obsidion, Olympia  October 16th - Roast Beef at Jai Tai, Seattle Every Thursday in Tacoma - Bob's Comedy Jive, 8 pm at Bob's Java Jive   Pudcasts   Girl Boss Radio From the Heart with Yoga Girl Dungeons, Dice, & Everything Nice The Adventure Zone  Group with Rebecca Lee Douglas Shattered Worlds RPG     Get involved in the show!   Find us on Facebook: Everything is Awesome Podcast With Jeff and KC Join our Facebook group, Friends of Everything is Awesome! on Twitter: @EIAPodcast or by email: everythingisawesomepodcast@gmail.com

Parenting Roundabout
Episode 179: The Competitive Sport of Raising Kids

Parenting Roundabout

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2017 50:29


00:31 Bathroom Beautification: Terri's master bath is getting a spruce-up, to ensure that the floor doesn't cave in.06:22 You Win Some, You Lose Some: Nicole brings us this week's rant, about parents who elbow other kids out of the way to help their own offspring get ahead.25:11 Friday Speed Round: When Kids Want to Change Their Names: Terri's daughter found out the hard way that Facebook doesn't look too kindly on name changes made just for fun. (Wondering how Nicole's daughter likes her name? We're waiting on a text. Check back at 45:54.)31:23 Interview of the Week: Robert Rummel-Hudson: Terri chats with Robert Rummel-Hudson, author of Schuyler's Monster and blogger at Support for Special Needs, about his daughter's summer internship.46:33 Shameless Self-Promotion: Terri wants you to Get a Running Start on Your Back-to-School Advocacy; Nicole wants you to follow her on Twitter; Catherine wants you to contact her if you're a children's book editor or agent.Thanks as always to Jon Morin for our fun in-and-out music. If you're reading this somewhere without hyperlinks, come to http://parentingroundabout.com for the full recap experience.

She's Running
Episode 23 - Interview with Sophia Houdaigui

She's Running

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 25, 2017 19:09


If anyone looks like a politician, it's Sophia Houdaigui, Running Start's 2017 #ILookLikeAPolitician Ambassador! Sophia's crazy smart and, at 18, a future major political player. Don't think we won't be all "I knew her when" when Sophia's running the world.

TSN 1040: Donnie & The Moj
McLennan: Vegas is off to a running start

TSN 1040: Donnie & The Moj

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 21, 2017 16:37


Jamie McLennan says Vegas is adding some very good talent in the expansion draft, along with a handful of key draft picks. Jamie also comments on Marian Hossa's skin condition and what it means for the Blackhawks

Leadership Style Power Podcast
Jessica Grounds | Project Mine the Gap

Leadership Style Power Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 20, 2017 38:32


There seems to be a trend of connecting with fellow California expats here in D.C. and Jessica Grounds is no exception. Moving to D.C. right after graduating from Pepperdine, Jessica is the epitome of the ‘make it happen’ attitude. Don’t let her optimistic outlook fool you, though. She has had a ‘juicy’ career since landing in D.C. which has evolved from couch surfing while looking for her first job to founding Running Start before pursuing a once in a lifetime opportunity on a leap of faith and ultimately founding Project Mine the Gap with Kristin Haffert. Read More » The post Jessica Grounds | Project Mine the Gap appeared first on Catherine Cassidy.

Talking Sports and Fitness with Zeke
Talking Sports and Fitness | Meet Fernando Lossa

Talking Sports and Fitness with Zeke

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2017 10:03


Fernando Lossa shares his story with Zeke, how he started running a year-and-a-half ago after weight loss surgery. Lossa tells Zeke he joined A Running Start running club, has competed in some 5Ks, and has kept off the 110 pounds (335 to 225) that he lost. Lossa tells Zeke that Bruce Ure, who lost 140 pounds through bariatric surgery and became an Ironman competitor, mentored him after his weight loss surgery. “Gastric bypass helped me control my bad eating habits,” Lossa tells Zeke. “Gastric surgery is all about changing your lifestyle … and BOOM I started running. A Running Start people are people who are positive and motivating. Running Start is part of my success … they motivate me to keep going. Bruce Ure has been a great mentor to me. When I was 335 pounds, I was lucky if I could run as long as 20 minutes. Now with losing over 100 pounds, I can run for over one-and-a-half hours.” Lossa shares with Zeke his love of the Rocky movies and his plans to run the Rocky 10K in Philadelphia in November: “I grew up on Rocky and I still watch his movies for motivation. I will be running up the steps (at the Art Museum that Rocky ran up). One of my goals after the Rocky 10K is to do a half Ironman.”

Achilles Running Podcast
Podcast Folge 12: David Allemann von On: Laufschuhe, Running Start-Up & Produktschwächen

Achilles Running Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 15, 2017 39:59


Wie erfinde ich einen Laufschuh? Achim Achilles b… Wie erfinde ich einen Laufschuh? Achim Achilles begrüßt David Allemann von On. Der Mitgründer der Schweizer Running-Firma empfängt Achim im retro VW-Bulli. Die beiden plaudern über die Entstehungs- und Erfolgsgeschichte von On, warum sich der On-Schuh durchgesetzt hat, was seine Schwächen sind und wie man erfolgreich mit Freunden arbeitet. Mach mit im Achilles-Laufclub: achilleslaufclub.steadyhq.com/de Aufgenommen bei: im retro VW-Bulli Bewertet den Achilles-Podcast (Herzchen, Sterne, Likes etc.) und schreibt gerne eine Rezension oder einen Kommentar. Dank euch! www.achim-achilles.de See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

HighPoint Atlanta Podcast
Stop Running. Start Doing.

HighPoint Atlanta Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 3, 2017 38:23


Stop Running. Start Doing. by HighPoint Church Atlanta

Run This World with Nicole DeBoom
40 - Isabel McDevitt on Looking People in the Eye

Run This World with Nicole DeBoom

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 11, 2017 49:04


Meet Isabel McDevitt, a woman in the forefront of social enterprise innovation, namely for bucking the system and creating a new paradigm for how societies treat homeless people. Isabel started her career working for a nonprofit in New York called the Doe Fund. There, she created Ready Willing & Able, a platform of entrepreneurial businesses created specifically to help train, employ and reenter formerly incarcerated men into the workforce. It was a huge success with staggering stats on how much it decreased recidivism rates. She later got married and moved to Boulder where I met her and we did some great work with our Running Start program. Isabel is now the Executive Director of the Boulder Bridge House doing the same thing she did in New York, but focused on the homeless population in the Boulder area. She is changing lives in a huge way.

Objectified: More Than A Body
Objectified: A Running Start

Objectified: More Than A Body

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2016 6:46


One of the most extraordinary moments from this summer's Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro was when two runners – Abbey D'Agostino and Nikki Hamblin encouraged each other to finish a race that neither could win. It was a moment that seemed to capture the Olypmic spirit in motion. Now this is behavior we teach and expect of young children, but don't seem to practice enough as adults – that we should pick each other up when we fall down.

Talking Sports and Fitness with Zeke
Talking Sport and Fitness - Meet Ironman Bruce Ure

Talking Sports and Fitness with Zeke

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2016 15:02


Bruce Ure shares his remarkable story with Zeke. Ure tells Zeke that he lost 140 pounds from his once 315-pound frame through bariatric surgery and his strong commitment to working out over the two-plus years since his surgery. Ure competed in his first Ironman competition this year. "I always had trouble with weight," Ure explains. "I would run for 6 to 8 months and lose 40 to 50 pounds. Then put it back on again. I never addressed the underlying issue but I would get active and lose weight but then I could not keep it off." The specific type of bariatric surgery Ure had was a sleeve gastrectomy in which a vertical, tube-shaped stomach is created so there is less room for food. "They remove a portion of your stomach making the area that keeps food smaller, thus your appetite decreases," Ure explains to Zeke. "You begin to eat food measured by handfuls, one or two handfuls four or five times a day. You tend to find yourself gravitating toward food that will give you the energy you need. You need to address your fitness and the eating disorder to have the right outcome for success. After surgery, you lose 100 pounds or so in the first year or so ... the challenge is keeping it off." Ure went to A Running Start in West Reading to get a good pair of sneakers and wound up getting much more. He met Sorita Averill, who owns A Running Start and became an Ironman competitor herself after undergoing three surgeries involving a double mastectomy and breast implants. "I met people there who meet and run weekly," Ure tells Zeke. "I met people training for all kinds of challenges. I met people training for The Ironman and they inspired me." He began by competing in a triathlon. He had been a runner on and off over the years. "I lived in Florida and am a natural swimmer and am very comfortable in open water," Ure tells Zeke. "I borrowed a bike, then got fitted for a new bike and started riding ... 30 miles became 50, then 60." His first Ironman competition in Cambridge, MD was scheduled for a 2.4-mile swim, a 112-mile bike ride and a 26.2-mile marathon run. The weather had different plans. "Event day there were 20-mile-per-hour winds and drenching rain," Ure explains, "and the swim was canceled." But there was plenty of water with parts of the route flooded. Running and biking in all that rain and wind was grueling enough without the swim. "Everything I thought I prepared for changed," Ure tells Zeke. "I completed the event in 14-and-a-half hours. Your desire to accomplish a goal is important and necessary for the mental confidence needed to complete an Ironman." It is not uncommon for an Ironman event to have the open-water swim event canceled due to rough weather but Ure's goal is to complete an Ironman that includes the swim. But his post sleeve gastrectomy and fitness-centric lifestyle is much more than Ironman competitions. "It’s a gift you give back to your family -- be healthy," Ure tells Zeke.

Integrate & Ignite Podcast
Episode 39: Focusing on the Positive with Nicole DeBoom of Skirt Sports

Integrate & Ignite Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 28, 2016 46:42


Born and raised in the Chicago suburbs, Nicole was a standout swimmer, qualifying for the 1988 Olympic Trials and later graduating from Yale University. She decided to pursue the sport of triathlon, and a lucky seat assignment introduced her to her future husband (future 2-time Ironman World Champion), Tim DeBoom, on a flight to the 1995 ITU World Championships. Nicole started racing professionally in 1999, racking up countless podium finishes. Her triathlon career culminated in a win at the 2004 Ironman Wisconsin, wearing a prototype of the first-ever running skirt a skirt that would launch a revolution in womens fitness clothing just a few months later. Nicole founded Skirt Sports in September 2004 with the mission of helping women find inspiration, confidence and courage through the transformative power of running and fitness. Today, Skirt Sports is a national womens apparel brand offering a full line of products that fit real womens bodies and support their busy running lives. Currently, you can find Nicole chatting with customers at the Skirt Sports Boulder flagship store, helping women change their lives through her non-profit organization Running Start, interviewing visionaries for her popular podcast Run This World and chasing around her 4-year-old girl, Wilder. Nicole started racing professionally in 1999, racking up countless podium finishes. Her triathlon career culminated in a win at the 2004 Ironman Wisconsin, wearing a prototype of the first-ever running skirt a skirt that would launch a revolution in womens fitness clothing just a few months later. Nicole founded Skirt Sports in September 2004 with the mission of helping women find inspiration, confidence and courage through the transformative power of running and fitness. Today, Skirt Sports is a national womens apparel brand offering a full line of products that fit real womens bodies and support their busy running lives. Currently, you can find Nicole chatting with customers at the Skirt Sports Boulder flagship store, helping women change their lives through her non-profit organization Running Start, interviewing visionaries for her popular podcast Run This World and chasing around her 4-year-old girl, Wilder. Today, Skirt Sports is a national womens apparel brand offering a full line of products that fit real womens bodies and support their busy running lives. Currently, you can find Nicole chatting with customers at the Skirt Sports Boulder flagship store, helping women change their lives through her non-profit organization Running Start, interviewing visionaries for her popular podcast Run This World and chasing around her 4-year-old girl, Wilder.

Talking Sports and Fitness with Zeke
Sorita Averill, breast cancer survivor, Ironman competitor and owner of ‘A Running Start’

Talking Sports and Fitness with Zeke

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2016 14:31


Sorita Averill shares with Zeke her remarkable story of becoming an Ironman competitor after undergoing three surgeries involving a double mastectomy and breast implants. Averill, who owns A Running Start in West Reading, trains runners, and is a veteran of many sprint distance triathlons and marathons, was training for her first-half Ironman five years ago when she found out she had breast cancer.