Podcasts about consulting

Share on
Share on Facebook
Share on Twitter
Share on Reddit
Copy link to clipboard

Professional who provides advice in their specific field of expertise

  • 6,613PODCASTS
  • 19,523EPISODES
  • 34mAVG DURATION
  • 8DAILY NEW EPISODES
  • Jan 24, 2022LATEST

POPULARITY

20122013201420152016201720182019202020212022


Best podcasts about consulting

Show all podcasts related to consulting

Latest podcast episodes about consulting

Consulting Success Podcast
Building Powerful Consulting Peer Groups with Leo Bottary: Podcast #222

Consulting Success Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 39:32


Great things in business are never done by one person; they're done by a team of people. To shed light on the premise of strength in numbers in forming powerful consulting peer groups, Michael Zipursky welcomes founder and managing partner at Peernovation, Leo Bottary. As a keynote speaker and workshop facilitator, Leo focuses on peer advantage in building high performing teams. Leo unpacks the lessons he learned from a decade's worth of academic research, including how consultants build better teams and become better leaders. Listen in as Leo shares how a group of people who share common values, yet offer different perspectives and skills, can bring remarkable ideas to life. Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share! https://www.consultingsuccess.com/podcast

Inside the ICE House
Episode 281: ReD Associates Managing Partner Millie Arora Brings Humanity to Strategy Consulting

Inside the ICE House

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 54:25


Millie Arora and her colleagues at ReD Associates defy the norm of strategy consultants. They strive to uncover how human behavior influences the decisions leaders make and employ the social sciences to help businesses see their clients, their opportunities, and the world more clearly. Millie brings us on a journey into her work in “fast and slow money,” how different generations approach financial decisions, and how social scientists help companies and people when tackling difficult decisions.   Inside the ICE House: https://www.theice.com/insights/conversations/inside-the-ice-house

Contenders Wanted
Episode 35 - Becoming Thoughtfully Fit for Success with Darcy Luoma

Contenders Wanted

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 49:02


Show Notes:We've all come across the internet trolls. They leave annoy or at the least frustrating comments that we all wish we could just reach across the internet sometimes and put them in their place. But unfortunately, if we do happen to be in a moment when our frustration or even self-righteous indignation get's the best of us and we write back a pithy and scathing response, we immediately regret it. But what if we could teach ourselves to always pause just before then, take a moment to think clearly, and then respond more thoughtfully. Well that is exactly what today's guest's system is designed to do. Our guest today is Darcy Luoma. She is the author of Thoughtfully Fit®, is a Master Certified Coach, a dynamic facilitator, and an inspiring motivational speaker. She has worked as director for a U.S. Senator, deputy transition director for a governor, and on the national advance team for two U.S. presidential campaigns. As the owner and CEO of Darcy Luoma Coaching & Consulting, she's worked in forty-eight industries with more than five hundred organizations to create high-performing people and teams. The media has named Darcy the region's favorite executive-and-life coach four times. Darcy balances her thriving business with raising her two energetic teenage daughters, adventure travel, and competing in triathlons. On the show today we discuss the following:Who is Darcy and what does she do (4:12)Darcy's Husband's Arrest (9:26)How she helped her daughters and handled her own lonely fight (13:15)The core of Thoughtfully Fit (20:12)The key to Thoughtfully Fit is the pause, but how? (26:51)Self-Awareness and Self-Mastery for Success (31:35)How slowing down actually speeds up your success (34:22)Why coaching is so valuable (36:43)The difference between coaching and mentoring (38:44)What does it mean to Darcy to be a Contender (41:50)How to learn more about Liz:Darcy's Website: https://darcyluoma.com/ Darcy's Thoughtfully Fit Quiz: https://darcyluoma.com/thoughtfully-fit-quiz/Additional Books, Individuals, or Items Discuss in the show:N/AContact the Host: rob@contenderswanted.comGiveaway: To get access for free to our Financial Freedom Path Finder Quiz and your own copies of your personalized bonuses, the Financial Freedom Path Education Cheat Sheet and the Financial Freedom Foundation Guide, enter your email at www.contenderswanted.com/freedom.

Pencil Leadership with Chris Anderson
5 Core Elements to Be Your Best Self with Sam Thiara

Pencil Leadership with Chris Anderson

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2022 25:35


Sam Thiara is a professional who has created a personal journey as a coach, speaker, storyteller, writer, workshop facilitator, educator, and entrepreneur. His goal is to engage individuals in their personal and professional development and was recognized by the Governor-General of Canada with the Canadian Sovereign's Volunteer Medal and the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal. His work is reflected in the hundreds of individuals he has mentored and the thousands he has engaged. Added to this are the 45+ non-profits that he has worked with over the years.Sam is currently working on numerous projects and his area of expertise is engaging with post-secondary institutions, administrators, educators, students, and alumni to support the journey of all and the collaboration required to support each area. He is also called upon to help with organizational alignment and improvements in companies.Presently, Sam is the Founder and Chief Motivating Officer at Ignite the Dream Coaching and Consulting, a platform that engages his audience to define their path. He appreciates education and is a lecturer at the Beedie School of Business at Simon Fraser University where he blends academic and professional experiences into a rich environment that captivates his audience. He also spent many years in the administration building a unique program focusing on activities outside of the classroom and saw a transformation of a student population of disengagement to active engagement.Sam's signature tagline is, “Everyone's life is an autobiography, make yours worth reading.” Support the show (https://paypal.me/pencilleadership)

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur
1050 - Legally Protecting Your Business with Mohaimina Haque, PLLC

The Thoughtful Entrepreneur

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 15:30


In this episode of the Thoughtful Entrepreneur, your host Josh Elledge speaks to attorney at law, https://www.attorneymina.com/ (Mohaimina Haque), PLLC.  Mohaimina's law firm is a general practice firm located in Washington D.C. They represent both individuals and companies and they're a one-stop-shop and work in various legal practice areas.  Mohaimina and Josh talk about how entrepreneurs, specifically franchise owners, need to protect themselves legally. It's a heavily regulated space and before you can expand into franchising, you need to legally protect your brand and IP. Do you have your trademarks filed? In the US, you have to make sure the trademark is filed domestically and internationally. You also need to be aware of both federal and state regulatory requirements. There are many legal steps and audits involved with franchising, so prepare to seek out an attorney and check these boxes before you jump in.  Business owners need to make sure they are registered properly in their home state and any states their businesses operate in. They also need to understand franchising disclosures.  It sounds like a lot of work, and it might be for some, but this puts in place a system that protects franchises and business owners. Putting a slight barrier in place also means those entering the space really understand both the opportunities associated with franchising as well as the obstacles and logistical challenges.  Mohaimina also shares that you should consult with a trademark lawyer. There are franchise disclosure laws in the US and in foreign countries and they're not the same from place to place. Consulting a dedicated trademark attorney is one of the best ways to navigate these complex legalities.  One way to protect yourself in the legal sense when it comes to your employees – have an employee handbook available to them so everyone knows what the expectations are. Employee handbooks are also a great place to educate your employees about how they're protected by certain laws – and to educate your management team and yourself. Mohaimina also shares what she and her firm have been up to in recent months and how her work has changed over the course of the pandemic. She also plans on entering the franchising space herself and continues to offer legal support to franchise owners through her firm. She wants her clients to feel they have a trusted attorney by their side when she works with them, and she makes it easier than ever to work with her and reach her when she's needed.  Interested in learning more about Mohaimina's work? Contact the Law Office of Mohaimina Haque, PLLC at https://www.attorneymina.com/contact-us (https://www.attorneymina.com/contact-us).  Check out the Law Office of Mohaimina Haque, PLLC at https://www.attorneymina.com/ (https://www.attorneymina.com/).  Check out Mohaimina Haque, PLLC on LinkedIn at https://www.linkedin.com/in/minahaque/ (https://www.linkedin.com/in/minahaque/).  Don't forget to subscribe to The Thoughtful Entrepreneur and thank you for listening. Tune in next time! More from UpMyInfluence: ✅ We are actively booking guests for our DAILY Entrepreneur Success Podcast.https://upmyinfluence.com/guest ( Schedule HERE). ✅ Are you a 6-figure consultant? Let us fill your sales schedule and move you to 7-figures.https://upmyinfluence.com/b2b ( Learn more here). ✅ Check out our freehttps://upmyinfluence.com/1 ( Authority Transformation Masterclass).

Speakers Excellence Podcast
Klar, wahr und auf den Punkt | Martin Limbeck

Speakers Excellence Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 28:31


Der Unternehmer ist nicht nur einer der erfolgreichsten Experten für Sales und Leadership in Europa, sondern auch Autor zahlreicher Bestseller sowie Gründer und geschäftsführender Gesellschafter der LIMBECK® GROUP. Mit seiner Mannschaft begleitet Martin Limbeck mittelständische Unternehmen und Konzerne unter anderem bei der Entwicklung ihrer digitalen Vertriebsstrategie sowie bei der Integration von digitalen Tools, KI und agilen Prozessen in bestehende Vertriebsstrukturen. Limbeck ist ein Kind des Ruhrgebiets: klar, wahr und auf den Punkt. Bei ihm und seinem Team gilt: weniger Show – mehr Anpacken! Trainings von der Stange gibt es bei der LIMBECK® GROUP nicht. Stattdessen startet die Zusammenarbeit mit einem Sales-DNA-Check, um Status quo, Pain Points und Entwicklungspotenzial zu ermitteln. Neben Vorträgen und Seminaren unterstützt Martin Limbeck, gemeinsam mit seinem Team, Unternehmen auch durch Consulting und Interimsmanagement, begleitet den Vertriebsaufbau und steht Führungskräften und Mitarbeitern als Sparringspartner zur Seite. Martin Limbeck lebt, was er lehrt – und macht gemeinsam mit seinem Team Unternehmen fit für Next Generation Sales. Zum Redner - Profil von Martin Limbeck: https://www.expert-marketplace.de/redner/martin-limbeck-csp-hardseller-verkaufsguru/ Bestellen Sie jetzt kostenfrei unsere Top 100 Kataloge und finden Sie den perfekten Referenten für jeden Anlass: https://www.speakers-excellence.de/service/katalogbestellung.html -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Mehr Informationen zu Speakers Excellence unter: www.speakers-excellence.de Abonnieren Sie unseren Kanal für weitere spannende Impulse: https://www.youtube.com/speakersexcellencetv Folgen Sie uns auch auf ... Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/speakers.excellence/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/speakersexcellence/ dem Speakers Excellence Blog: https://www.speakers-excellence.de/se/blog/

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing
Ep#164 Conversing Tax Laws And Bonus Depreciation with Natalie Kolodij

Creating Wealth through Passive Apartment Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 18:11


Today's guest is Natalie Kolodij, from Kolodij Tax & Consulting. She has invested in mobile homes and short-term rentals since 2014. In 2017, Natalie left her job to dive full-time into the real estate space. Through these years she found that investors lacked the specialized acumen which was needed for investors. Get the show notes at www.ushacapital.com/ep164Book Resources4 Hour Work Week - Timothy Ferriss7 Habits Of Highly Effective People - Stephen R. CoveyClockWork - Mike Michalowicz Connect with Natalie KolodijWebsite: https://www.kolotax.com/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Kolotax/Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/nkolodij/Connect with Rama KrishnaWebsite: www.ushacapital.comEmail: info@ushacapital.comLinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/rama-krishna-2489241a3 

Paid Vocation with Lupe Prado
How to Take Action on Your Dreams | Elie Bou-Issa

Paid Vocation with Lupe Prado

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 34:45


Episode #59: This week I am so excited to be joined by Elie Bou-Issa. Elie has more than 17 years of experience in the IT consulting field. He has delivered projects in private and public sectors to large customers in over 20 countries including countries in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, Canada and USA. He has been working with Microsoft for the past 12 years and is currently based in Texas. In 2020, Elie took his passion for wine to a higher level. He completed a 6-weeks program with University of Adelaide on “World of Wine: From Grape To Glass”.  And following the Beirut Port explosion in August 2020, Elie registered “Ana Beirut” (meaning “I am Beirut”) wine trademark under the U.S. trademarks and started his professional journey in wine. A wine tasting in May 2021 in Texas enabled Elie to select six wine blends to be part of the Ana Beirut collection and they reaped an array of rewards, including three silver medals at the 2021 Lone Star International Wine Competition.  In addition, Ana Beirut Rosé wine was awarded 90 points by Wine & Spirits and listed as a Best Buy, while Ana Beirut Assyrtiko won the bronze medal at the 2021 Lone Star International Wine Competition. The first shipment of wine made its way to Texas in December 2021 and launched this month. Elie is so inspiring and gives so many great tips for anyone wanting to pursue a passion project. I can't wait for you to listen. Connect with Elie: Website Instagram Connect with Lupe: Website Instagram

IT-BUSINESS Podcast
Digitaler Wandel – so klappt's!

IT-BUSINESS Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 29:12


Das Buzzword heißt „Digitalisierung“. Doch was kann man als Unternehmen tun, damit die Digitale Transformation endlich dauerhaft klappt und effektiv Gestalt annimmt. Maik Kaufmann, Gründer die Initiative „Digitalbegleiter“, gibt nützliche Tipps. Bildquelle: © Song_about_summer-stock.adobe.com - (M) Carin Boehm

Action and Ambition
Alexandra McGroarty Brings HR Expertise On The Global Level In Implementing Engagement, Retention, and Diversity Measures That Focus On The Employee Lifecycle

Action and Ambition

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 21, 2022 23:32


In today's episode of The Action and Ambition Podcast, we are joined with Alexandra McGroarty. She is a seasoned HR consultant with expertise in diversity, equity, inclusion, coaching, HR strategy, change management, and HR leadership. Alexandra is the Managing Partner and HR Consultant at McGroarty and Co. Consulting that focuses on HR and Business Consulting in areas such as HR Project Management, Workday, and Oracle Implementation, Interim HR Leadership, Coaching, DEI-B Training, and Strategy Build, Organizational Transformation, Change Management, and Change Communication work. Tune in to learn more on this!

Conversations in Close Protection
Developing Processes for Success: Personal, Protective Operations and Consulting

Conversations in Close Protection

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 97:13


Process for process sake is not a good thing. However, process to ensure increased results and probability of success is. This week we listen in as Dr. Jeremy Weisz from the The Process Breakdown Podcast talks with Chuck about the processes used in protection and consulting to derive foundational questions and start points to deliver the appropriate results and performance on protective details and consulting projects.  It is a great discussion Chuck and I elaborate on in our analysis.

Rise Through Style
Mindset Of A Successful Stylist

Rise Through Style

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 10:02


Ever wonder what makes someone successful in the personal styling field? Today, I'm covering the mindset of a successful personal stylist. Join my Online Personal Stylist Training: https://www.fashiontranslated.com/personal-stylist-training Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instragram.com/ChristieRessel Want a free wardrobe basics checklist? Join my VIP newsletter to nab it! www.fashiontranslated.com

Nathan For Us: A Nathan For You Podcast
Ep. 32 Chili Shop/ Massage Parlor

Nathan For Us: A Nathan For You Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 63:35


Put on your heat resistant goop and get a pot of chili on the burner, we're back! On this week's episode Kelly and Meagan talk extensively about fake restaurants they would create, their shared hatred of pickles, and whatever the heck a wellness wand is. Follow us on social: @Kellydoubleyou / @litwithkelly and @MeaganbiancoIntro and outro music: What's The Angle? by Shane Ivers - https://www.silvermansound.comFollow the podcast on Instagram and Twitter: @nathanforuspod

exchanges by Exciting Commerce | E-Commerce | Digitalisierung | Online - Handel
Exchanges #293: Unser Schnellstart ins Jahr 2022

exchanges by Exciting Commerce | E-Commerce | Digitalisierung | Online - Handel

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 75:05


Der Onlinehandel kennt keine Pause. Auch zum Jahreswechsel und in den ersten Wochen des Jahres ist einiges passiert oder öffentlich geworden, was für alle in der Branche Inspiration bieten kann. Jochen Krisch und Marcel Weiß schauen in den neuesten Exchanges verschiedene Entwicklungen, Deals und Ansätze an. Werbepartner: * Valantic: Valantic zählt zu den am schnellsten wachsenden Digital Solutions-, Consulting- und Software-Gesellschaften am Markt. Mehr unter http://www.valantic.com/k5

Strategy Simplified
S6E3: 2022 Consulting Salary Trends

Strategy Simplified

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 10:49


Management Consulted's annual consulting salaries report has been published! In this episode, we're breaking it all down. Listen for 2022 salary insights and trends as we answer the question, "What does the data tell us about the consulting industry, both in 2022 and looking ahead?"A couple of highlights for 2022:Starting base salaries rose by ~10% across firms and levels after staying flat last yearThere was an industry-wide increase in non-base comp (bonuses & benefits)Salaries are up, but so is consultant utilizationListen now for the inside scoop on 2022 consulting comp.Additional Links2022 consulting salaries report: DOWNLOAD Break into the world's top consulting firms with our Black Belt case prep program: LEARN MOREGot questions? We've got answers: team@managementconsulted.comSponsor an episode or advertise: Management Consulted Media Kit

Unleashed - How to Thrive as an Independent Professional
469. Lido Ramadan on Consulting with the Federal Government

Unleashed - How to Thrive as an Independent Professional

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 30:22


Founder of Aminad Consulting, Lido Ramadan has over 25 years of experience in founding, growing, leading, and sustaining services organizations. Prior to establishing Aminad, Lido founded multiple successful small businesses and led the operations of several rapidly growing consulting firms. In today's episode he talks about serving the federal government. To find out more about Lido's firm or to contact him directly, visit LinkedIn or AminadConsulting.com. Key points include: 05:17:Consulting analysis unique to the government 09:54: Surprising insights from interviews 13:55: An effective strategy 20:11: Projects for the SEC Unleashed is produced by Umbrex, which has a mission of connecting independent management consultants with one another, creating opportunities for members to meet, build relationships, and share lessons learned. Learn more at www.umbrex.com.

Greater Than Code
267: Handling Consulting Businesses and Client Loads

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 62:06


00:36 - Panelist Consulting Experience and Backgrounds * Debugging Your Brain by Casey Watts (https://www.debuggingyourbrain.com/) * Happy and Effective (https://www.happyandeffective.com/) 10:00 - Marketing, Charging, and Setting Prices * Patreon (https://www.patreon.com/) * Chelsea's Blog (https://chelseatroy.com/) * Self-Worth by Salary 28:34 - GeePawHill Twitter Thread (https://twitter.com/GeePawHill/status/1478950180904972293) - Impact Consulting * Casey's Spreadsheet - “Matrix-Based Prioritization For Choosing a Job” (https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1qVrWOKPe3ElXJhOBS8egGIyGqpm6Fk9kjrFWvB92Fpk/edit#gid=1724142346) * Interdependence (https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interdependence) 38:43 - Management & Mentorship * Detangling the Manager: Supervisor, Team Lead, Mentor (https://dev.to/endangeredmassa/detangling-the-manager-supervisor-team-lead-mentor-gha) * Adrienne Maree Brown (https://adriennemareebrown.net/) 52:15 - Explaining Value and Offerings * The Pumpkin Plan: A Simple Strategy to Grow a Remarkable Business in Any Field by Mike Michalowicz (https://www.amazon.com/Pumpkin-Plan-Strategy-Remarkable-Business/dp/1591844886) * User Research * SPIN Selling: Situation Problem Implication Need-payoff by Neil Rackham (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/833015.SPIN_Selling) 55:08 - Ideal Clients Reflections: Mae: The phrase “indie”. Casey: Having a Patreon to help inspire yourself. Chelsea: Tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes to in terms of a person's needs. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: CHELSEA: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode 267. I'm Chelsea Troy, and I'm here with my co-host, Mae. MAE: And also with us is Casey. CASEY: Hi, I'm Casey. And today's episode, we are our own guests. We're going to be talking to you about our experiences in consulting. To get this one started, how about we share what got us into consulting and what we like, don't like about it, just high-level? Chelsea, would you mind going first? CHELSEA: Sure. So I started in consulting, really in a full-time job. So for early in my programming career, I worked for several years for a company called Pivotal Labs and Pivotal Labs is chiefly, or was chiefly at the time, a software engineering consulting organization. My job was to pair program with folks from client teams, various types of clients, a lot of health insurance companies. At the time, there was a restaurant loyalty app that we did some work for. We did some work for General Motors, various clients, a major airline was also a client, and I would switch projects every three to six months. During that time employed by Labs, I would work for this client, pair programming with other pivots, and also with client developers. So that was my introduction to consulting and I think that it made the transition to consulting later, a little bit easier because I already had some consulting experience from under the Labs' umbrella. After I worked for Labs, I moved on to working at a product company for about 2 years and my experience at that product company burned me out on full-time programming for a little while. So in my last couple of months at that job, I realized that I was either going to have to take some time off, or I was going to have to find an arrangement that worked better for me for work, at least for the next little while. And for that next little while, what I decided I wanted to try to do was work part-time because I was uncomfortable with the idea of taking time off from programming completely. I felt that I was too early in my career and the skill loss would be too great if I took time off completely, but I knew I needed some space and so, I quit my full-time job. After I quit the full time—I probably should have done this before I quit the job, but I didn't—I called an organization that I had previously done some volunteer work with, with whom I discussed a job a couple of years prior, but for a couple of different reasons, it didn't work out. I said to them, “I know that you're a grant-funded organization and you rarely have the funding and capacity to bring somebody on, but just so you're aware, I like working with you. I love your product. I love the stuff that you work on. All our time working together, I've really enjoyed. So if you have an opening, I'm going to have some time available.” The director there emailed me that same day and said, “Our mobile developer put in his two weeks' notice this morning. So if you have time this afternoon, I'd really like to talk to you,” [chuckles] and that was my first client and they were a part-time client. I still work with them. I love working with them. I would consider them kind of my flagship client. But then from there, I started to kind of pick up more clients and it took off from there after that summer. I spent that summer generally working 3 days a week for that client and then spending 4 days a week lying face down in a park in the sun. That helped me recover a little bit from burnout. And then after that, I consulted full-time for about 2 years and I still consult on the side of a full-time job. So that's my story. Is anyone feeling a penchant for going next? MAE: I can go. I've been trying to think how am I going to say this succinctly. I've had at least two jobs and several club, or organization memberships, or founding, or positions since I was 16. So wherever I go, I've always been saying, “Well, I've done it these 47 ways already [laughs] even since I was a teenager.” So I've sort of always had a consulting orientation to take a broader view and figure out ways in which we can systematize whatever it is that's happening around me. Specifically for programming, I had been an administrator, like an executive leader, for many years. I just got tired of trying to explain what we as administrators needed and I just wanted to be able to build the things. I was already a really big Microsoft access person and anybody who just got a little [laughs] snarky in there knows I love Microsoft Access. It really allowed me to be able to offer all kinds of things to, for example, I was on the board of directors of my Kiwanis Club and I made a member directory and attendance tracker and all these things. Anyway, when I quit my executive job and went to code school in 2014, I did it because I knew that I could build something a lot better than this crazy Access database [laughs] that I had, this very involved ETL things going on in. I had a nonprofit that I had been involved with for 15 years at that point and I had also taken a database class where I modeled this large database that I was envisioning. So I had a bunch of things in order. I quit my full-time job and went to an income of $6,500 my first year and I hung with that flagship customer for a while and tailored my software. So I sort of have this straddling of a SaaS situation and a consulting situation. I embed into whoever I'm working with and help them in many ways. Often, people need lots of different levels of coaching, training, and skills development mixed with just a place to put things that makes sense to them. I think that's the brief version [laughs] that I can come up with and that is how I got where I am and I've gone in and out of also having a full-time job. Before I quit that I referenced the first year I worked a full-time job plus at least 40 to a 100 hours on my software to get it ready for prime time. So a lot of, a lot of work. CASEY: Good story. I don't think I ever heard these fuller stories from either of you, even though I know roughly the shape of your past. It's so cool to hear it. Thanks for sharing them. All right, I'll share about me now. So I've been a developer, a PM, and I've done a lot of design work. I've done all the roles over my time in tech. I started doing programming 10, 15 years ago, and I'm always getting burnt out everywhere I go because I care so much and we get asked to do things that seem dumb. I'm sure anyone listening can relate to this in some organization and when I say dumb, I don't use that word myself directly. I'm quoting a lot of people who would use that word, but I say either we're being asked to do things that don't make sense, aren't good ideas, or there are things that are we're being asked to do that would make sense if we knew why and it's not being communicated really well. It's poor communication. Either one, the other, or both. So after a lot of jobs, I end up taking a 3-month sabbatical and I'm like, “Whatever, I got to go. I can't deal with caring so much anymore, and I'm not willing to care less either.” So most recently, I took a sabbatical and I finished my book, Debugging Your Brain, which takes together psychology ideas, like cognitive behavioral therapy and programming ideas and that, I'm so proud of. If you haven't read it yet, please check it out. Then I went back to my job and I gave them another month where I was like, “All right, look, these are things need to change for me to be happy to work here.” Nothing changed, then I left. Maybe it's changing very slowly, but too slowly for me to be happy there, or most of these past companies. [laughs] After I left, this last sabbatical, I spent three to six months working on a board game version of my book. That's a lot of fun. And then I decided I needed more income, I needed to pay the bills, and I can totally be a tech consultant if I just deal with learning marketing and sales. That's been my… probably six months now, I've been working on the marketing in sales part, thinking a lot about it. I have a lot of support from a lot of friends. Now I consult on ways to make teams happier and more effective and that's my company name, Happy and Effective. I found it really easy to sell workshops, like diversity, equity, and inclusion workshops to HR departments. They're pretty hungry for those kinds of workshops and it's hard to find good, effective facilitators. It's a little bit harder to get companies to pay for coaching for their employees, even though a new EM would love coaching and how to be a good leader. Companies don't always have the budget for that set aside and I wish they would. I'm working with a lot of companies. I have a couple, but not as many as I'd like. And then the hardest, my favorite kind of client is when I get to embed with the team and really work on seeing what's going on me on the ground with them, and help understand what's going on to tell the executives what's happening and what needs to change and really make a big change. I've done that once, or twice and I'd love to do that more, but it's the hardest. So I'm thinking about easy, medium, hard difficulty of selling things to clients. I would actually make plenty of money is doing workshops, honestly, but I want the impact of embedding. That's my bigger goal is the impact. MAE: Yeah. I basically have used my software as a Trojan horse for [laughs] offering the consulting and change management services to help them get there because that is something that people already expect to spend some money on. That, though has been a little problematic because a few years in, they start to think that the line item in the budget is only for software and then it looks very expensive to them. Whereas, if they were looking at it as a consultant gig, it's incredibly inexpensive to them. CASEY: Yeah. It's maybe so inexpensive that it must not be a quality product that they're buying. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Put it that way implicitly. MAE: Definitely, there's also that. CASEY: When setting prices, this is a good general rule of thumb. It could be too low it looks like it'll be junk, like a dollar store purchase, or it can be too high and they just can't afford it, and then there's the middle sweet spot where it seems very valuable. They barely can afford it, but they know it'll be worth it, and that's a really good range to be in. MAE: Yeah. Honestly, for the work that I do, it's more of a passion project. I would do it totally for free, but that doesn't work for this reason you're talking about. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Like, it needs to hurt a little bit because it's definitely going to be lots and lots of my time and it's going to be some of their time and it needs to be an investment that not hurt bad [laughs] but just be noticeable as opposed to here's a Kenny's Candy, or something. CASEY: I found that works on another scale, on another level. I do career coaching for friends, and friends of friends, and I'm willing to career coach my friends anyway. I've always been. For 10 years, I've reviewed hundreds, thousands of resumes. I've done so many interviews. I'm down to be a career coach, but no one was taking me up on it until I started charging and now friends are coming to me to pay me money to coach them. I think on their side, it feels more equitable. They're more willing to do it now that I'm willing to take money in exchange for it. I felt really bad charging friends until I had the sliding skill. So people who make less, I charge less for, for this personal service. It's kind of weird having a personal service like that, but it works out really well. I'm so happy for so many friends that have gotten jobs they're happy with now from the support. So even charging friends, like charging them nothing means they're not going to sign up for it. MAE: Yes, and often, there is a bias of like, “Oh, well, that's my friend.” [laughs] so they must not be a BFD.” CASEY: Yeah. But we are all BFDs. MAE: Exactly! How about you Chelsea? How did you start to get to the do the pricing thing? CHELSEA: Yeah, I think it's interesting to hear y'all's approaches to the marketing and the pricing because mine has been pretty different from that. But before I get off on that, one thing I do want to mention around getting started with offering personal services at price is that if it seems too large a step to offer a personal service to one person for an amount of money, one thing that I have witnessed folks have success with in starting out in this vein is to set up a Patreon and then have office hours for patrons wherein they spend 2 hours on a Sunday afternoon, or something like that and anyone who is a patron is welcome to join. What often ends up happening for folks in that situation is that people who are friends of theirs support their Patreon and then the friends can show up. So effectively, folks are paying a monthly fee for access to this office hours, which they might attend, or they might not attend. But there are two nice things about it. The first thing about it is that you're not – from a psychological perspective, it doesn't feel like charging your friends for your time with them. It feels more indirect than that in a way that can be helpful for folks who are very new to charging for things and uncomfortable with the idea. The second thing is that the friends are often much more willing to pay than somebody who's new to charging is willing to charge. So the friends are putting this money into this Patreon, usually not because they're trying to get access to your office hours, but because they want to support you and one of the nice things about Patreon is that it is a monthly amount. So having a monthly email from Patreon that's like, “Hey, you we're sending you—” it doesn't even have to be a lot. “We're sending you 40 bucks this month.” It is a helpful conditioning exercise for folks who are not used to charging because they are getting this regular monthly income and the amount is not as important as receiving the regular income, which is helpful psychological preparation for charging for things on your own, I think. That's not the way that I did it, but I have seen people be effective that way. So there's that. For me, marketing was something that I was very worried about having to do when I started my business. In fact, it was one of those things where my conviction, when I started my consulting business, was I do not want to have to sell my services. I will coast on what clients I can find and when it is no longer easy, I will just get a full-time job because selling traditionally conceptualized is not something that I enjoyed. I had a head start on the marketing element of things, that is sort of the brand awareness element of things, my reputation and the reason for that is that first of all, I had consulted at Labs for several years, which meant that every client team that I had ever worked with there, the director remembered me, the product owner remember me. So a lot of people who had been clients of Labs – I didn't actually get anybody to be a client of mine who was a client of Labs, but the individuals I had worked with on those projects who had then changed jobs to go to different companies, reached out to me on some occasions. So that was one place that I got clients from. The other place that I gotten clients from has been my blog. Before I started my business, I had already been writing a tech blog for like 4, or 5 years and my goal with the tech blog has never actually been to get clientele, or make money. My goals for the blog when I started it were to write down what I was learning so that I would remember it and then after that, it was to figure out how to communicate my ideas so that I would have an easier time communicating them in the workplace. After that, it became an external validation source so that I would no longer depend on my individual manager's opinion of me to decide how good I was at programming. Only very recently has it changed to something like, okay, now I'm good enough at communicating and good enough at tech that I actually have something to teach anybody else. So honestly, for many years, I would see the viewership on my blog and I would be like, “Who are all these people? Why are they in my house?” Like, this is weird, but I would get some credibility from that. CASEY: They don't expect any tea from me. CHELSEA: Yeah. I really hope. I don't have enough to go around, [laughs] but it did help and that's where a lot of folks have kind of come from. Such that when I posted on my blog a post about how I'm going to be going indie. I've quit my job. I didn't really expect that to go anywhere, but a few people did reach out from that and I've been lucky insofar is that that has helped me sustain a client load in a way that I didn't really expect to. There's also, I would be remiss not to mention that what I do is I sling code for money for the majority of my consulting business, at least historically and especially in the beginning was exclusively that, and there's enough of a demand to have somebody come in and write code that that helped. It also helped that as I was taking on clients, I started to niche down specifically what I wanted to work on to a specific type of client and to a specific type problem. So I quickly got to the point where I had enough of a client load that I was going to have to make a choice about which clients to accept, or I was going to have to work over time. Now, the conventional wisdom in this circumstance is to raise your rates. Vast majority of business development resources will tell you that that's what you're supposed to do in this situation. But part of my goal in creating my consulting business had been to get out of burnout and part of the reason for the burnout was that I did not feel that the work that I was doing was contributing to a cause that made me feel good about what I was doing. It wasn't morally reprehensible, but I just didn't feel like I was contributing to a better future in the way that my self-identity sort of mandated that I did. It was making me irritable and all these kinds of things. MAE: I had the same thing, yeah. CHELSEA: Yeah. So it's interesting to hear that that's a common experience, but if I were to raise my rates, the companies that were still going to be able to afford me were going to be companies whose products were not morally reprehensible, but not things that coincided with what I was trying to get out of my consulting business. So what I did instead was I said, “I'm specifically looking to work with organizations that are contributing to basic scientific research, improving access for underserved communities, and combating the effects of climate change,” and kept my rates effectively the same, but niche down the clientele to that. That ended up being kind of how I did it. I find that rates vary from client to client in part, because of what you were talking about, Casey, wherein you have to hit the right price in order to even get clients board in certain circumstances. CASEY: Right. CHELSEA: I don't know a good way to guess it. My technique for this, which I don't know if this is kosher to say, but my technique for this has been whoever reached out to me, interested in bringing me on as a consultant for that organization, I ask that person to do some research and figure out what rate I'm supposed to pitch. That has helped a lot because a lot of times my expectations have been wildly off in those circumstances. One time I had somebody say to me, this was for a custom workshop they wanted. I was like, “What should I charge?” And they were like, “I don't know, a few thousand.” I was like, “Is that $1,200? Is that $9,000? I don't know how much money that is,” and so they went back and then they came back and they were able to tell me more specifically a band. There was absolutely no way I would've hit that number accurately without that information. CASEY: Yeah, and different clients have different numbers. You setting your price standard flat across all customers is not a good strategy either. That's why prices aren't on websites so often. CHELSEA: Yeah. I find that it does depend a lot. There's similarly, like I said, a lot of my clients are clients who are contributing to basic scientific research are very often grant funded and grants funding is a very particular kind of funding. It can be intermittent. There has to be a skillset on the team for getting the grant funding. A lot of times, to be frank, it doesn't support the kinds of rates that somebody could charge hourly in a for-profit institution. So for me, it was worth it to make the choice that this is who I want to work with. I know that my rate is effectively capped at this, if I'm going to do that and that was fine by me. Although, I'm lying to say it was completely fine by me. I had to take a long, hard look in the mirror, while I was still in that last full-time job, and realize that I had become a person who gauged her self-worth by the salary that she commanded more than I was comfortable with. More than I wanted to. I had to figure out how to weaken that dependency before I was really able to go off and do my own thing. That was my experience with it. I'm curious whether y'all, well, in particular, Casey, did you find the same thing? CASEY: The self-worth by salary? CHELSEA: Yeah. CASEY: I felt that over time, yeah. Like I went from private sector big tech to government and I got a pay cut and I was like, “Ugh.” It kind of hurt a little and it wasn't even as much as I was promised. Once I got through the hiring process, it was lower than that and now I'm making way less. When I do my favorite impact thing, the board game, like if I made a board game about mental health for middle schoolers, which is something I really want to do, that makes less than anything else I could with my time. I'll be lucky to make money on that at all. So it's actually inverse. My salary is inversely proportional to how much impact I can have if I'm working anyway. So my dream is to have enough corporate clients that I can do half-time, or game impact, whatever other impact things I'm thinking about doing. I think of my impact a lot. Impact is my biggest goal, but the thing is salary hurts. If I don't have the salary and I want to live where I'm living and the lifestyle I have, I don't want to cut back on that and I don't need to, hopefully. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: I'm hoping eventually, I'll have a steady stream of clients, I don't need to do the marketing and sales outreach as much and all those hours I kind of recoup. I can invest those in the impact things. I've heard people can do that. I think I'll get there. CHELSEA: No, I think you absolutely will. Mae, I'm curious as to your experience, because I know that you have a lot of experience with a similar calculation of determining which things are going to provide more income, which things are probably going to provide less income, and then balancing across a bunch of factors like money, but also impact, time spent, emotional drain, and all that stuff. MAE: Well, Chelsea. [laughter] I am a real merry go round in this arena. So before I became a programmer, I had a state job, I was well paid, and I was pretty set. Then I was a programmer and I took huge pay cut because I quit. I became a programmer when I was 37 years old. So I already had a whole career and to start at the beginning and be parallel with 20-year-old so it's not just like my salary, but also my level and my level of impact on my – and level of the amount of people who wanted to ask me for my advice [laughs] was significantly different. So like the ego's joking stopped and so when you mentioned the thing about identity. Doing any kind of consulting in your own deal is a major identity reorganization and having the money, the title, the clout, and the engagement. Like a couple years, I have spent largely alone and that is very different than working at a place where I have colleagues, or when I live somewhere and have roommates. But I have found signing up for lots and lots of different social justice and passion project things, and supporting nonprofits that I believe in. So from my perspective, I'm really offering a capacity building grant out of my own pocket, my own time, and my own heart and that has been deeply rewarding and maybe not feel much about my identity around salary. Except it does make me question myself as an adult. Like these aren't the best financial decisions to be making, [chuckles] but I get enough out of having made them that it's worth it to me. One of the things probably you were thinking of, Chelsea, we worked together a little bit on this mutual aid project that I took on when the pandemic started and I didn't get paid any dollars for that and I was working 18 hours a day on it, [chuckles] or something. So I like to really jump in a wholeheartedly and then once I really, really do need some dollars, then I figure something else out. That is kind of how I've ebbed and flowed with it. But mostly, I've done it by reducing my personal overhead so that I'm not wigged about the money and lowering whatever my quality-of-life spending goals [chuckles] are. But that also has had to happen because I have not wanted to and I couldn't get myself to get excited about marketing of myself and my whole deal. Like I legit still don't have a website and I've been in operation now since 2014 so that's a while. I meet people and I can demonstrate what it is and I get clients and for me, having only a few clients, there's dozens of people that work for each one. So it's more of an organization client than a bunch of individuals and I can't actually handle a ton. I was in a YCombinator thing that wanted me to really be reporting on income, growth rates, and all of these number of new acquisition things, and it just wasn't for me. Those are not my goals. I want to make sure that this nonprofit can help more people this year and that they can get more grant money because they know how many people they helped and that those people are more efficient at their job every day. So those are harder to measure. It's not quite an answer to your question, [laughs] but I took it and ran a little. CHELSEA: No, I appreciate that. There is a software engineer and a teacher that I follow on Twitter. His name is GeePawHill. Are y'all familiar with GeePawHill? MAE: No. CHELSEA: And he did a thread a couple of days ago that this conversation reminds me of and I found it. Is that all right if I read like a piece of it and paraphrase part of it? MAE: Yes, please. CHELSEA: Okay. So this is what he says. He says, “The weirdest thing about being a teacher for young geek minds: I am teaching them things…that their actual first jobs will most likely forbid them to do. The young'uns I work with are actually nearly all hire-able as is, after 18 months of instruction, without any intervention from me. The problem they're going to face when they get to The Show isn't technical, or intellectual at all. No language, or framework, or OS, or library, or algorithm is going to daunt them, not for long. No, the problem they're going to face is how to sustain their connection to the well of geek joy, in a trade that is systematically bent on simultaneously exploiting that connection while denying it exists and refusing any and all access to it. It is possible, to stick it out, to acquire enough space and power, to re-assert one's path to the well. Many have done it; many are doing it today. But it is very hard. Very hard. Far harder than learning the Visitor pattern, or docker, or, dart, or SQL, or even Haskell. How do you tell people you've watched “become” as they bathed in the cool clear water that, for some long time, 5 years or more, they must…navigate the horrors of extractive capitalist software development? The best answer I have, so far, is to try and teach them how and where to find water outside of work. It is a lousy answer. I feel horrible giving it. But I'd feel even more horrible if I didn't tell them the truth.” CASEY: I just saw this thread and I really liked it, too. I'm glad you found it. MAE: Oh, yeah. I find it honestly pretty inspiring, like people generally who get involved in the kinds of consulting gigs that we three are talking about, which is a little different than just any random consulting, or any random freelancing. CASEY: Like impact consulting, I might call that. MAE: Yeah. It's awesome if the money comes, but it's almost irrelevant [chuckles] provided that basic needs are meant. So that's kind of been my angle. We'll see how – talk to me in 20 more years when I'm [chuckles] trying to retire and made a lot of choices that I was happy with at the time. CASEY: This reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend who's an executive director of an orchestra in the nonprofit space and he was telling me that so many nonprofits shoot themselves in the foot by not doing enough fundraising, by not raising money, and that comes from not wanting to make money in a way because they're a nonprofit, money is not a motive, and everybody's very clear about that. That's noble and all, but it ends up hurting them because they don't have the money to do the impactful things they would as a nonprofit. Money is a necessary evil here and a lot of people are uncomfortable with it. Including me a lot of the time. Honestly, I have to tell myself not to. What would I tell a friend? “No, charge more money.” Okay, I guess I'll tell myself to do that now. I have this conversation with myself a lot. MAE: Yeah. I've been very aware that when I become anti-money, the well dries up. The money well. [laughs] CASEY: Yeah. MAE: And when I am respectful of and appreciative of money in the world, more comes my way. There is an internal dousing, I think that happens that one needs to be very careful about for sure. CASEY: One of the techniques I use with myself and with clients is a matrix where I write out for this approach, this thing that I'm thinking about how much money will it make, how much impact will it have on this goal, and all the different heuristics I would use to make the decision, or columns and all the options arose. I put numbers in it and I might weight my columns because money is less important than impact, but it's still important. It's there. I do all this math. In the end, the summary column with the averages roughly matches what's in my head, which is the things that are similar in my head are similar on paper, but I can see why and that's very clarifying for me. I really like being able to see it in this matrix form and being able to see that you have to focus on the money some amount. If you just did the high impact one, it wouldn't be on the top of the list. It's like, it's hard to think about so many variables at once, but seeing it helps me. CHELSEA: It is. GeePaw speaks to that some later in the thread. He says, “You've got to feed your family. You've got to. That's not negotiable. But you don't got to forget the well. To be any good at all, you have to keep finding the well, keep reaching it, keep noticing it. Doesn't matter whether it's office hours, or after hours. Matters whether you get to it. The thing you've got to watch, when you become a professional geek, isn't the newest tech, and it sure as hell isn't the org's process. You've got to watch whether, or how you're getting to the well. If you're getting to the well, in whatever way, you'll stay alive and change the world.” I think I'm curious as to y'all's thoughts on this, but like I mentioned earlier, I have a full-time job and I also do this consulting on the side. I also teach. I teach at the Master's program in computer science at University of Chicago. I do some mentoring with an organization called Emergent Works, which trains formerly incarcerated technologists. The work situation that I have pieced together for myself, I think manages to get me the income I need and also, the impact that I'm looking for and the ability to work with people and those kinds of things. I think my perspective at this point is that it's probably difficult, if it's realistic at all, to expect any one position to be able to meet all of those needs simultaneously. Maybe they exist, but I suspect that they're relatively few and far between and I think that we probably do ourselves a disservice by propagating this idea that what you need to do is just make yourself so supremely interview-able that everybody wants to hire you and then you get to pick the one position where you get to do that because there's only one in the entirety of tech, it's that rare. Sure, maybe that's an individualist way to look at it. But when we step back and look more closely, or when we step back and look more broadly at that, it's like, all right, so we have to become hypercompetitive in order to be able to get the position where we can make enough while helping people. Like, the means there seem kind of cutthroat for the ends, right? [laughs] CASEY: This reminds me of relationships, too and I think there's a lot of great parallels here. Like you shouldn't expect your partner to meet all of your needs, all of them. MAE: I was thinking the same thing! CASEY: Uh huh. Social, emotional, spiritual, physical, all your needs cannot possibly by one person and that is so much pressure to put on that person, CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's like not healthy. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: You can choose some to prioritize over others for your partner, but you're not going to get a 100% of it and you shouldn't. CHELSEA: Well, and I find that being a conversation fairly regularly in monogamous versus polyamorous circles as well. Like, how much is it appropriate to expect of a partner? But I think it is a valid conversation to have in those circles. But I think that even in the context of a monogamous relationship, a person has other relationships—familial relationships, friend relationships—outside of that single romantic relationship. CASEY: Co-workers, community people, yeah. CHELSEA: Right. But even within that monogamous context, it's most realistic and I would argue, the most healthy to not expect any one person to provide for all of your needs and rather to rely on a community. That's what we're supposed to be able to do. CASEY: Yeah. MAE: Interdependence, not independence. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's more resilient in the face of catastrophe, or change in general, mild, more mild change and you want to be that kind of resilient person for yourself, too. Just like you would do a computer system, or an organization. They should be resilient, too. MAE: Yes. CASEY: Your relationship with your job is another one. MAE: Totally. CHELSEA: Right. And I think that part of the reason the burnout is so quick – like the amount of time, the median amount of time that somebody spends at a company in tech is 2.2 years. MAE: I know, it's so weird. CHELSEA: Very few companies in tech have a large number of lifers, for example, or something like that. There are a number of reasons for that. We don't necessarily have to get into all of them, although, we can if you want. But I think one of them is definitely that we expect to get so much out of a full-time position. Tech is prone. due to circumstances of its origin, to an amount of idealism. We are saving the world. We, as technologists, are saving the world and also, we, as technologists, can expect this salary and we, as technologists, are a family and we play ping pong, and all of these things – [laughter] That contribute to an unrealistic expectation of a work environment, which if that is the only place that we are getting fulfillment as programmers, then people become unsatisfied very quickly because how could an organization that's simultaneously trying to accomplish a goal, meet all of these expect for everybody? I think it's rare at best. CASEY: I want to bring up another example of this kind of thing. Imagine you're an engineer and you have an engineering manager. What's their main job? Is it to get the organization's priorities to be done by the team, like top-down kind of thing? We do need that to happen. Or is it to mentor each individual and coach them and help them grow as an engineer? We need that somewhere, too, yeah. Or is it to make the team – like the team to come together as a team and be very effective together and to represent their needs to the org? That, too, but we don't need one person to do all three of those necessarily. If the person's not technical, you can get someone else in the company to do technical mentorship, like an architect, or just a more senior person on, or off the team somewhere else. But we put a lot of pressure on the engineering managers to do that and this applies to so many roles. That's just one I know that I can define pretty well. There's an article that explains that pretty well. We'll put in the show notes. MAE: Yes! So what I am currently doing is I have a not 40 hours a week job as an engineering manager and especially when I took the gig, I was still doing all of these pandemic charity things and I'm like, “These are more important to me right now and I only have so many hours in the day. So do you need me to code at this place? I can, but do you need me to because all those hours are hours I can go code for all these other things that I'm doing,” and [laughs] it worked. I have been able to do all three of the things that you're talking about, Casey, but certainly able to defer in different places and it's made me – this whole thing of not working full-time makes you optimize in very different ways. So I sprinkle my Slack check-ins all day, but I didn't have to work all day to be present all day. There's a lot that has been awesome. It's not for everyone, but I also have leaned heavily on technical mentorship happening from tech leads as well. CASEY: Sounds good. MAE: But I'm still involved. But this thing about management, especially in tech being whichever programmer seems like the most dominant programmer is probably going to be a good needs to be promoted into management. Just P.S. management is its own discipline, has its own trajectory and when I talk to hiring managers and they only care about my management experience in tech, which is 6 years, right? 8, but I have 25 years of experience in managing. So there's a preciousness of what it is that we are asking for the employees and what the employees are asking of the employer, like you were talking about Chelsea, that is very interesting. It's very privileged, and does lead a lot of people to burnout and disappointment because their ideas got so lofty. I just want to tie this back a little bit too, something you read in that quote about – I forget the last quote, but it was something about having enough to be able to change the world and it reminded me of Adrienne Maree Brown, pleasure activism, emergent strategy, and all of her work, and largely, generations of Black women have been saying, “Yo, you've got to take care [chuckles] of yourself to be able to affect change.” Those people have been the most effective and powerful change makers. So definitely, if you're curious about this topic, I urge you to go listen to some brilliant Black women about it. CASEY: We'll link that in the show notes, too. I think a lot about engineering managers and one way that doesn't come up a lot is you can get training for engineering managers to be stronger managers and for some reason, that is not usually an option people reach for. It could happen through HR, or it could happen if you have a training budget and you're a new EM, you could use your training budget to hire coaching from someone. I'm an example. But there's a ton of people out there that offer this kind of thing. If you don't learn the leadership skills when you switch roles, if you don't take time to learn those skills that are totally learnable, you're not going to have them and it's hard to apply them. There's a lot of pressure to magically know them now that you've switched hats. MAE: And how I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have a therapist, [laughs] I don't understand why everyone in life doesn't have multiple job coaches at any time. Like why are we not sourcing more ideas and problem-solving strategies, and thinking we need to be the repository of how to handle X, Y, Z situation? CASEY: For some reason, a lot of people I've talked to think their manager is supposed to do that for them. Their manager is supposed to be their everything; their boss. They think the boss that if they're bad, you quit your job. If they're good, you'll stay. That boss ends up being their career coach for people, unless they're a bad career coach and then you're just stuck. Because we expect it so strongly and that is an assumption I want everyone listening to question. Do you need your manager at work to be that person for you? If they are, that's great. You're very fortunate. If not, how can you find someone? Someone in the community, a friend, family member, a professional coach, there's other options, other mentors in the company. You don't have to depend on that manager who doesn't have time for you to give you that kind of support. CHELSEA: So to that end, my thinking around management and mentorship changed about the time I hit – hmm. It was a while ago now, I don't know, maybe 6 years as a programmer, or something like that. Because before that, I was very bought into this idea that your manager is your mentor and all these types of things. There was something that I realized. There were two things that I realized. The first one was that, for me, most of my managers were not well set up to be mentors to me and this is why. Well, the truth is I level up quickly and for many people who are managers in a tech organization, they were technologists for 3 to 5 years before they became managers. They were often early enough in their career that they didn't necessarily know what management entailed, or whether they should say no based on what they were interested in. Many managers in tech figure out what the job is and then try to find as many surreptitious ways as possible to get back into the code. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: Additionally, many of those managers feel somewhat insecure about their weakening connection to the code base of the company that they manage. MAE: Yeah. CHELSEA: And so it can be an emotionally fraught experience for them to be mentor to someone whose knowledge of the code base that they are no longer in makes them feel insecure. So I learned that the most effective mentors for me – well, I learned something about the most effective mentors for me and I learned something of the most effective managers for me. I learned that the most effective managers for me either got way out ahead of me experience wise before they became managers, I mean 10 years, 15 years, 20 years, because those are not people who got promoted to management because they didn't know to say no. Those are people who got promoted to management after they got tired of writing code and they no longer staked their self-image on whether they're better coders than the people that they manage. That's very, very important. The other type of person who was a good manager for me was somebody who had never been a software engineer and there are two reasons for that. First of all, they trended higher on raw management experience. Second of all, they were not comparing their technical skillset to my technical skillset in a competitive capacity and that made them better managers for me, honestly. It made things much, much easier. And then in terms of mentors, I found that I had a lot more luck going outside of the organization I was working for mentors and that's again, for two reasons. The first one is that a lot of people, as they gain experience, go indie. Just a lot of people, like all kinds. Some of my sort of most trusted mentors. Avdi Grimm is somebody I've learned a lot from, indie effectively at this point. GeePawHill, like I mentioned, indie effectively at this point. Kenneth Mayer, indie effectively at this point. And these are all people who had decades of experience and the particular style of programming that I was doing very early in my career for many years. So that's the first reason. And then the second reason is that at your job, it is in your interest to succeed at everything you try—at most jobs. And jobs will tell you it's okay to fail. Jobs will tell you it's okay to like whatever, not be good at things and to be learning. But because if I'm drawing a paycheck from an organization, I do not feel comfortable not being good at the thing that I am drawing the paycheck for. MAE: Same. CHELSEA: And honestly, even if they say that that's the case, when the push comes to shove and there's a deadline, they don't actually want you to be bad at things. Come on! That doesn't make any sense. But I've been able to find ambitious projects that I can contribute to not for pay and in those situations, I'm much more comfortable failing because I can be like, “You know what, if they don't like my work, they can have all their money back.” And I work on a couple projects like that right now where I get to work with very experienced programmers on projects that are interesting and challenging, and a lot of times, I just absolutely eat dirt. My first PR doesn't work and I don't know what's wrong and the whole description is like somebody please help and I don't feel comfortable doing that on – if I had to do it at work, I would do it, but I'm not comfortable doing it. I firmly believe that for people to accelerate their learning to their full capacity for accelerating their learning, they must place themselves in situations where they not only might fail, but it's pretty likely. Because that's what's stretching your capacity to the degree that you need to get better and that's just not a comfortable situation for somewhere that you depend on to make a living. And that ended up being, I ended up approaching my management and my mentorship as effectively mutually exclusive things and it ended up working out really well for me. At this particular point in time, I happened to have a manager who happened to get way out ahead of me technically, and is willing to review PRs and so, that's very nice. But it's a nice-to-have. It's not something that I expect of a manager and it's ended up making me much more happy and manage relationships. MAE: I agree with all of that. So well said, Chelsea. CHELSEA: I try, I try. [laughs] Casey, are there things that you look for specifically in a manager? CASEY: Hmm. I guess for that question, I want to take the perspective inward, into myself. What do I need support on and who can I get that from? And this is true as also an independent worker as a consultant freelancer, too. I need support for when things are hard and I can be validated from people who have similar experiences, that kind of like emotional support. I need technical support and skills, like the sales I don't have yet and I have support for that, thank goodness. Individuals, I need ideally communities and individuals, both. They're both really important to me and some of these could be in a manager, but lately, I'm my own manager and I can be none of those things, really. I'm myself. I can't do this external support for myself. Even when I'm typing into a spreadsheet and the computer's trying to be a mirror, it's not as good as talking to another person. Another perspective that I need support on is how do I know what I'm doing is important and so, I do use spreadsheets as a mirror for that a lot of the time for myself. Like this impact is having this kind of magnitude of impact on this many people and then that calculates to this thing, maybe. Does that match my gut? That's literally what I want to know, too. The numbers aren't telling me, but talking to other people about impact on their projects really kind of solidifies that for me. And it's not always the client directly. It could be someone else who sees the impact I'm having on a client. Kind of like the manager, I don't want to expect clients to tell me the impact I'm having. In fact, for business reasons, I should know what the impact is myself, to tell them, to upsell them and continue it going anyway. So it really helps me to have peers to talk through about impact. Like that, too types of support. What other kinds of support do you need as consultants that I didn't just cover? MAE: I still need – and I have [laughs] hired Casey to help me. I still need a way to explain what it is that I am offering and what the value of that really is in a way that is clear and succinct. Every time I've gone to make a website, or a list of what it is that I offer, I end up in the hundreds of bullet points [laughs] and I just don't – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, yeah. MAE: Have a way to capture it yet. So often when people go indie, they do have a unique idea, a unique offering so finding a way to summarize what that is can be really challenging. I loved hearing you two when you were talking about knowing what kinds of work you want to do and who your ideal customer is. Those are things I have a clearer sense of, but how to make that connection is still a little bit of a gap for me. But you reminded me in that and I just want to mention here this book, The Pumpkin Plan, like a very bro business book situation, [chuckles] but what is in there is so good. I don't want to give it away and also, open up another topic [laughs] that I'll talk too long about. So I won't go into it right now, but definitely recommend it. One of the things is how to call your client list and figure out what is the most optimal situation that's going to lead toward the most impact for everybody. CASEY: One of the things I think back to a lot is user research and how can we apply that this business discovery process. I basically used the same techniques that were in my human computer interaction class I took 10, or 15 years ago. Like asking open ended questions, trying to get them to say what their problems are, remembering how they said it in their own words and saying it back to them—that's a big, big step. But then there's a whole lot of techniques I didn't learn from human computer interaction, that are sales techniques, and my favorite resource for that so far is called SPIN selling where SPIN is an acronym and it sounds like a wonky technique that wouldn't work because it's just like a random technique to pull out. I don't know, but it's not. This book is based on studies and it shows what you need to do to make big ticket sales go through, which is very different than selling those plastic things with the poppy bubbles in the mall stand in the middle of the hallway. Those low-key things they can manipulate people into buying and people aren't going to return it probably. But big-ticket things need a different approach than traditional sales and marketing knowledge and I really like the ideas in SPIN selling. I don't want to go into them today. We'll talk about it later. But those are two of the perspectives I bring to this kind of problem, user research and the SPIN selling techniques. I want to share what my ideal client would be. I think that's interesting, too. So I really want to help companies be happier and more effective. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective, and that has the impact on the users of the company, or whoever their clients are. It definitely impacts that, which makes it a thing I can sell, thankfully. So an organization usually knows when they're not the most happy, or the most effective. They know it, but my ideal client isn't just one that knows that, but they also have leadership buy-in; they have some leader who really cares and can advocate for making it better and they just don't know how. They don't have enough resources to make it happen in their org. Maybe they have, or don't have experience with it, but they need support. That's where I come in and then my impact really is on the employees. I want to help the employees be happier and more effective. That's the direct impact I want, and then it has the really strong, indirect impact on the business outcomes. So in that vein, I'm willing to help even large tech companies because if I can help their employees be happier, that is a positive impact. Even if I don't care about large tech companies' [chuckles] business outcomes, I'm okay with that because my focus is specifically on the employees. That's different than a lot of people I talk to; they really just want to support like nonprofit type, stronger impact of the mission and that totally makes sense to me, too. MAE: Also, it is possible to have a large and ever growing equitably run company. It is possible. I do want to contribute toward that existing in the world and as much as there's focus on what the ultimate looking out impact is, I care about the experience of employees and individuals on the way to get there. I'm not a utilitarian thinker. CASEY: Yeah, but we can even frame it in a utilitarian way if we need to. If we're like a stakeholder presentation, if someone leaves the company and it takes six months to replace them and their work is in the meantime off board to other people, what's the financial impact of all that. I saw a paper about it. Maybe I can dig it up and I'll link to it. It's like to replace a person in tech it costs a $100K. So if they can hire a consultant for less than a $100K to save one person from leaving, it pays for itself. If that number is right, or whatever. Maybe it was ten employees for that number. The paper will say much better than I will. CHELSEA: I think that in mentioning that Casey, you bring up something that businesses I think sometimes don't think about, which is some of the hidden costs that can easily be difficult to predict, or difficult to measure those kinds of things. One of the hidden costs is the turnover costs is the churn cost because there's how much it takes to hire another person and then there's the amount of ramp time before that person gets to where the person who left was. CASEY: Right, right, right. CHELSEA: And that's also a thing. There's all the time that developers are spending on forensic software analysis in order to find out all of the context that got dropped when a person left. CASEY: Yeah. The one person who knew that part of the code base, the last one is gone, uh oh. CHELSEA: Right. CASEY: It's a huge trust. And then engineering team is often really interested in conveying that risk. But if they're not empowered enough and don't have enough bandwidth time and energy to make the case, the executive team, or whoever will never hear it and they won't be able to safeguard against it. MAE: Or using the right language to communicate it. CASEY: Right, right. And that's its own skill. That's trainable, too thankfully. But we don't usually train engineers in that, traditionally. Engineers don't receive that training unless they go out of their way for it. PMs and designers, too, honestly. Like the stakeholder communication, everybody can work on. MAE: Yeah. CASEY: That's true. MAE: Communication. Everyone can, or not. Yes. [laughs] I learned the phrase indie today. I have never heard it and I really like it! It makes me feel cool inside and so love and – [overtalk] CASEY: Yeah, I have no record label, or I am my own record label, perhaps. MAE: Yo! CASEY: I've got one. I like the idea of having a Patreon, not to make money, but to have to help inspire yourself and I know a lot of friends have had Patreons with low income from it and they were actually upset about it. So I want to go back to those friends and say, “Look, this prove some people find value in what you're doing.” Like the social impact. I might make my own even. Thank you. MAE: I know I might do it too. It's good. That's good. CHELSEA: Absolutely. Highly recommended. One thing that I want to take away is the exercise, Casey, that you were talking about of tallying up all of the different things that a given position contributes in terms of a person's needs. Because I think that an exercise like that would be extremely helpful for, for example, some of my students who are getting their very first tech jobs. Students receive a very one-dimensional message about the way that tech employment goes. It tends to put set of five companies that show remain unnamed front and center, which whatever, but I would like them to be aware of the other options. And there is a very particular way of gauging the value of a tech position that I believe includes fewer dimensions than people should probably consider for the health of their career long-term and not only the health of their career, but also their health in their career. CASEY: One more parting thought I want to share for anyone is you need support for your career growth, for your happiness. If you're going to be a consultant, you need support for that. Find support in individuals and communities, you deserve that support and you can be that support for the people who are supporting you! It can be mutual. They need that, too.

Relationships & Revenue with John Hulen
Episode 86 Making Elephants Fly with Terry Weaver

Relationships & Revenue with John Hulen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 19, 2022 94:41


In today's episode, John talks with Terry Weaver - author of Making Elephants Fly: Getting Your Dreams Off the Ground, keynote speaker, coach, founder of The Thing conference, podcaster, ideapreneur, and dreamer. Terry helps leaders navigate the galaxy of entrepreneurship. Listen to this episode to learn more: [01:49] - The weather channel and entrepreneurship [05:06] - Building long term relationships in business [09:44] - Sales process is about serving people [11:16] - How to be successful [19:43] - Suggestions to change the education system [23:02] - Future of the retail industry [30:00] - The world is shifting and you must be ready to adapt [32:01] - How Terry helps people find clarity [41:13] - Don't have just one business, have a portfolio of things that you do [46:35] - Terry's definition of creatives [51:04] - Scariest thing in the entrepreneur space [56:11] - About his podcast Making Elephants Fly [1:04:25] - About The Thing conferences - main conference and mini-conference [1:10:54] - How Terry builds up his significant relationships and the impact those relationships have on his business [1:18:21] - One habit that every creator/entrepreneur must have [1:24:34] - Failing vs. failure [1:37:52] - What leadership is all about NOTABLE QUOTES: "Hustle is meant to be a season, not a way of life."  "Ask yourself what you really want, get really clear about that, and then go after it." "Unless your dream is bigger than you are, there's a real problem with your dream." "The tribe doesn't expand what people are already in it. It's got to be people who aren't in it." "We can only amplify someone that's already making noise. None of us can help someone who is silent."  "When you know your stuff so well, it makes it easier to say no. Because saying no to the wrong things makes it easier to say yes to the right things." "If you're not recruiting more leaders, you're not doing anything as a leader." "We live in a world of checks, likes, and top friend lists, and we want to accumulate relationships like we're collectors of cards." "Ideas that don't get acted upon don't help anybody." "Failing means I'm taking a risk. I'm trying something new. I did it wrong, and now I have an opportunity to learn from it. Failure, on the other hand, is a state of being. It is a choice to stay exactly where I am and not move forward." BOOKS MENTIONED:   The Big Leap: Conquer Your Hidden Fear and Take Life to the Next Level by Gay Hendricks (https://tinyurl.com/TheBigLeapBookGH)     Hell Yeah! Or Hell No! And How to Tell the Difference: The Ultimate Guide to Intuitive Decision Making by Sam Kyle (https://tinyurl.com/HellYeahOrHellNoBook)   RESOURCES MENTIONED: Seth Godin's blog: https://seths.blog/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/stop-stealing-dreams6print.pdf  Seth Godin's Ted Talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXpbONjV1Jc  USEFUL LINKS http://terryweaver.com/  https://thethingorlando.com/  https://www.instagram.com/terrytheweaver  https://www.instagram.com/thethinglive  https://www.facebook.com/terrytheweaver  https://twitter.com/terryweaver  https://www.linkedin.com/in/terrytheweaver  CONNECT WITH JOHN  Website - https://thejohnhulen.com   Clubhouse - https://www.joinclubhouse.com/@johnhulen   Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/johnhulen   Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/johnhulen   Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/johnhulen   LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnhulen   YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLX_NchE8lisC4NL2GciIWA   EPISODE CREDITS Intro music provided by Tony Palacios - https://www.instagram.com/tonytonedog/   Outro music provided by Jeff Scheetz - https://jeffscheetz.com/  

MinistryWatch Podcast
Ep. 160: Church is Boring…and other Myths

MinistryWatch Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 24:51


Today I'm pleased to have back on the program Ron Sellers, the president of Grey Matter Research and Consulting.   Ron Sellers and I discuss a new study his organization has done in conjunction with Infinity Concepts.  That study was published a week ago, and it's called “The Congregational Scorecard:  What Evangelicals Want In A Church.”  Before we jump into that interview, I just want to note that we will have a way for you to get a copy of this 34-page report in the show notes. https://greymatterresearch.com/articles-studies/ The producers for today's program are Rich Roszel and Ben Warwick. We get database and other technical support from Cathy Goddard, Stephen DuBarry, Emily Kern, and Casey Sudduth. I'm Warren Smith, and – until next time – May God bless you.

Cut Through the Noise with Dave Turano
What's sexy about marketing?

Cut Through the Noise with Dave Turano

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 49:04


Marketing isn't known for being sexy. Finding customers can feel like chasing, and many companies scare people away when they only talk about themselves. In this episode, marketing consultant Tim Fitzpatrick teaches us how to get back to the basics. Marketing well requires looking at data to see what customers we're attracting and why. It comes down to pinpointing our ideal customers, listening to them, and helping them become their best. And although it isn't sexy, we sometimes have to delay immediate results to build strong, stable relationships with ourselves and with others. Tim Fitzpatrick is the president of Rialto Marketing, where he helps companies build results that last. Like this episode? Share it around and write us a review on Apple Podcasts.

Leaders Create Leaders
Episode 86: 9 Secrets To Master Your Time In 2022

Leaders Create Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2022 28:11


In this new episode, I dive into the secrets of what it truly takes to take your life and business to a new level this year. If you're done playing small and ready to step into your greatness, this episode is for you. What are you willing to do to create the life you've always dreamed of? LFG!SHOW NOTES:0:00 Podcast Intro2:24 The Untold Power of Saying NO4:55 The Importance of Re-evaluating Your Values7:00 Write Out Your Big Vision 7:56 Why To Work From Your Calendar9:15 The Power of Virtual Assistants & Support12:07 How To Figure Out Your Zone of Genius15:59 How To Set Boundaries In Your Life19:55 Why Leaders Live In Integrity With Boundaries24:51 You Are Worthy of Support & Receiving 27:02 Podcast Outro

The Thinking Project
#180 - Jason Strand | SUPERCLOSERS and Sales

The Thinking Project

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 80:36


Jay Strand is a Serial Entrepreneur with over 5 years of startup and business growth experience. Having started, built, and sold businesses in various industries, including E-commerce, Weddings, Events, Retail, Amazon Sales, Food Storage, Fulfillment, CBD, Consulting, and Sales Mentoring. Jay currently serves as the Executive Director of SUPERCLOSER | SUPERCOACH, specializing in Business Consultation and Management of Multiple Sales Teams. Shoutout to our sponsors – Monarch Social – a one-stop shop for everything digital marketing! For links to my course VA University, Sales Genius, and to inquire about my Empathetic Selling program – Click here! Enjoy the episode!

Roads Taken
International Man of Mystery: Jorge Motoshige on never staying still and gaining new experiences

Roads Taken

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 16:18


Guest Jorge Motoshige felt as though college surrounded him with an interesting, diverse group of people that helped him land in a number of different places with some comfort, because he didn't have any concerns about being able to get out there and meeting new people of all kinds of different backgrounds. Get out there, he did, becoming employee number 113 at Yahoo upon graduation. After a number of years in producing there, he timed his departure right before the first dotcom bust and left the company in 2000. Figuring out where to go and who to be next proved more difficult and so he took the opportunity to travel. Frequent visits to New York made him realize that this California boy could spend two or three years there. Before he knew it, he'd been there for at least 15.Though he joked in college that he doubt he'd live past 40, fate proved otherwise, though his bachelor days were numbered. Through mutual friends, he met Elisabeth, an opera singer from Greece, and ended up married in 2019. The couple lives an international lifestyle with Elisabeth basing her career out of Berlin and Jorge doing likewise from New York.In this episode, find out from Jorge how never staying still lets you consistently amass new experiences …on ROADS TAKEN...with Leslie Jennings Rowley.About This Episode's Guest//Jorge Motoshige, international man of mystery, splits his time between New York and Berlin and the many destinations of his professional and personal travels. Who knows where he will turn up next?  Executive Producer/Host: Leslie Jennings RowleyMusic: Brian Burrows Find more episodes at https://roadstakenshow.com Email the show at RoadsTakenShow@gmail.com

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Episode 209: Wire Taps— Dartmouth grad with 11 years of work experience in Japan. Syrian American chemical engineer looking to transition to consulting. West African candidate weighing offers from Booth, Johnson, Yale and Stern, for Investment Banking.

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 36:58


This Martin Luther King Day edition of the podcast takes a moment to recognize the unparalleled contributions of Dr. King before moving into the latest news from the MBA admissions front. With R2 deadlines mostly in the rearview, Graham is impatient about interview invites and Alex offers him some advice in this regard. Your hosts then break down the latest Employment Report from Kellogg and mention the recent publication of Real Humans pieces for UT Austin, Vanderbilt Owen, and Boston Carroll. Also of note, two upcoming 'deferred enrollment' events hosted by Clear Admit and featuring admissions representatives from Berkeley, Chicago Booth, Columbia, CMU Tepper, UVA Darden, Wharton, Yale SOM, and MIT Sloan - sign up here! https://bit.ly/demba22 As to this week's featured candidates, Alex and Graham kick things off with a close look at a Dartmouth grad who has worked for 11 years in Japan. He's launched several entrepreneurial ventures, most recently setting up a language school. A super GMAT and fascinating experience helps, but he will really need to show fit and that he plans to fully engage during his MBA experience. Next, Alex selects a Syrian American chemical engineer who has worked in the petrochemical industry and wants to move to consulting and sustainability. She also has a passion for advocacy work and is currently in the midst of a 'gap year' to pursue that passion (while applying to b-school). Finally, from DecisionWire, Graham and Alex break down the dilemma for a candidate who is weighing offers from Chicago / Booth, Cornell / Johnson, Yale SOM and NYU / Stern - with varying scholarship amounts. The admitted student is from West Africa and is seeking to enter Investment Banking. Your hosts also give credit to the contributions from the community on DecisionWire for this entry. This episode was recorded in Paris, France and Cornwall, England. It was mixed, produced, re-mixed, and version-ed, by the incredible Dennis Crowley in sunny Philadelphia. Please remember to rate and review this podcast wherever you listen, and to tell at least 100 friends about it. Thanks for listening!

The UpLevel Lounge Podcast
69: How, When, & Why to Start Offering Consulting

The UpLevel Lounge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 17, 2022 20:36


Providing done-for-you services can sometimes feel like running on a treadmill. You're working hard, putting in the energy, but never really moving forward. So how do you scale your business, increase your income, and ditch the overwhelm? Try consulting. After years of working as a virtual assistant and online business manager, I realized I was meant for more. I desired a lighter workload and more high-level work, work that would get me excited to sit down at my desk every day. I found that in consulting. Now, instead of running on the done-for-you treadmill, I get to support high-level business owners with their strategies and help them create plans to grow their own businesses, all while scaling my own further than I ever thought possible. If you're looking for that new opportunity, the next big thing for your business and your life, here it is. You've got knowledge that's worth sharing, so why not make money while you do it?   Don't forget to join me in my free Facebook group, The UpLevel Lounge.  This group is full of amazing women who are focused on collaboration over competition and are ready to take their businesses to the next level.  I would love to see you in there!    Full show notes available at www.melissafroehlich.com/69   Join The Consulting Framework Accelerator   Where We Can Connect:  www.melissafroehlich.com http://melissafroehlich.com/rtawaitlist Join The UpLevel Lounge Facebook Group  Subscribe to the Podcast Connect with Melissa on Instagram Follow Melissa on Facebook

Walk With Me Podcast
Global Virtual Panel of Stillbirth Survivors Event - Jan.14 2022

Walk With Me Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 15, 2022 122:03


This event is to raise awareness and educate others on the Stillbirth topic. This event will be a survivors resource training! Hosted by Regeline Sabbat - Motivational Keynote Speaker, 5x Bestselling Author, Life Coach, First generation Haitian American, the host of Walk With Me Podcast on JRQTV, Financial Expert, and CEO and Founder of Life Service Center of America, LLC. Endorsed by Les Brown.   Speakers: (Master of Ceremonies) Lakisha James - Corporate event planner, Set Designer, Mentor, Author, and Atlanta Chapter Leader for World Women Conference & Awards Stacey Matarazzo Dinburg- Stacey is the vice president and co-founder of The 2 Degrees Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to impacting stillbirth outcomes in the state of NJ. As a mother of a stillborn daughter Stacey has felt the need to turn her tragedy into a purpose. Stacey and her husband Sean's first born daughter, Rhyan Ava was born sleeping on January 30, 2014 at 37 weeks gestational age. She has since become an advocate for maternal health including infertility, maternal mental health, pregnancy and infant loss, pregnancy after loss, and parenting after loss. Over the past 6 years, Stacey has been an invited speaker at RMA of NJ's series “The Doctor is in”, “The Stillbirth Management Conference” through the Partnership of Maternal & Child Health of Northern New Jersey, and has testified for the appropriate implementation of The Autumn Joy Stillbirth Research & Dignity Act in Trenton. Her stillbirth story has been featured in NY FOX 5's Dr. Manny Alvarez's “Ask Dr. Manny” news blog and in Hackensack Merdian Health Views magazine. Stacey is a certified special educator and studied behavioral psychology at Caldwell University. She is currently studying to become a certified bereavement and birthing doula. She also works part time as an instructional facilitator and a teacher trainer at a specialized school for students with special needs. Most importantly, Stacey is the proud mother of 2 beautiful little girls, her rainbows. She currently resides in New Jersey with her family.   Ana Vick- Ana Vick is the Co-Director of Awareness for PUSH for Empowered Pregnancy and a mother of three (always missing one) whose traumatic experience with two early miscarriages and her middle son, Owen's, unexpected stillbirth in 2015, have called her to join the fight to end preventable stillbirths.  Putting her UCLA Psychology B.A. and television production background into use, Ana leads discussion and support rooms weekly on Clubhouse in the Empowered Pregnancy Club that she founded to connect with loss families, expectant parents and medical providers. She is a vocal part of the community of bereaved parents on social media (her handle on all platforms is StillMySon) helping to break the stigma and silence shrouding stillbirth. She interviews other bereaved parents regularly about their experience because she believes that by amplifying the stillbirth crisis we can create an urgent outcry for improved standards of care for everyone.  Ana promotes change through supporting legislative efforts including advocating for stillbirth tax credits around the country and bills targeting stillbirth prevention and bereavement care. She is relentless in her determination to end stillbirth and improve maternity care because of the rampant number of families, like her own, that continue to be wrecked by this failure of our medical system. Our country has a long way to go in developing protocols to prevent stillbirths, so it's critical that we are not silent on this issue. As a bilingual Latina, Ana's interest in improving the higher rate of stillbirth in the BIPOC community is deeply personal and an area of change she will be dedicating great attention to this year.  Ana has shared her personal story in national and local press including Today Parents and CBS 17 News, however, her main focus is on collaboration with other nonprofits, pregnancy advice platforms (such as Mommy Labor Nurse and Juna) and influencers to spread PUSH for Empowered Pregnancy's prevention tips to expectant parents. By empowering families with the knowledge that stillbirth still happens (even in healthy pregnancies like hers was) and explaining what they can do to minimize their risks, she believes we can save many babies in memory of her son, Owen, and all babies gone too soon.  The Vick's recently relocated cross country from California to North Carolina, where her husband is from, with their two living children and two mini aussie pups; They fill each other's days with joy and gratitude as they navigate life after loss together. Randy is a Canadian dad of 2 girls (one in heaven). He lost his second born daughter to stillbirth in June 2020 and since then has realized the gap in support for grieving dads.  He is eager to spread the message of what it's like as a grieving dad and how we can support them when they need it most Kim is a mom of 2 girls (one in heaven). Her oldest is 4 years old and River Joy would have been 18 months old as she was born still at 34 weeks pregnant in June of 2020.  Kim is married her to husband Randy of almost 7 years where together with their daughter they live in Ontario Canada. Kim is passionate about stillbirth advocacy and supporting others through their grief with her social media platform (Instagram). Her goal is to help other mamas know they aren't alone in their grief, and also help to prevent stillbirth from happening by educating others.  Karina Portes, mommy to son Trevor Rafael whom was stillborn. As a grieving mom finding out the cause of death of my son was devastated. After sending his placenta pathology to and Dr. Harvey Kliman from Yale university who determined it was from a Placenta abruption due to a 16% percentile small Placenta. In other words this could have possibly been preventable if my baby placenta was measure during my pregnancy which unfortunately is not standard care in the United States today. There are 23,000 babies a year that are stillborn just in the United States and a lot of them are preventable making measuring the placenta standard care would've save my baby and many more. Today my family and I have to live to this ongoing grief and trama.    Sponsors: Ragne Sinikas - Founder of World Women Conference & Awards (WWCA), Women Entrepreneurs TV, Change Makers Coach, Public Speaker Michael D. Butler -CEO of Beyond Publishing, Book Publisher, Global Speaker, Media Coach Daniel Gomez- Keynote Speaker, Corporate Trainer, Executive Coach, Confidence Architect, and Author Melahni Ake- Melahni Ake, is the founder of Everyday Leaders Professional Coaching and Consulting, a Certified John Maxwell Team leadership coach, speaker and trainer, and as a Certified WHY Institute Agent she helps others Discover their own WHY, Melahni professional influence began at Walt Disney World and carried into financial services, fundraising and medical device sales and leadership. She believes in the power of our mindset to design our life with purpose. She is a popular Event Master of Ceremonies, Voice Actor, Leadership Podcast Host of Everyday Leaders 50in50, best selling author, motivational speaker and life strategy coach who challenges her clients to dream beyond their limiting beliefs and create better strategic ways to make sense out of the possibilities in front of them to change the world. What she knows is that When you know your WHY, and START with WHY, What You Do has more Impact. Lakisha James- Corporate event planner, Set Designer, Mentor, Author, and Atlanta Chapter Leader for World Women Conference & Awards

The ConTechCrew
The ConTechCrew 296: A Covid Project for Construction with Jonathan Marsh of Steel Toe Consulting

The ConTechCrew

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 77:34


This week's construction tech news with Josh Bone (@BIM2theBone), Jeff Sample (@IronmanofIT) & Jonathan Marsh (@ErieForage) Featuring: -Interview with Jonathan Marsh -ConTech News Follow @TheConTechCrew on social media for more updates and to join the conversation! Listen to the show at http://thecontechcrew.com Powered by JBKnowledge Learn more at http://thecontechcrew.com or follow @JBKnowledge & @TheConTechCrew on Twitter.

GENERATION RIPE
The Seventy-Fourth One... and Lux ATL

GENERATION RIPE

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 84:03


Episode 74 and Wendi and Dfernando's guest interview is writer, speaker, cheerleader, and catalyzer of communities for women: Lux ATL.Lux ATL is a former university instructor and lifelong exotic dancer turned itinerant preacher for women's empowerment through sensual awakening. Through her workshops, retreats, and digital courses, she helps women reconnect with their desires and boldly pursue a path of pleasure and fulfillment.She is also a published scholar in the field of women's studies under the name of Dr. Lindsay Byron.  Her short documentary CONJURED and Southern Cultures Magazine's article REWRITING ELIZABETH reconstruct the lives of women wrongfully institutionalized at an infamous Southern mental hospital in the mid-twentieth century.She was named Best Stripper in Atlanta in 2015, and competed in the elite Miss Pole Dance America competition in 2016. As an academic expert on women's issues as well as a long-term sex worker, she brings a unique mixture of historical, cultural, and real-world insights that cannot be found elsewhere.In 2021 she released her autobiography titled TOO PRETTY TO BE GOOD, and is the host of the podcast HOOKERGATE: Criminals and Libertines in the South, which focuses on a high profile Southern prostitution ring during the early 1970's and the Watergate scandal.  She was also featured on the Epix documentary series SEX LIFE in Season 1, Episode 3: ROPE, TITS AND TEARS.  Also on Episode 74, Wendi and Dfernando talk about Butters the Cat and some new developments, plus Wendi talks about some recent paparazzi photos taken of her on the set of THE GOLDBERGS.  On THE RIPE REPORT, Dfernando rediscovers the 90s CBS TV sitcom CYBILL (now streaming on TUBI TV), and Wendi shares some beauty treatments with BLISS' What a Melon Reviving & DeStressing Overnight Mask.Watch Wendi and Dfernando and their TEAM GENERATION RIPE: Greg Covey, Shelley McLendon and Ponciana Badia on Season 7 Episode 2 of CELEBRITY FAMILY FEUD - now on ABC OnDemand and Hulu and on the GENERATION RIPE website.  Follow us on our Instagram:Wendi McLendon-CoveyDfernando ZarembaGENERATION RIPE... and our guest Lux ATL, her TikTok, her Twitter, her Facebook, and her YouTube Channel.  Remember to subscribe to GENERATION RIPEAnd rate & leave us a review by clicking HERE!Visit Dfernando Zaremba's website: dfernandozaremba.com

Live Let Thrive (airbnb life, shareconomy, real estate, innovation)
Ep 188: From Maintenance Guy to owning 100 units! Emanuele Pani!

Live Let Thrive (airbnb life, shareconomy, real estate, innovation)

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 68:31


No Money, No Experience, No Credit? No Problem! Emanuele Pani shows us how straight hustle got him from being a multi-family maintenance guy to owning over 100 units! No Excuses folks. Just LIVE LET THRIVE!!! @EPANI.REALESTATE @PANIPROPERTIES LEAVE US A VOICEMAIL!!! www.speakpipe.com/LIVELETTHRIVE Steve's Airbnb/STR Management Company: WWW.ARGESTRENTALS.COM Myka's Info: FB: www.facebook.com/myka.a.artis IG: @sharebednbreakfast IG: @mykaartis Airbnb listings: www.sharebnb.com Myka's Consulting: 1-on-1 Consulting - Clarity.fm/sharebnb Timeshare Course - gum.co/qErMd Become An Airbnb Host - www.airbnb.com/r/mykaa5?s=6&t... Sign up for Minut – Use promo code MYKAA Sign up for Stayfi - stayfi.com?lmref=xSakAg Get $65 off your next Airbnb trip - www.airbnb.com/c/mykaa5?refer... Sign up for Pricelabs - Referral Code - NpgYJI Holler at Steve and Myka! www.liveletthrive.com liveletthrive@gmail.com 469-530-0239 (KEEP THE QUESTIONS COMING!) IG: @liveletthrive FB: www.facebook.com/LiveLetThrive/ Join our Fan Group: www.facebook.com/groups/18642... Mahogany Fitt's info: www.facebook.com/Mahoganyfitt/

Strategy Simplified
S6E2: What are the World's Best Consulting Firms?

Strategy Simplified

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 14, 2022 8:59


In this episode, we're sharing our rankings of the world's best consulting firms. There are hundreds of consulting firms out there, each one with a slightly different flavor. Finding which one is right for you - and why - is critical. We hope we can shed some light on that for you today.Additional LinksBreak into the world's best firms with our Black Belt program: LEARN MOREPromote your firm to our community: PROMOTEGot questions? We've got answers: team@managementconsulted.comSponsor an episode or advertise: Management Consulted Media Kit

Boss Ladies and Babies
BIPOC Health Disparities

Boss Ladies and Babies

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 46:19


In this episode I'm honored to be joined by Reketta P. to bring awareness to the health disparities and the devastating statistics that BIPOC birthing persons are experiencing. Reketta is a mom of 3 and Licensed Professional Counselor located in the state of Alaska. She owns Arise Counseling, LLC where she specializes in perinatal mental health and relationship therapy. Reketta is also a BIPOC Health Equity Consultant. She provides workshops and affinity groups to small and medium-sized organizations looking to reduce the health disparity rates in the BIPOC communities by increasing self-awareness and intentional action. Key Points From This Episode: -Perinatal mental health -Insight to statistics of BIPOC birthing persons are 3-4 times more likely to die from pregnancy and childbirth related complications than white women -Unconscious and implicit bias in health care -Anti-racism work and the difference between anti-racism vs being not racist -Allyship and the difference between true allyship and performative allyship

Entelechy Leadership Stories
Sherri McManus and Lou Everett, Leadership and DEI Consulting

Entelechy Leadership Stories

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 22:03


Sherri McManus and Lou Everett, Leadership and DEI Consulting Sherri and Lou are known for their highly effective coaching, teaching, and speaking on the importance of personal growth and how it impacts our Influence as a Leader. With more than four decades of combined experience in training, coaching, and leadership, they also have received training and mentoring from well-known and successful coaches and teachers from the likes of Tony Robbins, Zig Ziglar, Brian Tracy, John Maxwell, Jack Canfield, Paul Martinelli, and are Certified Leadership Coaches and Corporate Trainers. Topics We Discuss include: - Sherri's experience working to break a "glass ceiling" and Lou's diverse family experience - Leadership and influence - 6 Things a Leader Should Do to make DEI personal - 5 factors of Connecting - Importance of Leadership and Investing in true DEI initiatives - Gaining clarity for personal and professional growth of teams during "The Great Disengagement" Learn Morehttps://www.loueverettgroup.com/ (https://www.loueverettgroup.com) hhttps://www.linkedin.com/company/the-lou-everett-group (ttps://www.linkedin.com/company/the-lou-everett-group)

Let The Journey Begin
#094 - The Gray Area with James Sewell

Let The Journey Begin

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 32:53


This week, Owner/CEO of JDS Consulting, Inc, James Sewell, joins Hilary and Jason. Growing up in Omaha, Nebraska, James never felt like he could truly be himself; however, during his time in college he finally felt comfortable letting loose and being who he was. He talks about having generalized anxiety and feeling different than his peers, but alcohol was the solution able to bring down the barriers. For him, letting loose meant going out to the bars six days a week and what was once an opportunity to have fun, quickly escalated into a problem. Eventually, his drinking career resulted in several DUIs over a span of a few years and his court-ordered treatment from one particular counselor is what changed his life. He began looking at all the reasons why he drank and by working on those deep-seated problems, he has been able to stay sober for over 10 years. One of James's main messages in sobriety is to be kinder to oneself and how it is important to accept the reality of sobriety. During addiction, the substance is what makes the world around us and our situation feel great; however, the world is not like that. There are good days and there are bad days and James stresses the important part for him was to arrive at a place in which he can accept this reality and live in it without needing a substance, a reality in which James refers to as “The Gray Area.” Today, James works in the recovery and mental health field in hopes of improving some of the shortcomings addiction treatment can have.   You can connect with James and find his work at:   - JDS Consulting, Inc (Insurance Billing and Consulting for Behavioral Health Facilities): https://www.jdsconsultinginc.com/   - TRUST SoCal (Detox and Residential for Primary Mental Health): https://trustsocal.com/   - Training Institute for Addiction Counselors: https://www.traininginstitute.org/w/     For more information on the Red Songbird Foundation, please visit:   redsongbird.org   If you are interested in donating to the Red Songbird Foundation, please visit:   redsongbird.org/donate   Follow us on Instagram at: @redsongbirdfoundation     New episode every Thursday!   Check us out on YouTube every Friday! Let The Journey Begin Podcast     Please subscribe, rate, and review!   Listen on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Google Podcasts, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Work Smart Hypnosis | Hypnosis Training and Outstanding Business Success
WSH359 - Kathleen Shannon on Positive Value Changework

Work Smart Hypnosis | Hypnosis Training and Outstanding Business Success

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2022 50:28


Kathleen Shannon is a Licenced Clinical Mental Health Counselor and Certified Rehabilitation Counselor at Shannon Counseling and Consulting with more than 21 years of experience working as a licensed provider. She has worked with veterans on various issues including anxiety, depression, recovery, and PTSD. Previously, she has worked with Lourdes Behavioral Health, GENEX Services, and the US Department of Veterans Affairs. Kathleen holds a Master of Arts in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling from the University of South Florida. Join us at our next certification course LIVE and ONLINE at: https://worksmarthypnosislive.com/ Kathleen joins me today to discuss positive value changework. She shares the origins of EMDR and its similarities to NLP. We discuss how to navigate situations when clients ask for particular techniques and how she helps her clients work through self-sabotaging values to encourage belief systems and cognitive shifts. We discuss how she conducts screening and works with sleep issues from a semantic point of view. Kathleen highlights tips for mastering conversational hypnosis and explores metaphors and their meaning. We also discuss the homework Kathleen gives to her clients and why you shouldn't assume you still have rapport. "Metaphors are the language of trauma." - Kathleen Shannon The origin story of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy Handling client requests for specific techniques and whether they are suitable for the client, their values, and the problem An example of client self-sabotage and how to introduce cognitive and behavioral shifts How clients are finding Kathleen and Shannon Counseling and Consulting and the changework areas she works with Getting specific and using the Parts Model, Core Transformation, Holmes Model, and Transforming Yourself Model Why you should not assume you still have rapport and how to use Scott D. Miller's Outcome Rating Scale Resources Mentioned: Psychology Today Quartet Health Scott D. Miller Podcast: Session #320 – Follow-up Success with Stop Smoking Hypnosis Connect with Kathleen Shannon: Shannon Counseling and Consulting NLP Carolinas Shannon Counseling and Consulting on Facebook Kathleen Shannon on LinkedIn Join our next online certification course… wherever you are in the world! https://WorkSmartHypnosisLIVE.com/ Get an all-access pass to Jason's digital library to help you grow your hypnosis business: https://www.hypnoticbusinesssystems.com/ Get instant access to Jason Linett's entire hypnotherapeutic training library: https://www.hypnoticworkers.com/ If you enjoyed today's episode, please send us your valuable feedback! https://www.worksmarthypnosis.com/itunes https://www.facebook.com/worksmarthypnosis/ Join the new WORK SMART HYPNOSIS COMMUNITY on Facebook! https://www.facebook.com/groups/worksmarthypnosis/ Want to work with Jason? Check out: https://www.virginiahypnosis.com/call/

The Power of Healing Your Energy
Healthy Boundaries

The Power of Healing Your Energy

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 39:30


What do Healthy Boundaries and Veganism have in common? So much more than you think, being able to find clarity through a Plant-Based lifestyle. A Plant-Based lifestyle will help you rewrite your healing at 360 degree. Get ready to transform and come into alignment with the truth of who you are. Boundaries will help you set this in motion. BIO: Diane Randall, M.A., CHC is energized, committed, and passionate about leading wellness conversations around life balance, self-care, plant-based nutrition, and whole-life wellness. Her joy is when men and women adapt health and wellness methods that reduce stress and bring harmonious balance to their lives. She excels at equipping busy professionals with workable wellness advice and strategies that fit their demanding lifestyles. Diane is an author, whole life consultant, college instructor, and w speaker workshop presenter, and speaker whose articles have appeared in publications such as the New York Times, Balance Magazine, Choice, Consulting, The Active Times, and American Holistic Health Association (AHHA). She has been a guest on numerous podcasts and appeared on television; including a guest appearance on the Oprah Winfrey Show to talk about successful relationships. Diane hosted her own podcast, Balanced Living for Busy Professionals, to bring the best inner tools and strategies to her listeners. In addition, Diane is the founder of the Whole Life Wellness an online community for busy professionals to connect, share, explore ideas around living a healthier lifestyle. For more information about workshops, speaking appearances, and access to numerous resources visit her website at www.dianerandallconsults.com. Her book “Jumpstart Your Life” https://www.dianerandallconsults.com/... https://www.dianerandallconsults.com/... https://www.linkedin.com/in/dianerand... https://www.instagram.com/dianerandal... --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/24k-healing/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/24k-healing/support

Play to Potential Podcast
657: 85.01 Dorie Clark - Winding journey to entrepreneurship

Play to Potential Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 5:35


NUGGET CONTEXT Dorie speaks about how she started with a degree in Theology from Harvard Divinity School and then tried her hand at Journalism, Politics and other fields that has got her to her current role that includes teaching, speaking, writing, Coaching and Consulting. GUEST Dorie Clark is an American author and executive education professor at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. She has recently published her 4th book - The Long Game - How to be a Long-Term Thinker in a Short-Term World. Her previous books include Reinventing You (2013), Stand Out (2015), Entrepreneurial You (2017).  She completed her Master in Theological Studies at Harvard Divinity School, and has had a career in Journalism and as a Political Speech Writer before creating a niche around helping people reinvent themselves and create compelling personal brands. She has been on the Thinkers 50 list in 2019 and 2021. She was also recently named the #1 Communication Coach in the World by the Marshall Goldsmith Coaching Leading Global Coaches Awards. Published in Jan 2022. HOST Deepak is a Leadership Advisor and an Executive Coach. He works with leaders to improve their effectiveness and in helping them make better decisions specifically around organizational and career transitions. He currently runs Transition Insight (www.transitioninsight.com) and works with leaders to handle phases of transition thoughtfully. He has worked as an Operations Consultant with KPMG in UK, Strategy Consultant with McKinsey in the US and as a Leadership Consultant with EgonZehnder (a Swiss Leadership Advisory firm) where he helped companies recruit CEOs, CXOs and Board Members and worked on Leadership Development. Deepak is a certified CEO Coach and is an alumnus of IIT Madras, IIM Ahmedabad and London Business School. His detailed profile can be found at https://in.linkedin.com/in/djayaraman OTHER GUESTS 1.Vijay Amritraj 2.Amish Tripathi 3.Raghu Raman 4.Papa CJ 5.Kartik Hosanagar 6.Ravi Venkatesan 7.Abhijit Bhaduri 8.Viren Rasquinha 9.Prakash Iyer 10.Avnish Bajaj 11.Nandan Nilekani 12.Atul Kasbekar 13.Karthik Reddy 14.Pramath Sinha 15.Vedika Bhandarkar 16.Vinita Bali 17.Zia Mody 18.Rama Bijapurkar 19.Dheeraj Pandey 20.Anu Madgavkar 21.Vishy Anand 22. Meher Pudumjee 23.KV Shridhar (Pops) 24.Suresh Naraynan 25.Devdutt Pattanaik 26.Jay Panda 27.Amit Chandra 28.Chandramouli Venkatesan 29.Roopa Kudva 30.Vinay Sitapati 31.Neera Nundy. 32.Deepa Malik 33.Bombay Jayashri. 34.Arun Maira 35.Ambi Parameswaran 36.OP Bhaat 37.Indranil Chakraborty 38.Tarun Khanna 39. Ramachandra Guha 40. Stewart Friedman 41. Rich Fernandez 42. Falguni Nayar 43. Rajat Gupta 44. Kartik Hosanagar 45. Michael Watkins 46. Matt Dixon 47. Herminia Ibarra 48. Paddy Upton 49. Tasha Eurich 50. Alan Eagle 51. Sudhir Sitapati 52. James Clear 53. Lynda Gratton 54. Jennifer Petriglieri. 55. Matthew Walker 56. Raj Raghunathan 57. Jennifer Garvey Berger 58. BJ Fogg 59. R Gopolakrishnan 60. Sir Andrew Likierman. 61. Atul Khatri 62. Whitney Jonson 63. Venkat Krishnan 64. Marshall Goldsmith 65. Ashish Dhawan 66. Vinay Sitapati 67. Ashley Whillans 68. Tenzin Priyadarshi 69. Ramesh Srinivasan 70. Bruce Feiler 71. Sanjeev Aggarwal and T. N. Hari 72. Bill Carr 73. Jennifer Wetzler 74. Sally Helgesen 75. Dan Cable 76. Tom Vanderbilt 77. Darleen DeRosa 78. Amy Edmondson 79. Katy Milkman 80. Harish Bhatt 81. Lloyd Reeb 82. Sukhinder Cassidy 83. Harsh Mariwala 84. Rajiv Vij DISCLAIMER All content and opinions expressed in the podcast are that of the guests and are not necessarily the opinions of Deepak Jayaraman and Transition Insight Private Limited. Views expressed in comments to blog are the personal opinions of the author of the comment. They do not necessarily reflect the views of The Company or the author of the blog. Participants are responsible for the content of their comments and all comments that are posted are in the public domain. The Company reserves the right to monitor, edit, and/or publish any submitted comments. Not all comments may be published. Any third-party comments published are third party information and The Company takes no responsibility and disclaims all liability. The Company reserves the right, but is not obligated to monitor and delete any comments or postings at any time without notice.

Breakfast With Champions
Episode 706 with Rajsheda Griffin - Instagram Collaboration Masterclass

Breakfast With Champions

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 64:34


Thank you for joining us on Breakfast With Champions! Today we hear from Rajsheda Griffin, also known as Rocki! Instagram Marketing Agency, Coaching and Consulting, helping businesses leverage their Instagram monetize and establish the "Know, like, and trust" factor! 

No Rain... No Rainbows
178: Who AM I? How to Answer the Question of Identity with Sam Thiara

No Rain... No Rainbows

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 36:51


“Everyone's life is an autobiography. You are a living story. Keep building that autobiography into something worth reading.” -Sam Thiara   “Who Am I?” is one of the hardest questions to ever bewilder us. Some people were able to find the answer early on, but most people struggle with identity crises even in their 40's or older. But where do we even begin searching for the answer? And is that answer really worth the journey? Today's conversation emphasizes that we should not be defined by what we do, but rather by who we are. Before you embark to find out what you want to do, discover first who you are and the journey will be much more fulfilling.   Sam Thiara is a British-born Canadian whose parents came from Fiji Islands while his grandparents came from India. In search of his identity, Sam embarks on a journey to find his roots with a small blurry picture and a burning enthusiasm. Was Sam able to find the missing piece in his puzzle?    In this episode, Sam shares how his travel to India was like and the lessons he learned along the way. As the Chief Motivating Officer of Ignite the Dream Coaching and Consulting, Sam also shares inspiring thoughts about perceiving obstacles, creating and being guided by your 5 core elements, facing tons of rejections, and making each setback a learning opportunity.    Sometimes, we forget that we are valuable– a living story, waiting to be heard by the world. Should you ever feel insignificant or invisible, tune in as Sam shares the CARPE formula to turn the ordinary into extraordinary.      Connect with Ted:  Website Facebook  Twitter Instagram     LinkedIn YouTube Highlights:  02:43 How to Figure Out Who You Are 09:50 Obstacles Are Necessary Building Blocks of Success  16:19 The Identity Struggle 24:50 CARPE: How to Discover the Extraordinary in the Ordinary  30:11 A Greater Need to C-A-R-E 34:03 Recap

Govcon Giants Podcast
117: Rebecca Wilson Pselos - GSA Strategies for beginners

Govcon Giants Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 87:48


Our guest for this week's podcast, Rebecca Wilson Pselos, the President of Kite Tail Strategy. She began her career auditing Departments of Defense (DOD) and Homeland Security (DHS) major acquisitions. She then worked for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Office of Inspector General, reviewing the agency's approaches to leasing underutilized property, requirements development for Earth Science programs, and contracting services.  More recently, she served as the Deputy Associate Administrator for the General Services Administration (GSA) Office of Congressional and Interagency Affairs where she represented many GSA programs and significantly influenced major legislation. With almost 15 years of expertise in government contracting and government affairs, Rebecca is dedicated to helping small businesses strategically pursue federal contracts and advocating on their behalf.  This is a one of a kind interview getting some inside knowledge and information from a former GSA and GAO personnel who has gone on to start her own organization, Kite Tail Strategy. We talked about the policies and programs of the General Services Administration (GSA) Marketplace, U.S. Government Accountability Office (U.S. GAO) and The Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) compliance, requirements and many more. Tune in to this episode now with our next Giant, Rebecca Wilson Pselos.

Relationships & Revenue with John Hulen
Episode 85 Netflix for Entrepreneurs with Paul Klein

Relationships & Revenue with John Hulen

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 46:04


In today's episode, John talks with Paul Klein - co-founder and producer of BizableTV, entrepreneur, business consultant, podcaster, speaker, guitarist, husband, and dad. Paul has worked with brands like Target, Slack, Holiday Inn, Dollar General, and many more. Listen to this episode to learn more: [01:58] - How he got his start and what led him to BizableTV [05:52] - What you may give up in order to become an entrepreneur [09:41] - What his podcast looked like and why he decided to transition it [12:38] - What is BizableTV and who it is for? [17:14] - Where did the idea for BizableTV come from [24:16] - What impact Paul's significant relationships have on his business [27:32] - What Paul does to improve his significant relationships [30:00] - Entrepreneurs need balance in their lives [31:07] - Maintaining work-life harmony [33:10] - Paul's favorite guitar and favorite band [36:33] - Coupon code for listeners to get a lifetime BizableTV discount [38:00] - How someone can directly work with Paul [39:19] - One habit Paul believes every entrepreneur must have NOTABLE QUOTES: “Be your own entrepreneur within the framework of working for someone else.” "Discretionary time is more important than money because you can spend it with those you love." “The mantra of hustle for entrepreneurs is garbage. That is the quickest path to death, not only for your business but also for you physically." *Coupon Code to sign up for BizableTV = JH22 (Click here to use) **Link to free preview of BizableTV - https://bizabletv.com/zen/kd_episode_5_review_1- 048cbb  BOOK MENTIONED: Future-Proofing You: Twelve Truths for Creating Opportunity, Maximizing Wealth, and Controlling Your Destiny in an Uncertain World (https://tinyurl.com/FutureProofingYouBook) USEFUL LINKS https://bizabletv.com/  https://www.paulklein.net/  https://www.instagram.com/bizabletv  https://www.instagram.com/paulkleinTV  https://www.facebook.com/bizabletv  https://www.facebook.com/paulklein.net/?modal=admin_todo_tour  https://twitter.com/PaulKleinTV   https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoQRkgXR4ClPAub12lXgPw g CONNECT WITH JOHN  Website - https://thejohnhulen.com  Clubhouse - https://www.joinclubhouse.com/@johnhulen  Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/johnhulen  Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/johnhulen  Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/johnhulen  LinkedIn - https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnhulen  YouTube -  https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLX_NchE8lisC4NL2GciIWA  EPISODE CREDITS Intro music provided by Tony Palacios - https://www.instagram.com/tonytonedog/  Outro music provided by Jeff Scheetz - https://jeffscheetz.com/ 

Unternehmerwissen in 15 Minuten - Mit Rayk Hahne
629: Die Arbeit vor dem Erfolg mit Florian Gschwandtner

Unternehmerwissen in 15 Minuten - Mit Rayk Hahne

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 12, 2022 15:01


Das ist Folge 629 mit Gründer von Runtasitic und Investor Florian Gschwandtner. Willkommen zu Unternehmerwissen in 15 Minuten. Mein Name ist Rayk Hahne, Ex-Profisportler und Unternehmensberater.  Jede Woche bekommst Du eine sofort anwendbare Trainingseinheit, damit Du als Unternehmer noch besser wirst.  Danke das Du Die Zeit mit mir verbringst. Lass uns mit dem Training beginnen. Wenn Dir die Folge gefällt, teile Sie mit Deinen Freunden unter dem Link raykhahne.de/629. In der heutigen Folge geht es um, die Arbeit vor dem Erfolg. Welche 3 wichtigen Punkte kannst Du Dir aus dem heutigen Training mitnehmen? Wie Eltern Dich auch falsch prägen können. Was alles gegen Dich spricht. Wie Du dennoch erfolgreich wirst. Du kennst sicher jemanden für den diese Folge unglaublich wertvoll ist. Teile sie mit ihm, der Link ist raykhahne.de/629 . Bevor wir gleich mit der Folge starten, habe ich noch eine Empfehlung für Dich. Diesmal in eigener Sache. Es ist Zeit durchzustarten. Du willst Deine Arbeitszeit reduzieren und gleichzeitig Deine Gewinne steigern? Du willst wissen welche Werkzeuge die ganz großen Unternehmen anwenden, die den kleinen Unternehmen aber verborgen bleiben? Dann ist der Unternehmerkader spannend für Dich. Unter raykhahne.de/kader kannst Du Dir genau anschauen wie unser Jahresprogramm Dir dabei hilft Deinen perfekten Unternehmertag näher zu kommen. Du wirst lernen mit welchen Leistungssportlereigenschaften Du als Unternehmer noch besser wirst und damit Deine Lebensbereiche gleichmäßig steigerst. Mehr dazu unter raykhahne.de/kader Rayk: Willkommen Florian Gschwandtner! Bist Du ready für die heutige Trainingseinheit? Florian: Natürlich! Hallo! Schön, dass ich da sein darf! Rayk: Lass uns gleich starten! Was sind die drei wichtigsten Punkte, die wir über Dich wissen sollten in Bezug auf Beruf, Vergangenheit und etwas Privates? Florian: 1. Ich bin Investor und Start-up-Gründer. 2. Ich war in der Landwirtschaftsschule und mit Runtastic mein Projekt gestartet. 3. Ich liebe Sport und gehe am Wochenende gerne mal weg. Rayk: Was ist Deine spezielle Expertise? Viele kennen Dich aus den Zeiten von Runtastic. Jetzt habt ihr ein neues Thema. Was machst Du aktuell? Florian: Über die letzten zehn Jahre hinweg haben wir gesehen, wie wichtig Leadership und – wir nennen es – Twenty first Century Skills sind. Da gehören Kommunikation, Kollaboration, Achtsamkeit und ganz viele Basiselemente hinein. Wir haben dann im Unternehmen zwei Tage lang ein Leadership-Training gemacht, alle waren super aufgeregt. Was ist da passiert? Jeder war danach wieder im Daily Business und nichts ist in Wahrheit passiert. Wir sind davon überzeugt, dass im 21. Jahrhundert Führung anders aussehen muss, auch Mitarbeiterentwicklung. Auf der einen Seite sind wir old school, machen Consulting für viele Unternehmen vom Start-up über KMU bis zum Großkonzern. Dieses Lernen wollen wir in eine digitale Plattform verpacken, in eine Software. Gerade sind wir ganz am Anfang und nächstes Jahr wird die Beta-Version bzw. das MVP herauskommen. Rayk: Wenn man sich Deine Sternstunden so anschaut: Das perfekte Leben, jung, vermögend, gesund. Aber was war Deine berufliche Weltmeisterschaft, Deine größte Herausforderung? Wie hast Du diese überwunden? Florian: Ich bin auf dem Bauernhof großgeworden – als zweites von drei Kindern. Da mein Bruder nicht Bauer werden wollte, war der Reihenfolge entsprechend ich als nächster dran. Bei meinen Eltern ist das immer noch eine offene Diskussion. Sie haben mich ein bisschen dazu gezwungen, fünf Jahre in die Landwirtschaftsschule zu gehen und dort mein Abitur zu machen. Aber das war wirklich etwas, das mich null interessiert hat. Und wenn man etwas tut, bei dem man keine Passion hat, keinen Spaß hat, dann ist das schon schwierig. Ich habe, Gott sei Dank, verstanden, dass mir das Abitur helfen wird, nachher frei entscheiden zu können und zu dürfen. Ich habe das Abitur gemacht und dann Technik studiert. Software Engineering für mobile Endgeräte hat sich gut angehört, aber auch das war nicht zu 100 % meins. Ich habe nie diesen Mentor oder diese Person gehabt, die sagt, sie glaube an mich und dass ich alles richtig mache und nicht schon mit 21 alles verstehen und der Beste sein müsse. Dann habe ich mein zweites Studium gemacht. Long story short: Erst mit der Gründung von Runtastic habe ich zum ersten Mal in meinem Leben das machen dürfen, was mir wirklich Spaß gemacht hat. Diese Ausbildungen haben mir alle geholfen, der Kommunikator zwischen Technik und Wirtschaft zu sein. Das ist die Message für alle da draußen – egal, ob jung oder alt, ob Startup oder mittelständischer Betrieb: Es ist ganz wichtig, die richtigen Menschen zusammenzubringen, um zu verstehen, wie man das Potenzial herausholt. Das ist das, was ich ganz gut kann: motivieren und verstehen, wen ich miteinander verbinde. Rayk: Bei vielen ist das ja falsch geprägt und sie denken, dass man schnell mal eine App programmiert und dann hat man es im Leben geschafft. Kannst Du mit uns teilen, wie das bei Dir war? Wie viel Herzblut ist da reingegangen, wie viele schlaflosen Nächte? Florian: „Each overnight success took at least eight to ten years.” Wie oft lesen wir denn über die 99 % der Dinge, die nicht funktioniert haben? Die stehen halt nicht so in den Medien. Wie war die Zeit? Die Zeit war brutal schwer. Wir haben 2009 gestartet, gerade nach der Wirtschaftskrise und die österreichische Start-up-Szene war nicht vorhanden. Wir hatten unsere Idee, hatten unseren Businessplan geschrieben und hätten gern Risikokapital, eine Sicherung, ein Investment abgeholt – hat natürlich jeder gewusst, warum es nicht funktionieren wird. Wer soll denn jemals mit einem Smartphone laufen gehen? Es machte absolut keinen Sinn. Und jedes Nein war für mich im Kopf ein Ja mehr. Ich musste das umso mehr probieren und nicht aufgeben, nur weil andere Leute meinten, das ginge nicht. Dann war es eine intensive Zeit: Wir haben am Wochenende gearbeitet, wir haben in Österreich Apps für andere Firmen programmiert. All das Geld vom Wochenende haben wir dazu verwendet, die ersten Mitarbeiter zu bezahlen. Meine drei Gründerkollegen und ich haben die ersten 18 Monate null Euro verdient, dann in den zwei Jahren danach etwa 1.000 € brutto. Das Gute ist: Wenn Du am Tag 15 bis 18 Stunden arbeitest hast Du keine Zeit zum Geldausgeben. Nach 18 Monaten ist aus dem Kerngeschäft unser Cashflow positiv geworden. Dann haben die Leute angeklopft. Aber wir waren in der starken Lage, zu sagen, dass wir jetzt keinen brauchen. Die Zeit war tatsächlich schön, sie war aber auch brutal und von ganz viel Fleiß gesegnet, sicherlich auch mit Glück im Sinne vom richtigen Timing. Timing ist ganz entscheidend. Ich habe damals drei wunderbare Gründerkollegen gefunden. Wir haben uns in den Eigenschaften, im Tun und Sein so gut ergänzt, dass wir noch heute gute Freunde sind und gemeinsam 30 Start-up-Investments haben. Das ist wahrscheinlich das größte Glück im Leben, dass eine Freundschaft auch über den Erfolg hinaus bestehen kann. Rayk: Vielen Dank, dass Du da so transparent bist. Was ist danach passiert? Du hast die Sache letzten Endes übergeben und Dich aus der Verantwortung gezogen. Jetzt bin ich am Ziel und es war mega anstrengend. Aber was kommt denn jetzt? Florian: Alle wollen einen Marathon laufen. Dann laufen sie hin und haben nie überlegt „What next?“ und dann fallen sie in ein Loch, Depressionen und Sonstiges. Das Ende schon im Kopf haben! Mein Ende war schon immer, das Runtastic eine saubere Firma ist, die wirtschaftlich so funktioniert, dass wir alle davon leben können. Das ist ja alles noch besser ausgegangen. Wir sind Teil der Adidas Gruppe und ich hätte dort eine Rolle übernehmen können. Ich habe für mich gewusst, dass ich Unternehmer bin, der gerne Start-ups, neue Ideen vom Kopf in die reale Welt herausbringt. Ich habe meinen Ausstieg gut vorbereitet, über viele Monate, und Runtastic gut übergeben. Mir war es ganz wichtig, dass die Firma auch ohne mich funktioniert. Darum muss man gut delegieren, abgeben und bewusst ein bisschen weniger da sein. Manche Dinge laufen sogar besser. Man ist nicht unersetzbar, das sind wir alle nicht. Die Zeit danach war schon hart. Ich habe 8 Wochen Auszeit auf Hawaii gemacht und wurde nicht mehr gebraucht, musste nicht mehr alle Entscheidungen treffen. Das war eine verrückte Phase. Nun bin ich in einer neuen Position, bei der ich nicht mehr alles selbst entscheiden muss. Mir macht es viel Spaß, auch mal im Beifahrersitz sitzen und Leuten meine Erfahrung mitgeben zu dürfen. Rayk: Was dürfen wir bei Deinem neuen Thema erwarten? Was ist da so das Kernthema, das ihr vermittelt? Florian: Das Kernthema ist Leadership. Wir glauben, dass Leadership nicht nur Führungspersonen haben sollten, sondern auch Mitarbeiter*innen. Jeder sollte Zugang zu Wissen haben und jeder sollte die Chance haben, während der Woche in der Arbeitszeit auch zu lernen. Es muss ein kontinuierlicher Prozess sein. Wir denken so an ein bis zwei Stunden pro Woche und wollen die Plattform sein, die den roten Faden beim Lernen hat. Da wird es theoretische Aktivitäten geben, aber auch praktische. Du wirst Dein eigenes Profil haben. Es wäre auch spannend, wenn sich die Leute über gleiche Themen miteinander austauschen. Wir glauben einfach daran, dass die kontinuierliche Weiterbildung täglich Brot für jeden sein muss. Egal, ob Tischlerbetrieb, Start-up oder Konzern mit 60.000 Mitarbeitern. Rayk: Wie können wir mit Dir in Kontakt treten? Wie können wir mehr über diese Plattform erfahren, um Dich in Deiner Mission voranzutreiben und zu unterstützen? Florian: Über Instagram – florian.gschwandtner oder leaders21.com. Natürlich über LinkedIn – ich oder das Unternehmen. Dann gibt es noch unter leaders21 unseren Leadership-Podcast. Oder einfach über die Internetseite www.leaders21.com. Rayk: Vielen Dank, dass Du Deine Zeit und Deine Erfahrung mit uns geteilt hast. Ich freue mich auf das nächste Gespräch mit Dir. Florian: Sehr gerne!   die Shownotes zu dieser Folge findest Du unterde/629 alle Links habe ich Dir dort aufbereitet und Du kannst die Inhalte der Folge noch einmal nachlesen   Dir hat die Folge gefallen und Du konntest sofort etwas umsetzen? Dann sei ein Held für jemanden und teile diese Folge.: Erst den Podcast abonnieren unter raykhahne.de/podcast , oder folge mir bei Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn oder YouTube; denn ich bin hier, um Dich als Unternehmer noch besser zu machen. Danke das Du die Zeit mit uns verbracht hast. Das Training ist vorbei, jetzt liegt es an Dir. Viel Spaß mit der Umsetzung.  

consulting coaching mentaltraining passion man sports training leadership arbeit hawaii anfang wochenende technik darum dinge thema idee sinn zeiten medien szene rolle leben mitarbeitern mitarbeiter diskussion dank wirtschaft eltern erfolg spa plattform stunden wahrheit teile empfehlung gro welt firma nein bei leute investment investments investors nun twenty mir app software timing sie vergangenheit lass gerade diesmal position erfahrung werkzeuge eigenschaften erst prozess zugang seite freunde apps die zeit startups euro mentor brot studium leuten geld loch monaten bezug kontakt wissen bauer marathon expertise gott phase sache kommunikation unternehmen kopf meine das ende unter lage aktivit unternehmer entscheidungen ziel freundschaft florian projekt mehr beruf ideen punkte beste mvp smartphones faden firmen sinne lernen bevor herausforderung kindern achtsamkeit dein deine inhalte verantwortung umsetzung egal potenzial endes reihenfolge jeder tobias beck viele wenn du du dir tun arbeitszeit welche cashflow bruder depressionen kernthema business plan weiterbildung die arbeit bauernhof profil ausstieg wirtschaftskrise internetseite sicherung herzblut abitur kannst du bist du konzern flei privates weltmeisterschaft kollaboration wenn dir endger wochen auszeit kerngesch zeit wir software engineering kommunikator mein name leadership training kmu risikokapital deinen deinem leadership podcast daily business du deine zeit deine erfahrung das training rayk hahne unternehmertag unternehmerwissen beifahrersitz deinen freunden century skills das gute florian gschwandtner runtastic manche dinge sonstiges trainingseinheit beta version du die zeit
Leaders Create Leaders
Episode 85: Harness Your Superpower Energy For Success In 2022 Featuring Monica Adams

Leaders Create Leaders

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 39:14


How are you intentionally mastering your energy for success in the new year?In this new episode, I dive deep with my sister and energy master Monica Adams on practical strategies to embody & harness your superpower energy for success in the new year.SHOW NOTES0:00 Intro3:10 What is the sacred heart?6:00 The Importance of energy management12:40 How to honor & manage the energy of others 14:50 How to set boundaries to protect your energy21:11 How to set preferences for your energy in all areas27:10 Having difficult conversations in relationships30:40 Can anyone be an empath?32:07 Owing your power as an empath37:04 The importance of community 38:20 OutroIf you're a conscious leader or entrepreneur listening to this right now, that's confirmation that you're supposed to be receiving this message.Ready to accept the call to take this journey into the highest expansion of self-mastery and influential leadership of your life in 2022?If you're serious about being one of the most influential leaders on this planet, shoot me a DM with the word “CLM” on my Instagram @gerardadams and I'll be in touch with you asap. Take action now

21 Hats Podcast
Maybe It's Not the Marketing

21 Hats Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 43:56


This week, in episode 91, we introduce a new member of the 21 Hats Podcast team, Shawn Busse, who tells Jay Goltz and Laura Zander about an intriguing challenge he faces. Twenty-two years ago, Shawn co-founded a marketing firm called Kinesis, but now he's trying to convince clients that it takes more than just marketing. Sometimes, it's not enough just to drive more leads. Sometimes, you have to step back and take a deeper look at your business, which not every client is ready to do. In fact, it took Shawn 10 years (and the Great Recession) to do it with his own business.

The Amber Lilyestrom Show
Nicole Beurkens

The Amber Lilyestrom Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2022 61:53


If you are currently struggling with your child, no matter their age, this is the episode for you. Dr. Nicole Beurkens is a leading holistic child psychologist. She has dedicated her 25-year career to providing parents with research-based strategies that get to the root of children's attention anxiety mood and behavior challenges, so they can reach their highest potential. She runs a multidisciplinary evaluation and treatment clinic and is a bestselling author, published researcher, award winning therapist, media expert, and experienced mother of four. In this episode, we talked about some examples of challenges faced in parenthood. We also discuss the psychology and brain development of children, from birth until they are in their 20s. Join us, as we clear out the clouds of doubt that comes from mom guilt! In this Episode You'll Learn:  [5:35] The personal and professional of Dr. Nicole [11:40] Setting expectations in the right place [20:25] Opening the conversation [24:29] The process of being a dad [28:00] Disregulation, Coregulation, and Self-Regulation [37:09] Reestablishing boundaries [45:00] Regressions and growth of the development stages [50:27] Consulting with professionals [52:59] The brain and the body [55:32] Tips for the picky eater   Quotes:  “There will be a lot of really uncomfortable problematic things that will happen for your kids and with your kids in the course of their childhood years and that does not mean you are doing anything wrong that means you have a human child human brain in a human body” [14:46] “Get yourself in some individual therapy work, so that you can have the guidance you need to learn how to do this for yourself, and you get practice with that with the support of a therapist and then you become able to do that better for yourself, which means now you can do that better for your kids” [25:27] “You have different phases of development in childhood and in adulthood” [46:33]     Links Mentioned:  Contact Dr. Nicole Beurkens: Podcast: The Better Behavior Show Facebook: Nicole Beurkens Instagram: @drnicolebeurkens Website: drbeurkens.com , visit here for a free Top 10 Nutrients Guide! Text Amber at 603-931-4386, and join the community to connect through daily inspirations, and have special access to episodes and behind the scenes updates! Email us at: hello@amberlilyestrom.com  

Craft of Consulting Podcast
Consulting Case Studies That Convert—with Anfernee Chansamooth

Craft of Consulting Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 38:21


Marketing consultant and content strategist Anfernee Chansamooth reveals how to create compelling case studies and use them effectively to get more consulting clients.

Uncharted Podcast
Uncharted Podcast #112 featuring Kristi Faltorusso: Tips and Frameworks to Structuring your Customer Success Teams

Uncharted Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 26:36


Kristi Faltorusso is an award winning Customer Success Executive with experience in building, scaling and transforming Customer Success organizations at hyper-growth B2B SaaS companies. Over the past decade she has helped many companies redefine Customer Success resulting in increased retention, long term revenue growth and customer advocacy. She is currently the VP of Customer Success at ClientSuccess, a leading Customer Success Management solution, where she leads Customer Success, Technical Support and Consulting. In addition, she is also the Founder of Keeping CS Simple, a content experience, supporting the simplification of Customer Success for Executives, CS Leaders, CPSs and more. This episode is brought to you with the support of Indeed, Novo, Netsuite and Shopify. --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/uncharted1/support

Legal Mastermind Podcast
EP 138 - John Schroeder - Building Your Firm's Digital Content With A Digital Consultant

Legal Mastermind Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 10, 2022 21:37


John Schroeder is the Managing Partner of De Facto Digital Consulting which provides unbiased advice and strategy on digital marketing for lawyers and law firms. On This Episode, We Discuss...- Why Law Firms Benefit from a Digital Consultant- How Objectivity is Valuable to A Consultant- Creating Strategies to Retain Visitors on Your Firm's Digital Platform

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner
Dr. Paul White: The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace

The POZCAST: Career & Life Journeys with Adam Posner

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 9, 2022 37:27


2:16 - Path to Christian Education3:40 -  Current Generation getting into Workplace4:30 - Instant Gratification6:25 - Early Work Experience/ Early Mistake7:40 - Definition of Family Business8:44 - Challenges of Succession10:25 - Love Appreciation vs. Work place Appreciation11:32 - Learning about Book Writing12:54 - Who is the book for13:56 -Feeling of Recognition15:34 - Genuine Care18:08 - Generational differences21:15 - Universal Boundaries23:23 - Written Communication / Digital Boundaries/ Different Perspective24:47 - Empathy26:05 - Introverts26:44 - Challenges of Consulting in a Large Company27:56 - Personal Feedback28:36 - Definition of Culture30:21 - Advice on Buying the book34:15 - Professional Accomplishment35:33 - Dr. Paul's North Star 

Be In Demand
79. Lisa Bloom and Business Storytelling To Sell and Get Known Easier

Be In Demand

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2022 34:13


Once upon a time…..you won't believe what happened to me...I was working with this client…. Stories are all around us and can draw in your audience and prospective client with a few lines. Not only are our brains hardwired for stories, they help your listener picture exactly what you're sharing. Maybe stories should be part of your customer experience. Today's storytelling expert and guest will tell us more. Lisa Bloom, founder of Story Coach, works with organizations developing leaders, creative yet resilient cultures, and leading powerful change processes with the power of storytelling. She works with entrepreneurs and business owners to help them find confidence, attract ideal clients, and find their success story.  And she trains coaches to use storytelling as a powerful approach to impact their clients and grow their business.    Lisa is a professional Storyteller, accredited Coach, Author, Mentor and Leadership expert. Her ground-breaking techniques have enabled her to grow her business and take to the stage where she speaks internationally about this approach to business, leadership and coaching.   Here's a snapshot of our conversation: Stories are all around you in the everyday moments of your life. Why stories (plural) need to be part of your everyday content and sales process. How Lisa got into and felt at home the moment she walked into a storytelling workshop, which changed her life. PLUS, you can snag a free Kindle version of her NEW book during the launch in early January 2022. Join her FREE BOOTCAMP this week! To learn more about the guest on this episode: Website: www.Story-Coach.com   Links and resources mentioned in this episode: Get on the waitlist to write a signature speech you'll be proud delivering!  Grab the FREE resource Go from Unknown to Visible. Follow me on Instagram: @laurieann.murabito For more about me and what I do, check out my website. If you're looking for support to grow your business faster, get fully booked and profitable, schedule a call to explore if you'd be a good fit for one of my coaching programs.   Thank you for listening!

The Marketing Book Podcast
365 CMO to CRO by Rolly Keenan

The Marketing Book Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 74:45


CMO to CRO: The Revenue Takeover by the Next Generation Executive by Mike Geller, Rolly Keenan, and Brandi Starr About the Book: As your company's chief marketing officer, you're responsible for your organization's growth and reputation—but you don't have enough control. Your organization works in departmental silos, with functional leaders pushing their own solutions and feeling satisfied with functional KPIs. But the kind of exponential growth that creates unstoppable momentum requires your customer-facing departments to fight for the customer instead of their own departmental wins. You're not the only one who notices—but you are the only one in the perfect position to do something about it. Discover how to reach your potential and stand out as more than a marketing professional. In CMO to CRO, industry experts Brandi Starr, Mike Geller, and Rolly Keenan show you how to bring revenue to the forefront and make every team's number one objective a seamless customer experience. You'll learn how to create consistency by reorganizing your business, following the customer, prioritizing revenue, and using CX technology to succeed where your competition fails. This book presents a revolutionary approach to not only unite the silos but position you as an innovative leader and finally uncover what CX is really about: revenue growth. About the Author: Rolly Keenan has more than 20 years of experience in Enterprise software Consulting and marketing strategy and is the Chief Revenue Officer of Tegrita, a full-service marketing technology consulting firm. He is a graduate of Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management. And interesting facts – Rolly is a trained hostage negotiator, and before getting into the business of marketing, technology, and revenue, Rolly was on staff at USA Volleyball in Colorado Springs, working with the best volleyball teams in the country! Click here for this episode's website page with the links mentioned during the interview... https://www.salesartillery.com/marketing-book-podcast/cmo-cro-rolly-keenan