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Private research university in Illinois, United States

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Latest podcast episodes about Northwestern University

The KORE Women Podcast
Professional Certified Coach, Author of ”Red Cape Rescue: Save Your Career Without Leaving Your Job,” Keynote Speaker, and Workshop Facilitator - Darcy Eikenberg

The KORE Women Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 26, 2021 23:27


This week on the KORE Women podcast Dr. Summer Watson speaks with Darcy Eikenberg, who is a professional certified coach, Author of "Red Cape Rescue: Save Your Career Without Leaving Your Job,” Private Coach to Leaders & High Performing Teams, Keynote Speaker, and Workshop Facilitator for Companies & Professional Associations. Like many of us in the working world today, Darcy Eikenberg wears a lot of hats. She's been an executive coach to leaders at organizations such as The Coca-Cola Company, Microsoft, State Farm, Deloitte Consulting, and more. She consults and speaks about career growth, employee engagement, and leadership development all over the world, and shares career and workplace strategies regularly at RedCapeRevolution.com. Her ideas have been shared in the Harvard Business Review, Thrive Global, CNN.com. The Ladders, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and Forbes, among others. Darcy is an International Coaching Federation (ICF) Professional Certified Coach (or PCC), former principal and communication consulting business leader at Hewitt Associates (now part of Alight Solutions) and graduated from Northwestern University. Darcy brings a sense of encouragement and humor to serious matters in our work and careers, and offers simple, practical ways we can transform our lives at work, right where we are, right now. To connect with Darcy Eikenberg go to: Darcy@RedCapeRevolution.com or find her on LinkedIn. Her book, "Red Cape Rescue: Save Your Career Without Leaving Your Job” can be found on Amazon, Target and other retailers.  Thank you for taking the time to listen to the KORE Women podcast and being a part of the KORE Women experience. You can listen to The KORE Women podcast on your favorite podcast directory - Pandora, iHeartRadio, Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, YouTube, Spotify, Stitcher, Podbean, and at: www.KOREWomen.com/podcast. Please leave your comments and reviews about the podcast and check out KORE Women on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook. You can also learn more about Dr. Summer Watson and KORE Women at: www.korewomen.com

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Positioning for Longevity in the Investment World | End of Decades-Long Bull Market in Bonds?

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 24, 2021 55:40


In this episode, co-hosts Elliot Turner, Phil Ordway, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) positioning for longevity in the investment world; and (ii) whether we are near the end of the decades-long bull market in bonds. Enjoy the conversation!   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.   The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.

Blue Dot
Blue Dot 233: The Sonic Mind: A Conversation with Neuroscientist Nina Kraus

Blue Dot

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 52:17


Host Dave Schlom visits Northwestern University neuroscientist Nina Kraus to chat about her work on the science of sound and its importance to our brains.

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick
Derek Thompson and Christian Finnegan Episode 460

Stand Up! with Pete Dominick

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 67:30


Stand Up is a daily podcast. I book,host,edit, post and promote new episodes with brilliant guests every day. Please subscribe now for as little as 5$ and gain access to a community of over 800 awesome, curious, kind, funny, brilliant, generous souls Check out StandUpwithPete.com to learn more Derek Thompson is a senior editor at The Atlantic magazine and a weekly news analyst for NPR's "Here and Now." We talked about his latest pieces at The Atlantic. He was born in McLean, Va., in 1986, and he graduated from Northwestern University, in 2008, with a triple major in journalism, political science, and legal studies.  In 2015, he wrote the cover story "A World Without Work" about the future of jobs and technology. "Hit Makers," his first book on the secret histories of pop culture hits and the science of popularity, came out in February 2017. He has appeared on Forbes' "30 Under 30" list and Time's "140 Best Twitter Feeds." I always love talking to him.  The Great Resignation Is Accelerating A lasting effect of this pandemic will be a revolution in worker expectations. America Is Running Out of Everything ----------------------------------------------  Christian Finnegan  is an American stand-up comedian, writer and actor based in New York City.   BUY HIS NEW ALBUM--- "Show Your Work: Live at QED"   Finnegan is perhaps best known as one of the original panelists on VH1's Best Week Ever and as Chad, the only white roommate in the “Mad Real World” sketch on Comedy Central's Chappelle's Show. Additional television appearances as himself or performing stand up have included “Conan”, “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson”, "Would You Rather...with Graham Norton", “Good Afternoon America” and multiple times on The Today Show and Countdown with Keith Olbermann, and on History's I Love the 1880s. He hosted TV Land's game show "Game Time". As an actor, Finnegan portrayed the supporting role of "Carl" in the film Eden Court, a ticket agent in "Knight and Day" and several guest roles including a talk show host on "The Good Wife". In October 2006, Finnegan's debut stand up comedy CD titled Two For Flinching was released by Comedy Central Records, with a follow-up national tour of college campuses from January to April 2007. “Au Contraire!” was released by Warner Bros. Records in 2009. His third special "The Fun Part" was filmed at the Wilbur Theatre in Boston on April 4, 2013 and debuted on Netflix on April 15, 2014. Check out all things Jon Carroll Follow and Support Pete Coe Pete on YouTube Pete on Twitter Pete On Instagram Pete Personal FB page Stand Up with Pete FB page      

The Dissenter
#537 Christopher Kuzawa: Developmental Plasticity, Life History, and Epigenetics

The Dissenter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 56:41


------------------Support the channel------------ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/thedissenter SubscribeStar: https://www.subscribestar.com/the-dissenter PayPal: paypal.me/thedissenter PayPal Subscription 1 Dollar: https://tinyurl.com/yb3acuuy PayPal Subscription 3 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ybn6bg9l PayPal Subscription 5 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/ycmr9gpz PayPal Subscription 10 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y9r3fc9m PayPal Subscription 20 Dollars: https://tinyurl.com/y95uvkao This show is sponsored by Enlites, Learning & Development done differently. Check the website here: http://enlites.com/ Dr. Christopher Kuzawa is Professor of Anthropology and Faculty Fellow at the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University. He uses principles from anthropology and evolutionary biology to gain insights into the biological and health impacts of human developmental plasticity. His primary field research is conducted in Cebu, the Philippines, where he works with a large birth cohort study that enrolled more than 3,000 pregnant women in 1983 and has since followed their offspring into adulthood (now 30 years old). He uses the nearly 3 decades of data available for each study participant, and recruitment of generation 3 (the grandoffspring of the original mothers), to gain a better understanding of the long-term and intergenerational impacts of early life environments on adult biology, life history, reproduction, and health. In this episode, we talk about developmental plasticity and epigenetics. The topics covered include: early life environments and their health impacts; brain evolution and life history; longitudinal health studies done in the Philippines; human epigenetics; and the extended evolutionary synthesis. -- A HUGE THANK YOU TO MY PATRONS/SUPPORTERS: KARIN LIETZCKE, ANN BLANCHETTE, PER HELGE LARSEN, LAU GUERREIRO, JERRY MULLER, HANS FREDRIK SUNDE, BERNARDO SEIXAS, HERBERT GINTIS, RUTGER VOS, RICARDO VLADIMIRO, CRAIG HEALY, OLAF ALEX, PHILIP KURIAN, JONATHAN VISSER, JAKOB KLINKBY, ADAM KESSEL, MATTHEW WHITINGBIRD, ARNAUD WOLFF, TIM HOLLOSY, HENRIK AHLENIUS, JOHN CONNORS, PAULINA BARREN, FILIP FORS CONNOLLY, DAN DEMETRIOU, ROBERT WINDHAGER, RUI INACIO, ARTHUR KOH, ZOOP, MARCO NEVES, COLIN HOLBROOK, SUSAN PINKER, PABLO SANTURBANO, SIMON COLUMBUS, PHIL KAVANAGH, JORGE ESPINHA, CORY CLARK, MARK BLYTH, ROBERTO INGUANZO, MIKKEL STORMYR, ERIC NEURMANN, SAMUEL ANDREEFF, FRANCIS FORDE, TIAGO NUNES, BERNARD HUGUENEY, ALEXANDER DANNBAUER, FERGAL CUSSEN, YEVHEN BODRENKO, HAL HERZOG, NUNO MACHADO, DON ROSS, JONATHAN LEIBRANT, JOÃO LINHARES, OZLEM BULUT, NATHAN NGUYEN, STANTON T, SAMUEL CORREA, ERIK HAINES, MARK SMITH, J.W., JOÃO EIRA, TOM HUMMEL, SARDUS FRANCE, DAVID SLOAN WILSON, YACILA DEZA-ARAUJO, IDAN SOLON, ROMAIN ROCH, DMITRY GRIGORYEV, TOM ROTH, DIEGO LONDOÑO CORREA, YANICK PUNTER, ADANER USMANI, CHARLOTTE BLEASE, NICOLE BARBARO, ADAM HUNT, PAWEL OSTASZEWSKI, AL ORTIZ, NELLEKE BAK, KATHRINE AND PATRICK TOBIN, GUY MADISON, GARY G HELLMANN, SAIMA AFZAL, ADRIAN JAEGGI, NICK GOLDEN, PAULO TOLENTINO, JOÃO BARBOSA, JULIAN PRICE, EDWARD HALL, HEDIN BRØNNER, DOUGLAS P. FRY, FRANCA BORTOLOTTI, GABRIEL PONS CORTÈS, AND URSULA LITZCKE! A SPECIAL THANKS TO MY PRODUCERS, YZAR WEHBE, JIM FRANK, ŁUKASZ STAFINIAK, IAN GILLIGAN, LUIS CAYETANO, TOM VANEGDOM, CURTIS DIXON, BENEDIKT MUELLER, VEGA GIDEY, AND THOMAS TRUMBLE! AND TO MY EXECUTIVE PRODUCERS, MICHAL RUSIECKI, ROSEY, JAMES PRATT, MATTHEW LAVENDER, SERGIU CODREANU, AND BOGDAN KANIVETS!

Discover CircRes
October 2021 Discover CircRes

Discover CircRes

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 30:54


This month on Episode 29 of Discover CircRes, host Cynthia St. Hilaire highlights four original research articles featured in the September 17th and October 1st issues of Circulation Research. This episode also features conversations with BCVS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award finalists, Dr Jiangbin Wu from the University of Rochester, Dr Chen Gao from UCLA, and Dr Chris Toepfer from Oxford University.   Article highlights:   Raftrey, et al. Dach1 Extends Arteries and Is Cardioprotective   Zhang, et al. Blood Inflammatory Exosomes and Stroke Outcome   Joyce, et al. Cardiovascular Health and Epigenetic Age   Liu, et al. Wls Suppresses Fibrosis in Heart Regeneration   Cindy St. Hilaire:        Hi, and welcome to Discover CircRes, the podcast of the American Heart Association's journal, Circulation Research. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire from the Vascular Medicine Institute at the University of Pittsburgh. And today, I'll be highlighting articles presented in our September 17th and October 1st issues of Circulation Research. I also am going to speak with the BCVS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award finalists, Dr Jiangbin Wu from the University of Rochester, Dr Chen Gao from UCLA, and Dr Chris Toepfer from Oxford University. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The first article I want to share is titled, Dach1 Extends Artery Networks and Protects Against Cardiac Injury. The first author is Brian Raftrey, and the corresponding author is Kristy Red-Horse from Stanford University. Coronary artery disease occurs when blood vessels supplying the heart develop atherosclerotic plaques that limit blood flow, which prevents oxygen and nutrients from reaching the cardiac tissue and often leads to a heart attack or cardiac arrest. The suggested strategy for treating coronary artery disease is to promote the growth of new blood vessels to compensate for the dysfunctional ones. Several factors are known to control coronary blood vessel development, including the transcription factor, DACH1. In mice lacking DACH1, embryonic coronary artery development is stunted. But whether increasing DACH1 protein levels boosts heart vessel development, and whether this would work in mirroring coronary arteries, were unanswered questions. Cindy St. Hilaire:        This group engineered inducible gain-of-function DACH1 mice and found that DACH1 over expression in the embryo boosted coronary artery development. The team then used the same model to induce DACH1 in adult mice for six weeks. While there was no apparent differences in the artery growth between the animals and the controls under normal conditions, after myocardial infarction, the mice over expressing DACH1 had better recovery and survival with increased artery growth and heart function. The results paved the way for studying the mechanisms of DACH1-mediated protection, and how they might be leveraged as potential coronary artery disease treatments. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The second article I want to share is titled Circulating Pro-Inflammatory Exosomes Worsen Stroke Outcomes in Aging. The first author is Hongxia Zhang, and the corresponding author is Kunlin Jin from University of North Texas Health Science Center. Aging is associated with declining tissue function and an assortment of health issues. But in rodents at least, certain factors, including the plasma of youthful animals and the exosomes of stem cells, can have rejuvenating effects on old animals. Exosomes are small membrane-bound particles containing cellular contents that circulate in the blood after they're released from cells. This group has shown that as rats age, the animals' serum exosomes accumulate pro-inflammatory mediators, such as C3a and C3b. Cindy St. Hilaire:        When these aged rats were subjected to stroke, and then injected with serum exosomes isolated from either old or young rats, those receiving youthful exosomes fared much better in terms of infarct size and sensory motor deficits, while those receiving aged exosomes fared worse. The team went on to show that injected exosomes accumulate at the site of stroke injury, but those from old donors caused more neuronal damage, as seen by reduced synaptic function. Preventing C3a activity on microglia reversed the effects of the old exosomes and improved stroke outcome, suggesting that such modulation of inflammatory molecules might be a treatment strategy for stroke. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The next article I want to share is titled Epigenetic Age Acceleration Reflects Long-Term Cardiovascular Health. The first author is Brian Joyce, and the corresponding author is Donald Lloyd-Jones. And they're from Northwestern University. DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that regulates gene transcription. Studies of young and old individuals have shown that at certain locations in the genome, methylation status is highly correlated with age. These methylation patterns are also linked to measures of cardiovascular health, including blood pressure, cholesterol level and body mass index. This suggests that if a person has particularly good or particularly poor cardiovascular health, their DNA may appear younger or older than the individual's actual age. Cindy St. Hilaire:        This group tested the hypothesis that people with poor cardiovascular health exhibit methylation changes more commonly found in elderly individuals than those with good cardiovascular health. And if so, DNA methylation patterns might be useful for predicting future cardiovascular risk. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The team examined DNA methylation of over a thousand individuals enrolled in a prospective heart health cohort, testing them around age 40 and then again at around age 45. Changes in methylation status were then compared to individuals' cardiovascular health scores over a longer period. Sure enough, faster epigenetic changes did correlate with poor cardiovascular health later in life. Data from the second cohort of individuals supported the initial findings. This study indicates that DNA methylation status may be an early biomarker that signals cardiovascular issues, and may therefore allow for prompt implementation of treatment and prevention strategies. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The last article I want to share is titled, Yap Promotes Noncanonical Wnt Signaling from Cardiomyocytes for Heart Regeneration. The first author is Shijie Liu, and the corresponding author is James Martin. And they're from Baylor College of Medicine. After a heart attack, cardiomyocytes are destroyed and replaced with a fibrotic scar that interferes with the contractile function of the heart. While adult mouse and human hearts are similar in this regard, the hearts of newborn mice possess greater regenerative capacity, and this regeneration capacity persists for approximately one week. The transcription factor YAP is known to regulate regenerative processes in neonatal hearts of mice. And its deletion eliminates regeneration, and its over-activation in adult cardiomyocytes reduces fibrosis. Cindy St. Hilaire:        These experiments suggest cardiomyocytes transmit signals to cardiac fibroblasts. Wntless protein regulates the release of Wnt signaling molecules and also is a target of YAP. Mice that lack Wntless in their cardiomyocytes appear to have normal heart development and function. However, their neonatal regenerative capacity was impaired. In the weeks after heart injury, the mice that lack Wntless had reduced heart function, increased scar size and increased numbers of activated cardiac fibroblasts compared with that seen in controls. The study indicates that Wntless is critical to the regeneration of cardiac tissue, and may perhaps be leveraged to minimize scarring after heart attacks. Cindy St. Hilaire:        I'm really excited to have with me today the three finalists of the BCVS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award. The first person I'm going to be speaking with is Jiangbin Wu, who is a research assistant professor at the Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute at the University of Rochester. Thank you so much for joining me today. Jiangbin Wu:               Thank you. Cindy St. Hilaire:        And congratulations, actually. I know this is a highly competitive award that gets a lot of applications, so congrats on becoming a finalist. Before we get to your abstract, which is related to mitochondria and calcium influx in cardiomyocytes, I was wondering if you could share a bit about yourself. Maybe what your research path was, and what brought you to study cardiomyocytes and the mitochondria that are within them? Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah. Right now, I'm an assitant professor at Cardiovascular Research Institute of University of Rochester. Previous, I was actually studying in the cancer field and also some kind of mitochondria work in some cancer cells. Although when I came to the University of Rochester and I switched to cardiovascular and then we are working on a kind of microRNA[at the initial. The way we screen for these is just by doing the RNA-Seq is target the microRNA. and then we start to study the function of these genes, and found that it's a mitochondria calcium channel regulator. Cindy St. Hilaire:        The title of your abstract is FAM210A Maintains Cardiac Mitochondrial Homeostasis Through Regulating LETM1-Dependent Calcium Efflux. So before we unpack what all those words in the abstract title mean, could you tell me how you ended up focusing on FAM210A? What does this protein do, and why'd you focus on it? Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah. As I mentioned that we just gathered this protein actually is by some kind of chance as a microRNA target. And this protein full name is family with similarity 210 A, actually is a family of proteins. This is just one of them. And the way discover is localized in mitochondria in the membrane. And also, there is some other people's report is in mitochondria. And we want to sort out its function inside the mitochondria and in the cardiac background. So we do some kind of omics or mass spec to get its interlocking interacting proteins. And then we found LETM1. It's a calcium channel inside the mitochondria in the membrane. So we figured out is, this FAM210 protein regulate LETM1 function in calcium, pump calcium is part of the mitochondria matrix. And I think this is a very important, because calcium overload is always happening in the very heart of the cardiomyocytes. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's a perfect segue, because my next question was really what is the gap in knowledge that your study was trying to address? Were you really focused on just the function of this one protein, or what was the greater goal of this study? Jiangbin Wu:               Actually, the function this protein is the initial step. Our final aim is to use this protein, to over expression this protein in the heart failure patient or in some kind of heart failure models to do the, sort of do the work in some heart failure patients. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Maybe a gene therapy approach, or if there's a pharmacological way to up regulate this protein? Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah, because we've proposed that the self expression of this proteins will reduce the calcium overloading cardiomyocytes, which is a major cause for the cardiomyocytes death in heart failure process. So over expression will reduce this kind of process. And then it will make the cardiomyocytes survival in the failure heart. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That is interesting. I mean, obviously you were using a mouse knockout model, so you know what's driving the expression down in that case. But in humans, what do we know about the regulation of this protein? Is anything known, or any known causes that cause its reduction in expression? Jiangbin Wu:               Actually, we do. Its expression in heart failure is slightly increased in heart failure. So we feel it's a kind of some kind of compensating effect to try to save the heart from failing. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Interesting. It's just not turned on early enough, in that case then. Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah. And for the regulating protein for this one, I think we find microRNA can suppress its expression, but not too many other influences on these regulator proteins. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That is so interesting. So what's next? What are you going to do next on this project? Jiangbin Wu:               Yeah. I think currently, we are just at the start to do some kind of therapeutic effect that use to these proteins. I think we will do more deep in the therapeutic effects for over expression of these genes in... Currently, we are working on mouse models. Maybe in different heart failure models to prove that it's very benefiting to the heart failure patients. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Wonderful. Well, congratulations on an excellent study. Really looking forward to your presentation, which is coming up shortly, and really looking forward to your future research in this field. Jiangbin Wu:               Okay, thank you. Cindy St. Hilaire:        So I also have with me, Dr Chris Toepfer, who's another finalist for the BCVBS outstanding early career investigator award. He's a principal investigator from the University of Oxford, and his abstract is titled, Defining Diverse Disease Pathway Mechanisms Across Thick And Thin Filament, Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Variance. So congratulations, Chris, and thank you for joining me today. Chris Toepfer:             Thank you very much. It's great to be here. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Before we start to discuss your abstract, I was wondering if you could just share a little bit about yourself. Maybe your career path, and how you came to study hypertrophic cardiomyopathy? Chris Toepfer:             Yeah, sure. I guess this story gets longer and longer every time somebody asks it,right, in your career? Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's a good thing. Chris Toepfer:             Yeah. I started out as an undergraduate in London, and actually during the second year of my undergraduate degree, I fell into a lab kind of out of interest. It was starting to study cardiac muscle mechanics. And that was the lab of Professor Michael Ferenczy. And ended up, after I finished my undergraduate degree, I joined him for a PhD. I had a PhD program that also took me overseas to the NIH to work with Dr James Sellers, who was a muscle motor protein biochemist. And we really, I sort of really fell in love, with the idea of studying disease of multiple levels, and understanding how the heart would function from the basic molecule up to the entire organ and looking at different systems in between. Chris Toepfer:             And that's what led me to then, so my postdoctoral position to seek out a completely different direction in some ways, but something that could also extend how we could look at the heart. And that's where I moved to Boston to work with Christine and Jonathan Seidman. I'm looking at more of the genetic basis then of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy rather than just, sort of more diffusely the mechanisms underlying cardiac muscle contraction. And then two years ago, I moved back to the UK to Oxford to sets up my own group, which has been fun during the pandemic as you can imagine. Cindy St. Hilaire:        It's hard enough starting up a lab under normal times. I can't imagine doing it during a pandemic. Chris Toepfer:             And we are now completely focused on stem cell models and CRISPR CAS engineering, and trying to understand hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a dish. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's wonderful. And actually I looked at your CV. We actually overlapped a little bit. I was doing my postdoc at NIH in the NHLBI while you were there for your graduate school. So I too fell in love with kind of the starting with the human as the model path of research. So maybe you can  kind of fill in all the listeners in who aren't cardiomyopathy experts. So what is, I guess, in a nutshell, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and what gap in knowledge was your study specifically addressing? Chris Toepfer:             So in general, about one in 500 people have hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. And for those that are genetically linked, a lot of them are in the key contractile proteins of the heart, the drive muscle contraction. And what you often see in those people is they have thickened hearts. And what happens is actually the heart begins to be too hard, and it actually relaxes very poorly in between beats. Chris Toepfer:             So what we are really trying to understand in this disease and with this abstract was how are different forms of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy created? Because it can be a couple of different forms. There are different proteins involved that have very vastly different functional mechanisms within the cell. So would this, we went away, we generated some stem cell models where we could then differentiate into cardiomyocytes. Model the disease in a dish. And we made kind of a group of good methods to go and look at what was happening inside the cells. And then we could screen drugs against what's happening inside those cells, so that was kind of the idea of what we were looking at, at the time. And what's fallen out of all of that is a drug now called Melacamptin that's starting to get to the clinic, which addresses some of these underlying mechanisms we were beginning to study. So that's what I'll talk about a bit later on in our session today. Cindy St. Hilaire:        It's great. One of the things you focused on in the abstract is comparing these thick and thin filament variants. What are the implications of those, I guess, in the human disease state, but also in how you could design or use your stem cells as a model, and were any of the results that you found surprising? Chris Toepfer:             So I think what was the really key finding that we saw was that the thick filament variants seemed to be switching myosin, which is a molecular motor that drives cardiac muscle contraction very much to arm”ON”. And my sort of analogy to that is they're all very sort of bodybuilder like. Myosin switched on, ready to go to work causing way too much contraction. And the compound that we were using at the time Myocamptin, we could turn those off and resolve the disease. Whereas with the thin filament variants, they were operating through a completely different mechanism. And when we tried to treat them with the same compound, they wouldn't always salvage disease. So though the face of it, they look the same in the dish, in that they contracted too much, relaxed very poorly. You're clearly doing it via complete different mechanism. And that's what we're starting to dig into now. And that's what we'll be talking about. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah. And that's actually kind of the question I was going to finish up with you. What are the, I guess translational implications? No, yes. You're using this drug. Is that only good for thick filament-like variants? And are you going to be able to screen patients to tell which variant they have, and therefore if this or that drug might be useful? Chris Toepfer:             So we're in a real golden age now for genomics where I guess patients can come into the clinic and they can be sequenced and you could maybe tell them now what might be the underlying cause of their disease. I am not a clinician, but what we, as a basic scientist can say is, well, we can go away and try and understand whether this variant you may have in your genome is causative of disease. And if it is what mechanism that may fall under, what may be causing them to have this phenotype? Chris Toepfer:             And I think what we can do is we can try and then bin the subpopulations of variants, and try and find novel drugs or novel pathways that we could try and find drugs for to treat the disease, and to differentiate them from each other. So I think it's too early to say whether Mylocamptin will be able to sort this for everybody, I guess we will find out in the next years. But I think already we can start thinking about, well, what would be the next step after this? We can bring precision medicine even further. And that's, I think the goal where we're heading towards. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Well, that's wonderful, and this is a wonderful abstract. I'm really looking forward to seeing the full study and your presentation later on. And thank you so much for joining. Chris Toepfer:             No. Yeah. Thank you for having me. I'm really looking forward to it later on. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Great. Dr Chen Gaol is the third finalist for the BCBS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award. She's an assistant researcher at UCLA, and her abstract is titled, Functional Impact of RBFox1C in Cardiac, Pathological Remodeling through Targeted MRNA Stability Regulation. So congratulations, and thank you so much for joining me today. Chen Gal:                    Absolutely, thank you for having me. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Before we jump into your abstract, could you share with us a little bit about your career path, and how you came to study the role of RNA binding proteins, I guess specifically in pathological cardiac remodeling? Chen Gal:                    Yes, I think my research over the years has been into the very basic questions, which is I'm interested in looking at how the RNA is being regulated. For example, how the RNA is being spliced, is being ideated, and how the RNA is being degraded if it's ever been translated into protein. And the second half of my research is of course, physiological driven, because I'm interested in different type of cardiac disease, starting from the traditional heart attack to the now more emerging medical need, which is the cardiometabolic disease. So I was trained as a molecular biologist. I started in molecular biology Institute at UCLA. My PhD supervisor is Dr Yibin Wang, who first introduced me to understand there is actually a whole new world of R regulation at a post-transcription level. Chen Gal:                    So at that time we basically utilized the R sequencing. Just look for the easiest to heart, and try to understand how these RNA are differentially spliced in the heart. And I was so interested in understanding more about a cardiology. So I decided, even if I move out to my postdoc research I still want to continue working in the heart, although at a totally different angle. And that is when I started to really try to understand different aspects of RNA regulation. So now I am starting to be a junior faculty, establishing my own lab. And I really wanted to understand more how different steps of our metabolism is regulated. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Really timely research. And I really like how you are doing a great job combining extremely basic biochemical processes with advanced disease states. An extra, that's why this abstract made it as a finalist. So congrats on that. So your study was focused on the RNA binding protein, RB Fox one, which has several isoforms. And so can you tell us which isoform you were looking at, and why you were interested in that particular isoform? Chen Gal:                    Yes, actually I've studied about ISO form of RPFox1. It itself, is actually subject to alternative splicing, while generating one nuclear, and another simosolic isoform. Where I was a PhD student, I was very simple minded, just trying to screen for the R binding protein that actually is expressed in the diseased heart. So RBFox1 is at least at a transcriptional level, the only one that we identify to be to decreased in the fatal heart. The nuclear function, the nucelo ISO form of RPFox1 is mainly regulating alternative splicing. But it is when I was studying this nuclear function of the RBFox1, I identified there is actually another isoform where she is in the set ourselves based on the different of c terminal domains of the RFox1. So I was just wondering, apparently you shouldn't be regulating and splicing anymore. I just move on to another layer of RA regulation. And then what I found most interesting is these RBFox1 is regulating the R stability, which is something that we'll talking about later today. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's great. So to do this study, you actually created a new knockout mouse model where you specifically deleted this one C isoform. What was kind of the baseline and maybe the disease state phenotypes that you saw in that mouse? Chen Gal:                    The result and phenotype so far is very striking. We utilize the CAS nine CRISPR technology simply because for, we were lucky the settle the Fox warehouse, one extra axon. So that does allow us to coach the lox P side, just blanking in that particular AXA. And in theory we could across it with different CRE, and to generate either cardiac or different tissue, specifically knock out. Even at a baseline we see a decreased cardiac function when we inactivate this isoform in the adult heart. And when we look at the gene expression profile is, I call mind-blowing type of experience, because turns out this gene not only is regulating some of the inflammatory genes, but also is helping involve protein translation and delivery metabolism, which I hope in the future will set us on the path to really understand the role of this RP Fox1. Not only into HFpEF, but also in the cardiometabolic disorder. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah, that's great. It's so rewarding when you do this one really big kind of risky experiment, and it turns into not just one interesting path to study, but multiple. One of the things that you mentioned in the abstract is clip seek. I was wondering if you could tell us a little bit about this technology, and how you used it in your study? Chen Gal:                    Yeah. I think one of the rewarding parts for me focusing on the R metabolism is really driving different accounting and sequencing tools, and utilize that in the heart. So cardiomyocyte has been traditionally viewed now to be very easy to work with type of model comparing helo cells, right? And I think in the field, we are still so short of knowledge, what type of the cutting-edge tools that we can use in the heart. My research involved clip seek, which is to use UV crosslinking the RNA with the R binding protein. So that will allow us to understand which are the RNA targets that are directly interacting with the RNA binding protein. I'm also using great seek, which is to find dynamically label the recency size to RNA. And that will allow us to look forward to RA degradation profile at a global level in the baseline or under disease. So I thought those are really cool technologies, and that's something that makes me excited about my work on a daily basis. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Yeah, that's wonderful. So what's next? What are you going to do after this initial study? What's the next question you're going to go after? Chen Gal:                    Yeah, like I mentioned, I'm interested in, honestly, different type of heart disease, not just the stress induced heart failure, but also the recent years, I started to branch out a little bit to understand more of the biology of HFpEF. For example, how the R binding protein that we are studying right now is playing a role in the development of HFpEF. Or we actually understand very little about them, the micromechanism for HFpEF development, right. What are the RNA splicing profile in the cardio metabolic disorder on account? We also find differential regulation of R stability in the HfPEF compared to the HFpEF compared to the HFrEF. So I thought those are really interesting questions that I would like to pursue in the future. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's great and best of luck in those future studies. Chen Gal:                    Thank you. Cindy St. Hilaire:        Before we leave, I was wondering if you could share with us any advice that you would give to a trainee, maybe something that you wish you knew ahead of time in this kind of early career stage. Chen Gal:                    I consider myself a really, really lucky person. And if I have one word to give to the younger people, younger than me, is to find great mentors for your career. And luckily our field has a lot of good mentors who are ready to help us every single step of our career. For example, my PhD supervisor, Dr Wang. And I have met a lot of good mentors inside and outside of UCLA. I'm pretty sure this is the same thing for Chris, who is trained by Dr Seidman, and everybody know how great a mentor she is. So I think having a great mentor will help you every step of your career development to making sure you're always on the right track. And that, that is also something that you will do when we have our own lab, because we want to be great mentors for our trainees as well. Cindy St. Hilaire:        I know. That's something I strive for too, is to emulate my amazing mentors that I've had. What do you think is a good quality for a good mentor? Like what's one of the, I guess key features that you look for in someone that you would like to be your mentor? Chen Gal:                    For me, I think my mentors are all cheerleaders. They never try to push me to move out one career path versus the other. They are good listeners, and they are also my role models. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's wonderful. Chris, what's a piece of advice that you would like to share with trainees that your former self wish you knew of? Chris Toepfer:             I think it's very important to echo the message of a good mentorship, and a good lab environment that allows you to flourish and really helps you to grow yourself to the future. And also helps you understand the bits of you that you could actually grow as well, a little bit better. So you become a more rounded scientist. I think something that's really important or something that I've always found very infectious is to find mentorship and mentors that are also incredibly enthusiastic about you as an individual, as well as the science. I think that that can really drive you. And I think that's also an important thing to have in yourself, to have, to find that question for yourself that really drives you and you can be really enthusiastic about. Cindy St. Hilaire:        I totally agree. Well, thank you again for joining me today. Congratulations on being a finalist, and I wish everyone the best of luck in their presentations later on at BCBS. Chen Gal:                    Thank you so much. Jiangbin Wu:               Thank you. Chris Toepfer:             Thank you very much. Cindy St. Hilaire:        That's it for the highlights from the September 17th and October 1st issues of Circulation Research. Thank you for listening. Please check out the CircRes Facebook page, and follow us on Twitter and Instagram with the handle  @CircRes and #Discover CircRes. Thank you to our guests, BCBS Outstanding Early Career Investigator Award Finalists, Dr Jaobing Wu, Dr Chen Gal, and Dr Chris Toepfer. And a special congratulations to Dr Toepfer who won this year's competition. This podcast is produced by Asahara Ratnayaka, edited by Melissa Stoner, and supported by the editorial team of circulation research. Some of the copy texts for highlighted articles is provided by Ruth Williams. I'm your host, Dr Cindy St. Hilaire. And this is Discover CircRes, you're on the go source for the most exciting discoveries in basic cardiovascular research. This program is copyright of the American heart association, 2021. The opinions expressed by speakers in this podcast are their own and not necessarily those of the editors or of the American heart association. For more information, please visit AHAjournals.org  

The Experiment
Justice, Interrupted

The Experiment

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 20:54


Last week, Justice Sonia Sotomayor announced that the Supreme Court had broken with tradition and changed its rules for oral argument. This came after a study revealed that women are disproportionately interrupted by men in the highest court in America. This week, we're re-airing a More Perfect episode about the Northwestern University research that inspired the Court's changes. This story originally aired on More Perfect, a Radiolab spin-off about the Supreme Court. A transcript of this episode will soon be made available. Please check back. Be part of The Experiment. Use the hashtag #TheExperimentPodcast, or write to us at theexperiment@theatlantic.com.

FriendsLikeUs
Trauma Free Stories Of Color Matter

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 119:00


Felischa Marye, Jeanne Sparrow, and Subhah Agarwal visit friends and discuss representation without trauma, Chicago radio and more with host Marina Franklin. Felischa Marye is an American television writer and producer from Chicago. She is best known for her work as a writer and story-editor for the Netflix series 13 Reasons Why, and as the creator and showrunner of Bigger on BET. She is a graduate of the UCLA MFA screenwriting program, during which she won various film fellowships, and writing competitions including; the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and Streisand/Sony Fellowship, Film Independent's Project Involve Award, and the Entertainment Weekly Award. Jeanne Sparrow is renowned speaker, top consultant and 7-time Emmy-winning television and radio personality. She hosts a weekly radio show on #1 rated V-103, WVAZ Chicago, an iHeart Radio Station, and is also a graduate faculty instructor at Northwestern University. Jeanne helps people and organizations find more success and deliver their unique, authentic value through visionary leadership, effective sales and inspiring speaking. Subhah Agarwal has brought an honesty to her comedy that is refreshing, and at times a bit disturbing... but in a good way. Trust me. Subhah has written for the "Plan B" movie on Hulu, and “The Jim Jefferies Show"on Comedy Central, amongst others. You can also catch her jokes live at stand up comedy clubs across the country. If you don't want to leave your couch, you can see her late night debut on NBC's "A Little Late With Lilly Singh." She's also appeared on season three of HBO's "Westworld", on TruTv's sketch comedy "Friends of the People", and as herself on MTV2, Comedy Central, and Gotham Comedy Live. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

Newsy Jacuzzi
Kid News This Week: Flying microchips, Kerala exodus, California “snake-mare,” airport pig patrol

Newsy Jacuzzi

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 20, 2021 19:25


Commonwealth Club of California Podcast
Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World

Commonwealth Club of California Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 19, 2021 78:37


Making sense of sound is one of the hardest jobs our brains must do. Our hearing is always on. We can't close our ears the way we close our eyes. And yet we are quite adept at ignoring sounds that are unimportant. Nina Kraus explores what is going on in our brains when we hear a word, a chord, a meow, or a screech, and examines the partnership of sound and brain, showing how the processing of sound drives many of the brain's core functions. Our hearing brain interacts with what we know, with our emotions, with how we think, with our movements, and with all our other senses. Auditory neurons make calculations at one-thousandth of a second. Hearing is the fastest of our senses. Sound also plays an unrecognized role in both healthy and hurting brains. Kraus explores the power of music for healing as well as the destructive power of noise on the nervous system. She traces what happens in the brain when we speak another language, have a language disorder, experience rhythm, listen to birdsong, or suffer a concussion. Join us as Kraus explores how our deep engagement with sound leaves a fundamental imprint on who we are. NOTES MLF: Humanities SPEAKERS Nina Kraus Hugh Knowles Professor of Neurobiology, Communication Sciences, and Otolaryngology, Northwestern University; Author, Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World In Conversation with George Hammond Author, Conversations With Socrates In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, we are currently hosting all of our live programming via YouTube live stream. This program was recorded via video conference on October 7th, 2021 by the Commonwealth Club of California. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Arbitrary & Capricious
Presidential Administration & Political Polarization

Arbitrary & Capricious

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 75:39


On October 1, 2021, the Gray Center hosted a conference to mark the twentieth anniversary of Elena Kagan's landmark published article on “Presidential Administration,” where authors and scholars discussed and presented seven new working papers and two new books on this important and timely concept, during a series of panel discussions. The first panel was introduced by Gray Center Co-Executive Director Adam White and The Ohio State University's John W. Bricker Professor of Law, Christopher Walker, and it focused on presidential administration and political polarization. It included a discussion featuring The George Washington University Law School's Richard Pierce, Jr., Michael Rappaport of the University of San Diego School of Law's Center for the Study of Constitutional Originalism, and Vanderbilt University Law School's Kevin Stack, which was moderated by the Center for Strategic and International Studies's Melanie Marlowe. Michael Rappaport's working paper, co-authored with Northwestern University's John O. McGinnis, is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/McGinnis-Rappaport-Presidential-Polarization.pdf Kevin Stack's working paper is available at: https://administrativestate.gmu.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/29/2021/09/Stack-Partisan-Administration.pdf This episode features Melanie M. Marlowe, Richard J. Pierce Jr., Michael B. Rappaport, Kevin M. Stack, Christopher J. Walker, and Adam White.

The Actors Lounge
EPISODE 217: Caroline Harris- Talks Embracing The Process & Building Your Career Step By Step

The Actors Lounge

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 65:38


Caroline Harris is an actor from Chicago who is currently based in Los Angeles. Caroline's recent TV credits include WESTWORLD (HBO), AMERICAN GIGOLO (Showtime), BRUH (BET+), and SHOOK (Disney Youtube). Feature credits include a supporting role in HAPPIEST SEASON (Sony) and a leading role in DASHING IN DECEMBER (Paramount Network). Caroline is a graduate of Northwestern University and the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art (LAMDA). --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/theactorslounge/support

UNcivilized UNplugged
Kimberley Ann Johnson — Call of the wild

UNcivilized UNplugged

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 63:10


Being a mother is a different experience from the father one. Women have a laborious job of creating life within themselves, and this can be a traumatic experience from pregnancy to giving birth. So the father, partner, or husband has to play the supporting role. In this episode, our guest Kimberly Ann Johnson explains how these traumas can affect life as a couple, from sexuality to intimacy. In addition, she will talk to us about how we can heal the trauma related to our genitals and the lack of empathy regarding rest or recovery from birth for the sake of progress. Did you know the benefits of witnessing touch? Press play and find out. ABOUT KIMBERLY ANN JOHNSON. Kimberly Ann Johnson is a Sexological Bodyworker, Somatic Experiencing practitioner, birth doula, postpartum care advocate and single mom. Kimberly graduated Valedictorian in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University. She is the host of the Sex Birth Trauma podcast and creator of Activate Your Inner Jaguar: A Real World Understanding of Your Nervous System and Embodied Consent. In private practice in Encinitas, CA, she helps women prepare for birth, heal from birth injuries, gynecological surgeries and sexual boundary ruptures. She also trains birth professionals, bodyworkers, and somatic therapists to help women with prolapse, incontinence, painful sex and other pelvic floor and gynecological issues. CONNECT WITH KIMBERLY Instagram: @kimberly.ann.johnson Website: https://kimberlyannjohnson.com/ Facebook WHAT YOU WILL HEAR: [4:12] Meeting today's guest: Kimberly Johnson. [6:47] Postpartum recovery. [15:43] The importance of postpartum rest. [24:18] Witnessing touch. [33:32] Healing through trauma. [48:05] Learn to communicate your wishes. [53:06] Feeling comfortable in your skin. [58:57] Patriarchy in relationships. If you look at the civilized world and think, "no thank you," then you should subscribe to our podcast, so you don't miss a single episode! Also, join the UNcivilized community, and connect with me on my website Man UNcivilized.com or Instagram so you can join in on our live recordings, ask questions to guests, and more. Find Traver on Instagram @traverBoehm Get a copy my book, Man UNcivilized Join us on the New Year's Costa Rica Unfolding Retreat Dec. 27th 2021- Jan 3, 2022.

8111
Corey Rosen

8111

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 71:19


This week on 8111, Corey Rosen. Corey answers the question of “what would an 8111 theme song sound like”. Corey grew up in Rochester, NY. His dad is a children's dentist and his mom is a teacher. He's the middle child of three brothers. As a kid he went to sleep away camp in the Catskill mountains where they put on plays. Theatre became a permanent fixture in his life. Corey gravitated towards filmmaking as a kid, remaking some of his favorite character driven films with friends from the neighborhood. He went on to study Radio, TV & Film at Northwestern University. Corey worked as a producer on a student comedy TV show called “Stinky's Pub” and there he learned a number of skills. After his sophomore year he worked as an intern at Jim Henson studios and Comedy Central. The following year Corey applied to the LucasArts internship program and was accepted, in part via a shared interest in golf by Lisa Vaughn. He interned in the scanning and optical department in the Summer of 1993. Corey was in a near fatal car accident on interstate 580 and kept working at ILM from his hospital bed. This led to a full time job that lasted for the next 12 years. Corey and Scott Leberecht created their own short films at ILM including the Sprit of Spawn and the Sprit of Sleepy Hallow. These fun short films led to an opportunity to work as a writer developing original projects for Lucasfilm Animation. He then returned to doing cloth work as a TD and started to feel like it was time to move on. Post ILM he has worked at The Orphanage, Image Movers Digital, and now at Tippett Studio writing theme park ride films. Corey recently wrote a book called, “Your Story Well Told” in connection with work he's done on The Moth on NPR. It was great to reconnect with Corey and hear his story.

Weiss Advice
Operation Invest Now with Johnny Lynum

Weiss Advice

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 29:02


Johnny Lynum is an active duty United States Air Force Lieutenant Colonel, seasoned real estate investor, and entrepreneur. Johnny started his real estate investing career in 2010 and has extensive experience in project management, operations, marketing, and negotiations. Over the last six years, he has purchased and sold over two dozen single-family properties and one apartment across four different markets. Currently, he has a real estate portfolio valued at over $4.5M. Johnny holds a Master's Degree in Business Administration from TUI University, a Bachelor's degree in Electrical Engineering from The University of Alabama, and Financial Planning and Services Certification from Northwestern University. Johnny's first book, “Real Estate Success Strategies; What They Forgot TO Teach You In School'' is slated for publishing in Dec 2021.[00:01 - 04:48] Air Force OfficerLet's get to know Johnny LynumBalancing 16 Years of service and real estate[04:49 - 21:39] Operation Invest NowReal Estate is a BusinessFor all veterans out there, real estate can be for youWhat to Do on Your DowntimeVA LoansComing Soon: Real Estate Success StrategiesA Story of PerseveranceJohnny's most recent transactionGetting more from smaller deals[21:40 - 29:02] THE FINAL FOURWhat's the worst job that you ever had?Working at TargetWhat's a book you've read that has given you a paradigm shift?Rich Dad Poor DadWhat is a skill or talent that you would like to learn?GolfWhat does success mean to you?Time for youPutting actions behind your wordsConnect with Johnny. Links available belowTweetable Quotes:“Not every job is the same.” - Johnny Lynum“During your downtime, maximize your time and use it properly.” - Johnny Lynum“If you show up consistently, then good things will happen.” - Johnny LynumConnect with Johnny through Instagram, and LinkedIn. Visit his website https://www.opinvestnow.com/ and your freedom.LEAVE A 5-STAR REVIEW by clicking this link. WHERE CAN I LEARN MORE?Be sure to follow me on the below platforms:Subscribe to the podcast on Apple, Spotify, Google, or Stitcher.LinkedInYoutubeExclusive Facebook Groupwww.yonahweiss.comNone of this could be possible without the awesome team at Buzzsprout. They make it easy to get your show listed on every major podcast platform.Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/weissadvice)

This Week in Intelligent Investing
David Spiegelhalter on Risk and the Use (and Misuse) of Statistics | Suprising Market Internals

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 50:33


In this episode, co-hosts Phil Ordway, Elliot Turner, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) an interview with Sir David Spiegelhalter on risk and the use (and misuse) of statistics, published in the Financial Times on April 16, 2021; and (ii) a table from Morgan Stanley, showing that more than 90% of stocks have declined more than 10% from their YTD highs (>30% for Nasdaq and Russell 2000 stocks) even as the market indices remain only a few percentage points off their highs. Enjoy the conversation!   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.   The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.

KMJ's Afternoon Drive
Friday 10/15 - Hour 3

KMJ's Afternoon Drive

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 38:26


After research out of Northwestern University confirmed what most women already knew, the Supreme Court has revamped oral argument rules to reduce the likelihood that female justices will be interrupted by male justices and attorneys. Another Democrat will add their name to the list of candidates running against Congressman Valadao in 2022. Kingsburg council member Jewel Hurtado has survived a recall effort after organizers fell short on the number of validated signatures to trigger a special election. A woman who suffered burns and nerve damage after spilling hot coffee on herself is suing an owner of a Massachusetts Dunkin' Donuts because employees allegedly mocked her injuries. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Better Call Daddy
169. My Favorite Mistakes. Mark Graban

Better Call Daddy

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 47:50


Mistakes are something to learn from and stumble into.  As much as you plan, problems are going to happen!  Try not to be too hard on yourself and put all your eggs in one basket!  Unexpected magic can occur while in the pursuit of perfection. If Mark had a statistical problem he'd call his daddy, to make better decisions!  Like father like son, they are both engineers, fans of Dr. W. Edwards Deming, Donald Wheeler, and worked for General Motors!  Today we are talking about favorite mistakes!  Better Call Daddy: The Safe Space For Controversy. Mark Graban is author of the award-winning book Lean Hospitals: Improving Quality, Patient Safety, and Employee Engagement. Mark is also co-author, with Joe Swartz, of Healthcare Kaizen: Engaging Front-Line Staff in Sustainable Continuous Improvements. His most recent book is Measures of Success: React Less, Lead Better, Improve More. He is also the creator and editor of the anthology book Practicing Lean. He serves as a consultant to organizations through his company, Constancy, Inc and also through the firm Value Capture. He is also a Senior Advisor to the technology company KaiNexus. He has focused on healthcare improvement since 2005, after starting his career in industry at General Motors, Dell, and Honeywell. Mark is also a professional speaker, having appeared a numerous “Agile” conferences and has been a main-stage speaker at the Lean Startup Week event. Mark is the host of podcasts including “Lean Blog Interviews,” “My Favorite Mistake,” and “Habitual Excellence, Presented by Value Capture.”   Mark has a B.S. in Industrial Engineering from Northwestern University and an M.S. in Mechanical Engineering and an M.B.A. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Leaders for Global Operations Program.  “Data are not taken for museum purposes; they are taken as a basis for doing something. Data shouldn't just passively reside in spreadsheets. Data should be used to make decisions every day.” Connect with Mark:  https://wgnradio.com/pinch-hitters/my-favorite-mistake-host-mark-graban-on-how-the-pandemic-prompted-new-business/   myfavoritemistakepodcast.com   www./markgraban.com/   Me and my daddy would love to hear from you podchaser.com/bettercalldaddy or ratethispodcast.com/bettercalldaddy          

This...I...Do...For...Me:  Over 50, Black and Fabulous!

Kwavi is 53 years old and BOLD! She is a certified Life Coach, Author, International Retreat Creator and an in-demand Speaker. Her niche is working with illustrious groups of women who are age 50+ to inspire them to live their best life! Kwavi received her B.Sc in Informational Technology from Thames Valley University in the United Kingdom. Additionally, she obtained her master's degree in Medical Informatics from Northwestern University in Chicago. Although she was very successful in her previous careers, Kwavi is equally proud of the excellent training that she received from the Life Coach School. Her emphasis is on the whole woman age 50 and beyond and her experience in Information Technology compliments her current career trek by providing women with tools and empowering knowledge. Kwavi also reaches women through her Master Classes like “3 Simple Steps to Live Your Best Life Over 50”. It is through Kwavi's commitment to motivating, encouraging and assisting women that accelerates her clients' ability to reach their maximum potential. This is a mission for her. In her exploratory work and conversations with women age 50+, Kwavi gleaned that the theme that kept permeating the dialogue was their feelings of invisibility. Kwavi in her mission to eradicate those internal feelings both within her clients and those external systems that contribute to this line of thinking became more determined to create solutions to this issue. “It is women who will make a difference in the world, says Kwavi. This is why she is adamant that it is not too late to walk into your authentic self and flourish in the way God has intended for you. “The world needs you”, says Kwavi. She has created the Flourish Online Community; in her words (as highlighted on her website) you will learn to reinforce self-care in the following ways: Get a whole new outlook on life in your 50s and beyond; Make your health a top priority inclusive of proper rest/sleep, increased energy and glow from the inside out; Identify habits that keep you stuck like people pleasing, perfectionism, shaky boundaries; Take steps to create the life you truly want Kwavi instructs her group members that there are six pillars to Flourish: It's all about you Relationships Health and Wellness Sleep and Sex Style To deepen her work with her women age 50 and beyond, Kwavi has written a book entitled “50 Questions to Answer When You Reach 50”. This is a guide that will help you shine and thrive! The book's aim is to get its reader to focus on answering questions that encourage you to really examine the things that are important to you. It is a non-judgmental and non-“preachy” approach to helping you pinpoint how you want to proceed on your life's journey without comparing yourself to others nor setting goals that don't serve you. You will walk away with a sense of renewal and a sense that all things important to you are conquerable. Kwavi has set a challenge to reach one million women, and she is determined to impact these women because it is them who are key to making our universe a healthier place for all. Kwavi has been featured on CBS, NBC, Best Self Magazine and the Atlanta Journal Constitution. Kwavi, who reside in Atlanta, is a prolific blogger, dedicated wife and mother of two teenage boys. You can connect with Kwavi on kwavi.com, Instagram – www.kwavi.tv/instagram1 Tik Tok -- @kwavi_tv

Mommy Dentists in Business
164: Interview with Corporate Scientist, Joe Oxman Ph.D.

Mommy Dentists in Business

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 15, 2021 28:44


Joe Oxman received his Ph.D. in organic photochemistry from Northwestern University (1983).  He has been employed by 3M for 38 years and is currently a Corporate Scientist. A developer of many dental and non-dental technologies and is considered a global expert in photocurable systems, nanotechnology, structural composites, hard tissue adhesives, glass ionomer materials, orthogonal smart-materials, bioactives and technologies to minimize polymerization shrinkage stress. He has 112 issued US patents, more than 100 publications/abstracts in peer reviewed journals and has been an invited global lecturer for more than 350 keynotes, presentations, and dental school curricula. He has received many international recognitions including induction into the prestigious 3M Carlton Society (2003), two American Chemical Society (ACS) Cooperative Research Awards (2007 and 2020), the University of Colorado Engineering & Applied Science Corporate Advocate Award (2007), the IADR Peyton Skinner Award for Innovation in Dental Materials (2013), ACS Industrial Polymer Science Award (2016) and induction as an ACS Polymer Fellow (2017). He was instrumental in co-establishing the NSF Cooperative Research Center on “Fundamentals Applications of Photopolymerization” (Universities of Iowa and Colorado). He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the AADR, the MinnCResT External Review Board and previously served as the 3M Director of Research for University of Minnesota Dental Research Center for Biomaterials and Biomechanics and as a coach and judge for the Discovery Education/3M Young Scientist Challenge.

Hooked on Science
Biomedical Engineering with Emily Schafer

Hooked on Science

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 49:58


In this episode, Julija chats with Emily Schafer, a PhD student studying biomedical engineering at Northwestern University. Learn about how polymers are everywhere, what it's like having bottles of neurotransmitters laying around, and the challenges of communicating science through podcasting! Check out Julija's episode of In the Spotlight on Spotify or Apple Podcasts! Follow Emily on Twitter Check out In the Spotlight on Twitter Learn more about Northwestern's Science Policy Outreach Taskforce on their website Read the episode transcript here (coming soon!!) **************************************************************** Follow Hooked on Science on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter Check out the Linktree if you have an idea for an episode topic, have a question about an episode, or want to get in touch! Theme by Javier Suarez and is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-SA 4.0) license. --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/hookedonscience/message

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul
Why You Need Relational Self-Awareness - Dr. Alexandra Solomon

Starve the Ego Feed the Soul

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 56:14


Welcome back Starve the Ego Feed the Soul fam! Donorbox link to show your support for the show or buy me a coffee https://donorbox.org/nico-barrazaOver the last two decades, Dr. Alexandra H. Solomon has become one of today's most trusted voices in the world of relationships, and her work on Relational Self-Awareness has reached millions of people around the world. Dr. Solomon is a licensed clinical psychologist at The Family Institute at Northwestern University, and she is on faculty in the School of Education and Social Policy at Northwestern University where she teaches the internationally renowned course, Building Loving and Lasting Relationships: Marriage 101. In addition to writing articles and chapters for leading academic journals and books in the field of marriage and family, she is the author of two bestselling books, Loving Bravely and Taking Sexy Back. Dr. Solomon regularly presents to diverse groups that include the United States Military Academy at West Point and Microsoft, and she is frequently asked to talk about relationships with media outlets like The Today Show, O Magazine, The Atlantic, Vogue, and Scientific American.In this episode Dr. Solomon and I dive deeper into her ideas around building relational self-awareness (RSA) and why this is the most important thing we can be working on to live more fulfilling and joyous lives. If you have followed me for a while you know I am consistently reverting back to building self-awareness as the nexus of being better humans, partners, parents, lovers, friends, and so on. Dr. Solomon brings her amazing background as a clinical psychologist and expands on this with me in an hour long conversation that is filled with so much insight.A link to Dr. Solomon's new podcast launching this month https://dralexandrasolomon.com/podcast/Links to Dr. Solomon's E-course and books: https://dralexandrasolomon.com/train-with-alexandra/And last but not least...her social media links are belowInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/dr.alexandra.solomon/Twitter: https://twitter.com/ahsolomonFacebook:https://www.facebook.com/dralexandrasolomon/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/alexandrahs1

Power Up for Profits Podcast
189: Plant-based is no longer enough: Branding in a flexitarian world with Elysabeth Alfano

Power Up for Profits Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 8:41


Plant-based is no longer enough.  You'll need more than that label to effectively engage your consumers for a long-lasting and loyal relationship. In this branding and marketing session with Elysabeth Alfano, you'll learn the critical elements for developing a strong brand and how to stay true to your vision. Elysabeth Alfano is a successful businesswoman, a strategic consultant in the plant-based business arena and a keen investor.  A graduate of Northwestern University and the Thunderbird School of Global Management, Elysabeth began her career working with Fortune 500 companies (IBM-Europe and The Kellogg Company in Brand Management on Special K and Frosted Mini-Wheats) before running her own international businesses.   Elysabeth is the Founder of Plant Powered Consulting. Connected to almost everyone in the Who's Who of the Plant-based World, Elysabeth enjoys helping small, medium and large businesses succeed by consulting on and executing business development, marketing/branding and PR strategies and by connecting entrepreneurs and C-Suite executives with her vast network.  She also advises multinational companies on the direction, growth, and whitespace opportunities in the marketplace. As one of the foremost plant-based business experts in North America, Elysabeth speaks globally on the latest plant-based business and investment developments, analysis, and trends around the world and on major media outlets. She also speaks on issues of a shifting global food supply system, as she recently did at the U.N. Global Compact Leaders Summit,and what it represents for sustainability, climate change, food insecurity, human health, animal welfare and a growing global population. Elysabeth produces and hosts the weekly series The Plantbased Business Hour. On PBH, Elysabeth features the venture capitalists, CEOs, analysts, innovators, and entrepreneurial start-ups from around the globe who are shaping the plant-based market. PBH is the only video/audio program focusing on the exploding plant-based business arena and has been received with tremendous success.   http://www.veganvisibility.com/summit

The FitMind Podcast: Mental Health, Neuroscience & Mindfulness Meditation
#79: Apkar V. Apkarian, PhD - Pain & Placebo

The FitMind Podcast: Mental Health, Neuroscience & Mindfulness Meditation

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 52:54


Apkar V. Apkarian, PhD is a professor of physiology, anesthesiology, and physical medicine and rehabilitation at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. He has been studying pain for more than two decades and is a pioneer in the use of fMRI to study the neurochemistry of the brain. Dr. Apkarian's research has increasingly focused on chronic pain, including the strategic use of placebo treatment. In this episode, we discuss the placebo effect, how pain works in the brain, and susceptibility to chronic pain and placebo response. FitMind Neuroscience-Based App: http://bit.ly/afitmind Website: www.fitmind.co

Open Mike Podcast
119-A Firebombing & Wrongful Conviction Revealed Dark Realities of Detroit's Criminal Justice System

Open Mike Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 32:43


In 2005, 18-year-old Kenneth Nixon and his girlfriend were arrested and charged with murder, arson, and four counts of attempted murder in conjunction with a tragic Detroit firebombing that killed two children. While Kenneth's girlfriend was acquitted by a jury, he was sentenced to two life sentences. A collaborative review by the Medill Justice Project, Cooley Law Innocence Project, and Wayne County Conviction Integrity Unit would ultimately determine Kenneth didn't receive a fair trial, citing inconsistent eyewitness testimony, opportunistic jailhouse informant testimony, and poor arson investigation. On February 18th, 2021, Nixon was released from prison, 16 years after his conviction. In this stunning installment of Open Mike, Kenneth reflects on the systemic biases that contributed to his wrongful conviction and provides updates about his post-release life — including inspiring advocacy work with the National Organization of Exonerees. Show Notes [00:01] Welcome to Open Mike! [00:17] Kenneth Nixon's background and bio. [01:43] Welcome to the show, Ken! You've been out of prison, almost eight months to the day! What was it like walking out of prison, getting your freedom back after sixteen years? [02:45] So much has changed over sixteen years… what milestones did you miss the most when you were incarcerated? [03:28] How many children did you have when you were convicted? Did you get to see them when you were in prison? [04:44] In 2005 there's a firebombing on Charleston Street in Detroit, Michigan. 20-month-old Tamyah Vaughn and her 10-year-old brother, Raylond were killed. Where were you when this happened? [05:36] Later on you found out the crime happened around midnight… where was this house in relation to you? Did you know this family? [06:27] Why do you think the thirteen-year-old brother of the victims told police he saw you commiting this crime? [08:22] This young boy's transcripts showed that he was inconsistent all along; he couldn't get his stories straight! [09:01] How did his statement come out at trial? Did your lawyer do a good job in demonstrating the inconsistent statements and impeach him? [09:45] Your girlfriend Latoya Caulford was also charged, so she was unable to testify on your behalf. What was her charge? [10:03] Did the boy say he saw her too? [11:30] Latoya was acquitted… is this your children's mother? Is she still part of yours and the kids' lives? [12:31] Let's talk about the prosecutor, Patrick Muscat — he's been a prosecutor on several of these wrongful conviction cases. He framed you to be a jilted lover who wanted revenge. When he said that, what was your reaction? [13:33] There was testimony at your trial that stated you had gasoline on your clothes. Can you explain why that was? [14:32] Police brought a dog in to identify fire accelerants at the scene of the crime. Muscat didn't tell the jury that the dog is trained to detect petroleum-based products — a dog doesn't know the difference between gasoline and perfume, or motor oil and glue, for example. Ken's possessions that had gasoline on them were taken for testing at the lab and didn't match any of the evidence at the scene of the crime. [15:23] Didn't a cop, Robert McGee, say that his dog linked your clothes to the crime, and his dog is never wrong? [15:41] Were you satisfied with how your attorney defended you? [16:31] We've done several wrongful conviction stories here on Open Mike, and one of the lynch pins that convicted many people were jail snitches, which are so problematic for so many reasons. And in your case, you had one who claimed you admitted to the firebombing. What do you know about this guy, and did he get a deal for testifying against you? [17:52] Outrageous! Did he ever come clean and say he lied? [18:56] Did the student's interview eventually lead to your exoneration? [19:51] Did you and your girlfriend get tried together? [20:44] When you heard the guilty verdict, what was going on in your head? [21:52] What did you tell the sentencing judge right before you were handed your sentence? [22:07] How did the Justice Project at Northwestern University get involved in your case? [25:24] How did the Brady violations come to light? Did the students identify them or did something else happen? [26:43] The Wayne County Conviction Integrity Unit and the Cooley Law Innocence Project got involved… I assume Northwestern University got them involved? [27:28] What information was presented to the judge, and what did he do? [28:09] One thing that's a little strange here, is that the victims' family were upset about your release. What do you think about that? [28:58] You're still a young man — what's in store for you ahead? [29:48] Ken is part of the National Organization of Exonerees which aims to bring awareness to the wrongful conviction crisis. [30:27] Ken is the 28th person exonerated by the Wayne County Conviction Integrity Unit. [31:43] Thank you to Kenneth Nixon for appearing on the show! There are so many similarities between all of these wrongful conviction cases, but thankfully the truth came out and Ken is reunited with his kids. Thank you for watching Open Mike — please subscribe, comment, like, and share the episode, we'd love to hear from you! We'll see you soon.

Fostering Change
Fostering Change | Dr Bruce Perry Recap

Fostering Change

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 51:17


On this season 2 recap we chat with Dr. Bruce Perry!Dr. Perry is the Principal of the Neurosequential Network, Senior Fellow of The ChildTrauma Academy and a Professor (Adjunct) in the Departments of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University in Chicago and the School of Allied Health, College of Science, Health and Engineering, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria Australia. Over the last thirty years, Dr. Perry has been an active teacher, clinician and researcher in children's mental health and the neurosciences holding a variety of academic positions. His work on the impact of abuse, neglect and trauma on the developing brain has impacted clinical practice, programs and policy across the world. Dr. Perry is the author, with Maia Szalavitz, of The Boy Who Was Raised As A Dog, a bestselling book based on his work with maltreated children and Born For Love: Why Empathy is Essential and Endangered. Dr. Perry's most recent book, What Happened to You? Conversations on Trauma, Resilience, and Healing (2021), co-authored with Oprah Winfrey, is a #1 New York Times Bestseller. Dr. Perry was on the faculty of the Departments of Pharmacology and Psychiatry at the University of Chicago School of Medicine from 1988 to 1991. From 1992 to 2001, Dr. Perry served as the Trammell Research Professor of Child Psychiatry at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas. During this time, Dr. Perry also was Chief of Psychiatry for Texas Children's Hospital and Vice-Chairman for Research within the Department of Psychiatry. From 2001 to 2003, Dr. Perry served as the Medical Director for Provincial Programs in Children's Mental Health for the Alberta Mental Health Board. He continues to consult with the government of Alberta on children's issues and serves as a founding member of the Premier's Council of Alberta's Promise. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Selling With Social Sales Podcast
The New Wave of Modern Sales Engagement with Michael Labate, #187

Selling With Social Sales Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 49:43


Sinking time and money into outdated sales techniques is why so many organizations are struggling to increase their results.  That's why the question should shift to focus on how to implement the most cutting-edge sales tools to identify prospects faster and nurture deeper relationships. My guest in this episode of The Modern Selling Podcast is a tech-savvy sales leader who has his finger on the pulse of modern sales in the digital age. Make sure to tune into my in-depth conversation with the one and only Michael Labate to get a digital front row seat to the incredible social selling tools, strategies, and insights he's using to 3x the sales conversations of his team. Michael Labate, North American President of Intellias has a remarkable career spanning over two decades in various industries including Technology, Banking, and Sales & Marketing, serving midsize and large enterprise clients.  Combining his extensive business background with his Executive MBA from Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management, Michael was instrumental at SAP, and, now Intellias, in establishing profitable revenue-enabling and revenue-generating business activities across regions with a focus on digital sales strategy, innovation, go-to-market, and operational excellence. The incredible insights Michael shares in this episode are exactly what sales leaders need to quickly gain an insider's advantage to master the art of social selling. Download this episode so you can hear how mastering social selling can land sales teams 100% better leads for 50% of the cost. How to adapt to remote selling the right way. The pandemic has changed how sales leaders are approaching customer touchpoints, for the first time in some organizations.  So, I was curious to know what Michael has seen emerging in this space and what Intellias, a global enterprise, has done to adapt to remote selling. Michael shares, “If the pandemic did anything, it accelerated what I call social selling – it's broader than just social – it also includes the social tools and technologies behind doing this… For Intellias, it was a major adaptation we had to make. There was some of this in place, but never implemented in the North American market.” Even for sales teams with large technology budgets, it can be challenging to make that shift to more social-driven outreach in the current virtual selling world. Plus, without the right digital transformation training, many sales leaders have a host of remote sales tools and strategies but lack the clear vision to know how to execute. Michael encountered a similar challenge with moving Intellias into leveraging social selling. He solved that with mandatory sales leadership training, like the courses we offer here at Vengreso, for example, our Modern Sales Mastery program. “We had to establish baselines to see how well we were actually doing. We noticed very quickly, with doing online engagement, that being proactive and moving the conversation from email or phone call to social platforms that we started seeing a significant uplift in our results. But, we had to invest in training first.” Tune into the full episode to hear what Michael recommends that sales leaders and executives do before making the remote selling leap. Does remote selling work for every customer segment? At Vengreso, we always promote hyper-personalization in sales – no matter the client, like we do following our PVC sales methodology. And, I was curious to hear Michael's approach and if he saw Intellias moving back toward using more traditional sales methods, at some point in the future. His answer is exactly why selecting the right sales strategy for your customer segments is so important. “We have both SMB and enterprise clients. On the SMB side, social selling drives these important interactions, especially since we are doing a lot of cross-border outreach. But, on the enterprise side, the initial outreach is not happening on LinkedIn, it's happening very differently…” Listen to the episode (particularly around the 15-minute mark) to hear Michael's actionable advice on how to approach enterprise prospects in the digital age to consistently nail sales meetings. What are sales leaders really missing? Sales data proves that the fastest way to get into someone's office is not through a cold call or a cold email, but rather through a referral. Yet, despite 60% of referrals resulting in a sales conversation, it always amazes me how many sales leaders don't start an outbound cadence with the referral. This is such an important sales tool that so many teams aren't using that could powerfully move the needle on their company's growth. At Vengreso, our longest article is about prospecting and it outlines why the first step of any outbound cadence must be securing a digital referral.  After all, why go after new business with cold outreach, when you can easily tap into the network you have at your fingertips? I wanted to pick Michael's brain and see what he believed was holding sales leaders back from using the power of referral. His insight was very telling, “When I ask sales leaders this same question, I often hear that it takes time to try to find that referral… sales executives are up against quota, so they'd rather ‘spray and pray' because they think it's easier or faster.” That's why Michael highly recommends that sales leaders take a very unique approach to get better sales referrals.  Check out the episode to hear the strategy Michael uses to get more quality referrals – in less time. How do you win the cold outreach game? I knew if anyone could answer this question, it would be Michael. In our conversation, I asked him to share some of the data he's collected within a global sales engine that points to what's really working in cold outreach. Because I'm always surprised when I speak to experienced sales leadershow much emphasis they place on the number of dials they can make in a day. That's not what we consider modern selling at Vengreso.  Instead, we focus on targeting specific accounts, with varied buyer personas and using that to make hyper-personalized outreach to a highly selective group. The data Michael shares validates that point too, “We tracked the likelihood that an outreach method would produce a strong lead over an entire year. The data says it all. Our cold calls had a 0.15% success rate, generic automated emails bumped up to 0.3%, highly personalized emails jumped up to 1% success rate, but LinkedIn was closer to 2.5-3%!” This new discussion around social selling is so powerful and immediately relevant for ALL sales leaders. We dive deeper into conquering cold outreach on LinkedIn throughout this entire episode. So, make sure to tune in to hear Michael's approach to social selling and how you can use it to consistently book more sales meetings. What's the modern selling wave of the future? Almost by accident, Michael shared this powerful statistic, “This method was 50% cheaper but it  produced 100% more inbound responses.” So, naturally, I had to know what he was referencing. Michael calls it intent- or signal-based outreach and according to his results, it is THE best way to win the remote selling game. His approach to intent-based outreach follows five key steps: Identify a source to provide intent-based data. Look for trends in who is searching on key parameters. Based on the data, put these contacts into an immediate outreach sequence. Leverage integration tools to target these audiences with specific sales messaging. Follow-up with personalized messages that speak to the pain points (that you know they have). In today's technology-driven world, it seems like a straightforward framework to follow, especially when you deploy tools like Bombora and Zoominfo. When you look closely at the sales data – intent-based outreach becomes even more of a no-brainer approach to at least try.  According to Michael, “When you use this targeted approach and reach out with messages that are hyper-personalized to people that you know have a problem that you can solve, then I've seen response rates shoot up another 1-2%.”  But, this is just the tip of the social selling iceberg. Listen to the entire episode to hear Michael's top 10 must-have sales tools that he's used to quickly expand Intelllias into North America and beyond – using powerful social selling.  If you get anything out of this episode, the 10 minutes on this topic alone is well worth the listen!

Inside Outside
Ep. 268 - Kevin Leland, Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Dir. of Applied Innovation at Baxter on Open Innovation & Global Connections

Inside Outside

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 21:12


On this week's episode of Inside Outside Innovation, we sit down with Kevin Leland, CEO and Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Director of Applied Innovation at Baxter. The three of us talk about the changing world of open innovation and what it takes to connect and collaborate, to solve big industry problems. Let's get started. Inside Outside Innovation is the podcast to help new innovators navigate what's next. Each week, we'll give you a front row seat into what it takes to learn, grow, and thrive in today's world of accelerating change and uncertainty. Join us as we explore, engage, and experiment with the best and the brightest innovators, entrepreneurs, and pioneering businesses. It's time to get started. Interview Transcript with Kevin Leland, CEO and Founder of Halo and Matt Muller, Director of Applied Innovation at BaxterBrian Ardinger: Welcome to another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. I'm your host, Brian Ardinger. And as always, we have another amazing set of guests. Today, we have Kevin Leland, who is the CEO and Founder of Halo. And Matt Muller, who is the Director of Applied Innovation at Baxter. Welcome. Kevin Leland: Thank you. Brian Ardinger: Hey, I'm excited to have you both on the show to talk about a topic that's near and dear to a lot of folks out there. That's the topic of open innovation and how to corporates and startups and new ideas get started in this whole world of collaborative innovation. Kevin you're the CEO and founder of Halo. What is Halo? And how did you get started in this open innovation space? Kevin Leland: Halo is a marketplace and network where companies connect directly with scientists and startups for research collaborations. It's about as simple to post RFP or a partnering opportunity on Halo as it is to post a job on LinkedIn. And then once it's posted scientists submit their research proposals. We went live in January. Matt and the team of Baxter was our very first customer. So, the earliest of early adopters and they were a really fantastic partner.I came across the idea of Halo and got into open innovation really kind of by accident. The original concept for Halo was crowd funding for medical research. So, a little bit different, but we would work with technology transfer offices at universities to identify promising technology that just needed a little bit of funding to get to the next level.And through that experience, I learned that scientists needed more than just funding. They needed the expertise and the resources of industry. Meanwhile, I was learning how industry was actively trying to partner with these scientists and these early-stage startups, because they realized that they were less good at the early-stage discovery process of research. And so to me, it seemed like an obvious marketplace solution. And so that's where the impetus of the business came and how we started. Brian Ardinger: Let's turn it over to you Matt. From the other side of the table, from a corporation, trying to understand and facilitate and accelerate innovation efforts. What is open innovation mean to you and how did Halo come to play a part in that?Matt Muller: As you mentioned earlier, I'm Director of Applied Innovation here at Baxter and I am in our Renal Care Business. And so that's the business at Baxter that's focused on treating end stage kidney disease. And that's one of Baxter's largest businesses. As a company, we have over $12 billion in sales annually, and dialysis in the renal care businesses, is our largest business unit.And it is an area that we've struggled with innovation. And particularly what we excel at, at Baxter is we excel at treating kidney disease in the home. So, this is a particular therapy called peritoneal dialysis. Patients are able to do it in their home while they sleep. And one of the big challenges that we have today with peritoneal dialysis is that patients need dialysis solution. They use about 12, 15 liters of this sterile medical solution every night to do their therapy. And today the way we do that and the way we've done it ever since this therapy has been around since early seventies is we literally deliver that solution in bags, by trucks. We make it in big plants in the United States and trucks drive all across the country and they deliver it to patients in their home.And as a company, we, for a long time have said, we really need to change this business model. It's not sustainable for us. It requires our patients store a lot of water in their home or the solution rather in their home. And they have to essentially dedicate a whole room of their houses to storage of their supplies.So, we have, for the longest time said, we want to change how this is done. And we want to be able to use the patient's own water in their home. And instead of delivering all these bags of solutions deliver concentrates much like if you go on, you buy a soft drink at the movie theater, it comes from a concentrated box of syrup that is, you add water to it and you have your soft drink. And so that's our vision. And we've struggled for many years of how to bring innovation into the marketplace for making that pure water that we need in the home. We have a lot of very bright scientists at Baxter. The problem is that as Kevin mentioned before, our scientists are really good at solving particular problems in particular getting products to market. Where we've been struggling is that the science has not or at least we haven't been aware of the science that could really allow us to break this barrier and make the leap to be able to make this pure solution medical grade solution in the home. And that's why we've reached out to Kevin and his platform as a way to do that is to go out to a really broad community of researchers to bring new ideas into the company, to help us figure out new ways to approach the problem.Brian Ardinger: The history of open innovation is long. And there's a lot of things that have been tried in the past. Did Baxter try other methods in the past? Or how did you go about trying to determine what things we should innovate internally and try to solve that way versus when and where we go outside for solutions? Matt Muller: I would say as a company, we probably hadn't been as involved specifically in the university and in the startups space. So, a lot of times as a company, we have a lot of people that come to us with ideas and looking for funding. Most of the time, it's a very common proposition that they give you. They need a certain amount of funding, and in three years, they'll have a product. Three years is like the magic number. And the reality is that it's frequently the claims and the charity are very oversold, and we haven't been really successful in that type of space. And so, we've been really looking at different ways to engage a larger community. The other element of it too, is sometimes when you talk open innovation, we're limited by our existing network of people. And so that is the employees and who they work with. Maybe it's the fact we're in Northern Illinois, we're close to Northwestern University and people here have relationships with professors at Northwestern.So, we develop those relationships and the open innovation opportunities through those connections. We've been looking into how do we expand that? Reach a broader audience and get a global connection, so to speak and open to new ideas. Brian Ardinger: And that's a great segue. Kevin, you've worked with companies also besides Baxter out there and that. What are some of the typical mistakes or challenges that you see corporations making when trying to get started in an open innovation.Kevin Leland: First of all get started is kind of the big challenge, because there's still some resistance to open innovation, and even the term open can be scary to some companies because it implies, or it can be interpreted as we're letting all of our competitors know what our strategic interests are. And so, I'm even hesitant sometime about using the word open. I mean, we're really about facilitating partnerships between companies and researchers who have mutually shared interests and can work together to solve problems. Some of the approaches in the past to me just seemed really inefficient, like traveling around the world and going to conferences and hoping you hear somebody speak or get a referral from someone or just call up the universities. Or just more likely to just work with Harvard, Yale, and Princeton are just example of select universities as if there couldn't possibly be great research coming out anywhere else.And so that was part of the problem that I was trying to solve with Halo in terms of democratizing access to companies like Baxter for all scientists, regardless of where they are in the world, or what institution, where they reside and making the process a lot easier for both the scientists and for the company.Because one of the reasons that companies don't pass a wider net is because it's a lot of tedious administrative work in terms of emailing and downloading attachments and PDFs. So, the platform is designed to streamline that entire process so they can cast a wider net. The Ewing Marion Kauffman FoundationSponsor Voice: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is a private, nonpartisan foundation based in Kansas City, Missouri, that seeks to build inclusive prosperity through a prepared workforce and entrepreneur-focused economic development. The Foundation uses its $3 billion in assets to change conditions, address root causes, and break down systemic barriers so that all people – regardless of race, gender, or geography – have the opportunity to achieve economic stability, mobility, and prosperity. For more  information, visit www.kauffman.org and connect with us at www.twitter.com/kauffmanfdn and www.facebook.com/kauffmanfdn.Brian Ardinger: Are there types of businesses or types of challenges that seem to work better when tackled in this open format or open environment? Kevin Leland: We're focused on scientific innovation. So the other key difference is that all of our community are PhDs or part of funded startups. So it's not a challenge site where just anybody can submit an idea. So that's one of the key differences. Brian Ardinger: Are the types of businesses or types of challenges that seem to work better in this type of environment.Kevin Leland: In the case of Halo, we seen everything from very specific requirements that were similar to what Baxter was looking for where they lay out the actual technical requirements of what they're looking for. And then on the other side of the spectrum, we have what Bayer has done, which is a very open-ended call for proposals around the area of sustainable agriculture. And so, the platform is flexible enough that it works for either approach. The key difference, I mean, it really depends on the goal of the company. So in the case of Baxter, a lot of our other customers like Pepsi or Reckitt, they're looking for a very specific solution, to a challenge that they have. Whereas a company like Bayer kind of doesn't know what they don't know, and they're just kind of want to see what's out there.And then from a management perspective, when you do have a very open-ended call, you get a lot more proposals and the more specific requirements the fewer you are going to get. So, it kind of depends on, on what your ultimate strategy is. Brian Ardinger: That's a great way to segue it back to Matt. I'm assuming that your work with Halo is not the only type of innovation initiative that's going on at Baxter. Can you talk a little bit about some of the other innovation efforts that are going on there and how does your work with Halo fit in with those?Matt Muller: As a company, really, a lot of our innovation framework is built into our core business objectives. The way we're structured as a company we're in business units. So, as I said, I work in renal care, so everything, we start with our business and understanding what does that business strategy. Where do we want to play as a company? And then what are the key problems that we want to solve?And I mentioned up front one of the key problems right now that we want to solve, is we want to figure out how to be a more sustainable business and get away from shipping water across the globe. So that's a key strategic initiative for our business. So, then what we define at that point, what are the key elements or the problems that we need to solve in meeting that strategic initiative. One is how do we purify water in the home? And then we figure out what are the ways, you know, based on those specific problems we find we have, what are the best ways to solve that problem?So, in some cases, we're at a point where we need more ideas. Whereas a company, we stagnated and we tried these pathways are not fruitful. We're kind of keep banging our head against the wall. Let's really go out there and see what's out there. And that was an example of what we did with Halo. We also have our own internal engineering organization. We're a global company. So, there are specific things that we may do from an innovation project where we would work on it internally because we feel like we have the internal expertise. Or a lot of times what we will do is we'll look for external partnerships and that may be in the form of through various engineering consulting companies and product development consulting companies that we may partner with because they may have very specific experiences in a space that we're interested in, or maybe an adjacent space.And that's another big element is we get siloed and focused in medical. But there are a lot of adjacent areas where technologies are being developed and, you know, maybe it's the petroleum or refining industry, or maybe it's, you know, some other area of medical that we just don't play in. And we can bring in these consultant firms that just have much broader exposure. And so that's also an element that we look at. So it's really a mix between this open concept like what we do with Halo, engineering consulting and partnerships, and then internal. Brian Ardinger: You know the world is changing so fast and everything is happening so rapidly that it's tough to keep up. Even if you're an expert in your particular industry, like you said, even understanding what's going on in cross industries and that. Kevin, can you talk a little bit about the types of industries that you serve and why a platform like this can give advantage to corporate?Kevin Leland: Yeah, absolutely. I thought it was interesting when Matt was talking about getting inspiration from other industries like oil and gas or petroleum, because that's really what the platform is designed for. Researchers don't necessarily think in terms of what the commercial application is. They think of what their expertise is. And by collecting all this data on what their focus area is and then on the flip side, what companies are interested in, we can more programmatically find connections that in potential partners where otherwise, it would really have no idea that there might be a fruitful opportunity there. In general, we've been focused like broadly on the area of sustainability, which can include anything from sustainable agriculture, like Bayer to sustainable packaging or work with PepsiCo and then water treatment, which is what we did with Matt and his team.So that's a really broad category. We do have a few other opportunities are kind of outside that scope. But we are also looking at doing more in the medicine and pharmaceutical areas as well. Brian Ardinger: Matt, can you talk a little bit about the early days of finding an innovation effort like this? What were some of the challenges or pitfalls or things you had to do to get buy in and then go and actually execute on this particular challenge? Matt Muller: It's hard to sometimes in a large company get traction. And so, you need a champion. And Kevin's known that cause we've actually worked together to help to get that traction within Baxter. I think it helped as we got started because Kevin had some prior connections with some core people at Baxter, which helped to get some initiative.But I think the biggest challenge is getting started and showing the value and gaining the buy-in to get something like this funded internally in a large company. I think a lot of people have an opinion of large companies have endless resources. And can do anything they want. But the reality is everything's looked at very closely.You're constantly getting distracted with the new crisis or the new area of focus. And people are constantly changing roles and companies. So, you need that champion internally. You need to then be able to get that own internal opportunity to influence. To get the approval, to fund something like this.But then secondly, you need the success stories to come out of it, because if you don't have that initial success, chances are that then you're not going to get that momentum and people aren't going to believe in following through with it. And that was key to our relationship here is getting really some initial successes that we could point to. And then things have kind of evolved from there. Brian Ardinger: And that's a great point. I think a lot of companies are naturally more fearful because failing in an existing business model is not a good thing, but yet to innovate, you know, that there are some things that are probably not going to work and that. Open innovation almost gives you some opportunity to try and test and experiment a little bit outside of your core realm.Gives you a little bit more ground cover sometimes to have different types of conversations than you would have, just if it was only internal and working from that perspective. Kevin, what else are you seeing when it comes to the benefits of companies reaching outside of their four walls to create their innovation initiatives? Kevin Leland: The biggest benefit and maybe Matt can speak to this is they're identifying partners that they would have never known about otherwise. So Matt was able to identify a team in Australia. UNSW Sydney. And I don't think Baxter has anyone on the ground there, and probably wouldn't have found that otherwise. And then the secondary benefit is it's almost like a market analysis tool or market intelligence tool because the companies are learning about new technologies and trends and different pockets of innovation around the world that they really didn't have visibility into previously.Brian Ardinger: What are you guys most excited about moving forward?Kevin Leland: I'm really excited to see this working. So, you know, I did a ton of customer discovery before launching Halo. I had dozens of interviews with innovation executives on one side and scientists on the other side. But you never really know until you actually go into the wild and introduce a platform to the users to see if it's going to work. And we've done 20 plus RFPs now since Baxter. We work to put 12 Fortune 500 companies, every one of them has resulted in signed agreements. And, you know, obviously it takes time to see these products into the marketplace, but that's the next thing I'm excited about is when Baxter introduces a new home dialysis device, where patients can make the dialysis solution from their kitchen and don't have to have 900 pounds of solution sitting in their bedroom.Brian Ardinger: Matt, what are you excited about? Matt Muller: Well, I like your vision of the future there, Kevin, first of all. Beyond that, you know, and obviously helping us accelerate, getting the innovative products to market. The other thing that I've really enjoyed is being able to make these broader connections that we never would have before. Kevin used the example of we're connected now with the University of New South Wales on a really interesting research project.But the other thing that this connected us with is a whole network of experts on an NSF Foundation called New, which is very well aligned with some of our core business and research interests that we never would have had before. You know, if we hadn't been involved with this initiative. And so, it's those types of things that also really get me excited because it really helps us.You know, at the end of the day we're scientists. We're engineers. We all like collaborating with other scientists and engineers to solve problems. And this is just exciting because it broadens that network for us even more. For More InformationBrian Ardinger: Matt and Kevin, thank you for collaborating here at Inside Outside Innovation and sharing some of the insights on what's working in this new changing landscape that we're in. So, I appreciate you both being on. If people want to find out more about yourselves or the companies and that that you work at, what's the best way to do. Kevin Leland: For me, they can connect with me on LinkedIn. Just search Kevin Leland should be one of the top three, I think, or go to Halo. Science Matt Muller: And similarly, you can connect with me on LinkedIn. I'm Matthew Muller, Director of Applied Innovation, Baxter Healthcare. We also have a company bio description on Kevin's platform. Halo. We also have put out two new challenge statements with respect to some of the key technical challenges that we have in our space. So, you know, go to Kevin's platform and check those out as well, please.Brian Ardinger: Well, Matthew, Kevin, thank you again for being on Inside Outside Innovation. I look forward to continuing the conversation and thank you very much.Kevin Leland: Thanks Brian.Brian Ardinger: That's it for another episode of Inside Outside Innovation. If you want to learn more about our team, our content, our services, check out InsideOutside.io or follow us on Twitter @theIOpodcast or @Ardinger. Until next time, go out and innovate.FREE INNOVATION NEWSLETTER & TOOLSGet the latest episodes of the Inside Outside Innovation podcast, in addition to thought leadership in the form of blogs, innovation resources, videos, and invitations to exclusive events. SUBSCRIBE HEREYou can also search every Inside Outside Innovation Podcast by Topic and Company.  For more innovations resources, check out IO's Innovation Article Database, Innovation Tools Database, Innovation Book Database, and Innovation Video Database.  

Story in the Public Square
An Inside Look at Today's China with Desmond Shum

Story in the Public Square

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 12, 2021 29:13


There is a contradiction inherent in today's China.  The Chinese Communist Party wields total control over the politics of the land, but the state also celebrates and encourages private wealth.  Desmond Shum offers an insider's account of wealth, power, corruption, and vengeance in today's China. Shum was born in Shanghai and raised in Hong Kong and developed the largest air cargo logistics facility in China, the Beijing Airport Cargo Terminal.  He also led the development of the Bulgari Hotel in Beijing.  Since the early 2000s, Shum was an early pioneer of philanthropy in China, gifting extensively both domestically and internationally.  Desmond holds a bachelor's degree in Finance and Accounting from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and is a graduate of the joint-EMBA program of Northwestern University and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

B2B Mentors
How to Leverage Research & Thought Leadership to Get New Customers

B2B Mentors

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 40:54


John Busby serves as Centerfield's Chief Marketing Officer & Managing Director. In addition to corporate marketing, John leads the content, editorial, research, video and PR teams for the Consumer Guides division, which helps millions of in-market consumers choose and purchase the right product or service through brands like BroadbandNow and SafeHome. Prior to joining Centerfield, John was Head of Analytics for Amazon's grocery delivery service and responsible for business intelligence, data science and automated reporting. Prior to Amazon, John was Senior Vice President of Analytics and Marketing at Marchex. John began his career in product management for InfoSpace, Go2net and IQ Chart. He holds a Bachelor of Science from Northwestern University.Follow John on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/johnmbusby/Learn more about Centerfield here: https://www.centerfield.com/Follow and connect with the host, Connor Dube: https://www.linkedin.com/in/socialsellingexpert/Instagram: connor_dubeIf you're already thinking you need to find a more efficient way to conquer your monthly B2B content like blogs, newsletters, and social media – we'd like to show you how we can improve the quality, save you tons of time, and achieve better results! To learn more visit www.activeblogs.comEpisode Summary:John Busby, Chief Marketing Officer and Managing Director at Centerfield, joins Connor to talk about customer acquisition, essential marketing skills, and the impact of market research. Learn the ins and outs of the customer acquisition business model, the critical role of innovation and technology, and how to get straight to the [pain] point when you reach out to potential customers.Key Takeaways:Customer acquisition combines B2B and B2C marketing. B2B comes in when the company pursues new brand partners to sell the customer acquisition service, and then they deploy B2C techniques to pursue new business for their brand partners. Strategies include paid searching, social media marketing, paid ads, and leveraging an established web presence for the brand partner's benefit.The customer acquisition business model demands constant innovation because it requires improved performance every month to maintain the brand partner relationship. Creativity is necessary, but you also need technology and data analytics.Initial contact efforts should directly address a potential customer's problem or industry pain point right off the bat. If the subject line of an email doesn't inspire them to open it, your future emails are automatically relegated to the junk folder.Hope you enjoyed this episode of B2B Mentors! Make sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast platform. Leave us a 5-star review, so your friends and colleagues can find us too. B2B Mentors is brought to you by activeblogs.com. Head over to our Content Trifecta page to schedule a chat with Connor about custom marketing content solutions for your company and the Content Trifecta effect!

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go
White Sox / Astros Game 4 postponed to Tuesday

WBBM Newsradio's 4:30PM News To Go

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 6:29


Also in the news; the outbound Kennedy was closed for nearly eight-hours overnight after a fatal crash in the Norwood Park neighborhood on the northwest side; First Lady Jill Biden is scheduled to be in Chicago this week; Northwestern University says a new president will take the reins of the university next summer; one of Chicago's top independent government watchdogs says Mayor Lightfoot waited too long to take action against the head of the Chicago Park District over the growing lifeguard harassment scandal; and much more.  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Duration, Terminal Value, and FOMO | Great Investing Texts to Re-Read Often

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 10, 2021 51:05


In this episode, co-hosts Elliot Turner, Phil Ordway, and John Mihaljevic discuss (i) duration, terminal value, and the "fear of mission out"; and (ii) investing articles and texts that belong in every investor's "re-read" folder. Enjoy the conversation!   About the Co-Hosts: Elliot Turner is a co-founder and Managing Partner, CIO at RGA Investment Advisors, LLC. RGA Investment Advisors runs a long-term, low turnover, growth at a reasonable price investment strategy seeking out global opportunities. Elliot focuses on discovering and analyzing long-term, high quality investment opportunities and strategic portfolio management. Prior to joining RGA, Elliot managed portfolios at at AustinWeston Asset Management LLC, Chimera Securities and T3 Capital. Elliot holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation as well as a Juris Doctor from Brooklyn Law School.. He also holds a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emory University where he double majored in Political Science and Philosophy. Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. John Mihaljevic leads MOI Global and serves as managing editor of The Manual of Ideas. He managed a private partnership, Mihaljevic Partners LP, from 2005-2016. John is a winner of the Value Investors Club's prize for best investment idea. He is a trained capital allocator, having studied under Yale University Chief Investment Officer David Swensen and served as Research Assistant to Nobel Laureate James Tobin. John holds a BA in Economics, summa cum laude, from Yale and is a CFA charterholder.   The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.

The Mike Nowak Show
Of Sound Mind, Learning and Feeling

The Mike Nowak Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021


Nina Kraus, PhD, is director of the Brainvolts Lab at Northwestern University. She joins us today to discuss her decades of work exploring hearing and the brain. That research has led to her new book, "Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World."

Crypto Current
Warren Anderson on Deploying Findora's Public Blockchain with Programmable Privacy

Crypto Current

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 30:16


Warren Anderson joins us to discuss how Findora is public blockchain with programmable privacy. Warren Paul Anderson is VP of Product at Discreet Labs, which is developinghttps://findora.org/ ( Findora), a public blockchain with programmable privacy. Previously, Warren led product at Ripple for 4.5 years working on the XRP Ledger, Interledger, & PayString protocols, the RippleX platform, and RippleNet's On-Demand Liquidity enterprise product. Prior to Ripple, in 2014 Warren co-founded Hedgy, one of the first DeFi platforms for derivatives using programmable, escrowed smart contracts on the Bitcoin blockchain. Warren has two bachelor's degrees from Northwestern University, and did graduate studies at Harvard University.   Links: https://findora.org/ (https://findora.org/) https://discreetlabs.io/ (https://discreetlabs.io/)  https://twitter.com/FindoraOfficial (https://twitter.com/FindoraOfficial)  https://t.co/nVKyMSJN5e?amp=1 (http://discord.findora.org)  https://medium.com/findorafoundation (https://medium.com/findorafoundation) *Disclaimer. Richard Carthon is the Founder of Crypto Current. All opinions expressed by members of the Crypto Current Team, Richard or his guest on this podcast are solely their opinions and do not reflect the opinions of Crypto Current. You should not treat any opinion expressed by Richard as a specific inducement to make a particular investment or follow a particular strategy but only as an expression of his opinion. This podcast is for informational purposes only.  ~  Put your Bitcoin and Ethereum to work. Earn up to 12% interest back with https://get.tantralabs.io/earn/?utm_source=cryptocurrent&utm_medium=display&utm_campaign=advertising-display-cryptocurrent&utm_content=lp (Tantra Labs). ~  New to crypto? Check out our https://bit.ly/394YKFw (Crypto for Beginners) Step-by-Step Guide to Crypto Investing!  ~  Follow us on https://bit.ly/3CPwepn (Youtube), http://bit.ly/2TRIArp (Twitter), http://bit.ly/38yfrqo (Instagram), http://bit.ly/39DhpHi (Facebook), http://bit.ly/38wsXL5 (LinkedIn), & https://bit.ly/3yQ30Es (Tik Tok).  ~  Want to make ~$25+ a month for FREE? Sign up to get a FREE https://www.emrit.io/?referral=cryptocurrent (emrit.io Coolspot today)!  ~  Want to learn more about cryptocurrency? Check out our https://bit.ly/2CbaYzw (educational videos) today!  ~  https://bit.ly/2TF3Gtb (Swan) is the easiest and most affordable way to accumulate Bitcoin with automatic recurring purchases. Start your plan today and get $10 of free Bitcoin dropped into your account.  ~  Want access to cool crypto/blockchain projects that you can use immediately? Check out our https://bit.ly/3eZ8J1E (partnerships page)!  ~  Looking to attend a cryptocurrency or blockchain event? Check out our https://bit.ly/2ZVCV8f (events page)!  ~  Tune in on https://bit.ly/2CN9bl1 (Crypto Current TV) throughout the week for a 24/7 crypto stream on the latest action on crypto markets, news, and interviews with the industry's top experts!  ~  Enjoying our podcast? Please leave us a 5 star review http://bit.ly/2Is3iJ9 (here)!  ~  Stay up to date with the latest news in cryptocurrency by opting-in to our http://bit.ly/2xmkKfQ (newsletter)! You will receive daily emails (M-S) that are personalized and curated content specific to you and your interests, powered by artificial intelligence.  ~  We were featured as one of the http://bit.ly/2vRAGGl (Top 25 Cryptocurrency Podcasts) and one of the http://bit.ly/33cnus9 (16 Best Cryptocurrency Podcasts in 2020).  ~  Are you an accredited investor looking to invest in cryptocurrency? Check out http://bit.ly/2IrKABr (Crescent City Capital).  ~  Earn Interest. Receive Loans. Trade Crypto. Start Today! Learn more about how you can https://bit.ly/38Ezc3s (sign up for...

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast
Episode 190: Admissions Director Q&A—Emily Haydon of Northwestern Kellogg

Clear Admit MBA Admissions Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 33:11


Hear directly from Kellogg MBA admissions in this podcast episode of our Admissions Director Q&A with Emily Haydon, Interim Assistant Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid for the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University.

Two Broads Talking Politics
Sol Flores & Alex Sims (#VoteHerIn, Episode 76)

Two Broads Talking Politics

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 32:09


Special #MakeHerstory edition of #VoteHerIn, a collaboration of Two Broads Talking Politics & author Rebecca SiveWith Illinois Deputy Gov Sol A. Flores and strategist Alex Sims.Sol Flores serves as deputy governor in Illinois Governor JB Pritzker's administration overseeing Health and Human Services since February 2019. As Deputy Governor, she helped oversee the administration's response to COVID-19, including housing relief and vaccination efforts. Additionally, Flores spearheads the administration's efforts around poverty alleviation, hunger relief, expanding healthcare access to all, and strengthening the state's safety nets for its most vulnerable residents. She was the founding executive director of La Casa Norte, a non-profit organization established in 2002 that has served more than 30,000 youth and families confronting homelessness. Flores built La Casa Norte from two employees to a multi-million-dollar organization delivering inspiration, hope, and critical services. She is a tireless advocate, having served on numerous working groups, commissions, and nonprofit boards. Flores was raised by a single mother who came to Chicago from Puerto Rico, who was recognized as a national Champion of Change by President Barack Obama.Alexandra (Alex) P. Sims believes that one's birthplace and economic status shouldn't negatively affect one's life journey, and her career has taught her that real change is brought about when there is synergy, empathy, and aligned purposes among all public affairs sectors: business, government, philanthropy, and grassroots organizing. Alex came to Chicago from metro Detroit to attend Northwestern University. Awarded the prestigious CORO Fellowship, Alex was assigned by the CORO program to serve in the St. Louis, Missouri area. Motivated by President Barack Obama's education and social policies, Alex was appointed to head his 2012 Presidential campaign for the St. Louis region. Following Obama's victory, Alex continued as a State Coordinator with Organizing for Action (OFA), relocating to Chicago. It was in Chicago there that she founded Every Vote Counts, where she directed the registration of over 120,000 voters in 4 four months - the largest voter registration campaign in the country that year. While Senior Advisor to the City of Chicago Treasurer, she launched an aggressive and strategic agenda of financial equity and access. Now, founder and CEO of APS and Associates, she counsels numerous clients, including The Obama Foundation and Illinois Governor JB Pritzker.Both Sol and Alex are graduates of the women in public leadership initiative created by Rebecca Sive for the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy.

F***ing Shakespeare
AWP21 Episode—Michael Zapata

F***ing Shakespeare

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 24:25


We talked to Michael Zapata about his novel The Lost Book of Adana Moreau. It was the winner of the Chicago Review of Books Award for Fiction, an NPR Best Book of the Year, a Most Anticipated Book of 2020 from The Boston Globe and The Millions, and his debut novel. Zapata is a founding editor of MAKE Literary Magazine as well as on the core faculty of StoryStudio Chicago and the MFA faculty of Northwestern University.This book is a wholly satisfying romp through the history of science fiction (even for the uninitiated!) with a healthy side-portion of theoretical physics. But please don't be intimidated. Zapata's prose is whimsical and yet gloriously skillful, encouraging us to “challenge our most potent ideologies.” Isn't that what good art is supposed to do?Honorable Mentions:The Yellow House by Sarah BroomWe by Yevgeny ZamyatinChilean author Roberto BolañoHungarian author László Krasznahorkai

Destination On The Left
Episode 249: Why Disruption Creates Added Value, with Sherrif Karamat

Destination On The Left

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 18:18


Sherrif Karamat, CAE, is the President and Chief Executive Officer of PCMA. He also serves as President of the PCMA Foundation and Publisher of Convene magazine. As CEO, Sherrif leads the vision, mission, and promise for PCMA's global family of brands. He serves the greater business events industry as a prominent business architect, enabling our community to become a catalyst for economic and social progress, organizational success, and personal and professional development. In his previous role as Chief Operating Officer, Sherrif led the development and implementation of PCMA's new vision: driving global economic and social transformation through business events. In addition to his responsibilities at the executive level, Sherrif also directed streamlining of PCMA's content creation and delivery channels into one organization. He oversaw partnership, business services, membership, business development, and technology teams. As part of PCMA's growth strategy, Sherrif has led a major data intelligence program and played a key role in the 2017 acquisition of Incentive Conference & Event Society Asia Pacific (ICESAP). A leader in the business events industry, Sherrif previously served as Vice President of Business Sales and Services for Toronto Convention & Visitors (Tourism Toronto). He has served on various boards and is currently a director on the Destination International Board of Trustees. Sherrif is a life-long learner, and in addition to completing his bachelor's degree and Masters of Business Administration from York University in Toronto, Canada; he has completed postgraduate certificate programs at Wharton School of Business at The University of Pennsylvania, Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University and the University of Chicago. At Harvard Business and Law School, he completed a program on strategic negotiations for senior executives and a program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), one on data intelligence and big data. On this episode of Destination on the Left, I talk with Sherrif Karamat, who I met at the Destinations International annual convention in Baltimore, Maryland, and whose insights I hope will inspire you going forward. Sherrif shares his thoughts on the importance of face-to-face meetings and gives an overarching perspective of the business meetings industry's impacts on a vast range of topics and industries. We discuss why when we meet in person, we solve complex issues faster, how those connections will help form and sustain the meetings industry of the future, and why disruption uncovers new value and brings us into focusing on outcomes rather than outputs. What You Will Learn: Why the events industry has been sadly missed over the last 18 months The critical flashes of brilliance that Sherrif has found during the COVID-19 pandemic Lessons learned on recovery and change and how Sherrif is taking some of them forward How do we create engaging experiences and broaden our reach with technology Sherrif's thoughts on how disruption will shape the future of the travel industry Why it's vital to be centered around the people we serve, so they will want to engage with us Lessons for the Future When humans are faced with roadblocks, we start to innovate — and COVID-19 certainly threw up a few obstacles! Sharrif and I discuss the lessons learned by the travel industry, including how we can leverage technology to broaden our reach and engage with more people. Sharrif also shares why he firmly believes that in-person events will see a resurgence in the future as people seek out opportunities to forge meaningful connections. Purpose Driven Outcomes Disruption can help us uncover added value by challenging the status quo. In the travel industry, we want to center our events and organizations around the customers we serve and how we are solving their issues or creating value for them that makes them want to engage with us. When we rethink that status quo and shift our mindset, we can bring people together and focus on positive outcomes, not merely outputs. Convening Leaders Registration Page: https://conveningleaders.org/ Website: https://www.pcma.org/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sherrif-karamat-822b821/ https://www.linkedin.com/company/pcma_2/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PCMAHQ/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/pcmahq We value your thoughts and feedback and would love to hear from you. Leave us a review on your favorite streaming platform to let us know what you want to hear more of. Here is a quick tutorial on how to leave us a rating and review on iTunes!: https://breaktheicemedia.com/rating-review/  

Tech Transfer IP
Putting Augusta University on the Technology Transfer Map with Mike Moore

Tech Transfer IP

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 22:39


Today's guest, holder of a PhD in biochemistry, found his way into the technology transfer field through an unusual method; cold writing to technology transfer offices. After working at Northwestern University for 17 years, Mike Moore decided he wanted to expand his scope of experience and he moved to the far lesser-known University of Augusta, where he is currently the Director of the Office of Innovation Commercialization.  In this episode, Mike shares information about Augusta that many of you will be pleasantly surprised to hear, as was he, including the fact that it has the only public medical school in Georgia, one of the largest medical schools in the country, and is the home of a life sciences business development incubator.  Mike's team is small but mighty, and he is determined to overcome the challenges that come as a result of the size of the institution and turn Augusta into a university that people think of as a leader of innovation. He shares the factors that he believes are vital to success, as well as the hopes he has for the future of his own office, and all technology transfer offices out there!   In This Episode: [00:53] A rundown of Mike's educational and professional background. [01:50] What drew Mike to the field of technology transfer.  [02:34] The unusual approach that landed Mike his first technology transfer job at Northwestern University.  [04:04] Why Mike chose to leave his position at Northwestern and take up a post at Augusta University.  [04:50] Mike shares some of the history of Augusta University, and the role of the Office of Innovation Commercialization which he is the director of.   [06:06] The incubator space at Augusta, and how it was funded.  [07:30] How Mike's office is structured.  [08:36] Value that Mike sees in working collaboratively.  [09:18] Invention disclosures, patent applications, and licenses coming out of Augusta in a typical year. [10:43] What Mike sees as the key to the success of innovations.   [12:08] The challenge of corporate partners that Mike is looking forward to taking on at Augusta. [13:21] Some of the things that Mike would have liked to have done better.  [14:45] Technology Transfer success stories out of Augusta University.   [15:35] Some of the greatest difficulties that Mike is currently facing.   [16:46] How Mike's office works towards improving levels of traditionally underrepresented groups in the technology transfer field.   [17:24] Global and local organizations that Mike's office is involved with, and the value that Mike sees in these connections.  [21:25] Mike's view on credentialing. [20:36] Hopes that Mike has for the future of Augusta's Office of Innovation Commercialization.   Find Mike: Email  

SuperAge: Live Better
Sonic Brain Health? What You Can Do to Improve: Nina Kraus, Ph.D 

SuperAge: Live Better

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 58:48


How does sound make us feel connected to our communities and the world around us? How can sound actually damage our brain? How do we create a sonic environment that promotes better health? What impact does playing music have on our brain and rate of success in life? Nina Kraus, the author of Of Sound Mind, joins us on the SuperAge podcast to answer these questions. Nina Kraus is a professor at Northwestern University investigating sound, speech, and music. In this episode, Nina and David tackle the fascinating topic of sound. They discuss how it can connect us to the world but could also damage our brains, how creating sound, or playing music, can lead to a more successful life, how we have the choice to curate a powerful sonic environment for better health, and more. What you will learn in this episode: How sound damages the brainHow sound benefits the brainHow making music leads to a healthier, more successful lifeHow we can curate our sonic environment for better health “Making music is one of the best things that we can do to strengthen our sound mind.”“Our hearing brain is vast as is our sound mind. Our sound mind engages how we feel, what we know about sound, how we move.” Listen to the SuperAge podcast wherever you get your pods. Connect with Nina Kraus: https://brainvolts.northwestern.edu Buy Nina's book, Of Sound Mind:https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/sound-mind

Best in Fest
The Re-birth of Television again with Bridget Terry - Ep #29

Best in Fest

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 39:50


Streaming and the pandemic are inextricably linked, so let's jump on the bandwagon!  In this episode Leslie and Bridget dive into developing a storyline for streaming networks, trends in television, the rise of Sci-fi and women, finding your way into a pitch and behind the camera, ageism in Hollywood (ignore the elderly at your peril), made for TV movies, Ed Asner AND MUCH MORE!Bridget Terry has produced, written or directed a variety of award-winning television, including productions honored with the George Foster Peabody Award, ACE award, Christopher Humanitarian Award, Video Hall of Fame inductee, Action for Children's Television, three Emmy nominations, and a Writers Guild Award nominee. Terry joined actress Shelley Duvall to create and produce three award-winning TV anthologies: "Faerie Tale Theatre," "Tall Tales and Legends" and "Nightmare Classics," adapting age-old stories with lush period design coupled with an eclectic, creative roster, including Robin Williams, Francis Coppola, Eric Idle, Tim Burton, Jules Feiffer, Liza Minnelli, Mick Jagger, Susan Sarandon, and Vanessa Redgrave. Active in the indie film world, Terry most notably wrote and produced “Shadrach,” starring Harvey Keitel and Andie MacDowell, adapted from a William Styron short story about an ancient ex-slave's journey back to his Depression-era plantation birthplace. Critically acclaimed internationally, “Shadrach” was an official selection at the Venice Film Festival, the Ghent Festival and opened the Los Angeles Independent Festival.   A film history buff, Terry produced, directed and co-wrote "Without Lying Down," an indie documentary feature about early women filmmakers.  It premiered on Turner Classic Movies and was an official selection at the Edinburgh, London and Sydney film festivals and was nominated for a Writers Guild of America award. As a writer-producer, Terry continues to be active in television movies, series and limited series having written and/or produced for Netflix, ABC, CBS, PBS, Showtime, Lifetime, TNT and Hallmark.   Terry served as VP of Publicity and Marketing for director Robert Altman, helming promotions for his films Three Women, Quintet, A Wedding and Popeye – about which she authored a definitive behind-the-scenes book. She began her career as a publicist on features such as "Rich Kids," "An Officer and a Gentleman," “HEALTH” and "Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid." She has written several articles on feature filmmaking.She currently serves as an adjunct Professor, teaching film producing at UCLA and Columbia College Hollywood – as well as lecturing at North Carolina State University and, in China, at Beijing's Yan Ze University. Terry is a graduate of Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism, and a member of the Writers Guild of America, a fellow at Los Angeles' Film Independent and a Member Emeritus of the Publicist's Guild of America.  She lives in Santa Monica, Ca.

The Cannabis Conversation | Medical Cannabis | CBD | Hemp
EPISODE #134 Cannabis Travels with Joe Dolce, CEO of Joe Dolce Communications

The Cannabis Conversation | Medical Cannabis | CBD | Hemp

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 36:32


On today's show, we're joined by Joe Dolce - Journalist, Podcaster, Author, and Founder of media training company Joe Dolce CommunicationsIn this episode, Joe shares his personal journey through the world of cannabis charting the experiences and events that informed his book, Brave New Weed, published in 2017 by HarperCollins.→ View full show notes, summary, and access resources here: https://www.canverse.global/shownotes/e134About Joe DolceJoe Dolce is the founder and CEO of the MedicalCannabisMentor.com online education platform, with courses for healthcare practitioners, dispensary personnel and patients. He is also the author of Brave New Weed: Adventures into the Uncharted World of Cannabis, which was published to critical acclaim in 2017 and hosts the Brave New Weed podcast, which boasts an international audience of first movers, industry experts and rabble rousers with a deep interest in high-minded conversations about the plant and its many applications. Before entering the world of medical cannabis, Joe worked at the highest level of media. He is founder anc CEO of Joe Dolce Communications, one of New York City's most highly regarded Presentation & Media Training companies, and was editor-in-chief of Details magazine. He was a contributing editor at Gourmetand has written for T: The New York Times Magazine, New York, Rolling Stone, Travel & Leisure, Departures, plus dozens of other top-tier publications. He has an MA from New York University and a BA from Northwestern University.ResourcesJoe Dolce Communications Website: https://www.joedolce.com/Join Joe on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joedolce1/

This Week in Intelligent Investing
Special: How the World‘s Greatest Investors Win, with William Green and Phil Ordway

This Week in Intelligent Investing

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 2, 2021 63:24


In this special episode, co-host Phil Ordway speaks with William Green about the book, "Richer, Wiser, Happier: How the World's Greatest Investors Win in Markets and Life". Enjoy the conversation!   About the Participants: Philip Ordway is Managing Principal and Portfolio Manager of Anabatic Fund, L.P. Previously, Philip was a partner at Chicago Fundamental Investment Partners (CFIP). At CFIP, which he joined in 2007, Philip was responsible for investments across the capital structure in various industries. Prior to joining CFIP, Philip was an analyst in structured corporate finance with Citigroup Global Markets, Inc. from 2002 to 2005. Philip earned his B.S. in Education & Social Policy and Economics from Northwestern University in 2002 and his M.B.A. from the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University in 2007, where he now serves as an Adjunct Professor in the Finance Department. William Green is the author of Richer, Wiser, Happier: How the World's Greatest Investors Win in Markets and Life (Scribner/Simon & Schuster, April 2021). Over the last quarter of a century, he has interviewed many of the world's best investors, exploring in depth the question of what qualities and insights enable them to achieve enduring success. He's written extensively about investing for many publications and has been interviewed about the greatest investors for magazines, newspapers, podcasts, radio, and television. He has also given many talks about the lessons we can learn from the most successful investors, not only about how to invest but about how to improve our thinking. Green has written for many leading publications in the US and Europe, including The New Yorker, Time, Fortune, Forbes, Barron's, Fast Company, Money, Worth, Bloomberg Markets, The Los Angeles Times, The Boston Globe Magazine, The New York Observer, The (London) Spectator, The (London) Independent Magazine, and The Economist. He has reported in places as diverse as China, India, Japan, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, the US, Mexico, England, France, Monaco, Poland, Italy, and Russia. He has interviewed presidents and prime ministers, inventors, criminals, prize-winning authors, the CEOs of some of the world's largest companies, and countless billionaires. While living in London, Green edited the European, Middle Eastern, and African editions of Time. Before that, he lived in Hong Kong, where he edited the Asian edition of Time during a period in which it won many awards. Green has collaborated on several books as a ghostwriter, co-author, or editor. One of them became a #1 New York Times and #1 Wall Street Journal bestseller in 2017. He also worked closely with a renowned hedge fund manager, Guy Spier, helping him to write his much-praised 2014 memoir, The Education of a Value Investor: My Transformative Quest for Wealth, Wisdom, and Enlightenment. Green also wrote and edited The Great Minds of Investing, which features short profiles of 33 renowned investors, along with stunning portraits created by Michael O'Brien, one of America's preeminent photographers. Born and raised in London, Green was educated at Eton College, studied English literature at Oxford University, and received a Master's degree from Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. He lives in New York with his wife, Lauren, and their children, Henry and Madeleine. The content of this podcast is not an offer to sell or the solicitation of an offer to buy any security in any jurisdiction. The content is distributed for informational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice or a recommendation to sell or buy any security or other investment, or undertake any investment strategy. There are no warranties, expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, completeness, or results obtained from any information set forth on this podcast. The podcast participants and their affiliates may have positions in and may, from time to time, make purchases or sales of the securities or other investments discussed or evaluated on this podcast.

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast
The Maven Story with Avi Geller

The Logistics of Logistics Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 53:02


The Maven Story with Avi Geller Avi Geller and Joe Lynch discuss the Maven story. Avi is he founder and CEO of Maven a technology company that is reinventing transportation management. About Avi Geller Avi Geller is the founder and CEO of Maven Machines. Since 2014, Avi has led Maven's growth as an IoT platform that serves the transportation industry through real-time, mobile cloud enterprise software. Avi originally hails from Palo Alto, California, but started Maven in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania due to the city's impressive innovation and technology resources. Prior to founding Maven, he held international positions with SAP and contributed to the growth of several successful software companies and startups. Avi also has an engineering degree from MIT and an MBA from Northwestern University. About Maven Maven is reinventing transportation management. With Maven's powerful, easy-to-use software platform, trucking and transportation fleets leverage mobile cloud and industrial IoT technologies to optimize efficiency, safety, and profitability. Maven utilizes machine learning and data analytics for real-time, automated dispatch, planning, route optimization, workflow, and fleet management solutions. Maven's exponential growth is largely driven by close industry partnerships, empowering fleets to produce measurable results with innovative technological solutions. Key Takeaways: The Maven Story  Avi Geller is the Founder and CEO of Maven, which is reinventing transportation management. In the podcast interview, Avi describes his personal entrepreneurial journey and the many challenges he has faced since starting Maven. Maven is reshaping the future of trucking and transportation by improving operational efficiency, driver safety, and maximizing profits. Fleets that rely on Maven to manage their operations are cutting route planning time in half, reducing the time spent managing log edits by over 50%, and seeing fewer HOS violations. Maven is a leading logistics software pioneer that solve complex operational problems across multiple industries, including LTL, Truckload, Parcel, Energy/Fuel, and Transportation. By leveraging mobile cloud, industrial IoT, and machine learning technologies, Maven provides premier Fleet, ELD, Workflow, Inbound Planning, and Dispatch solutions to over 300 fleets, including 1,000+ truck fleets. Learn More About The Maven Story Avi Geller LinkedIn Maven Maven Company News Yourga Trucking Optimizes Compliance, Safety, & Productivity with Maven's Fleet Management Platform The Logistics of Logistics Podcast If you enjoy the podcast, please leave a positive review, subscribe, and share it with your friends and colleagues. The Logistics of Logistics Podcast: Google, Apple, Castbox, Spotify, Stitcher, PlayerFM, Tunein, Podbean, Owltail, Libsyn, Overcast Check out The Logistics of Logistics on Youtube

Morning Shift Podcast
WBEZ Weekly News Recap for October 1, 2021

Morning Shift Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 30:10


Cook County Board President Toni Preckwinkle announces she'll seek a fourth term and Northwestern University temporarily suspends Greek life after multiple women allege being drugged at frat houses. Reset goes behind the headlines on the Weekly News Recap.

Shock Your Potential
The Power of Theatre to Transform - Nina Meehan

Shock Your Potential

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 29:32


“The power of theatre to transform and shock potential is so huge.” Nina Meehan Theatre has long been perceived to be a powerful tool that spurs conversations as well an avenue in which societal matters can be explored and understood. Nina Meehan has been in the arts space for quite a while and says that theatre helps people to view the world differently and deepens their self-awareness. Nina Meehan is an award-winning director, playwright and producer, and a dedicated arts educator, with expertise in youth development and non-profit management. Her work focuses on nurturing innovation in children and connecting people in our increasingly digital world. Nina's award-winning theatrical work for young people as CEO of Bay Area Children's Theatre has reached more than 1 million kids and adults and has toured nationally and internationally. Some of Nina's most recent credits include: the adaptation of Chelsea Clinton's book, "She Persisted," Grace Lin's "Where the Mountain Meets the Moon," and the New York Times bestselling "Goodnight Goodnight Construction Site" series. She has received the Alumna of the Year Award from Head-Royce School in (2020), the Diablo Valley Innovation Award (2020), the Theatre Bay Area Award Best Director and Best New Musical (Goodnight, Goodnight Construction Site, 2018). She was an invited speaker at Visioni in Bologna, Italy, and an invited speak at a conference hosted by the National Endowment for the Arts. Nina also serves as Board President for TYA/USA and was named as one of Red Tricycle's “Moms Who Rock.” She holds a BS in theatre from Northwestern University and a Master's of Nonprofit Administration from the University of San Francisco. She is also a certified yoga instructor. Her work has been spotlighted in the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, American Theatre Magazine, San Francisco Chronicle, Barron's, Red Tricycle, ABC News, NBC News, and CBS News. Nina is our guest today and, in this episode, she will talk about the transformative power of theatre to both children and adults.   Listen in! Social Media www.facebook.com/ninameehan     https://www.instagram.com/nmeehan/ instagram.com/bactheatre    https://www.instagram.com/bactheatre   https://www.facebook.com/bakctheatre    I am the founder of Bay Area children's theatre which me and my friends started 18 years ago and we have produced enough shows to reach literally a million people. [2:58] The part that I think is the most exciting for me is the growth from where we started to now having professional adult actors for family and student audiences and also working with young people. [3:35] The growth of the organization has truly been because of the demand from the community. [4:07] What I have learned over those years as a theatre creator is that art and creativity bring all the soft skills into our world. [4:26] Kids in a lot of ways are far more willing to take that risk of getting up there on stage than adults. [6:40] The power of what it looks like to see a kid stand up and own their art, reflects self-confidence and independence which are skills that children need. [7:35] We did online theatre during the pandemic and interestingly, the same transformative moments were experienced, where participants owned and took charge of their performances. [7:52] The power of theatre to transform and shock potential is so hug [8:10] What I've seen with the adults that we engage with that is interesting, is the conversation that their children's performances initiate afterwards. [8:15] As adults we are often putting limitations on ourselves with the excuse that we are not artists yet maybe we are. [12:27] I have loved working with kids for 18 years and it's been so beautiful seeing adults try to take the step to be creative. [12:55] The more that we can open that potential and that opportunity to redefine what it is to be a creative in our current modern world the more we can be creative and express ourselves. [13:50] We are programmed to be creative beings and that comes in lots of different shapes and forms. [16:26] Encouraging the people around us is important because that is our power, considering so much of being creative is about just allowing ourselves the permission to do it. [18:22] The more that we can say how we feel and appreciate art, the more we can have moments where we can value the creativity in the people around us. [18:52] Commercial break. [20:25] In terms of giving back to your community, I think it is so important to look around and see who in your community is doing work that is inspiring the next generation to become creative leaders. [22:43] We all want empathetic humans taking over from us in the next generation. [ We are all working on a shoestring but there is a whole world of non-profit organizations out there that would love to have support in different ways. [23:45] The other part of it is really looking into your own being and finding your own creative moments that brings you joy, and bring that into your adult world. [24:23] For entrepreneurs, for those who run businesses, board service for non-profit organizations is an insanely huge and powerful gift you can give back to your community. [26:23] The way non-profit sector is set up, we cannot function without a dedicated arm that is our board of directors. [26:44] Find time today to try creative play and just see what happens. [28:31] …………………..….. TopDog Learning Group, LLC is a leadership, change management, and diversity and inclusion consulting firm based in Orlando, FL, USA but with “TopDoggers” (aka consultants) throughout North America and beyond. They focus on training programs (both virtual and face-to-face), keynotes and “lunch and learns,” group and 1:1 coaching, and off-the-shelf solutions. One such solution is their Masterclass on The Top 3 Strategies to be Resilient in Times of Change. This thoughtful self-paced online training will guide you through three tactics you can immediately use to—not just survive—but thrive when change comes at you. Use the code RESIL50OFF for 50% off the program! Just go to https://bit.ly/3a5mIS6 and enter the code RESIL50OFF, in all capitals, to redeem your 50% off coupon. The link and code will be available in our show notes for easy access.  

Access and Opportunity with Carla Harris
Building Equity Along the Blockchain

Access and Opportunity with Carla Harris

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 29:04


On this episode, we delve into the world of NFTs, cryptocurrency, and blockchain technology. We hear from artist Lauren Washington, a senior at Northwestern University, who is using non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, to help connect with a new and thriving community of collectors and artists of color. Then, host Carla Harris sits down with Erikan Obotetukudo, founder of the Audacity Fund and founding member of Crypto for Black Economic Empowerment. Erikan shares her insights on the inequities of traditional financial systems and the potential for cryptocurrency to change the narrative for entrepreneurs of color and others left behind around the world. https://www.morganstanley.com/what-we-do/inclusive-innovation-and-opportunity Disclaimer textThe guest speakers are neither employees nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC. (“Morgan Stanley”). The views and opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect those of Morgan Stanley. The information and figures contained herein has been obtained from sources outside of Morgan Stanley and Morgan Stanley makes no representations or guarantees as to the accuracy or completeness of information or data from sources outside of Morgan Stanley. Morgan Stanley is not responsible for the information or data contained in this podcast. This podcast does not provide individually tailored investment advice and is not a solicitation of any offer to buy or sell any security or other financial instrument or to participate in any trading strategy. It has been prepared without regard to the individual financial circumstances and objectives of persons who receive it.© 2021 Morgan Stanley & Co. LLC, Members SIPC.

Lead Like a Woman
Finding the Side Door

Lead Like a Woman

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 30:12


Michelle Bomberger is the Founder, CEO, and Managing Attorney at Equinox Business Law Group. As a small business founder and entrepreneur, Michelle understands the emotional and practical aspects of owning and scaling a business, which makes her an effective guide for business leaders in evaluating risk and opportunity in their decision making. She received her MBA and law degrees from Northwestern University and undergraduate degree from the University of Notre Dame. Michelle serves on the Board of Directors for Bellevue LifeSpring and Youth Theatre Northwest, serving youth and families in the community. She was honored by the Puget Sound Business Journal as one of its “40 Under 40” in 2012. In addition, she and Equinox Business Law Group were awarded the King County Executive's Woman-Owned Small Business of the Year Award in 2013, along with being listed as one of Puget Sound's 100 Fastest-Growing Private Companies in 2020. In this episode… If you are a new business owner, do you have a trusted person to go to for legal advice? If you are an established company, have you been investing in regular legal counsel? This is a very important aspect of running a business that many owners often neglect. Having seen how many small business owners fail to seek legal advice when starting their organization, Michelle Bomberger was driven to become a small business consultant. She later created Equinox Business Law Group to provide legal services to such companies. She advises them to plan for their future, manage their businesses in a smart and strategic way, and pay attention to their people and organization in general. In this episode of the Lead Like A Woman Show, Andrea Heuston is joined by Michelle Bomberger, the Founder, CEO, and Managing Attorney at Equinox Business Law Group, to talk about the value of receiving legal advice as you grow a business. Michelle also talks about her law firm's business model, how she serves her clients, and she shares her experience being a guest co-host on The Shrimp Tank Podcast. Stay tuned.

Inquiring Minds
The Sound Mind with Neuroscientist Nina Kraus

Inquiring Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 28, 2021 34:49


Nina Kraus, Ph.D., is a neuroscientist who has done groundbreaking research on sound and hearing for more than three decades. She's the Hugh Knowles Professor of Neurobiology, Communication Sciences, and Otolaryngology at Northwestern University, and she has been a frequent guest on Indre's other podcast, Cadence: What Music Tells Us About the Mind. Nina has just released her first trade book called “Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World”. Today she joins Indre to explain just how important sound is, how the hearing brain engages how we think, feel, move, and incorporate information from our other senses, and why the “sound mind” is so integral to how we experience the world.   Show Links: “Of Sound Mind: How Our Brain Constructs a Meaningful Sonic World” by Nina Kraus Brainvolts Website https://brainvolts.northwestern.edu/ Inquiring Minds Podcast Homepage Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds Listen to the Cadence Podcast See https://omnystudio.com/policies/listener for privacy information.   Support the show: https://www.patreon.com/inquiringminds See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Tech News Weekly (MP3)
TNW 202: Itty Bitty Flying Microchip - Surface Duo 2, Surface Laptop Studio, Square Outage, Files and Folders

Tech News Weekly (MP3)

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 71:32


John Rogers from Northwestern University talks about the creation of tiny microchips that can fly and sample the environment. Cherlynn Low from Engadget shares her hands-on thoughts of the latest Microsoft Surface hardware announced this week. Mikah talks about what happens when Square's payment services go down at peak time on a Saturday morning. Jason and Mikah discuss files, folders, directories, and how all of these things are taken for granted in modern day computing. Hosts: Jason Howell and Mikah Sargent Guests: John Rogers and Cherlynn Low Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/tech-news-weekly. Get episodes ad-free with Club TWiT at https://twit.tv/clubtwit Sponsors: Command Line Heroes - TNW plextrac.com/twit akamai.com/tnw