Podcast appearances and mentions of John Oliver

British comedian and television host

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Men In Blazers
Men in Blazers 02/01/23: With John Oliver

Men In Blazers

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 56:39


Rog is joined by "Last Week Tonight" host and longtime GFOP John Oliver for our annual mid-season review show in which they break down Liverpool's Campaign of Blunder, if Jack Grealish is just a child in a grown up's body, and the drunkest World Cup of all-time.See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

FriendsLikeUs
Zainab Johnson and Dawn B Visit Friends

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 1, 2023 94:15


Zainab Johnson and Dawn B visit friends and discuss Florida Blocking AP African American Studies, Tech Lay Offs, why we continue to compare excellent black women, and more with host Marina Franklin. Zainab Johnson, a stand-up comedian, actress, and writer is quickly being propelled as one of the most unique and engaging performers on stage and screen. In 2019, Zainab was named one of Variety's Top 10 Comics To Watch. She was one of the hosts for Netflix's show "100 Humans". You can also catch her as Aleesha on the Amazon Prime comedy series "Upload". Zainab made her first late night stand up appearance on NBC's Late Night with Seth Meyers, and has also had appearances on HBO's All Def Comedy (2017), NBC's Last Comic Standing (2014), Arsenio (2014), BET's Comic View (2014), AXSTV's Gotham Comedy Live! She starred in the web series titled Avant-Guardians. Zainab is a regular at the Improv Comedy Club in LA and the Comedy Cellar in NY, and has performed in the Montreal Just For Laughs Festival as one of the 2014 New Faces of Comedy and returned numerous times since.   Dawn Boatman “Dawn B” is a comedian, host, actress, and radio personality. Hailing from Chicago Il., Dawn B began her career over 20 years ago performing at local comedy clubs and bars around the country and internationally. She joined an improvisational group called "The Forgotten City".   Dawn B honed her comedic career when she decided to move to the east coast while working for the clothing company Sean John as a district merchandiser. She later moved to New York City and performed at clubs like Caroline's and The Improv. Dawn B started traveling internationally and performing for the military.  She has told jokes in Japan, the United Kingdom, and Haiti. Dawn B's raw talent and quick wit for comedy, has always been in her soul. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

IoT For All Podcast
Biggest Firmware Vulnerabilities & How to Fix Them | NetRise's Thomas Pace | Internet of Things Podcast

IoT For All Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 26, 2023 18:49


Thomas Pace, CEO and Co-Founder of NetRise, discusses the biggest firmware vulnerabilities and how to fix them before they become a problem. He breaks down how firmware analysis is done, what is software bill of materials (SBOM)  and additional challenges surrounding the space.Thomas is currently the co-founder and CEO of NetRise, a cybersecurity company focused on providing visibility into devices to identify vulnerabilities and risks via firmware analysis. Before NetRise, Thomas served as the Global Vice President of Enterprise Solutions at Cylance. His responsibilities ranged from conducting incident response investigations, product marketing, public speaking, and analyst relations. Thomas was also responsible for ICS security at the DOE for three years and served in the United States Marine Corps, serving in both Iraq and Afghanistan. Thomas has spoken at Black Hat, DEFCON, RSA, and was interviewed on 60 Minutes and Last Week Tonight with John Oliver for his efforts related to ransomware.NetRise provides visibility and risk identification to a class of devices (IoT, ICS, MedDev, telecommunications equipment) that historically have had no visibility with the intention of providing clear recommendations to remediate these risks efficiently.

History Nerds United
History Nerds United S2:E3 - Author Buddy Levy Returns

History Nerds United

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 36:56


Let's get cold! Friend of the pod, Buddy Levy, returns to talk his new book Empire of Ice & Stone. We discuss Buddy becoming a pandemic grandpa, being mocked by John Oliver, and opportunist expedition leaders. Come listen!Buy Empire of Ice & StoneCheck out Buddy's website

FriendsLikeUs
Professor Christina Greer and Erin Jackson Visit Friends

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 25, 2023 96:16


This week on friends Professor Christina Greer and Erin Jackson visit friends and talk on MLK's woke speech you don't hear, Mayor Adams, that corrupt republican party, and more!  Erin Jackson is one of the fastest-rising comedians in New York City. She works nightly in the city's top comedy clubs and most recently made her Netflix debut on Season 2 of Tiffany Haddish Presents: They Ready. She currently writes for the hit Netflix show, The Upshaws, and has appeared on Late Night with Seth Meyers, CONAN, The Ellen DeGeneres Show, This Week at the Comedy Cellar, and Last Comic Standing. Erin co-hosted three seasons of Exhale, a panel talk series on the ASPiRE television network, and has been a panelist on sports and pop-culture programs on MSNBC, NFL Network and VH-1. Her comedy album, Grudgery, was released in 2018 and debuted at No. 1 on the iTunes comedy charts. Erin is a proud alumna of Howard University and a die-hard fan of the Philadelphia Eagles. Christina Greer is an Associate Professor of Political Science at Fordham University - Lincoln Center (Manhattan) campus. Her research and teaching focus on American politics, Black ethnic politics, campaigns and elections, and public opinion. Prof. Greer's book Black Ethnics: Race, Immigration, and the Pursuit of the American Dream (Oxford University Press) investigates the increasingly ethnically diverse black populations in the US from Africa and the Caribbean. She finds that both ethnicity and a shared racial identity matter and also affect the policy choices and preferences for black groups. Professor Greer is currently working on a manuscript detailing the political contributions of Barbara Jordan, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Stacey Abrams. She recently co-edited Black Politics in Transition, which explores gentrification, suburbanization, and immigration of Blacks in America. She is a member of the board of The Tenement Museum in NYC,  The Mark Twain House in Hartford, CT, Community Change in Washington, DC, and serves on the Advisory Board at Tufts University. She is a frequent political commentator on several media outlets, primarily MSNBC, WNYC, and NY1, and is often quoted in media outlets such as the NYTimes, Wall Street Journal, and the AP. She is the co-host of the New York centered podcast FAQ-NYC, is a political analyst at thegrio.com and host of the podcast quiz show The Blackest Questions at thegrio.com, is a frequent author and narrator for the TedEd educational series, and also writes a weekly column for The Amsterdam News, one of the oldest black newspapers in the U.S. Prof. Greer received her BA from Tufts University and her MA, MPhil, and PhD in Political Science from Columbia University.   Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

ARC ENERGY IDEAS
Are Carbon Offsets Credible?

ARC ENERGY IDEAS

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 24, 2023 34:16


Carbon credits are coming under increasing scrutiny. The Guardian ran an article last week that alleged that 90% of rainforest carbon credits issued by Verra, manager of the world's leading voluntary carbon markets program, the Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) Program, did not represent genuine offsets.  And, comedian John Oliver made the entertaining case that carbon offsets do not deliver the emissions benefit that they claim.  This week, our guest Dirk Forrister, President and CEO of the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA) helps us understand the current state of the carbon markets. Here are some of the questions that Peter and Jackie asked Dirk: What is your response to the critics of carbon markets – including John Oliver and The Guardian? To improve credibility, some groups are advocating that avoidance credits should be banished, and only removal credits should be supported – do you agree with that perspective? When do you expect that countries can trade credits across borders? Does the Article 6 agreement ,made during COP 26, facilitate international trade? Do you think Canada could use Article 6 to offset the emissions for operating LNG export terminals?  Are you concerned by the price volatility in carbon credit markets? Content referenced in this podcast: Our weekly publication, the ARC Energy Charts has our 2023 outlook for the Canadian oil and gas industry revenue, cash flow, and capital spending – see the last page The Guardian, January 18, 2023 “Revealed: More than 90% of rainforest carbon offset credits by biggest provider are worthless, analysis shows” John Oliver show on carbon offsets  International Emissions Trading Association (IETA) website: https://www.ieta.org/ Please review our disclaimer at: https://www.arcenergyinstitute.com/disclaimer/  

Hearts and Minds
Less Taking, More Giving

Hearts and Minds

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 23, 2023 11:01


Cinephile with Adnan Virk
Bill Nye the Oscar winner + Chris recaps Buffalo

Cinephile with Adnan Virk

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 48:42


Holy Spider. Chris recaps his Buffalo trip with no voice. Critics' Choice Awards recap. Bill Nye the Oscar winner?! Chris needs fatter friends. Nine. Can you have too many Oscar winners in a movie? Adnan has John Oliver fatigue. EO. A movie about a donkey. Close. Did Adnan miss the boat on Tar? No pets in the Virk household.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Le Batard & Friends Network
CINEPHILE - Bill Nye the Oscar winner + Chris recaps Buffalo

Le Batard & Friends Network

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 48:42


Holy Spider. Chris recaps his Buffalo trip with no voice. Critics' Choice Awards recap. Bill Nye the Oscar winner?! Chris needs fatter friends. Nine. Can you have too many Oscar winners in a movie? Adnan has John Oliver fatigue. EO. A movie about a donkey. Close. Did Adnan miss the boat on Tar? No pets in the Virk household.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FriendsLikeUs
Who Are You Without That Body?

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 18, 2023 93:46


Mia Jackson and Hollie Harper visit Friends and talk about changing the voice in our head, body shaming, and how Mayor Adams cut funding to libraries.  Mia Jackson is a bonafide Georgia peach (that's Georgian for “native”). In 2017, she was selected as a New Face by the Just for Laughs Comedy Festival and Atlanta's Creative Loafing named her the Critic's Choice Best Stand-Up in the city. She has toured nationally with Amy Schumer and is a featured comic at festivals and clubs across the country. Her first stand up special aired in October 2018 as part of Unprotected Sets on EPIX. Mia has appeared on NickMom's Night Out, Viceland, Comedy Central's This Week at the Comedy Cellar and was a semi-finalist on Season 9 of NBC's Last Comic Standing. Her Comedy Central half hour special debuted in November 2019. Hollie Harper is a comedy nerd from South Jersey. She is currently the creator and co-exec producer of Hella Late! with Hollie Harper on BRIC TV and a co-host of the nationally trending Twitter Storytelling Chat “BlerdDating.” Hella Late! with Hollie Harper was recently in the 2021 NYC Web Fest where she was nominated as Best Actress. Hollie was a semi-finalist in the 2019 NBC Standup Competition and has been featured on NY1, and in Black Enterprise Magazine, Thrive Global, Confessional Magazine and Black San Diego Magazine. Her popular sketch comedy show AMERICAN CANDY has played the Comic Strip, Gotham Comedy Club, BAM Café as well as the Chicago Sketch Comedy Festival. Time Out Chicago named them one of the five groups to watch. Hollie is a regular host for West Side Comedy Club in NYC and works with Gold Comedy and Stand Up Girls, two programs that empower young women by teaching them standup comedy. She was recently the talent coordinator and casting for “Blood Lassi” on Spotify, written by Pratima Mani, and moderated the panel for the Emmy Award winning, WOC editing team of Black Lady Sketch Show for The Black TV and Film Collective. She is also the Creative Consultant for the very successful Black Women in Comedy Laff Fest. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

However, I Wish You Luck: A

in which the hosts discuss season 2, episode 22 of the NBC sitcom Community, "Applied Anthropology and Culinary Arts." Also discussed: food deliver apps, condoms, and grades. This episode earns a C. 

Live Like the World is Dying
S1E56 - This Year in the Apocalypse 2022

Live Like the World is Dying

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 13, 2023 59:05


Episode Summary Brooke and Margaret recap the passed year of horrifying events, from climate collapse, to inflation economics, to developments with Covid, mass shooting, why the police continue to suck, culture wars, bodily autonomy, why capitalism ruins everything, as well as a glimpse of what could be coming this next year both hopeful and dreadful in This Year in the Apocalypse. Host Info Margaret can be found on twitter @magpiekilljoy or instagram at @margaretkilljoy. Brooke is just great and can be found at Strangers helping up keep our finances intact and on Twitter or Mastodon @ogemakweBrooke Publisher Info This show is published by Strangers in A Tangled Wilderness. We can be found at www.tangledwilderness.org, or on Twitter @TangledWild and Instagram @Tangled_Wilderness. You can support the show on Patreon at www.patreon.com/strangersinatangledwilderness. Next Episode Hopefully will come out Friday, Jan. 31st. Transcript This Year in the Apocalypse 2022 Brooke 00:15 Hello and welcome to Live Like the World is Dying, your podcast for what feels like the end times. I'm Brooke Jackson, your co-host for this episode, along with the indomitable Margaret killjoy. Margaret 00:27 Hiiii Brooke 00:28 We have something extra special for you. Hi, Margaret. You might be familiar with the monthly segment we started in 2022: This Month in the Apocalypse, and today we will take that into a sub segment: This Year in the Apocalypse. But, first we have to shout out to another member of the Channel Zero network of anarchists podcasts, but playing a little jingle from one of our comrades, Boo doo doo doo, doo doo. Brooke 01:18 And we're back. So, before I tell people about this extra special episode, I want to officially say "Hello," to my co host, Margaret. Hi, Margaret. Margaret 01:36 Hello, how are you? Brooke 01:38 I'm doing okay. How are you doing? Margaret 01:42 I'm doing terrible, and I'm not going to talk about it. Brooke 01:45 Okay, that's fair. That sounds like me most of the time. Okay, well, speaking of terrible, how did the last year treat you now that we've flipped the calendar? Is there anything you would like to say to the year 2022? Margaret 01:59 You know, it's fine. It's just the year 2020 part three. As far as the other parts of the year 2020, it's been...it was chiller, then parts one and two. Not from a climate point of view, but from a fascism point of view. Brooke 02:21 Oh, okay. That's a good point. Well, I feel like 2022 as with most years....Sorry. What, Margaret? Margaret 02:30 Everything's fine. Nothing bad happened. That's the end of the episode. Brooke 02:33 Always. Margaret 02:34 Everything's good. Brooke 02:35 Okay, cool. Well, this has been a fun recording. Yeah. Well, as with most years, in the last decade, I say, "Fuck you to 2022," and would like to burn it all down. So, we have that going for us. Margaret 02:51 Alright, fuck you, 2022. I do that when I leave a state. Brooke 02:58 You say, "Fuck you," to the State behind you? Margaret 02:59 Yeah, yeah. Brooke 03:01 Even even Oregon, even when you came to visit us out here? Margaret 03:05 Why would I? Why would Oregon be any different? Brooke 03:08 Because some of the people you love are in Oregon. Margaret 03:16 Whatever, fuck you too....I mean, many of the people I love were also in the year 2022. Brooke 03:21 Okay, all right. You got me. Margaret 03:24 Okay. Brooke 03:24 One point: Margaret , zero points: Brooke. Margaret 03:26 Yep, that's what I was saying. Brooke 03:27 Yeah. So. So, I was thinking about how we do this extra fun, special episode of This Year in the Apocalypse. And being typical Brooke, I was like, let's come up with a very orderly fashion in which to do this. I shall take all of the months and pick one thing per month, and we shall be organized. And spoiler alert for the audience. Margaret and I came up with separate lists. We haven't seen each other's lists. We don't know what each other shittiest things are. Margaret 03:53 Wait, I didn't pick the shittiest things. I just picked stuff. Brooke 03:56 Oh, damn, I pick the shitty stuff. Margaret 04:00 Okay, well, I tried to go with a little bit of, there's not a lot of hope in here. There's a little bit of hope in here. Brooke 04:08 It's funny, because when I was thinking about this, I was like, oh, Margaret should do the happy stuff, because Margaret does Cool People. And I can be the the Roberts Evans, everything's bastards side of the simulation. Margaret 04:20 Okay, well, it's a good thing we're figuring this out right now, on air. Brooke 04:23 Right? Margaret 04:24 Okay. So, we'll start with your month by month and then I'll interject? Margaret 04:28 That's fine. Brooke 04:28 Super fun. Yeah. And like a disclaimer on the month by month is that not all months were created equal. So, it's like, whatever the shittiest thing in one month, maybe, you know, way shittier than next month. That's annoying to like, try and compare them in that way. It was a silly way for me to do it, but.. here we are. Brooke 04:30 All right. flashing back 12 months to January, 2022: America hit a million COVID cases with Omicron surging, so Good job America. COVID ongoing and bad. Margaret 05:04 We're number one. Brooke 05:06 Yeah. The other the other real shitty, horrible thing in January was inflation, which technically was pretty crappy in 2021, as well. But we started feeling it more in January like that's when it started hitting and then was kind of ongoing throughout this year as businesses responded to the inflation, had to start raising prices and stuff. Well, had to...some had to, some chose to because they could get away with it. Margaret 05:34 Should I? I wrote down all the inflation numbers for the end of the year. Brooke 05:39 Yeah, baby. Margaret 05:41 The OECD, which stands for something something something, it's a group of 38 countries that sit around and talk about how great they are, or whatever economic something, something. You think I would have written it down. They do. They calculate inflation for their member countries, based on the Consumer Price index. It averaged. This is as of October, the report in December, talks about it as of October, it averaged about 10.7% overall inflation across these 38 countries in the last year. Food averaged at...I wrote down 6.1%. But, I actually think it was slightly higher than that. I think I typo-ed that. Brooke 06:22 In the US was closer to 8%. Margaret 06:26 Yeah, and then, okay. More developed nations saw this all a little bit lower the G7, which is the Group of Seven, it's the seven countries who have the elite cool kids club, and try and tell everyone what to do. Their overall inflation was 7.8%, as compared to the 10.7%. Inflation in the US actually tapered off most than most other countries, probably because we fuck everyone else over, but I couldn't specifically tell you. Inflation is a bit of a black box that even the people who know what inflation is don't really understand. And, energy inflation in general was the most brutal. Italy saw 70% energy inflation in the last year. It was 58%. In the UK, it was 17% in the US. So energy, inflation is actually outpacing even food inflation. And most of the food inflation, as we've talked about, at different times on this is caused by rising costs of fertilizer and like diesel and things like that. Yeah, that's what I got about inflation. There was a lot of it. It's technically tapering off a little bit in the United States. Just this moment. Brooke 07:41 Yeah, I was actually listening to a economics report about that yesterday about how it's tapering off a little bit. The extra shitty thing that happened in February, which added to the drastically increasing fuel prices and food prices, was that fucking Russia invaded Ukraine,and started bombing shit there. Margaret 08:04 Boo. Brooke 08:06 And that that might win as...if we're taking a poll here of all of the worst things that happened in the last year, I kind of feel like that, you know, that's got to be one of the top three. Margaret 08:16 It's, it's up there. Yeah. Even in terms of its effects on the rest of the world, even like, if you're like, on a, well, what do I care about what two European countries are doing? Because, but it affects the shit out of the global south. Ukraine in particular, and also Russia providing a very large percentage of the grain and wheat that goes to, especially Africa. So, yeah, a lot of the energy inflation in the rest of Europe is also a direct result of Russian imperialism. Brooke 08:47 Yeah, it's pretty...it's fucked up a lot of stuff. There was another shitty thing that happened before that happened in February, which is what the Olympics began. And you know, Boo the Olympics. Yeah. So then we then we moved into March and there was this thing called COVID. And then there was this bad inflation happening and then this war over in Ukraine, but then we also, in Florida decided to pass a bill, the nicknamed 'Don't Say Gay' bill. Margaret 09:18 Yeah. I can't believe that was less than a year ago. That was like eight culture wars ago. Brooke 09:26 I know, because I got some of the other ones coming up here. And it was like, oh, fuck, that's still a thing. And then moving into April, so, there was like this war going on, and inflation was bad, and people were dying of this pandemic that we were living in, and then also, the Johnny Depp vs Amber Heard trial began. And that might not seem like one of the shittiest things, but for like anyone who's been a survivor of domestic violence, and the way that trial it seemed like you know, every social media platform like you were getting like ads for it. Right? I know, other people talked about this, like everyone was seeing all these ads for news reports on it. It was like way at the top of the list. And, you know, again, domestic abuse survivor, like, I don't, I don't need to be reminded about, you know, this awful ongoing domestic abuse trial. Margaret 10:19 Yeah, yeah, that was, um, I like try to avoid everything that has to do with celebrities, but realizing how much that that like, ties into, I don't know, how we all talk about all of this shit. I have nothing really clever to say besides like, oh, my God, it's so fucked up. And I don't trust mainstream discourse around any of it. Yeah, Brooke 10:39 For sure. We also saw because of climate issues, Lake Mead was dropping to dangerously low levels, starting all the way in April. And I feel like we could have done this whole episode on climate catastrophes that happened in the last year, like This Year in the Apocalypse could have just been climate change. It was a lot. Margaret 11:00 Yes, well, fortunately that will start overriding everything else over the next couple of years. So, you know....One or the other just to Lake thing on my note, Lake Powell, which provides power to 4.5 million people could reach minimum power pool status by July [2023]. So that's a that's an upcoming thing to look forward to. Brooke 11:29 Yay, for the year ahead. Yeah, I don't even know what the status of Lake Mead is right now. I'm sure it's not doing great. And we'll probably start hearing about it again in the spring as it's at dangerously low levels, find more bodies and boats and whatever else. Margaret 11:46 And they're both. Both are on the Colorado River. Yeah, they're both on the Colorado River. Brooke 11:51 Yeah. And if you're not familiar with why Lake Mead matters, John Oliver actually did a really good piece on it on his show that talks about the water rights and stuff. I think it was John Oliver. Maybe it was John Stewart. Margaret 12:07 And if you want to read a terrible...a very good, although misogynist dystopia about what's coming in terms of water rights, there's a book called "The Water Knife" by Paulo [Bacigalupi], whose name last name I don't know how to pronounce. It's an Italian name. I think yeah, Brooke 12:21 I actually have that on my to-read-shelf. Margaret 12:23 Yeah, it's, um, that man should not be allowed to write sex worker characters ever again. Brooke 12:29 Thank you for the notice there on what to expect on that aspect. Margaret 12:34 But other than that, other than that, it's very interesting book. Brooke 12:40 Okay. May brought us a couple of big bad shootings, which is, you know, not again, not to diminish any other school shootings or shootings that happened or the fact that they're going on, you know, all the time in schools, but they were the ones that like, hit the news, really big. There was the Buffalo, New York supermarket shooting that happened. And then the towards the end of the month was that just God awful Robb Elementary School shooting in Texas, that I don't know how everyone else experienced it. But I, as a parent, you know, whose child who's only slightly older than that. It was absolutely horrifying for me and enraging, and I had a lot of feelings about it. And you know, school shootings are always hard to see, but that one in particular... Margaret 13:29 This is the coward cops one, where they kept parents out who were the parents who were trying to like save kids? Brooke 13:33 Yeah, for like 72 minutes or something like that, more than that they were outside the door where the guy was actively shooting on children. Margaret 13:41 This is...the character of American law enforcement was laid bare on that day, is how I feel. I mean, I have many feelings on all of it, but... Brooke 13:53 And that was in Uvalde, Texas, where they have two separate police systems. There is a police system just for the schools there in addition to the town's police. Margaret 14:07 There was that, uh, there was that lawsuit 10,15,20 years ago, something, where a man who was like, I think it was someone who's like stabbing people on the train, you know, just like, just just doing that thing. And, and a man stopped him, stopped the stabby guy while the cops cowered in behind, like they went into, like the driver's compartment of the train, and they just hid from the stabby guy. And the the guy stopped the stabby guy sued...I might have the details of this wrong. Sued and was like, the police have a duty to protect people. And it came back, the judge is like, "Actually they don't, it is literally not the jobs. The police's job is not to protect you. That is not their job." And, the sooner we all realize that the safer we'll be, because the more people will realize that safety is something that we're going to have to build without the infrastructure that pretends to offer a safety, but absolutely does not. And legally is not required to. Brooke 14:21 Yeah, I didn't know all the backstory of that. But, I know that that one went to the Supreme Court. And that became, you know, the national standard, because I remember reading about that part of it that, yeah, they don't, they don't have they don't have a duty to protect. Margaret 15:27 I think it was the stabby guy on the train. But I, you know, I'm not like a classic thing rememberer, it's not like my skill set. I didn't put my points in character creation in memory. Brooke 15:41 Well important thing there is was the the outcome of that. The other big bad shooting I remember making the news pretty loudly this year was also the Highland Park Parade shooting that actually happened in July. So that was a couple of months later. But yeah, good times. Guns. Margaret 15:58 Hurray. [sadly] Brooke 15:59 All right. So, we moved into June. And a couple of things are going on, on the global stage. Flooding began in Pakistan. And that flooding continued for a couple of months. We talked about this on one of our This Month, episodes, and even to right now, there is still flooding. And that flooding that did occur, you know, has displaced 1000s, if not millions of people. And it's really, really fucked things up and continues to fuck things up in Pakistan. Margaret 16:25 And I would say that flooding in general, is one of the things that we're seeing more and more of all over the world. And it's one of the things that like...I think a lot of people and maybe I'm just projecting, but you know, I grew up thinking of floods as sort of a distant thing. And then actually where I lived, most recently, we all had to leave because of constant flooding as climate changed. And I think that floods need to be something....It's the opposite of quicksand. When you're a kid you think about quicksand is like this thing to like, worry about, and then you grow up and realize that like quicksand is like not...don't worry about quicksand. That's not part of your threat modeling. And, so I think that flooding is something that whether or not it was on something that you were really worried about, wherever you live, it is something that you should pay attention to. It's not like, a run out and worry, right. But, it's a thing to be like more aware of, you know, there was recent...New Years in San Francisco and Oakland, there was really bad flooding. And then again, a couple of days later, might still be going on by the time people listen to this, but I'm not actually sure. And you know, there's the footage of people running out with like boogie boards or surfboards or whatever into the streets and, and playing in the flood. And, I'm not actually going to sit here on my high horse and tell people to never go into floodwater, you shouldn't, it is not a thing you should do, but it is a thing that people do. But I think people don't recognize fast moving currents, how dangerous they are, just how dangerous floods are, no matter how they look. And, if there's more than a foot of water, don't drive through it. Brooke 17:58 Yeah, if you're not experienced with floods, those are things you wouldn't know. So I have, you know, you said, that wasn't a big thing in your childhood, but because of where I live, it you know, I don't know if this is true of all the Pacific Northwest, but certainly, in my town, flooding is a big concern, we''re right on a river, and when there was bad rainstorms back in 96', like most of downtown got flooded. I mean, I was I was a kid then. I was I was a youth. And that experience, you know, kind of informed some of my youth, you know, we had a lot of lessons learned about how to manage flooding, what you do and don't do inflooding. So that's something that's been in the forefront of my mind. And yeah, as I see other people dealing with flooding for the first time in the news, it's like, oh, no, no, you don't. No. That's bad. Don't do that. Don't go in those waters. But it's their first time. They wouldn't know. Margaret 18:53 Yeah. Unless you were like, directly saving something or someone, especially someone, and then even then you have to know what you're doing. You know, they're a bigger deal, even smaller ones are a bigger deal than you realize, I guess is the thing to say about floods. Anyway, so Okay, so where are we at? Brooke 19:10 We're still in June, because there was, you know, in addition to the inflation, and the flooding, and the heat waves, and the war going on, and people dying of a pandemic, this little thing happened in the US where the Supreme Court's overturned a little a little old law called Roe v. Wade. Margaret 19:29 That was about two different ways of interacting with water? [joking] Brooke 19:33 Yes, exactly. Ties, ties, right and flooding there. Yeah. It was just a minor... Margaret 19:39 Yeah, that's my joke about people losing their capacity to control their own bodies. Just a little light hearted joke. Very appropriate. Brooke 19:48 As a person with a uterus, I genuinely can't...i can't joke about that one. Like, it's just too close to home. Margaret 19:54 Yeah, fair enough. I'm sorry. Brooke 19:57 No, it's I'm glad that you are, because it is good to laugh about these things that are actually very upsetting. It's how, it's part of our, you know, grieving process, how we deal with it as being able to laugh a little bit. Margaret 20:08 Yeah. Yeah, although and then, you know, okay, so we've had this like, fight, you know, America's polarizing really hard about a lot of very specific issues: people's ability to control the reproductive systems being a very major, one people's ability to control their hormonal systems and the way they present being another one, I'm sure I'll talk about that more. And, you know, the, the weirdly positive thing that happened this week that I started writing notes about, but didn't finish, is about how there's now...they're changing the laws about how the accessibility of abortion pills and so that they're going to be available in more types of stores for more people in the near future. This will not affect people who are in abortion ban states. So it's this polarization, it's becoming easier to access reproductive health and control in some states, and it's becoming harder and illegal to access it in other states. My other like, positive...It's not even a positive spin. It's the glint of light in the darkness is that abortion was illegal for a very long time in the United States, and people did it, and had access to it and not as well, and it is better when it is legal. Absolutely. But underground clinics existed. And people did a lot of work to maintain reproductive health. And now we have access to such better and safer tools for reproductive health, whether you know, it's access to abortion pills, or just everything about reproductive health has...we know a lot more about it as a society than at least medical and Western, you know, methods of abortion. We know a lot more about than we did a couple decades ago. And then, the other big thing that I keep thinking about...so there was the Jane Collective, right, in the US is I'm just like moving into history mode. Is that annoying? Brooke 22:06 Go for it. Margaret 22:07 Teah. It's my other fucking podcast, all history and so like there's the Jane Collective in the US. And they were really fucking cool. And they provided all these abortions to people in Chicago, and they actually pioneered a lot of methods of abortion and pushed forward a lot of important shit, right? In the 1920s, in Germany, anarchists ran more than 200 abortion clinics. Basically, if you wanted an abortion in 1920s, Germany, you went to the syndicalists, you went to the anarcho syndicalists. And because they sat there, and they were like, "Oh, a large amount of crime needs to be done on an organized fashion. And what is anarcho syndicalism? But a way to organize crime?" In this case, usually it's like class war against bosses and illegal strikes and stuff. But, "How do we organize that on a large scale?" And the anarchists were the ones who had the answer answers to, 'How do you organize crime on a large scale,' and I want to know more about that information. I haven't found that much about it in English yet. But, that kind of thing gives me hope. It gives me hope that we can, it's better when it is legal, I'm not being like, this is great, you know, it's fucked up, but we can do this. And, you know, on this very podcast, if you listen to one of the Three Thieves, Four Thieves? Some Number of Thieves Vinegar Collective, Margaret, famous remember of details, they they talk about their work, developing reverse engineering or making accessible, different abortion drugs and how to basically like, create them, and get them to where they need to be, regardless of the legality of those things. But, you might have more to say about this, too. I just wanted to go into history mode. Brooke 23:50 No, I I liked that. And yeah, you did those episodes in a few different ways about it that are super important. I mean, I don't think I need to rehash why Roe is so important. We we know that, you know, and it's not just about reproductive rights for people with uteruses, either. It's about the trends towards you know, bodily autonomy and regulation of bodies. And you know, what that signals as well, it's an issue for everybody. Margaret 24:17 Yeah. And remember, like at the very beginning, some people were like, they might be coming for birth control next, and everyone's like, Nah, they're not coming for birth control. And now you can see the same, the same right wing people who are like, "We should probably just kill the gay people." They like say it and city council meetings. They're also being like, "And birth control on my right, like, fuck that thing?" Brooke 24:36 Yeah. Frustrating. Margaret 24:39 Yeah. Get it out of someone's cold dead hands. Brooke 24:45 Yeah, this is one of those things where the months don't necessarily compare. Yeah. Margaret 24:49 There's that meme....Go ahead. I'm sorry. No, go. Brooke 24:52 We...you know there were historic heat waves going on. Continued flooding and droughts. And all kinds of climate nastiness. And then in, in Tariff Island, we saw a whole bunch of British officials resign, and then Boris Johnson resigning, which, you know, fuck the government and all of those kinds of things, and fuck that guy. But, it did also lead into this, what has been kind of a lot of turmoil in the UK as they've gone through now a couple of different prime ministers and just like, you know, just the the, the sign of the crumbles of how just overwhelmingly corrupt political leaders are, you know, at this point in so called, you know, democratic and stable democracies, that, you know, they're falling apart too. Margaret 25:39 Now, that's a good point. Um, what year did that lady I didn't like die? What day? What month? Queen? Brooke 25:48 I didn't put down the month because that's a happy thing that happened, not a shitty thing. Margaret 25:51 I know. Remember positive things about 2022. And like, stadiums full of like, Irish folks being like, "Lizzie's in a box. Lizzie's in a box." There's like some positive things. Brooke 26:08 I might rewatch some of those after this, just for a little pick me up. Margaret 26:11 Yeah. The people dancing in front of the palace, anyway. Yeah. I don't like colonialism or monarchy. I don't know if anyone knew this about me. Brooke 26:20 Yeah. No, same. I've been trying to explain to my kid about why Queen Elizabeth was bad. And she's having a hard time. Because, you know, children and fantasies and stories and kings and queens, and blah, blah, blah. Margaret 26:32 Yeah. Which is the fucking problem. Brooke 26:34 Yeah, a similar kind of thing happened in August in terms of like, you know, unstable, so supposedly stable governments, in that the the FBI had to raid Mar-a-Lago and Trump which, again, fuck Trump and the FBI and the federal government and all of that, but as a sign of, you know, our democracies actually not being very sound, and how just grossly corrupt politicians are and stuff, the only way they could get back a bunch of confidential documents and like, nuclear related stuff was to fucking invade a former president. Yeah. Also in August Yeah. monkeypox started hitting the news, which of course, speaking of culture was, right, that led into a whole bunch of stuff about, you know, a bunch of anti-gay stuff and reminders of what the AIDS epidemic was like, and just a whole bunch of fucking nonsense up in the news because of that. Margaret 27:32 God, I barely remember that. Brooke 27:34 Right, I think we did it on an episode, a This Month episode. Margaret 27:38 I mean, I remember it now. It's just there's so much. There's so much. Yeah. Yeah. Brooke 27:44 So September brought us protests starting to erupt in Iran. Finally. There was a woman, Masha Amini, who was arrested, you know, they had been doing caravans, were doing these crackdowns and the morality police and stuff. And so that was the start of a bunch of turmoil there that went on for at least three months. It's finally settled down some last month. But that was going on, and then also towards the end of the month hurricane Ian hit in Florida. So, not to make it all about the climate. But again, historic hurricanes and flooding and stuff. Margaret 28:19 Yeah. And these things are related to each other. I mean, like, as you have global insecurity caused by climate, it's going to show all of the cracks in the systems and like, it's hard, because it's like, overall, you know, I see the the attempted revolution, the uprising in Iran is an incredibly positive thing and like reminder of the beauty of the human spirit. And also, like, what happened, the end result of that, that, I don't even want to say, 'end result,' though, right? Because like, every social struggle is going to ebb and flow. And, our action is going to cause reaction. And you know, and whenever people have uprisings, they remember power. They also remember fear, right? And the system is hoping that people remember fear. And the people are hoping that they remember power, you know, and, and it seems impossible to predict which uprisings will lead to fear and which ones will lead to power in terms of even when they're crushed, right? Whether that is the fertile soil for the next rising or whether it you know, has salted the earth to try and keep my metaphor consistent. Brooke 29:43 Nah, mixed metaphors the best. Okay, yeah, it's not a bad thing that people were protesting against what was going on there. It's it's awful that they had to get to that point that the morality police were so bad that they had to start protesting and ongoing conflict and unrest in the Middle East, never ending. Margaret 30:06 And I want to know more. I haven't done enough research on this yet, but another like hopeful thing about, you know, sort of global feminist, radical politics, there's been a recent movement of men in Afghanistan, who are walking out of exams and walking out of different positions that only men are allowed to hold, you know, in schools and things like that, in protest of the fact that of women's disinclusion. Brooke 30:33 Okay, I hadn't heard anything about that. So that's, yeah, We'll have to add that to a This Month, because I want to know more about that too. That sounds really positive. Margaret 30:40 Yeah. Yeah. And I don't know whether it's, you know, happened three times, and it's caught headlines each time or I don't know enough about it to talk about it as a movement. But it matters. That kind of stuff matters. And yeah, it's hopeful. Brooke 30:57 Well, we moved into October and the fall season, and y'all might remember this little one, some South African asshole named Elon Musk, Mosh, Mosk, whatever that guy's name is, Margaret 31:10 He's named after the rodent, the muskrat. Brooke 31:13 Okay, that'll be easy to remember. That guy officially took over at the only social media platform that I don't mostly hate, which is Twitter. A lot of his fucked-up-ness...Nah, he did some of that the first week, that was still in October. And then definitely more came after that. But, he's destroying the microblogging site that we all love so much. Margaret 31:36 Yeah, I will say, my favorite meme that come out of that was basically like, you know what, I've decided that I am okay with Elon Musk being in charge of the exodus of all the rich people to Mars. [Laughs] Brooke 31:50 Yes, winning. Do that quickly. Margaret 31:53 Yeah. He'll fuck it up. Like he fucks everything up. You've seen Glass Onion? Brooke 31:58 Yes, I did. Margaret 32:00 I don't want to like spoil it for people. But, I'll just say that movie did a really good job of pointing out that Elon Musk is just a fucking...is not an intelligent person, is not doing genius things. And it was pointed out really well. Brooke 32:15 Can I point out something embarrassing? Margaret 32:17 Absolutely, it's just you and I here. Brooke 32:21 No one will ever know. I didn't realize when I watched it that that guy was supposed to be a parody of like Elon Musk specifically. I thought it was just like generic, you know, rich people are terrible. And then it wasn't till like after I watched it, and everyone else started watching it and commenting that it was Musk and I was like, "Oh, damn, obviously it is." Margaret 32:42 Yeah, it's the like, the car thing and the space thing are the main nods. I mean, it's at the same time. It could be Bezos it could be any fucking, like tech billionaire asshole. But I think it was, I think it was intentionally Musk. Brooke 32:56 Yeah, I've got to rewatch it with that in mind. I was too busy going, "Oh, it's that guy. It's that actor or actress. Someone I know that person. Enjoy the characters. Yeah. That was a thing that happened in December, but we haven't done November, so November, Powerball made some poor asshole into a billionaire. So I feel bad for that guy. Yeah. So the Powerball, nobody had won it for like three months, and the pot got up to like $2 billion. And a single a single person had the winning ticket when it was finally pulled. Which, if they take the cash payout, which I think most people do, it's actually only $1 billion. And then, probably the government takes that. So you're only half a billionaire, probably by the time all is said and done. But still, that's, you know, what a way to fuck up the rest of your existence by suddenly having that much money. Margaret 33:51 I'm like, I'd take a shot. Brooke 33:56 I like to think, you know, I have this list of all these nice things that I would do and people I would support and love, but the evidence bears out that anyone who's ever won something like that doesn't make all the great choices. Margaret 34:09 No, no. Okay. Yeah, I think you need to have a council of people who direct...I think that any anarchist who's like, possibly going to end up rich, like, whether through inheritance or becoming the next Stephen King or whatever needs to, like, seriously consider how the dealing with that money should be a collective effort and not an individual effort. Anyway. Brooke 34:35 I agree. Yeah. Margaret 34:36 I went through this when, at one point, I did not get...I did not become a millionaire. But, at one point, Hollywood was interested in one of my my books, and we had long conversations about it. I had conversations with the Hollywood director around it, about whether or not they would adapt a certain book of mine into a TV show. And it didn't work out in the end. But, I like sat there and mathed it out and was like, oh, if they make it TV show out of my book, I will become a millionaire. And like, what would that mean? And, and so that's when I started having these, like, which just totally the same as winning the Powerball and having a billion dollars, and also not just not my weird...I don't know, whatever. Now everyone knows this. Brooke 35:16 I don't think that's a unique thing. Yeah, so that happened in November. And that sucks. And it didn't make the news the way it should have. So I just wanted to highlight that horribleness. And then, also that orange clown douchebag potato that lives in Florida, said that he's going to run for president again. So, we have that to look forward to. But, then the third thing that happened, which isn't just isolated to November, but the World Cup started, and I have nothing against football, love football, the World Cup as a concept. Fine, but there are so many problems, much like the Olympics, with the way they do it. And what happens around all that. Margaret 36:00 Yeah, yeah, I love...I love that I should be able to like a lot of things. And then the way that they're done by our society precludes me from really deeply enjoying them. Brooke 36:10 Why do you have to take such a nice thing and ruing it. Margaret 36:13 All things. All things. You could name anything, and we could talk about how capitalism and fucking imperialism ruined it. Brooke 36:20 Yeah, pretty much. Down with those systems. Alright, so now we're finally getting into the end. You'll remember this one, because it was only like a month ago that there were some targeted attacks in North Carolina on power stations. 40,000 people without power for several days, in fact, it wasn't like a quick fix thing. They really fucked some shit up there. One that I didn't hear about, but that has some pretty big implications is that the country of Indonesia banned sex outside of marriage, even for foreigners living in their country, and stuff. Brooke 36:54 Yeah. So, I don't know if the ramifications for that are. I didn't dig deeper into like, what is the consequence of you doing that. But you know, Indonesia's massive. I mean, that populations huge. Margaret 36:54 I had no idea. Margaret 37:05 Yeah, Lousiana just banned, as of I think January 1, you're not allowed to access porn on the internet from Louisiana without showing a government ID to the website. Which, means that now everyone, basically they passed a law saying you have to install a VPN in order to access porn in Louisiana. Brooke 37:27 That's madness. Margaret 37:29 Yeah, and it fucks up sex workers, right? Like any of this stuff, any of this bullshit, it always just fucks sex workers. Brooke 37:39 Yeah, they become the victims of the law, even though they're not, they're not the bad guys here. And in porn, they're never the bad guys, Pro sex workers. My last horrible thing that happened in December was that China decided to just completely give up on all of its COVID protocols that it spent the whole year continuing to be super restrictive, and have lock downs and all of that. And then all of a sudden, it's just like, "No, we're not gonna do any of that anymore." Oh, just a great way to change policy is just to stop completely all of a sudden. Yeah. Margaret 38:15 I just think it's really funny, because it's like, what? Sometimes people like really talk about how they want like a multipolar world where there's like, it's like what people use to defend the USSR, right, is that they're like, well, at least, there was someone competing with the US or whatever. But, when I think about COVID response, there was always like the US response, which was absolute dogshit. And then there was the Chinese response, which was like, too authoritarian and caused a lot of suffering and all of these things, but, was not a non response. And now, that one has fallen as well. And there's just like, I mean, there's more countries than the US and China. I'm reasonably sure. I couldn't promise. So, hurray, we're in it. We're just in it. That's...this is just COVID world now. It's COVID's world. We just live in it. Brooke 39:13 Yeah, exactly. So I think you had some, like bigger overarching trends of things that happened in 2022. Margaret 39:21 A lot of the stuff I have is a little bit like what we have to look forward to. Brooke 39:26 Oh, nice. Margaret 39:27 Just some like nice, light stuff. The National Farmers Union in the UK says that the UK is on the verge of a food crisis. Brooke 39:35 Great. Margaret 39:36 Yields of tomatoes and other crops, especially energy intensive ones like cucumbers and pears are at record lows. And there's already an egg shortage in the UK, and a lot of places where there were stores are rationing sales of eggs, you can only buy so many eggs at any given time. And, it's not because there's no chickens. It's that rising costs of production have convinced more and more farmers...it's a capitalism thing in this like really brutal way. It's the markets logic, right? If it costs too much to produce a thing, don't produce it. But, when the thing you do is produce food, there's some problems here. Brooke 40:13 Are there? Margaret 40:14 And I mean, I'm a vegan. And I got to admit, when I hear things like, they're cutting back beef production, because it costs too much. I'm like, that's good. That is good for animals. And that is good for the climate. However, that's not being replaced with more of other types of foods. So it's not necessarily good. Brooke 40:33 And if Casandra were here, and she has very restrictive things on what she can eat, because of her health, she would be jumping in to say, "But protein!" because she needs to be able to have access to that. Margaret 40:45 No, totally. And I'm not trying to, I'm not like specifically pushing for a vegan world. And I recognize that everyone's bodies are different, and have different needs around a lot of things. But, I do think that data shows fairly clearly that the level of animal agriculture that we do, especially in centralized ways, across the world is a major driver of climate change. And, it is a major driving of a lot of really bad stuff. It's just a very inefficient way to produce food for a large number of people. This is different at different scales. And I am not, I'm not specifically trying to advocate for...Yeah, I don't think a vegan world is a good or just idea. I think it is perfectly natural for people to eat animals. However, I think that there's both needless suffering that can be cut back and as well as like, just specifically from a climate change point of view. So... Brooke 41:39 I hear you. Margaret 41:39 That said, UK, dealing with egg shortage. Basically, farmers might stop selling milk because of production...that it cost so much to produce the milk. Not like, I'm sure there's still farmers who are going to produce milk. But, more and more farmers are stopping. Beet farmers are considering the same. There's also just literally about 7000 fewer registered food production companies in the UK than three years ago. Brooke 42:04 Wow. Margaret 42:05 Because at least in the UK, fertilizer costs have tripled since 2019. And diesel costs are up at about...both feed and diesel costs are up about 75% from what they were before. Shortages. The infant formula shortage might last until Spring according to one major formula producer. We very narrowly avoided a major disruption as a result of a diesel shortage in the United States recently. Basically, they like brought more diesel plants...I don't know the word here, refineries? Refineries, like online kind of at the last minute, like because there was going to be like really major disruptions in the way that we move food and other things around the United States because of diesel shortages. Let's see what else... Brooke 43:00 Have...I'm super curious here, have food shortages in the UK ever caused problems of any kind? It seems like that's not a big deal. Like they're...they can deal with that. Right? That hasn't killed anyone, right? Margaret 43:10 Ireland's not part of the United Kingdom. [laughs] Yeah, yeah. No, it's okay. I mean, it's interesting, because like, modern farming has really changed the face of famine. Famine used to be a very common part of...I can actually only speak to this in a very limited context, it's like something that came up in my history research, like Napoleon, the middle one, or whatever. I can't remember. Probably the second, maybe the third I'm not sure. The Napoleon who like took over and like 1840...8? Someone is mad at me right now. In France, who modernized Paris and made it like, impossible to build barricades and shit. Brooke 43:52 We can FaceTime, Robert, real quick and find out. Margaret 43:55 Yeah, yeah, totally. And, but one of the things that he did, or rather, that happened under his reign as a part of 19th century development, is that famine had been a very major common regular part of French life. And it ceased to be, and famine is something that the modern world, developed parts of the modern world, have been better at minimizing as compared to like, some historical stuff. Obviously, a lot of this just gets pushed out into the developing world. And you know, famine is a very major part of a great number of other countries' existence. But, I think that people get really used to the idea that famine doesn't really happen. And it does, and it can again, and it's similar what you're talking about, like we have this like, kind of unshakable faith in our democracies. But, they are shakable they, they they shake. Brooke 43:56 They've been shooked. Margaret 44:48 Yeah, they're They are not stirred. They're shaken. Okay. Okay, so other stuff: Pfizer's currently working on an RSV vaccine. I consider that positive news. My news here is about a month old. It's been given the like, go ahead for further studies and shit and, and that's very promising because we're in the middle of a triple-demic or whatever. But there's actually been as a weird positive thing. I mean, obviously, we've learned that society does not know how to cope with pandemics. But, one thing is we have learned a lot more about a lot of health stuff as a result of this, you know, and the types of new vaccines that people are able to come up with now are very, they're very promising. And a fun news, as relates to the climate change thing that's happening, more and more Americans are moving to climate at risk areas. Specifically, people are leaving the Midwest. And they're moving to the Pacific Northwest and Florida. And these are two of the least climatically stable from a disaster point of view areas in the United States. Brooke 46:04 Okay. Margaret 46:05 Specifically, specifically because of wildfire in the Pacific Northwest, and hurricanes in Florida. Also earthquakes on the West Coast and things like that, but specifically wildfire. And also within those areas, a thing that causes...humans have been encroaching into less developed areas at a greater rate. And this is part of what causes, obviously the fires are getting worse out west as a result of climate change, but it's also the way in which new communities are developed out west that is causing some of the worst damages from fires. So yeah, everyone's moving to those places. That's not a good idea in mass. I'm not telling individuals who live in those places to leave. And there's actually, you know, the Pacific Northwest has some like stuff going on about fairly stable temperature wise, and for most climate models, but this is part of why disasters are impacting more and more Americans as people are leaving the places to move to places where it's greater risk. Yeah, there's this map, just showing where people are leaving and where people are going to. And it's actually, there are other places that people are going to that would have surprised me like, Georgia, North Carolina, parts of Tennessee, like kind of like Southern Appalachian kind of areas, like more and more people are moving towards, and more and more people are leaving upstate New York, which really surprised me. But, and more people are leaving North Texas and moving to Southeast Texas, or like the general eastern part of Texas is growing very rapidly. Okay, what else have I got? Taiwan has set up a set group called the Doomsday Preppers Association, which is just sick, because it's called the Doomsday Preppers Association. And it's like, not a wing nut thing. And they have a wing nut name which rules, I'm all for it. There's about 10,000 people or so who are organizing together to prepare for natural disasters, and also to prepare for the potential invasion from China. Which, China's back to threatening to, to do that. And it's but, it's like people just like getting together to like, build networks, learn radios, and just like, be preppers, but in a, like, normalized way, and it's fucking cool. And, I'd love to see it here. Okay. What else? I don't have too many notes left. Florida, is expected to have major wildfires starting in 2023 according to the National Interagency Fire Center report, as well as Georgia, New Mexico and Texas. I'm willing to bet that New Mexico and Texas in particular, and probably Georgia, that's probably...those are very big states with very different bio regions within them. And, so I couldn't point you, if you live in one of those places, you might want to look for the National Interagency Fire Center Report, and read more about it. Brooke 48:56 Speaking of moving, it's a great time to get the fuck out of Florida. With like, I could have done almost every month something just atrocious happened in Florida. Margaret 49:06 Yeah. And one of the things that, you know, we talked a little bit about the culture war stuff. One of the things that's happened in 2023, overall, is that we've started to see more political refugees from within the United States to the United States. We have seen a lot of trans families, or families of trans children, have had to leave states where their providing medical care for their children has become criminal. Obviously also with the end of Roe v. Wade, a lot of people have had to change which state they live in. Although, I don't like doing this like comparison thing, because it's just fucked for everyone, but you can you can vacation your way out of pregnancy. You know? Brooke 49:50 I don't know that I've heard it described that way, but... Margaret 49:54 But if you want to be a 13 year old on hormone blockers, or whatever that you need in order to stay safe, a lot of people are moving, and a lot of people can't move. And there's really complicated questions that we all have to ask ourselves right now about like, stay and go. And like, like stay and fight, versus get the fuck out. And everyone's gonna have to make those questions differently. Okay, another positive thing a weird, like positive tech thing... Brooke 50:20 Yay positive. Margaret 50:22 So like I own, and I recommend it to people who spend a lot of time off grid or out outside the range of cell service. I own like a Garmin satellite communicator, it's a little tiny device, it looks like a tiny walkie talkie. And it can talk to satellites. And I can like text from anywhere in the world, I can see the sky, whether or not I have cell service. And more importantly than that, I can send an SOS. And these are fairly expensive things, they cost a couple hundred dollars. And then you have to sign up for service. And they make sense for people who are like backpacking a lot or driving in areas where there's no, you know, service or whatever, right? New new phones, specifically the iPhone 14, I hate to be like, I'm not telling everyone to run out get new phone, but as a trend is very positive, that some new phones have this already built in. So you won't need to have a separate device. And I think that is a very positive thing from a prepper point of view, to have access to a way to communicate when cell service is not there. Yeah, that is really important. And I have one final thing and it's very positive. Brooke 51:29 Okay, I'm ready. Margaret 51:30 It's actually a double edged sword. On January 5, I'm cheating. This was in 2023. On January 5, 2023, this current year, like last week, yesterday, as we record this, two assholes in Bakersfield, California tried to set an Immigration Services Center on fire, like it was a center that like, um, I mean, ironically, it helped undocumented folks or like immigrant folks pay income taxes, and like helped people navigate the paperwork of being immigrants, you know, because there's actually something that people don't know, all these like, right wing pieces of shit, is that like, undocumented people, like, many of them pay taxes. I don't know. Whereas a lot of the people who like to talk all kinds of shit about undocumented people, don't pay taxes. Anyway, whatever. What were you gonna say? Sorry. Brooke 52:16 Oh, just this, that as an economist, as a group, undocumented people pay more into the system than they as a group take out of the system. Margaret 52:25 That makes a lot of sense. So, there's an Immigration Services Center. Two assholes, tried to set it on fire. They set themselves on fire, fled the scene on fire and left their cell phone at the scene. The reason it's double edged is, because one it sucks that people attack this and they actually did do damage to the center as well, mostly to some equipment used by someone who ran I believe a carwash out of that shared some space or whatever. But yeah, they like poured accelerant everywhere. And then a guy just like, knelt down over the pool of accelerant and like, lit it. And then just like, his, like, his leg was on fire. So, his friend ran over to help and like got caught on fire too. And then, they just both like, ran out of range of, because it's all caught on camera, you know? And fuck them. And I hope that their fucking wounds are horrible. And by the time you listen to this, they were probably caught because they left their fucking phone there. And fuck them. That's my light news. Brooke 53:36 I'll take it. Margaret 53:37 Okay, what are you excited for, looking forward? Go ahead. Sorry. Brooke 53:40 Well, hopefully more fascists are gonna light themselves on fire and other types of right wing assholes. I mean, I would be very happy about that happening in 2023 Margaret 53:48 Yeah. May this be the year of Nazis on fire. Brooke 53:54 Yes. Agreed. That would be lovely. I don't know about...I don't know if I have a lot of global stuff that I thought about being positive. I have. I have like personal stuff, like I am going to be doing...hosting more these podcast episodes. I've got one coming up. Maybe this month, we're releasing it? But I did it all by myself. Yeah, more lined up to come out in the next couple of months and some really cool topics and people that I get to chat with. So I'm stoked about that. Margaret 54:21 That is also something I'm excited about for 2023 is that this podcast is increasingly regular and it is because of the hard work of me...No, everyone else. Is the hard work of everyone else who works on this show are like really kind of taking the reins more and more and it is no longer, it's no longer the Margaret Killjoy Show and I'm very grateful and I believe you all will too. And if you're not grateful yet, you will be, because there'll be actual other voices, like ways of looking at things and and more of it because, you know, one person can only do so much. So I'm really grateful for that. Brooke 55:03 I'm excited about this book that's coming out next month, that... Margaret 55:06 Oh, yeah? Brooke 55:07 Some lady I know, wrote it. And, and I got to do some editing work on it. And, it's hilarious and the cover is gorgeous. Margaret 55:17 Is it called "Escape from Incel Island"? Brooke 55:19 Yeah, that one. Margaret 55:22 Is this my plugs moment? Brooke 55:24 Did you know If you preorder it right now, you can get a poster of that gorgeous cover that comes comes with the preordered one? Margaret 55:31 And, did you know that if you preorder it, I get a cut of the royalties when the book is released for all the preorders, which means that I can eat food. Brooke 55:43 Oh, we like it when you get food. Margaret 55:44 And I like having food. Yeah. So, if you go to tangledwilderness.org, you can preorder "Escape from Incel Island" and get a poster. And it's a fun adventure book. You can literally read it in a couple hours. It's very short. It's a novella. It's, to be frank, it's at the short end of novella. But that makes it good for short attention spans like mine. Brooke 56:08 Yeah, that's dope. I'm looking forward to that. And there'll be some other books coming out from that Strangers Collective one, one that I just started editing, that I don't know how much we're talking about it yet or not. Margaret 56:20 It's really cool. Brooke 56:20 So, I won't give too much away here, but just sucked me right in as I was editing, and it's cool. I'm so excited to read the rest of it. And then for us to release it. Margaret 56:29 Yeah. All right. Well, that's our Year in the Apocalypse, 2022 edition. And I know...wait, you're doing the closing part. Brooke 56:40 Yeah, sure. Margaret 56:41 I'm just the guest. Brooke 56:43 No, you're my co host. Margaret 56:45 Oh, I'm just the co host. Okay. Brooke 56:47 Yeah. Yeah. So I'm curious what other people think the worst things are that happened in 2022, if it's something that was on one of our lists, or something else that you know of, and reach out to us like on Twitter at tangledwild or Instagram, or you can reach out to me personally on Mastodon @ogemakwebrooke, if you can find me there. And the Collectiva Social, I think is my whatever, I don't remember how it works. But I'm yeah, I'm curious what other people would have to say is the worst which thing they want to vote for, if they have their own. So hit us up? Let us know. Margaret 57:22 Yeah, do it. Brooke 57:29 So, our listeners, we thank, we appreciate you listening. And if you enjoy this podcast, we would love it if you could give it a like or drop a comment or review or subscribe to us if you haven't already, because these things make the algorithms that rule our world offer our show to more people. The podcast is produced by the anarchist publishing collective Strangers in a Tangled Wilderness. Like I said, you can connect with us on Twitter, Instagram, or me personally on Mastodon, or through our website tangledwilderness.org. The work of Strangers is made possible by our Patreon supporters. Honestly, we couldn't do any of it without your help. If you want to become a supporter, check us out patreon.com/strangersInatangledwilderness. There are cool benefits for different support tiers. For instance, if you support the collective at $10 a month, one of your benefits is a 40% off coupon for everything we sell on our website, which includes the preorders for Margaret's new book, we'd like to give a specific shout out to some of our most supportive patreon supporters including Hoss dog, Miciaah, Chris, Sam, Kirk, Eleanor, Jenipher, Staro, Cat J., Chelsea, Dana, David, Nicole, Mikki, Paige, SJ, Shawn, Hunter, Theo, Boise Mutual Aid, Milica, paparouna, and Aly. Thanks so much. Find out more at https://live-like-the-world-is-dying.pinecast.co

FriendsLikeUs
The Science Of Literacy

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 11, 2023 90:37


Barber Shop Book's founder Alvin Irvy and Nonye Brown-West visit and discuss the importance of literacy in today's youth, personal stories of education placement and more with host Marina Franklin.  Alvin Irby is a former kindergarten teacher turned award-winning social entrepreneur, international speaker, comedian, and author. He is Founder and Chief Reading Inspirer at Barbershop Books, a literacy program that creates child-friendly reading spaces in barbershops and provides early literacy training to barbers. His work connecting reading to male-centered spaces and involving men in boys' early reading experiences earned him the National Book Foundation's 2017 Innovations in Reading Prize. Irby's popular TED Talk "How to inspire every child to be a lifelong reader," has been viewed over 1 million times. Irby's nationally-recognized cultural competency workshops help school districts, library systems, and education organizations create relevant and engaging learning experiences for all students. His Diversity & Inclusion trainings have been described as informative, inspiring, engaging, and humorous. Ir by helps educators better understand and address the systemic and personal challenges that inhibit children's intrinsic motivation to read and learn. His debut children's book, Gross Greg, combines Irby's passion for early literacy and comedy. Gross Greg is a laugh-out-loud story that captures the hilariously gross behavior of kids everywhere. As a stand up comedian, Irby's fresh perspective and smart brand of humor shine through in his comedy album "Really Dense." His clever social commentary and funny observations have not gone unnoticed. Irby won the Clean Comedy Showcase at the 2019 San Diego Comedy Festival and won 2nd place at NYC's 2019 Laughing Devil Comedy Festival. One of the highlights of Irby's comedy career was being selected as a national finalist for the StandUp NBC competition and performing at the legendary Hollywood Improv in Los Angeles. Alvin Irby holds a Masters of Science (MS) in Childhood Education from Bank Street Graduate School of Education, a Masters of Public Administration (MPA) from New York University's Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service, and a Bachelors of Arts (BA) in Sociology from Grinnell College. Nonye Brown-West is a New York-based Nigerian-American comedian and writer. She has been featured in the Boston Globe's Rise column as a Comic to Watch, as well as in NPR, PBS, ABC, Sway In The Morning, and the New York Comedy Festival. Nonye made her acting debut in The Sympathy Card, now available for streaming on Vudu, Apple, Amazon, and Google Play.   Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

英文小酒馆 LHH
《闲话英伦》-英国排名第一,世界前十,诺奖得主扎堆的学校牛在哪?

英文小酒馆 LHH

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 8, 2023 12:24


关注工号【璐璐的英文小酒馆】,获取全文逐字稿和更多好文哦Hi everyone, and welcome back to Britain Under the Microscope. 欢迎回来【闲话英伦】Hi, 安澜.Hi Lulu. hi everyone. Last time we were talking about Oxford from the Oxbridge combo. So today let's talk about Cambridge, 牛建里的剑桥. Yeah, absolutely. I think a lot of people in China, their first association with Cambridge is 徐志摩,is再别康桥. I've actually been to the memorial in Cambridge. So 康桥就是Cambridge, but it's just like a different translation. Now Oxford and Cambridge, Cambridge is later, right? It was founded later. Yeah, Cambridge is relatively new, because it was founded in 1209. Relatively new. Well, relatively.So Cambridge is quite similar to Oxford. There is no campus and the colleges are spread throughout the city, so it's made up of about 31 colleges with over 150 different institutions all within the university. So like Oxford which is located in Oxford city, Cambridge, it's also its own city. Cambridge is a city, and just like Oxford, it's got lots of people who live there. There's lots of it's actually quite a lot of service industries in Cambridge. So lovely city as well. It's a beautiful city. I would say Cambridge is slightly quieter than Oxford. Oxford is still quite close to central London. Cambridge is a little bit further out and there's a lot more countryside around Cambridge. And how far is it from London? There's about 2.5 hours. So it's a bit more out there. It is a little bit more out there, yeah. And I remember we were talking about most of your Prime Ministers graduated from Oxford. So, I remember you mentioning that Oxford is more humanities and Cambridge focuses a little bit more on science. Yeah, it's not as clear cut as that, but Cambridge does have a really strong scientific background. So for example, the Cavendish laboratory is one of the most famous in the world, in particular, for physics and biology, so it's really famous, even though it's quite new, it's 19th century, but this is where the electron, the neutron and DNA were discovered.Impressive. But having said that, it's not all science because I know that there is something theatrical going on in Cambridge.Yes, you have the really famous amateur theatrical club, footlights. I don't know. Hugh Laurie?Yes, Hugh Laurie, John Oliver, Douglas Adams. So for those of you who have listened to our literature album, we've talked about Douglas Adams and The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, this is where they all started. 对, 我们的名著专辑专门才讲过他的一本书。Yeah, talking about books though, Cambridge has some amazing libraries. There are over 100 libraries in Cambridge and the main one is actually what we call a legal deposit library. What is a legal deposit library? So under British law, every book that is published in the UK and Ireland, Cambridge University library can request a copy of it for free. Oh, so it's more like almost like an archive for record keeping. Yeah, Oxford has the same thing as well. But every book that is published in the UK generally goes to Cambridge University library. So that's about 100,000 books every single year. So that's like heaven for bookworms. I love the bookshops in Cambridge. Imagine being a student going to Cambridge...Oh, God, amazing.

FriendsLikeUs
Favorite Bevelations With Bevy Smith!

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 4, 2023 57:10


Favorite Episode of 2022! Lessons from a Mutha, Auntie, and Bestie with Bevy Smith! Bevy Smith, Joyelle Johnson, and Zainab Johnson visit Friends Like Us and discuss how it gets greater later and other Bevelations with host Marina Franklin!   Bevy Smith Quintessential Harlem girl, life-long New Yorker and Gracie Award Winner Bevy Smith is the host of Sirius XM's “Bevelations” on Radio Andy.  Once a wildly successful luxury fashion publishing exec, Bevy shifted her professional goals over a decade ago to pursue a life in front of the camera. A pop culture aficionado and fashion expert, Bevy served as moderator of Bravo TV's revolutionary “Fashion Queens," and was a former co-host on the nationally syndicated “Page Six TV.”  Bevy continues to be part of “The Wendy Williams Show's Style Squad.” Her memoir Bevelations: Lessons from a Mutha, Auntie, Bestie is available where books are sold. Joyelle Nicole Johnson is a Brooklyn-based stand-up comedian, writer, and actress. She made her network TV debut on Late Night with Seth Meyers and most recently performed as the warm-up act for Hasan Minhaj's Patriot Act. She wrote for the final season of Broad City, and has performed on Comedy Central's digital series Comics to Watch, Wyatt Cenac's Night Train for Seeso, Laff Tracks for TruTV as well as being a panelist for Refinery 29/Facebook Watch's After After Party and MTV News. And while transitioning to the headliner that she is today she regularly features for Hannibal Buress and has opened for Dave Chappelle, Maria Bamford & Russell Peters. She also combines her dream of comedy and activism by touring with Daily Show creator Lizz Winstead's Lady Parts Justice League. Her comedy special Love Joy on Peacock has been nominated for the Critic's Choice Award Best Comedy Special. Zainab Johnson , a stand-up comedian, actress, and writer is quickly being propelled as one of the most unique and engaging performers on stage and screen. In 2019, Zainab was named one of Variety's Top 10 Comics To Watch. Recently, she was one of the hosts for Netflix's new show "100 Humans". You can also catch her as Aleesha on the Amazon Prime comedy series "Upload". Zainab made her first late night stand up appearance on NBC's Late Night with Seth Meyers, and has also had appearances on HBO's All Def Comedy (2017), NBC's Last Comic Standing (2014), Arsenio (2014), BET's Comic View (2014), AXSTV's Gotham Comedy Live! She also just recently starred in a new web series titled Avant-Guardians. Zainab is a regular at the Improv Comedy Club in LA and the Comedy Cellar in NY, and has performed in the Montreal Just For Laughs Festival as one of the 2014 New Faces of Comedy and returned numerous times since.  Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

The Comedy Cellar: Live from the Table

Tyler Fischer is an actor and stand-up comedian. He has performed on America's Got Talent, NBC's Chicago Med, TV Land's YOUNGER and STARTUP on Netflix. He has been on Last Week Tonight with John Oliver and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, and recently co-starred in the western film Terror on the Prairie on The Daily Wire. His new comedy special "The New Normal'' is available on Youtube.

The Comedy Cellar: Live from the Table

Tyler Fischer is an actor and stand-up comedian. He has performed on America's Got Talent, NBC's Chicago Med, TV Land's YOUNGER and STARTUP on Netflix. He has been on Last Week Tonight with John Oliver and The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, and recently co-starred in the western film Terror on the Prairie on The Daily Wire. His new comedy special "The New Normal'' is available on Youtube.

Entertainment(x)
David Dabbon Part 2 ”Be Confident Of The Work You've Done”

Entertainment(x)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 29, 2022 19:11


David Dabbon (daviddabbon.com)(IG:@daviddabbon)(TW:@daviddabbon) is a composer/arranger based in New York City.  He earned an Emmy nomination for composing the music to the song “Eat Shit, Bob!” which aired on HBO's award-winning Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. On Broadway, he worked as the dance arranger for the Tony-nominated musical adaptation of Beetlejuice, the revival of Funny Girl,  and the celebrated musical comedy Disaster! He also provided additional orchestrations for the Broadway bio-musical Sondheim on Sondheim (Grammy nomination).  David is wrote original music and dance arrangements for the new production of Bob Fosse's Dancin'  (The Old Globe). ​ ​​He has an ongoing collaboration with six-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald, regularly providing orchestrations for her concerts and albums. His work can be heard on both Audra McDonald New York Philharmonic: Sing Happy and Audra McDonald: Go Back Home. His orchestration of the song “Somewhere/Some Other Time” was performed at the 42nd annual Kennedy Center Honors. ​Other works as composer include: Game On: an interactive game show musical (premiered at Pittsburgh C.L.O), Our New Town (production at Wagner College),  Golden Lotus (Workshop through Broadway Asia),Surface (Ballet Commission through Dallas Black Dance Theatre) The Mysteries (Marathon plays in 2014 at The Flea), All God's Creatures (feature length film), Dori the Donor (short film). ​He provided arrangements and orchestrations for the HBO documentary Six by Sondheim. ​ David is also a Usual Suspect at New York Theatre Workshop, a member of the Television Academy, ASCAP and The Society of Composers and Lyricists.   He earned a master of music degree in choral conducting from Carnegie Mellon University (under the tutelage of Dr. Robert Page) and a self-defined bachelor of music degree from The Hartt School.

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert
John Oliver's Community Calendar | Colbert Classic

The Late Show Pod Show with Stephen Colbert

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 8:16 Very Popular


John Oliver helped Stephen look into what was happening in John's English hometown, Bedford in this classic edition of Community Calendar. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

FriendsLikeUs
Top Topic Episode Of 2022! Real Talk On Food Shaming

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 28, 2022 100:01


A favorite episode in 2022! Listen to our golden episode now! Dr. Psyche Williams-Forson and Maijia Digiorgio visit Friends and have that real talk about race and food shaming with host Marina Franklin. Dr. Psyche Williams-Forson is currently Professor and Chair of American Studies at the University of Maryland College Park. She is also author of the award-winning Building Houses out of Chicken Legs: Black Women, Food, and Power, a groundbreaking study that explores the nexus between food, gender, race, class, and power in the United States. Her forthcoming book, Eating While Black: Real Talk on Food Shaming and Policing in America, examines anti-Black racism in and around our food lives. She is a cultural studies expert who combines design thinking, qualitative assessment methods, (including interviews, focus groups, observations and record reviews), oral history and material culture to foster social and systemic change. She has consulted for a number of historical and cultural heritage sites, public and private sector organizations, and provided numerous keynote addresses on race and culture. A proud member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., Dr. Williams-Forson holds her bachelor's degree in English, African-American Studies/Women's Studies from the University of Virginia. She earned her master's and doctorate in American Studies (with a certificate in Women's Studies) from the University of Maryland College Park. Maija DiGiorgio is a comedian, actor, writer, radio personality, filmmaker, musician, and a NY-to-LA transplant. In her first year of doing stand-up comedy, she took the comedy world by storm while taping five national TV appearances, which included her receiving a standing ovation at NBC's “Live from the Apollo”. Her hour special for Comedy Dynamics titled “Maija! Maija! Maija!,” recorded at the Tribeca Film Festival in NYC, is on Amazon Prime. Her Dry Bar Special “Maija Pinion” is currently airing on Amazon Prime and AppleTV has already reached over six million views on the web. Since her impressive start in comedy, DiGiorgio has performed at a wide array of notable venues and events throughout the world—including New York City's Beacon Theater, the New Orleans' Essence Festival, and Scotland's Edinburgh Festival—as well as on TV performances across most major networks—including HBO's “Def Comedy Jam,” NBC's “Comics Unleashed,” Fox's “Laughs” and the “Uncontrolled Comedy Hour,” and BET's “Comic View.” Through her work, she has had the opportunity to perform alongside many industry standouts, including Dave Chappelle, Kevin Hart, Bill Burr, Dane Cook, Wanda Sykes, Mike Epps, and Tracy Morgan. DiGiorgio has been described as “Fantastic!” by Dave Chappelle and has been referred to as “A f**king star!” by Bill Burr.  Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf

Product, Explained
S1E110 - Wren, Explained

Product, Explained

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 34:51


In this episode about Wren, Jeff and Mike talk about the size of a ton of carbon dioxide, climate anxiety, and how you can start making a difference today. Episode 110: Wren, Explained [00:40] Mike's passion and sustainability filibuster [1:30] MIT Technology Review - What is a ton of carbon dioxide? Hint - it's a cube full of telephone poles that weighs as much as a great white shark. [4:00] The IPCC, avoiding 1.5 degrees celsius warming, and how carbon dioxide/greenhouse gas emissions overfilling the earth's atmosphere are analogous to a bathtub overflowing with water. [5:00] Carbon Mitigation vs. Carbon Removal vs. Carbon Capture. Also - what do we do with all of this carbon that we capture? [6:45] What is Wren? Hint: your “All in One Climate Subscription” [7:30] What's the average carbon footprint in the US? Wren's carbon footprint calculator. [8:15] How do you choose how much carbon to offset? What about changing your behaviors like eating less meat or driving less? [10:30] Not all carbon credits are made equal; for example forest preservation to carbon removal efforts like Climeworks. John Oliver's expose on the pitfalls behind Carbon Capture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6p8zAbFKpW0 [13:00] Scientific American published a study that in general, the more you earn - the higher your individual carbon footprint [14:00] What's the benefit for customers for paying for a service like this? For customers like Mike, they're deeply passionate about this space, much of the benefit is realized in feeling like you're ‘doing your part' vs. the Tragedy of the commons problem. [16:30] What will it take for real changes to occur? [19:30] What is Wren's business model? Wren indexes highly on transparency and brings a portfolio approach to your subscription dollars. [22:00] Some of Wren's portfolio projects include Biochar in California, Mineral weathering in Scotland, and tech enabled rainforest protection. [24:00] The History of Wren - and how the team was initially focused on HR software before heading to Y Combinator [27:15] Wren's target customers are likely climate conscious people that want to spend money to see climate action implemented. Also Climate Anxiety is real. [30:00] Other competitors in the space are great - like Zopeful, but no climate solution is a bad solution - we need all hands on deck. [31:20] ProdEx scores: Mike 4.9 stars and Jeff 4.3 out of 5; if you're interested in Wren - check out www.wren.co/join/mikealcazaren to get your first month free. [32:30] Season 2 is coming next year! Let us know who you'd like to hear us interview on the podcast!

Series Podcast: This Way Out
The Queerest News of 2022 (pt.1)

Series Podcast: This Way Out

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 27, 2022 28:59


With attacks on LGBTQ (especially transgender) youth by Republican-controlled U.S. state legislatures, the war in Ukraine, and WNBA All-Star Brittney Griner's captivity in Russia, it's been a year of living dangerously for the queer community. Part 1 of our 2022 news review covers these major stories, easing the pain with satire by John Oliver and Jon Stewart, and a salute to the Bondian spy-adversary homoeroticism between “Skyfall” stars Daniel Craig and Javier Bardem. (NewsWrap returns the week of January 9th.) All this on the December 26, 2022 edition of This Way Out! Join our family of listener-donors today at http://thiswayout.org/donate/

Live From Detroit: The Jeff Dwoskin Show
Comedian Josh Gondelman is a People Pleaser

Live From Detroit: The Jeff Dwoskin Show

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 50:50


Hailing from Boston, comedian Josh Godelman worked tirelessly on his comedy. It all paid off after winning the Laughing Skull Comedy Festival. 4 Emmys and multiple books and albums later Josh is considered one of the best comedians working today. My guest, Josh Gondelman and I discuss: Meeting at the Laughing Skull Comedy Festival 2010 Josh winning the Laughing Skull Comedy Festival Hanging out at the Clermont Lounge Josh's comedy story which starts in Boston and takes us to New York Hell gigs vs Swell gigs Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (writer for 5 years) The best place to showcase your Emmy collection @Seinfeldtoday- Josh's Twitter sensation Writer and producer for Desus and Mero Josh's Make My Day podcast Wiki What? and much more! Check out Josh's brand new comedy special People Pleaser! (link below) Josh Gondelman is a comedian and writer known for his clever and relatable style. He has performed stand-up comedy on television shows such as "Conan" and "The Late Show with Stephen Colbert," and has written for "Desus & Mero" and "Last Week Tonight with John Oliver." In addition to his work in comedy, Gondelman is also a co-author of the book "Nice Try: Stories of Best Intentions and Mixed Results." His ability to find the humor in everyday situations and his charming stage presence make him a beloved performer among audiences of all ages. You're going to love my conversation with Josh Gondelman Website Twitter Instagram People Pleaser: comedy special Follow Jeff Dwoskin: Jeff Dwoskin on Twitter The Jeff Dwoskin Show podcast on Twitter Podcast website Podcast on Instagram Yes, the show used to be called Live from Detroit: The Jeff Dwoskin Show Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Entertainment(x)
David Dabbon Part 1 ”Make The Right Decision. Not The Emotional One.”

Entertainment(x)

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 26, 2022 23:39


David Dabbon (daviddabbon.com)(IG:@daviddabbon)(TW:@daviddabbon) is a composer/arranger based in New York City.  He earned an Emmy nomination for composing the music to the song “Eat Shit, Bob!” which aired on HBO's award-winning Last Week Tonight with John Oliver. On Broadway, he worked as the dance arranger for the Tony-nominated musical adaptation of Beetlejuice, the revival of Funny Girl,  and the celebrated musical comedy Disaster! He also provided additional orchestrations for the Broadway bio-musical Sondheim on Sondheim (Grammy nomination).  David is wrote original music and dance arrangements for the new production of Bob Fosse's Dancin'  (The Old Globe). ​ ​​He has an ongoing collaboration with six-time Tony Award winner Audra McDonald, regularly providing orchestrations for her concerts and albums. His work can be heard on both Audra McDonald New York Philharmonic: Sing Happy and Audra McDonald: Go Back Home. His orchestration of the song “Somewhere/Some Other Time” was performed at the 42nd annual Kennedy Center Honors. ​Other works as composer include: Game On: an interactive game show musical (premiered at Pittsburgh C.L.O), Our New Town (production at Wagner College),  Golden Lotus (Workshop through Broadway Asia),Surface (Ballet Commission through Dallas Black Dance Theatre) The Mysteries (Marathon plays in 2014 at The Flea), All God's Creatures (feature length film), Dori the Donor (short film). ​He provided arrangements and orchestrations for the HBO documentary Six by Sondheim. ​ David is also a Usual Suspect at New York Theatre Workshop, a member of the Television Academy, ASCAP and The Society of Composers and Lyricists.   He earned a master of music degree in choral conducting from Carnegie Mellon University (under the tutelage of Dr. Robert Page) and a self-defined bachelor of music degree from The Hartt School.

Sweden in Focus
Swedish news quiz 2022 - How well do you remember the year?

Sweden in Focus

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 32:00


Here are some of the stories we discuss in this week's episode:John Oliver discover's Malmö's sexy binsSweden blocks extradition of Turkish journalistGovernment orders crackdown on work and residence permit abusesCrown Princess's favourite chimp dies after zoo escapeJan: stormsFeb: Bishop defrockedMarch: MelodifestivalenApril: Nyamko Sabuni resignsMay: Boris Johnson to HarpsundJune: Riksbank hikes ratesJuly: Pole vault world recordAug: Right-wing extremist candidatesSep: Swedish electionOct: Nobel prizesNov: Spontaneous dance banDec: Hottest gifts Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

The Bugle
THE BUGLE REVIEWS 2022, PART 2

The Bugle

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 23, 2022 35:54


Andy introduces the second of a two part guide to 2022. In this episode we see the unravelling of British Prime Minister(s), the reaction to the passing of The Queen and the return of John Oliver for a birthday special.Featuring:Andy ZaltzmanChris AddisonNish KumarTiff StevensonAnuvab PalJohn OliverAlice FraserProduced by Chris Skinner and Laura Turner Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

EBPL Podcast from the East Brunswick Public Library
Read, Watch, Listen, S4 Ep1: Harry Marks

EBPL Podcast from the East Brunswick Public Library

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 22, 2022 7:00


Chris Barnes and local author and podcaster Harry Marks talk about everything he's reading, watching, and listening to, and yes, it's a little late, but Christmas is a state of mind, right? Check out all of these items with your EBPL library card here: https://ilove.ebpl.org/adults/news/read-watch-listen-s4-ep3-harry-marks READ Thistlefoot by GennaRose Nethercott WATCH Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO subscription required) Wednesday (Netflix subscription required) Die Hard Scrooged Krampus LISTEN James Taylor's One Man Band, July 2007 Michael Buble's Christmas Merry Christmas from Ella Fitzgereald Bing Crosby Christmas Classics About Harry Marks: https://linktr.ee/hcmarks Harry's Books: The Library at the Center of the Earth The Prophet

FriendsLikeUs
Who Hates Patti LaBelle's Pies?!

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 21, 2022 86:35


This week on friends Vanessa Fraction and Kenice Mobley visit friends and discuss Brittney Griner swap, Dorothy Pitman Hughes, Patti LaBelle concert scare and more with host Marina Franklin.  Kenice Mobley performs stand up comedy around the world and recently made her late-night debut on The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. She appears regularly on SiriusXM and is a Finalist in the StandUp NBC Competition. This year, Kenice worked on the BET Awards and By Us For Us, a sketch comedy series presented by Color of Change. She hosts Complexify on ViceNews, Love About Town, an interview and relationship podcast, and Make Yourself Cry, available on Planet Scum. Her new album : “Follow up questions” is available on all platforms right now!  Vanessa Fraction: Currently, Ms. Fraction is a Co-host with THE NAPPY BOY RADIO PODCAST hosted by; Rapper, Producer TPAIN. She is also an Analyst for THE COMEDY HYPE NEWS SHOW. Additionally, Vanessa (aka Action Fraction) is a certified Self-Defense instructor and teaches a class, “Kicks & Comedy”, That empowers women with life-saving self-defense skills and lifts spirits by infusing comedy.   Born in St. Louis and raised in Chicago, this mother of two has over a decade of experience captivating fans around the world with her one of a kind storytelling talent. Whether you see her on stage, television or hear her on the radio, Vanessa is on a mission to empower her audience to overcome their struggles while laughing at hers. These can be hilarious tales of being a single mother paying child support or revealing anecdotes on the battle of being a strong, successful black woman. Her television credits include appearances on Comedy Knock Out and Laff Mobb's Laff Tracks (TruTV), Tales (BET), and a  recurring role on BounceTV's Mann and Wife. Vanessa's hilarious and bold stand-up comedy has been showcased on many shows such as HBO's Def Comedy Jam, 1st Amendment Standup (STARZ) and Mike Epps Live at Club Nokia. As a writer she has worked on The Arsenio Hall Show (CBS), 106 & Park and The Mo'Nique Show (BET). Her film roles include Barber Shop 2: Back in Business and Kim Field's Holiday Love: The Rebirth. Her quick wit and sharp humor is featured when she guests hosts on entertainment shows like DishNation (FOX) When you "do the math" Vanessa Fraction equals One Very Funny Lady! Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf.

Playful Humans - People Who Play for a Living
David Kaye - Voice Actor (Megatron, Movie Trailers, & More)

Playful Humans - People Who Play for a Living

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2022 36:46


David Kaye's voice-over career began with ‘The Great American Hero', General Hawk in the DIC animation series, GI Joe in 1989. Working as an on-air talent for radio station CKLG (LG73) quickly became less interesting as both on-camera and behind-the-mic roles started taking up more time. Over the next two decades, David's voice career became legendary!David's biggest moment was when he was cast as ‘Megatron' in 1994 in the wonderfully popular series ‘Transformers.'  In 2007, David “crossed over” to become the only actor in the history of the franchise to play the lead villain AND the lead hero when he was cast as ‘Optimus Prime' for Cartoon Network's ‘Transformers: Animated.”David's voice can be heard in an insane amount of TV shows, movies, video games adn commercials like:  Insomniac's ‘Ratchet & Clank' as Clank, ‘Spider-Man: Shattered Dimensions' as ‘Mysterio', ‘Nick Fury' and ‘Captain America' in ‘Marvel: Ultimate Alliance 2', ‘Missing Link' in ‘Monsters vs Aliens', the game, the voice of Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, and many movie trailers like the Secret Life of Pets and Bad Moms!Find David Kaye at: https://www.davidkaye.com/Support the showJoin the Playful Humans community: Subscribe to the YouTube channel Subscribe to the Podcast Join the culture club! Book a playshop for your team Support our sponsors

Pshht Themes
The World Cup: Ughhhhhhhhhhh

Pshht Themes

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 19, 2022 97:49


Erin and Brennan take a moment to dust off their cleats and shin guards, the pitch ahead echoing with the roars of fans from around the world to see their heroes play. Those cheers: "WE WANT BEER!!!" The whistle blows and instead of making a start, Erin and Brennan begin to dissect the 2022 World Cup in Qatar. We discuss DESTINY, DESTINY, and Messi holding aloft the World Cup. We cheer the courage of the Iranian players, congratulate Morocco for one of the greatest performances ever, and laugh that Ronaldo is just the worst person. At the end, we have a greater kinship with John Oliver and his disdain for FIFA, A.K.A. that company the fans want to give a red card to. 

FriendsLikeUs
David Kau and Gilli Apter Visit Friends

FriendsLikeUs

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 14, 2022 110:09


Comedians David Kau and Gilli Apter visit friends and discuss comedy in South Africa, the danger of Kanye, Ramaphosa's scandal explained and more! David Kau- South African comedian who first gained mainstream exposure through the television comedy series The Pure Monate Show - which he co-created and produced - in 2003. Born in Maokeng near Kroonstad in the Free State province, Kau matriculated from Meridian College, Pretoria, in 1994. The following year he began a Performers' Diploma in Speech and Drama at the University of Cape Town, graduating in 1998. In the same year he performed at his first major comedy event - the Smirnoff International Comedy Festival. He returned to the festival the following year, touring from Cape Town to Durban. Since then he has headlined numerous comedy festivals and performed his own comedy specials. He also co-created and hosted the stand-up comedy show Blacks Only. In 2006 he was the host of the 3rd Channel O Music Video Awards. The following year he was a co-presenter of Nelson Mandela's 46664 concert. In 2008 he was the recipient of the inaugural Mzansi Star Comedian award at the first annual Stars of Mzansi Awards. His competitors in the category were Loyiso Gola, Marc Lottering and Krijay Govender. David hosted and judged of the SABC1 reality talent show So You Think You're Funny! He also co-created and hosted the stand-up comedy show Blacks Only – at Emperors Palace in Johannesburg back in 2004, which hasgone on to be the biggest comedy brand in the country, and 13 years later it is a staple in the entertainment landscape of South Africa. It has since featured local and International comedians Capone, Dwayne Perkins, Ruben Paul, Marina Franklin, and Trevor Noah, with David Kau hosting. Jimmy Carr made a surprise appearance at the show a few years ago. He was the host of the 3rd Channel O Music Video Awards and the following year he was a co-presenter of Nelson Mandela's 46664 concert. Most recent credits: SA Cricket Awards 2022 May, Savanna Comedy Central Comedy show Dec 2021, Nedbank SA Open Golf 2020, 2021 - Nelson Mandela Foundation Golf day 2022 April, MC and Comedy- Kirsty Watts Foundation Golf day (Comedy) 20th May 2022.  Gilli Apter is an award-winning filmmaker, TV comedy writer and mainly - comedian, from South Africa. Gilli has recently toured extensively throughout Europe and the UK, as well as Canada, Australia and Norway, hosting the comedy show, Story Party. In 2022 Gilli performed in LA and New York, ultimately heading to London where she is currently a regular face on the comedy circuit as well as the host of the weekly show, Story Party (storyparty.co). In 2018 Gilli was selected by Trevor Noah to film a short special as part of his Nationwild show for South Africa's streaming service, Showmax and in 2022 she filmed a short special for the Netflix show, Only Jokes Allowed. Both are currently available to watch. Gilli has recently had to end her writing career because she got some bad bitch nails and as a result, can no longer type. All jokes written prior to this event in 2022, will be her last. Always hosted by Marina Franklin - One Hour Comedy Special: Single Black Female ( Amazon Prime, CW Network), TBS's The Last O.G, Last Week Tonight with John Oliver, Hysterical on FX, The Movie Trainwreck, Louie Season V, The Jim Gaffigan Show, Conan O'Brien, Stephen Colbert, HBO's Crashing, and The Breaks with Michelle Wolf.