Podcasts about XS

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  • 483PODCASTS
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  • Oct 18, 2021LATEST

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Best podcasts about XS

Latest podcast episodes about XS

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight
So This Is What Rock Bottom Feels Like | Mon. Oct 18, 2021

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 18, 2021 20:03


I am so sorry Miami Dolphins fans. After an episode of hope, we were crashed back down to reality thanks to our team. Following the trip to London, and an embarrassing loss to the Jacksonville Jaguars, Miami now sits at 1-5. The outlook is dark, and frankly, there isn't much hope to be had. So, what to do from here? On today's episode, we briefly touched on the game, what happened, and the few silver linings to be taken away. Tua played well, Jaylen Waddle looks good, but something is deeply wrong with this organization. We try to parse through and figure it out. Join us, and let's dive in!

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
Which Big Ten Team Has The Best Chance To Beat Ohio State?

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 16, 2021 23:51


Halfway through the season, the Ohio State football team appears to be rounding into form. The offense looks explosive, the defense now looks fairly solid, and the Buckeyes' path to a fifth-consecutive Big Ten championship is starting to take shape. But which team still on their schedule presents the biggest challege to Ohio State's offense and defense?Buckeye Scoop's Xs and Os guru Ross Fulton joins host Tom Orr to break down what he's seeing from Ohio State on both sides of the ball right now, and what it could mean for the rest of the season.

Paul Allen
#92Noon! 9a Hour 10/14 - Evason/Zimm/Roach

Paul Allen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 14, 2021 44:25


Wild coach Dean Evason starts the show! Then a replay of Mike Zimmer's Xs & Os chat with PA, followed by the Voice of all voices, Alan Roach!

Press Send with Chinae Alexander
Remember: You Can Always Turn the Boat Around

Press Send with Chinae Alexander

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 13, 2021 47:02


Calling in with their questions today are listeners Lauren Gonzalez and Rachel Ho! I'm dishing out some advice on how to make planning fun, finding a balance between patience and pressure, navigating a delayed midlife crisis, how to avoid making your anxiety your truth, and the idea that you can always turn the boat around if you change your mind about something.  Old Navy is changing the shopping game with BODEQUALITY. BODEQUALITY means that now, in every store, you'll see new mannequins in multiple sizes, and online you can see the styles you love on models in sizes 4, 12 *and* 18. It means a consistent and comfortable fit for every size, 00 through 30, XS through 4X. That's BODEQUALITY — a revolutionized shopping experience, for women everywhere. See Oldnavy.com/bodequality for additional details. Produced by Dear Media

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
Will Ohio State's Defensive Improvement Continue Against Maryland?

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 15:39


Ohio State's defense has come a long way since the first couple weeks of the season where they looked totally lost and very predictable. But how much can you really take away from lockdown performances against offenses like Akron and Rutgers?BuckeyeScoop's Xs and Os guru Ross Fulton joins host Tom Orr to answer that and much more.- Why did Ohio State play so much Cover 2 against Rutgers after barely showing it earlier in the year?- What tweaks did they add to make themselves even less predictable? (And what the heck is MEG?)- How has Ronnie Hickman turned into such a dominating piece of the defense?- What change did the Buckeyes make to Craig Young's role, and when will he be a bigger part of the game plan?- What is Ross watching for when the Buckeyes face a more impressive Maryland offense this weekend?

Free Money with Matt and Drew
Picks Against The Spread for Week 6 College Football, Week 5 NFL

Free Money with Matt and Drew

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 61:59


Collectively, the Free Money Podcast went 25-23 last week, which, by my calculations, is exactly as the podcast title states: free money. Was it enough free money to buy that new boat you want? I hope not. If it was, you're gambling more than I feel comfortable being an indirect part of. But 25-23 is a winning record and a profitable weekend for the pod. Jay In Lyndon carried an otherwise even record into the green: Week 6 Results Matt: 8-8 Drew: 8-8 Jay: 9-7 25-23 overall Free Money returns this week with more picks against the spread for both college football and the NFL. Green is the goal again and I don't see why we can't keep it going with a board full of potential, although Jay is responsible for the games discussed on the podcast so he determines our portfolio. Also on this week's episode, Matt and I throw in more KSR randomness so it's not all Xs and Os, down-in-the-mud football talk for the full hour. Of course, Jay In Lyndon gave his Louisville Restaurant of the Week too. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Paul Allen
#92Noon! 9am Hour 10/7 - Vikings/Zimmer

Paul Allen

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 41:50


First hour is all Vikings, looking at how to "Dunk on Detroit" this weekend, then Mike Zimmer's Xs & Os chat with PA, and some old VIkes/Lions nostalgia to finish the first hour.

Big Blue Banter
All-22 Defense: Giants come up big in key spots, but major questions remain

Big Blue Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 52:55


 Dan and Nick dive into the All-22 coaches film to break down the defense from the Giants' Week 4 win over the Saints. As always, they break down drive by drive, individual plays and players that stood out. They also dive into the Xs and Os and hand out weekly awards for individual players.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Big Blue Banter
All-22 Offense: Embrace debate; Andrew Thomas or Daniel Jones for game MVP

Big Blue Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 91:09


Dan and Nick dive into the All-22 coaches film to break down the offense from the Giants' Week 4 win over the Saints. As always, they break down drive by drive, individual plays and players that stood out. Concepts that caught their attention. Xs and Os deep dives and of course superlatives of the week including the best route run, best play call, unheralded player of the week and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Al Galdi Podcast
Episode 160: breakdown of Taylor Heinicke with former ODU head coach Bobby Wilder and much more

The Al Galdi Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 6, 2021 69:35


09:59 - Washington Football Team: thoughts - and some scheduled fun - off Washington placing Jon Bostic and Torry McTyer on the Reserve/Injured List and signing a kicker - Chris Blewitt - to the practice squad 22:12 - Guest: Taylor Heinicke's collegiate head coach and former Old Dominion head coach Bobby Wilder with an extensive Xs and Os breakdown of Heinicke's play through four games in the Washington Football Team's 2021 season and of Washington's defensive struggles 51:41 - Washington Football Team: analysis of Washington on fourth downs and on two-point-conversion attempts in the 34-30 win at the Atlanta Falcons in Week 4 and over the last few seasons 01:01:49 - Nationals: react to the Nats re-signing Alcides Escobar https://www.tickpick.com/galdi Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Big Blue Banter
Giants in 10(ish): How the WR depth chart should look now

Big Blue Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 19:53


Dan and Nick dive into a new segment called Giants in 10(ish) or Giants in 10 or more -- the title is a work in progress but the objective is obvious. They'll be tackling 30,000-foot view questions, key topics, Xs and Os and more in a segment that will last 10 minutes or just a bit more. On the first edition, they dive into the WR depth chart and how to maximize this position group and the offense after the emergence of Kadarius Toney and John Ross in Week 4. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

The Neuro Experience
Protecting Players at All Cost

The Neuro Experience

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 4, 2021 49:41


We have a pandemic happening in our society. I'm not talking about COVID-19, I'm talking about the way in which coaches and trainers are training athletes without being properly credentialed. The coaching profession is ever changing. Coaches at each level of competition need to know more than just the Xs and the O's in order to be successful. As the primary individuals tasked with developing athletes from average to elite, they are challenged with not understanding how to optimise an athlete and get them to the NFL while also maintaining their health and well being for the long term. In this podcast I interview Pratik Patel and Alan Couzens on the intersection of performance and longevity. Alan coaches endurance athletes and uses the latest in science to optimise both performance and longevity. Ptraik is the assistant coach at the New York Giants. He also serves as the director of performance, nutrition and is the assistant Strength and Conditioning coach. Sponsors:  MUSE- get 15% off - CODE: NEURO Find Pratik here: @PratikxPatelFind Alan here: @Alan_CouzensSocial:Newsletter: https://bit.ly/3ewI5P0Instagram: thediamondboss_Twitter : louisanicola_The information provided in this show is not medical advice, nor should it be taken or applied as a replacement for medical advice. The Neuro Experience podcast, its employees, guests and affiliates assume no liability for the application of the information discussed. 

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight
Dispelling Myths Surrounding the Miami Dolphins Outlook | Thu. Sep 30, 2021

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 19:45


On today's episode, Moose becomes the Love Guru as he talks about why so many Miami Dolphins fans have fallen out of love with this team. What's the root cause? Is there merit for this lost hope? We talk about Flores' coaching prowess, Grier's ability to manage a roster, as well as Tua Tagovailoa and his potential future. Join us for a fun episode that hopefully brings back the spark if you've lost it, let's dive in!Sponsor: https://mybookie.ag (Use PROMO CODE "PHINSPOD")

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
Is Ohio State's Defense Improving Enough To Save The Buckeyes' 2021 Season?

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 30, 2021 18:28


The Ohio State defense looked much better against Akron than it had in previous games. But was that just because they were playing a bad MAC team? Or were there real signs of improvement?Buckeye Scoop's Xs and Os guru Ross Fulton joins host Tom Orr to break down the changes Ohio State made in both scheme and personnel, shares his thoughts on which ones are likely to stay long-term, and just how much better this Buckeye defense could be. Plus, a preview of the Buckeyes' trip to Rutgers. What can Ohio State expect from the Scarlet Knights?

Big Blue Banter
All-22 Defense: Azeez shines, Ryan and Peppers struggle in key spots

Big Blue Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 52:11


Dan and Nick dive into the All-22 coaches film of the Giants' defense in their Week 3 loss to the Falcons. They go series by series breaking down key plays, key concepts, Xs and Os, play calling, coverage, pass rush and defense. They also break down the superlatives of the week including unheralded player on film, pass rush grades, pass coverage grades, run defense grades and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Press Send with Chinae Alexander
How to Build a Social Media Following & Argue Emapthetically

Press Send with Chinae Alexander

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 45:55


Sitting down with me today I have listeners Dee Udre and Madeline Pahr as they call in needing advice! We're talking about how to be kind to your partner when you're hurt, how self-improvement can turn into self-isolation, and how to build a social media following and increase brand engagement.   Old Navy: Old Navy is changing the shopping game with BODEQUALITY. BODEQUALITY means that now, in every store, you'll see new mannequins in multiple sizes, and online you can see the styles you love on models in sizes 4, 12 *and* 18. It means a consistent and comfortable fit for every size, 00 through 30, XS through 4X. That's BODEQUALITY — a revolutionized shopping experience, for women everywhere. See Oldnavy.com/bodequality for additional details.   New Day Pod: We're all struggling with something, even if it doesn't look like it from the outside. That's why I want to tell you about New Day -- a new podcast with a simple goal - helping you get through today and look forward to tomorrow. New Day from Lemonada premieres September 15th - listen wherever you get podcasts.   Produced by Dear Media

Big Blue Banter
All-22 Offense: Andrew Thomas game ball, how the Giants only scored 14

Big Blue Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 29, 2021 90:59


Dan and Nick dive into the All-22 coaches film of the Giants' Week 3 loss to the Falcons. They go series by series breaking down key plays, key concepts, Xs and Os, play calling and quarterback play. They also break down the superlatives of the week including unheralded player on film, play call of the week, throw of the week, best route run and a lot more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

MORNING KOMBAT WITH LUKE THOMAS AND BRIAN CAMPBELL
UFC 266: Volkanovski-Ortega, Diaz-Lawler 2 | Joshua-Usyk | Quick Hitters | EP 207

MORNING KOMBAT WITH LUKE THOMAS AND BRIAN CAMPBELL

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 105:36


On Episode 207 of Morning Kombat Luke Thomas and Brian Campbell do a deep dive into the Xs and Os of UFC 266. They start off by previewing the main event and work their way down the card. Anthony Joshua vs. Oleksandr Usyk is also this weekend and the boys break down the fight in detail. They close out the show with quick hitters (Miesha Tate, Jake Paul, Dillon Danis, Masvidal-Edwards?), Dead wrong and Tip2Tip. Morning Kombat' is available on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, Castbox, Google Podcasts, Bullhorn and wherever else you listen to podcasts.    For more Combat Sports coverage subscribe here: youtube.com/MorningKombat   Follow our hosts on Twitter: @BCampbellCBS, @lthomasnews, @MorningKombat    For Morning Kombat gear visit:morning kombat.store   Follow our hosts on Instagram: @BrianCampbell, @lukethomasnews, @MorningKombat  To hear more from the CBS Sports Podcast Network, visit https://www.cbssports.com/podcasts/

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
Where Ohio State's Defense Is Improved, Where It Still Needs More Work

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2021 14:02


The Ohio State defense took a step forward against Tulsa, with new play-caller Matt Barnes seemingly making it less predictable and perhaps fixing some of the more glaring issues. But how much more work needs to be done, and is there enough time to fix the biggest remaining problems this season?Buckeye Scoop's Xs and Os guru Ross Fulton joins host Tom Orr to dissect the Ohio State defense, and figure out what's working and what's not as the Buckeyes head into their final non-conference tune-up of the year.

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
Why Ohio State's Rushing Attack Suddenly Looks So Dominant

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 23, 2021 12:17


One week after the Ohio State football team threw for nearly 500 yards, but struggled to run it against Oregon, the Buckeyes completely turned things around and put together a dominating ground attack against Tulsa. So what did the Buckeyes do to get the rushing game going again? Buckeye Scoop's Xs and Os guru Ross Fulton joins host Tom Orr to answer that question and more. - How a downhill rushing attack changed their attack- How a switch to two tight ends may have opened things up as well- TreVeyon Henderson's agility may have opened up some big plays in areas the Buckeyes hadn't attacked much before- The concept that victimized the Buckeyes against Oregon, which they used to their advantage against Tulsa

Greater Than Code
251: Diplomatic Accessibility Advocacy with Todd Libby

Greater Than Code

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 46:41


01:09 - Todd's Superpower: Advocacy For Accessibility * Getting Started * Designing With Web Standards by Jeffrey Zeldman (https://www.amazon.com/Designing-Web-Standards-Jeffrey-Zeldman/dp/0321616952) * The A11Y Project (https://www.a11yproject.com/) * W3C (https://www.w3.org/) 06:18 - Joining The W3C * The W3C Community Page (https://www.w3.org/community/) 07:44 - Getting People/Companies/Stakeholders to Care/Prioritize About Accessibility * Making A Strong Case For Accessibility by Todd Libby (https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2021/07/strong-case-for-accessibility/) * Diplomatic Advocacy * You Don't Want To Get Sued! / $$$ * “We are all temporarily abled.” 15:20 - The Domino's Pizza Story * Supreme Court hands victory to blind man who sued Domino's over site accessibility (https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/07/dominos-supreme-court.html) 18:21 - Things That Typically Aren't Accessible And Should Be * The WebAIM Million Report (https://webaim.org/projects/million/) * WCAG (https://www.w3.org/WAI/standards-guidelines/wcag/) * Color Contrast * Missing Alt Text on Images * Form Input Labels * What's New in WCAG 2.1: Label in Name by Todd Libby (https://css-tricks.com/whats-new-in-wcag-2-1-label-in-name/) * Empty Links * Not Using Document Language * Triggering GIFS / Flashing Content * Empty Buttons – Use a Button Element!! * Tab Order * Semantic HTML, Heading Structure 26:27 - Accessibility for Mobile Devices * Target Size * Looking at WCAG 2.5.5 for Better Target Sizes (https://css-tricks.com/looking-at-wcag-2-5-5-for-better-target-sizes/) * Dragging Movements 28:08 - Color Contrast * Contrast Ratio (https://contrast-ratio.com/) 33:02 - Designing w/ Accessibility in Mind From the Very Beginning * Accessibility Advocates on Every Team * Accessibility Training 36:22 - Contrast (Cont'd) 38:11 - Automating Accessibility! * axe-core-gems (https://github.com/dequelabs/axe-core-gems) Reflections: Mae: Eyeballing for contrast. John: We are all only temporarily abled and getting the ball rolling on building accessibility in from the beginning of projects going forward and fixing older codebases. Mandy: Using alt-tags going forward on all social media posts. Todd: Accessibility work will never end. Accessibility is a right not a privilege. This episode was brought to you by @therubyrep (https://twitter.com/therubyrep) of DevReps, LLC (http://www.devreps.com/). To pledge your support and to join our awesome Slack community, visit patreon.com/greaterthancode (https://www.patreon.com/greaterthancode) To make a one-time donation so that we can continue to bring you more content and transcripts like this, please do so at paypal.me/devreps (https://www.paypal.me/devreps). You will also get an invitation to our Slack community this way as well. Transcript: JOHN: Welcome to Greater Than Code, Episode 251. I'm John Sawers and I'm here with Mae Beale. MAE: Hi, there! And also, Mandy Moore. MANDY: Hi, everyone! I'm Mandy Moore and I'm here today with our guest, Todd Libby. Todd Libby is a professional web developer, designer, and accessibility advocate for 22 years under many different technologies starting with HTML/CSS, Perl, and PHP. Todd has been an avid learner of web technologies for over 40 years starting with many flavors of BASIC all the way to React/Vue. Currently an Accessibility Analyst at Knowbility, Todd is also a member of the W3C. When not coding, you'll usually find Todd tweeting about lobster rolls and accessibility. So before I ask you what your superpower is, I'm going to make a bet and my bet is that I'm 80% positive that your superpower has something to do with lobster rolls. Am I right? [laughter] Am I right? TODD: Well, 80% of the time, you'd be right. I just recently moved to Phoenix, Arizona. So I was actually going to say advocacy for accessibility, but yes, lobster rolls and the consumption of lobster rolls are a big part. MAE: I love it. That's fantastic. MANDY: Okay. Well, tell me about the advocacy. [chuckles] TODD: So it started with seeing family members who are disabled, friends who are disabled, or have family members themselves who are disabled, and the struggles they have with trying to access websites, or web apps on the web and the frustration, the look of like they're about ready to give up. That's when I knew that I would try to not only make my stuff that I made accessible, but to advocate for people in accessibility. MAE: Thank you so much for your work. It is critical. I have personally worked with a number of different populations and started at a camp for children with critical illnesses and currently work at an organization that offers financial services for people with disabilities – well, complex financial needs, which the three target populations that we work with are people with disabilities, people with dementia, and people in recovery. So really excited to talk with you today. Thanks. TODD: You're welcome. JOHN: When you started that journey, did you already have familiarity with accessibility, or was it all just like, “Oh, I get to learn all this stuff so I can start making it better”? TODD: So I fell into it because if you're like me and you started with making table-based layouts way back in the day, because what we had—Mosaic browser, Netscape Navigator, and Internet Explorer—we were making table-based layouts, which were completely inaccessible, but I didn't know that. As the web progressed, I progressed and then I bought a little orange book by Jeffrey Zeldman, Designing with Web Standards, and that pretty much started me on my journey—semantic HTML, progressive enhancement in web standards, and accessibility as well. I tend to stumble into a lot of stuff [laughs] so, and that's a habit of mine. [laughs] MAE: It sounds like it's a good habit and you're using it to help all the other people. So I hate to encourage you to keep stumbling, but by all means. [laughter] Love it. If you were to advise someone wanting to know more about accessibility, would you suggest they start with that same book too, or what would you suggest to someone stumbling around in the dark and not hitting anything yet? TODD: The book is a little outdated. I think the last edition of his book was, I want to say 2018, maybe even further back than that. I would suggest people go on websites like The A11Y project, the a11yproject.com. They have a comprehensive list of resources, links to learning there. Twitter is a good place to learn, to follow people in the accessibility space. The other thing that, if people really want to dive in, is to join The W3C. That's a great place and there's a lot of different groups. You have the CSS Working Group, you have the accessibility side of things, which I'm a part of, the Silver Community Group, which is we're working on the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 3.0, which is still a little ways down the road, but a lot of great people and a lot of different companies. Some of those companies we've heard of—Google, Apple, companies like that all the way down to individuals. Individuals can join as individuals if your company isn't a member of the W3C. So those are the three things that I mainly point to people. If you don't really want to dive into the W3C side of things, there's a lot of resources on the a11yproject.com website that you can look up. MANDY: So what does being a member entail? What do you have to do? Do you have to pay dues? Do you have to do certain projects, maybe start as an individual level, because I'm sure we have mostly individuals listening to the show. Me as a newbie coder, what would I do to get started as a member of this initiative? TODD: Well, I started out as an individual myself, so I joined and I can get you the link to The W3C Community Page. Go to sign up as an individual and someone will approve the form process that you go through—it's nothing too big, it's nothing complicated—and then that will start you on your way. You can join a sub group, you can join a group, a working group, and it doesn't cost an individual. Companies do pay dues to the W3C and if your company is in the W3C, you get ahold of your company's liaison and there's a process they go through to add you to a certain group. Because with me, it was adding me to The Silver Community Group. But as an individual, you can join in, you can hop right into a meeting from there, and then that's basically it. That's how you start. JOHN: What are the challenges you see in getting not only the goals of a W3C, but I'm assuming specifically around accessibility? TODD: Some of the things that I've seen is buy-in from stakeholders is probably the number one hurdle, or barrier. Companies, stakeholders, and board members, they don't think of, or in some cases, they don't care about accessibility until a company is getting sued and that's a shame. That's one of the things that I wrote about; I have an article on Smashing Magazine. Making A Strong Case for Accessibility, it's called and that is one of few things that I've come across. Getting buy-in from stakeholders and getting buy-in from colleagues as well because you have people that they don't think about accessibility, they think about a number of different things. Mostly what I've come across is they don't think about accessibility because there's no budget, or they don't have the time, or the company doesn't have the time. It's not approved by the company. The other thing that is right up there is it's a process—accessibility—making things accessible and most people think that it's a big this huge mountain to climb. If you incorporate accessibility from the beginning of your project, it's so much easier. You don't have to go back and you don't have to climb that mountain because you've waited until the very end. “Oh, we have time now so we'll do the accessibility stuff,” that makes it more hard. MAE: John, your question actually was similar to something I was thinking about with how you developed this superpower and I was going to ask and still will now. [chuckles] How did you afford all the time in the different places where you were overtime to be able to get this focus? And so, how did you make the case along the way and what things did you learn in that persuasion class of life [chuckles] that was able to allow you to have that be where you could focus and spend more time on and have the places where you work prioritize successful? TODD: It was a lot of, I call it diplomatic advocacy. So for instance, the best example I have is I had been hired to make a website, a public facing website, and a SAAS application accessible. The stakeholder I was directly reporting to, we were sitting down in a meeting one day and I said, “Well, I want to make sure that accessibility is the number one priority on these projects,” and he shot back with, “Well, we don't have the disabled users,” and that nearly knocked me back to my chair. [laughs] So that was a surprise. MAE: There's some groaning inside and I had to [chuckles] do it out loud for a moment. Ooh. TODD: Yeah, I did my internal groaning at the meeting so that just was – [chuckles] Yeah, and I remember that day very vividly and I probably will for the rest of my life that I looked at him and I had to stop and think, and I said, “Well, you never know, there's always a chance that you're able, now you could be disabled at any time.” I also pointed out that his eyeglasses that he wore are an assistive technology. So there was some light shed on that and that propelled me even further into advocacy and the accessibility side of things. That meeting really opened my eyes to not everyone is going to get it, not everyone is going to be on board, not everyone is going to think about disabled users; they really aren't. So from there I used that example. I also use what I call the Domino's Pizza card lately because “Oh, you don't want to get sued.' That's my last resort as far as advocacy goes. Other than that, it's showing a videotape of people using their product that are disabled and they can't use it. That's a huge difference maker, when a stakeholder sees that somebody can't use their product. There's numbers out there now that disabled users in this country alone, the United States, make up 25% of the population, I believe. They have a disposable income of $8 trillion. The visually disabled population alone is, I believe it was $1.6 billion, I think. I would have to check that number again, but it's a big number. So the money side of things really gets through to a stakeholder faster than “Well, your eyeglasses are a assistive technology.” So once they hear the financial side of things, their ears perk up real quick and then they maybe get on board. I've never had other than one stakeholder just saying, “No, we're just going to skip that,” and then that company ended up getting sued. So that says a lot, to me anyways. But that's how I really get into it. And then there was a time where I was working for another company. I was doing consulting for them and I was doing frontend mostly. So it was accessibility, but also at the same time, it was more the code side of things. That was in 2018. 2019, I went to a conference in Burlington, Vermont. I saw a friend of mine speaking and he was very passionate about it and that talk, and there was a couple others there as well, it lit that fire under me again, and I jumped right back in and ever since then, it's just then accessibility. MAE: You reminded me one of the arguments, or what did you say? Diplomatic advocacy statements that I have used is that we are all temporarily abled. [chuckles] Like, that's just how it is and seeing things that way we can really shift how you orient to the idea of as other and reduce the othering. But I was also wondering how long it would be before Pizza Hut came up in our combo. [laughter] MANDY: Yeah, I haven't heard of that. Can you tell us what that is? TODD: [chuckles] So it was Domino's and they had a blind user that tried to use their app. He couldn't use their app; their app wasn't accessible. He tried to use the website; the website wasn't accessible. I have a link that I can send over to the whole story because I'm probably getting bits and pieces wrong. But from what I can recall, basically, this user sued Domino's and instead of Domino's spending, I believe it was $36,000 to fix their website and their app, they decided to drag it out for a number of years through court and of course, spent more money than just $36,000. In the end, they lost. I think they tried to appeal to the Supreme Court because they've gone up as high as federal court, but regardless, they lost. They had to – and I don't know if they still have an inaccessible site, or not, or the app for that matter because I don't go to Domino's. But that's basically the story that they had; a user who tried to access the app and the website, couldn't use it, and they got taken to court. Now Domino's claimed, in the court case, that he could have used the telephone, but he had tried to use the telephone twice and was on hold for 45 minutes. So [laughs] that says a lot. JOHN: Looks like it actually did go to the Supreme Court. TODD: Yeah. Correct me if I'm wrong, I think they did not want to hear it. They just said, “No, we're not going to hear the case.” Yeah, and just think about all these apps we use and all the people that can't access those apps, or the websites. I went to some company websites because I was doing some research, big companies, and a lot of them are inaccessible. A little number that I can throw out there: every year, there's been a little over 2,500 lawsuits in the US. This year, if the rate keeps on going that it has, we're on course for over 4,000 lawsuits in the US alone for inaccessible websites. You've had companies like Target, Bank of America, Winn-Dixie, those kinds of companies have been sued by people because of inaccessible sites. MAE: Okay, but may I say this one thing, which is, I just want to extend my apologies to Pizza Hut. [laughter] MANDY: What kinds of things do you see as not being accessible that should be or easily could be that companies just simply aren't doing? TODD: The big one, still and if you go to webaim.org/projects/million, it's The WebAIM Million report. It's an annual accessibility analysis of the top 1 million home pages on the internet. The number one thing again, this year is color contracts. There are guidelines in place. WCAG, which is the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, that text should be a 4.5:1 ratio that reaches the minimum contrast for texts. It's a lot of texts out there that doesn't even reach that. So it's color contrast. You'll find a lot of, if you look at—I'm looking at the chart right now—missing alt texts on images. If you have an image that is informative, or you have an image that is conveying something to a user, it has to have alternative text describing what's in the picture. You don't have to go into a long story about what's in the picture and describe it thoroughly; you can just give a quick overview as to what the picture is trying to convey, what is in the picture. And then another one being another failure type a is form input labels; labels that are not labeled correctly. I wrote a article about that [chuckles] on CSS-Tricks and that is, there's programmatic and there's accessible names for form labels that not only help the accessibility side of it, as far as making the site accessible, but also it helps screen reader users read forms and navigate through forms, keyboard users also. Then you have empty links and then a big one that I've seen lately is if you look up in the source code, you see the HTML tag, and the language attribute, a lot of sites now, because they use trademarks, they don't have a document language. I ran across a lot of sites that don't use a document language. They're using a framework. I won't name names because I'm not out to shame, but having that attribute helps screen reader users and I think that's a big thing. A lot of accessibility, people don't understand. People use screen readers, or other assistive technologies, for instance, Dragon NaturallySpeaking voice input. But at the same time, I've got to also add accessibility is more than just deaf, or blind. I suffer from migraines, migraine headaches so animation, or motion from say, parallax scrolling can trigger a migraine. Animations that are too fast, that also trigger migraine headache. You have flashing content that can potentially cause seizures and that's actually happened before where an animated GIF was intentionally sent to someone and it caused a seizure and almost killed the person. So there's those and then the last thing on this list that I'm looking at right now, and these are common failures, empty buttons. You have buttons that don't have labels. Buttons that have Click here. Buttons need to be descriptive. So you want to have – on my site to send me something on the contact form, it's Send this info to Todd, Click here, or something similar like that. MAE: Can you think of any, John that you know of, too? I've got a couple of mind. How about you, Mandy? MANDY: For me, because I'm just starting out, I don't know a whole lot about accessibility. That's why I'm here; I'm trying to learn. But I am really conscious and careful of some of the GIFs that I use, because I do know that some of the motion ones, especially really fast-moving ones, can cause problems, migraines, seizures for people. So when posting those, I'm really, really mindful about it. JOHN: Yeah, the Click here one is always bothers me too, because not only is it bad accessibility, it's bad UX. Like HTML loves you to turn anything into a link so you can make all the words inside the button and it's just fine. [laughs] There's so many other ways to do it that are just – even discounting the accessibility impact, which I don't want it. TODD: Yeah, and touching upon that, I'm glad you brought up the button because I was just going to let that go [chuckles] past me. I have to say and I think it was in the email where it said, “What's bothering you?” What bothers me is people that don't use the button. If you are using a div, or an anchor tag, or a span, stop it. [laughs] Just stop it. There's a button element for that. I read somewhere that anchor tag takes you somewhere, a div is a container, but button is for a button. MAE: I love that. The only other ones I could think of is related to something you said, making sure to have tab order set up properly to allow people to navigate. Again, I liked your point about you don't have to be fully blind to benefit from these things and having keyboard accessibility can benefit a lot of people for all kinds of reasons. The other one is, and I would love to hear everybody's thoughts on this one, I have heard that we're supposed to be using h1, h2, h3 and having proper setup of our HTML and most of us fail just in that basic part. That's another way of supporting people to be able to navigate around and figure out what's about to be on this page and how much should I dig into it? So more on non-visual navigation stuff. TODD: Yeah, heading structure is hugely important for keyboard users and screen reader users as well as tab order and that's where semantic HTML comes into play. If you're running semantic HTML, HTML by default, save for a few caveats, is accessible right out of the box. If your site and somebody can navigate through using let's say, the keyboard turns and they can navigate in a way that is structurally logical, for instance and it has a flow to it that makes sense, then they're going to be able to not only navigate that site, but if you're selling something on that site, you're going to have somebody buying something probably. So that's again, where tab order and heading structure comes into play and it's very important. JOHN: I would assume, and correct me if I'm wrong, or if you know this, that the same sort of accessibility enhancements are available in native mobile applications that aren't using each HTML, is that correct? TODD: Having not delved into the mobile side of things with apps myself, that I really can't answer. I can say, though, that the WCAG guidelines, that does pertain to mobile as well as desktop. There's no certain set of rules. 2.2 is where there are some new features that from mobile, for instance, target size and again, I wrote another article on CSS-Tricks about target size as well. So it's if you ever noticed those little ads that you just want to click off and get off your phone and they have those little tiny Xs and you're sitting there tapping all day? Those are the things target size and dragging movements as well. I did an audit for an app and there was a lot of buttons that were not named. A lot of the accessibility issues I ran into were the same as I would run into doing an audit on a website. I don't know anything about Swift, or Flutter, or anything like that, they pretty much fall into the same category with [inaudible] as far as accessible. JOHN: I also wanted to circle back on the first item that you listed as far as the WebAIM million thing was color contrast, which is one of those ones where a designer comes up with something that looks super cool and sleek, but it's dark gray on a light gray background. It looks great when you've got perfect eyesight, but anybody else, they're just like, “Oh my God, what's that?” That's also one of the things that's probably easiest to change site-wide; it's like you go in and you tweak the CSS and you're done in a half hour and you've got the whole site updated. So it's a great bit of low-hanging fruit that you can attach if you want to start on this process. TODD: Yeah. Color contrast is of course, as the report says, this is the number one thing and let me look back here. It's slowly, the numbers are dropping, but 85.3%, that's still a very high number of failures and there's larger text. If you're using anything over 18 pixels, or the equivalent of 18—it's either 18 points, or 18 pixels—is a 3:1 ratio. With that color contrast is how our brains perceive color. It's not the actual contrast of that color and there are people far more qualified than me going to that, or that can go into that. So what I'll say is I've seen a lot of teams and companies, “Yeah, we'll do a little over 4.5:1 and we'll call it a day.” But I always say, if you can do 7:1, or even 10:1 on your ratios and you can find a way to make your brand, or whatever the same, then go for it. A lot of the time you hear, “Well, we don't want to change the colors of our brand.” Well, your colors of your brand aren't accessible to somebody who that has, for instance, Tritanopia, which is, I think it's blues and greens are very hard to see, or they don't see it at all. Color deficiencies are a thing that design teams aren't going to check for. They're just not. Like you said, all these colors look awesome so let's just, we're going to go with that on our UI. That's one thing that I actually ran into on that SAAS product that I spoke about earlier was there was these colors and these colors were a dark blue, very muted dark blue with orange text. You would think the contrast would be oh yeah, they would be all right, but it was horrible. JOHN: You can get browser plugins, that'll show you what the page looks like. So you can check these things yourself. Like you can go in and say, “Oh, you're right. That's completely illegible.” TODD: Yeah. Firefox, like I have right here on my work machine. I have right here Firefox and it does this. There's a simulator for a visual color deficiencies. It also checks for contrast as well. Chrome has one, which it actually has a very cool eyedropper to check for color contrast. If you use the inspector also in Firefox, that brings up a little contrast thing. The WAVE extension has a contrast tool. There's also a lot of different apps. If you have a Mac, like I do, I have too many color contrast because I love checking out these color contrast apps. So I have about five different color contrast apps on my Mac, but there's also websites, too that you can use at the same time. Just do a search for polar contrast. Contrast Ratio, contrast-ratio.com, is from Lea Verou. I use that one a lot. A lot of people use that one. There's so many of them out there choose from, but they are very handy tool at designer's disposal and at developers' disposal as well. JOHN: So I'm trying to think of, like I was saying earlier, the color contrast one is one of those things that's probably very straightforward; you can upgrade your whole site in a short amount of time. Color contrast is a little trickier because it gets into branding and marketing's going to want to care about it and all that kind of stuff. So you might have a bit more battle around that, but it could probably be done and you might be able to fix, at least the worst parts of the page that have problems around that. So I'm just trying to think of the ways that you could get the ball rolling on this kind of a work. Like if you can get those early easy wins, it's going to get more people on board with the process and not saying like, “Oh, it's going to take us eight months and we have to go through every single page and change it every forum.” That sounds really daunting when you think about it and so, trying to imagine what those easy early wins are that can get people down that road. TODD: Yeah. Starting from the very outset of the project is probably the key one: incorporating accessibility from the start of the project. Like I said earlier, it's a lot easier when you do it from the start rather than waiting till the very end, or even after the product has been launched and you go back and go, “Oh, well, now we need to fix it.” You're not only putting stress on your teams, but it's eating up time and money because you're now paying everybody to go back and look at all these accessibility issues there. Having one person as a dedicated accessibility advocate on each team helps immensely. So you have one person on the development team, one person on the dev side, one person on the marketing team, starting from the top. If somebody goes there to a stakeholder and says, “Listen, we need to start incorporating accessibility from the very start, here's why,” Nine times out of ten, I can guarantee you, you're probably going to get that stakeholder onboard. That tenth time, you'll have to go as far as maybe I did and say, “Well, Domino's Pizza, or Bank of America, or Target.” Again, their ears are going to perk up and they're going to go, “Oh, well, I don't really, we don't want to get sued.” So that, and going back to having one person on each team: training. There are so many resources out there for accessibility training. There are companies out there that train, there are companies that you can bring in to the organization that will train, that'll help train. That's so easier than what are we going to do? A lot of people just sitting there in a room and go, “How are you going to do this?” Having that person in each department getting together with everybody else, that's that advocate for each department, meeting up and saying, “Okay, we're going to coordinate. You're going to put out a fantastic product that's going to be accessible and also, at the same time, the financial aspect is going to make the company money. But most of all, it's going to include a lot of people that are normally not included if you're putting out an accessible product.” Because if you go to a certain website, I can guarantee you it's going to be inaccessible—just about 99% of the web isn't accessible—and it's going to be exclusive as it's going to – somebody is going to get shut out of the site, or app. So this falls on the applications as well. Another thing too, I just wanted to throw in here for color contrast. There are different – you have color contrast text, but you also have non-text contrast, you have texts in images, that kind of contrast as well and it does get a little confusing. Let's face it, the guidelines right now, it's a very technically written – it's like a technical manual. A lot of people come up to me and said, “I can't read this. I can't make sense of this. Can you translate this?” So hopefully, and this is part of the work that I'm doing with a lot of other people in the W3C is where making the language of 3.0 in plain language, basically. It's going to be a lot easier to understand these guidelines instead of all that technical jargon. I look at something right now and I'm scratching my head when I'm doing an audit going, “Okay, what do they mean by this?” All these people come together and we agree on what to write. What is the language that's going to go into this? So when they got together 2.0, which was years and years ago, they said, “Okay, this is going to be how we're going to write this and we're going to publish this,” and then we had a lot of people just like me scratching their heads of not understanding it. So hopefully, and I'm pretty sure, 99.9% sure that it's going to be a lot easier for people to understand. MAE: That sounds awesome. And if you end up needing a bunch of play testers, I bet a lot of our listeners would be totally willing to put in some time. I know I would. Just want to put in one last plug for anybody out there who really loves automating things and is trying to avoid relying on any single developer, or designer, or QA person to remember to check for accessibility is to build it into your CI/CD pipeline. There are a lot of different options. Another approach to couple with that, or do independently is to use the axe core gems, and that link will be in the show notes, where it'll allow you to be able to sprinkle in your tests, accessibility checks on different pieces. So if we've decided we're going to handle color contrast, cool, then it'll check that. But if we're not ready to deal with another point of accessibility, then we can skip it. So it's very similar to Robocop. Anyway, just wanted to offer in some other tips and tricks of the trade to be able to get going on accessibility and then once you get that train rolling, it can do a little better, but it is hard to start from scratch. JOHN: That's a great tip, Mae. Thank you. TODD: Yeah, definitely. MANDY: Okay. Well, with that, I think it's about time we head into reflections; the point of the show, where we talk about something that we thought stood out, that we want to think about more, or a place that we can call for a call of action to our listeners, or even to ourselves. Who wants to go first? MAE: I can go first. I learned something awesome from you, Todd, which I have not thought of before, which is if I am eyeballing for “contrast,” especially color contrast, that's not necessarily what that means. I really appreciate learning that and we'll definitely be applying that in my daily life. [chuckles] So thanks for teaching me a whole bunch of things, including that. TODD: You're welcome. JOHN: I think for me, it's just the continuing reminder to – I do like the thinking that, I think Mae have brought up and also Todd was talking about earlier at the beginning about how we're all of us temporarily not disabled and that I think it helps bring some of that empathy a little closer to us. So it makes it a little more accessible to us to realize that it's going to happen to us at some point, at some level, and to help then bring that empathy to the other people who are currently in that state and really that's, I think is a useful way of thinking about it. Also, the idea that I've been thinking through as we've been talking about this is how do we get the ball rolling on this? We have an existing application that's 10 years old that's going to take a lot to get it there, but how do we get the process started so we feel like we're making progress there rather than just saying, “Oh, we did HTML form 27 out of 163. All right, back at it tomorrow.” It's hard to think about, so feeling like there's progress is a good thing. TODD: Yeah, definitely and as we get older, our eyes, they're one of the first things to go. So I'm going to need assistive technology at some point so, yeah. And then what you touched upon, John. It may be daunting having to go back and do the whole, “Okay, what are we going to do for accessibility now that this project, it's 10 years old, 15 years old?” The SAAS project that I was talking about, it was 15-year-old code, .net. I got people together; one from each department. We all got together and we ended up making that product accessible for them. So it can be done. [laughs] It can be done. JOHN: That's actually a good point. Just hearing about successes in the wild with particularly hard projects is a great thing. Because again, I'm thinking about it at the start of our project and hearing that somebody made it all through and maybe even repeatedly is hard. TODD: Yeah. It's not something that once it's done, it's done. Accessibility, just like the web, is an ever-evolving media. MANDY: For me. I think my reflection is going to be, as a new coder, I do want to say, I'm glad that we talked about a lot of the things that you see that aren't currently accessible that can be accessible. One of those things is using alt tags and right now, I know when I put the social media posts out on Twitter, I don't use the alt tags and I should. So just putting an alt tag saying, “This is a picture of our guest, Todd” and the title of the show would probably be helpful for some of our listeners. So I'm going to start doing that. So thank you. TODD: You're welcome. I'm just reminded of our talk and every talk that I have on a podcast, or with anybody just reminds me of the work that I have to do and the work that is being done by a lot of different people, other than myself as well, as far as advocacy goes in that I don't think it's ever going to be a job that will ever go away. There will always be a need for accessibility advocacy for the web and it's great just to be able to sit down and talk to people about accessibility and what we need to do to make the web better and more inclusive for everybody. Because I tweet out a lot, “Accessibility is a right, not a privilege,” and I really feel that to my core because the UN specifically says that the internet is a basic human and I went as far as to go say, “Well, so as an accessibility of that internet as well.” So that is my reflection. MAE: I'll add an alt tag for me right now is with a fist up and a big smile and a lot of enthusiasm in my heart. MANDY: Awesome. Well, thank you so much for coming on the show, Todd. It's been really great talking with you and I really appreciate you coming on the show to share with us your knowledge and your expertise on the subject of accessibility. So with that, I will close out the show and say we do have a Slack and Todd will be invited to it if he'd like to talk more to us and the rest of the Greater Than Code community. You can visit patreon.com/greaterthancode and pledge to support us monthly and again, if you cannot afford that, or do not want to pledge to help run the show, you can DM anyone of us and we will get you in there for free because we want to make the Slack channel accessible for all. Have a great week and we'll see you next time. Goodbye! Special Guest: Todd Libby.

Press Send with Chinae Alexander
Would You Rather Be Celibate or Lose Your Sense of Taste? with Jena Kingsley

Press Send with Chinae Alexander

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2021 44:18


This week on Press Send I am joined by comedian, Jena Kingsley  Get ready to laugh your a$$ off as we chat about making friends in New York, bonding over mutual hatred, the slingshot effect that we're currently living in, managing anxiety surrounding loneliness juxtaposed with social anxiety, and whether or not we will ever bounce back from the pandemic.  Old Navy: Old Navy is changing the shopping game with BODEQUALITY. BODEQUALITY means that now, in every store, you'll see new mannequins in multiple sizes, and online you can see the styles you love on models in sizes 4, 12 *and* 18. It means a consistent and comfortable fit for every size, 00 through 30, XS through 4X. That's BODEQUALITY — a revolutionized shopping experience, for women everywhere. See Oldnavy.com/bodequality for additional details.   New Day Pod: We're all struggling with something, even if it doesn't look like it from the outside. That's why I want to tell you about New Day -- a new podcast with a simple goal - helping you get through today and look forward to tomorrow. New Day from Lemonada premieres September 15th - listen wherever you get podcasts. Produced by Dear Media

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight
Will Tua Be Able to Play on Sunday Against the Raiders? | Tue. Sep 21, 2021

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 17:28


As we move past this atrocious loss, there are some pieces of news that can provide some semblance of hope. First, it appears Tua Tagovailoa may very well be able to play in this game. We talk about why that is, and what to look out for in the coming days. We also look back at the Dolphins protection issues, who was to blame and can those issues be corrected moving forward? We touch on that, as well as other news and notes surrounding the Miami Dolphins, as well as this weekend's opponent, the Las Vegas Raiders. Join us, and let's dive in!Sponsor: https://mybookie.ag/ (Use PROMO CODE "PHINSPOD")

Locked On Vikings - Daily Podcast On The Minnesota Vikings
Mike Zimmer & Rick Spielman: On The Hot Seat?

Locked On Vikings - Daily Podcast On The Minnesota Vikings

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 21, 2021 26:23


The Minnesota Vikings are 0-2 for the 2nd year in a row. Are they doomed? Will head coach Mike Zimmer and general manager Rick Spielman survive the season, or is it time for a new era in Minnesota? Plus, questions about kickers, Xs and Os, and Klint Kubiak's play calling. Support Us By Supporting Our Sponsors! Built Bar Built Bar is a protein bar that tastes like a candy bar. Go to builtbar.com and use promo code “LOCKED15,” and you'll get 15% off your next order. BetOnline AG There is only 1 place that has you covered and 1 place we trust. Betonline.ag! Sign up today for a free account at betonline.ag and use that promocode: LOCKEDON for your 50% welcome bonus. Rock Auto Amazing selection. Reliably low prices. All the parts your car will ever need. Visit RockAuto.com and tell them Locked On sent you. Manscaped Fellas, don't gamble on shaving your balls with the wrong tools! Choose MANSCAPED™, Your Balls Will Thank You™! Get 20% off + free shipping with the code LOCKEDON at manscaped.com. Follow the show: @LockedOnVikings Follow the host: @LukeBraunNFL Join the discord community: https://linktr.ee/LukeBraunNFL Submit Twitter Tuesday questions: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc3mA_-Yke_oIwlZ5vOnIW_TK4d9gRwjmOB7YOLzeLLIz_-3w/viewform?usp=sf_link Sub on YouTube! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCU9qwCJcClgWI0JNTezBLqQ Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Motor City Hoops
Anthony Bellino - Michigan Sports Network

Motor City Hoops

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 20, 2021 63:53


On an amazing episode of the Motor City Hoops Podcast, I am joined by Anthony Bellino from The Michigan Sports Network, Xs and Os Bros, and BCSN Sports. Anthony and I continue to talk about player expectations for some members of the roster I did not get to on ep. 50. What kind of seasons do we see for guys like Hami Diallo, Josh Jackson, and a couple of the “vets”? We then dive into a really fun segment where we discussed some of “the Biggest” questions on the roster. What is THE BIGGEST short term need on the roster? Who is THE BIGGEST threat to be an unexpected starter? What player has THE BIGGEST chance NOT to meet fans expectations this season? ALL of these and more! We finish off the episode by bringing back the Around the NBA segment BUT keep a Pistons flavor with it. We check in on members of the roster from last season that have found a new home and see what kind of impact they may have with their new team. What will Wayne Ellington bring to the Lakers? Will Sekou make an impact in Brooklyn? Etc. 

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
Is There Reason To Worry About The Ohio State Offense?

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 16, 2021 17:05


Most of the talk around Columbus this week has centered around the issues on Ohio State's defense, but the offense struggled to run the ball consistently against Oregon as well. Is there cause for concern about the Buckeye offense?BuckeyeScoop.com's Xs and Os guru Ross Fulton joins host Tom Orr to discuss that and much more. - What did Oregon do to create mismatches for the Ohio State offensive line?- Were those issue fixable for the Buckeyes?- How much does it hurt that CJ Stroud hasn't run the ball much yet?- How can the Buckeyes make up for that?- What would Ross like to see the OSU staff change about the offense?

Press Send with Chinae Alexander
How Do I Live My Life to the Fullest? with Chinae Alexander & YOU!

Press Send with Chinae Alexander

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 46:52


Happy Wednesday! Today I'm sitting down with listeners Janelle Harding and Kelsey Slater as they call in with their burning questions. Join us as we talk about tips for time management, carving out time for yourself, having courage to set boundaries, longing for security, and living life to the fullest. Old Navy: Old Navy is changing the shopping game with BODEQUALITY. BODEQUALITY means that now, in every store, you'll see new mannequins in multiple sizes, and online you can see the styles you love on models in sizes 4, 12 *and* 18. It means a consistent and comfortable fit for every size, 00 through 30, XS through 4X. That's BODEQUALITY — a revolutionized shopping experience, for women everywhere. See Oldnavy.com/bodequality for additional details. New Day Pod: We're all struggling with something, even if it doesn't look like it from the outside. That's why I want to tell you about New Day -- a new podcast with a simple goal - helping you get through today and look forward to tomorrow. New Day from Lemonada premieres September 15th - listen wherever you get podcasts. Produced by Dear Media

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
How Can Ohio State Football Fix Its Biggest Issues On Defense?

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 22:45


The Ohio State Buckeyes are in a position they're not used to, trying to bounce back after a loss.After a demoralizing 35-28 defeat against Oregon, the defensive and particularly defensive coordinator Kerry Coombs, have come under fire. But what are they doing wrong, and can those issues get fixed this week?Buckeye Scoop's Xs and Os guru Ross Fulton joins host Tom Orr to answer those questions and much more. - Why is Ohio State's defense so predictable?- Why does it look like the front four and back seven aren't working well together?- Why is it such an issue that they're playing so many linebackers?- Is the biggest issue the personnel, the scheme, or the coaching?- How will they respond to the loss of free safety Josh Proctor?- Can Haskell Garrett stay at nose tackle, or does he have to move back to 3-tech?- Can the Buckeyes make a major schematic change in the middle of the season?

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight
The NFL World Just Can't Handle the Dolphins Winning | Tue. Sep 14, 2021

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 14, 2021 20:47


Over the last 48 hours, NFL media members, Patriots beat reporters, and even some self proclaimed Miami Dolphins fans feel as if the Phins did not deserve to win the game on Sunday. Many feel Mac outplayed Tua, and that it was apparent that the lucky fumbles are what gave Flores the win. In today's episode, we come back to reality to talk about exactly why the Dolphins won, why they are the better team, and the great outlook we can have following a season opening win against a division rival. We look ahead briefly to this weekend's matchup against the Buffalo Bills, but mostly, we set the record straight on what happened Sunday night. Join us as we talk Dolphins, let's dive in!

Buck Reising on 104-5 The Zone
Austin Burlage (Power T Tape) breaks down Vols vs Pitt with Buck Reising

Buck Reising on 104-5 The Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 18:35


Austin Burlage joins The Buck Reising Show for a look at Tennessee's loss against Pitt from an Xs and Os perspective.

Zone Podcasts
Austin Burlage (Power T Tape) breaks down Vols vs Pitt with Buck Reising

Zone Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 18:35


Austin Burlage joins The Buck Reising Show for a look at Tennessee's loss against Pitt from an Xs and Os perspective.

College Football Nerds
Live Show - Sat September 11th 2021 - Ohio State Loses to Oregon, Texas Downed By Arkansas

College Football Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2021 144:20


We're talking all the action of the day - Ohio State vs Oregon, Texas vs Arkansas, Michigan vs Washington, Iowa and Iowa State. Get in here and talk Xs and Os and nerdy data with us!

The WODcast Podcast
484 David Vanderveen - C0-founder XS Energy Drink

The WODcast Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 105:01


Growing up in West Michigan, David Vanderveen and his older brother learned how to surf among the sometimes ferocious fresh-water waves created during storms on Lake Michigan. He was arrested for skateboarding in empty city pools and was kicked out of school three times—twice for his poetry (once in 7th grade and again during his junior year at Wheaton College) and once for his exceptional cocktail mixology skills (also in 7th grade, but not at Wheaton). After some negotiations and promises to stop with the poetry, David matriculated to and graduated from Calvin College, Wheaton's sister school, with degrees in philosophy and political science. Due to a market shortage of philosophy career positions, he worked as an daily news editor and hand model in Japan, a director of public affairs in Michigan, co-founder of a bespoke crystal-powered chakra aligning jewelry company in the Midwest, a marketing director in the Napa Valley, the co-founder of a chaotic Venezuelan biotech and pharmaceutical company, a grassroots political organizer, an exporter of artificial heart valves to Pakistan, a technology sales and marketing executive, and chief technology officer at a series of small and large tech companies. David participated in the Dot-Com revolution (neither proletariat nor bourgeoisie) and briefly owned a small Red Bull distributorship as part of said revolution. Never one to quit, he failed to get off the Dot-Com merry-go-round before the music ran out. He left tech when the founder of Znetix, where David was the CTO, was arrested for the largest case of investor fraud in Washington State's history. Oh, and David also co-founded XS, a global energy drink brand that has generated over US $2 billion in revenue, sold more than one billion cans, and shared over US$500 million in profits with an army of independent business owners around the world. David has leapt from the frying pan into the fire multiple times and lived to tell about it. He doesn't recommend it. That said, if you're interested in a career-as-roller-coaster-ride and life as an adventure, David has a lot to offer. Exclusive to WODcast listeners: * THORNE: Health solutions Trusted by 40,000 medical professionals, over 100 professional and collegiate sports teams, the UFC, and now CrossFit. Thorne, the Official Supplement Partner of CrossFit. . Our exclusive WODCAST storefront can be found at thorne.com/u/wodcast – shop here for our crossfit 20% off discount. * MUDWTR is a coffee alternative with 1/7th the caffeine as a cup of coffee. Rather than relying on hundreds of milligrams of caffeine for energy mud leans on functional mushrooms and adaptogens for energy without the jitters and crash of caffeine. Visit mudwtr.com/wodcast to support the show and use code WODCAST at check out for $5 off 


Press Send with Chinae Alexander
How to Manage Your Anxiety and Stop Doomscrolling feat. Chinae Alexander

Press Send with Chinae Alexander

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 8, 2021 24:19


Have you been feeling anxious lately? Well, me too. Sit down, take a breath, and join me today as I share some ways in which I try to manage my anxiety. When the state of the world feels as if it's only getting worse, just know you are not alone.    Old Navy: Old Navy is changing the shopping game with BODEQUALITY. BODEQUALITY means that now, in every store, you'll see new mannequins in multiple sizes, and online you can see the styles you love on models in sizes 4, 12 *and* 18. It means a consistent and comfortable fit for every size, 00 through 30, XS through 4X. That's BODEQUALITY — a revolutionized shopping experience, for women everywhere. See Oldnavy.com/bodequality for additional details.   Conair: Want big, beautiful, effortless waves in time for back to school? The Conair Double Ceramic Waver is designed with not just one but three barrels for deep, continuous waves. To order, just go to Conair.com and search “waver.”   Produced by Dear Media

Buck Reising on 104-5 The Zone
Austin Burlage (Power T Tape) breaks down the Vols' season opener

Buck Reising on 104-5 The Zone

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 9:52


Austin Burlage of Power T Tape dives into the Xs and Os of Tennessee's win over Bowling Green, and previews Pitt.

Zone Podcasts
Austin Burlage (Power T Tape) breaks down the Vols' season opener

Zone Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 9:52


Austin Burlage of Power T Tape dives into the Xs and Os of Tennessee's win over Bowling Green, and previews Pitt.

College Football Nerds
Week 1 Live Show - College Football Nerds Game Night Live - September 4

College Football Nerds

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 173:55


We're talking all the action of the day - Clemson vs Georgia, UCLA vs LSU, Bama vs Miami. Get in here and talk Xs and Os and nerdy data with us!

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show
How Can Ohio State Fix Its Defense Before The Oregon Game?

Morning Scoop: Daily Buckeye Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2021 17:23


Ohio State opened its 2021 season with a road win against a solid Minnesota team, but that performance left the Buckeyes with some big questions to answer, especially on defense. What went wrong against the Gophers, and can Ohio State fix those issues in time for their massive showdown this weekend against Oregon?Buckeye Scoop's Xs and Os guru Ross Fulton joins host Tom Orr to recap what he learned during the season opener, and what it could mean when the Buckeyes host the Ducks.

Press Send with Chinae Alexander
Taking Your Calls LIVE: Sexy Pics & Wedding Planning with Opinionated Family Members

Press Send with Chinae Alexander

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 49:03


I'm excited to have listeners Melissa Gandarinho and Katie Coffey joining me today as they call in needing advice! On this episode, we're talking about making moves to accept yourself, the difference between body positivity and body confidence, the importance of letting your mind rest, and how to plan a wedding when opinionated family members are involved.    Old Navy: Old Navy is changing the shopping game with BODEQUALITY. BODEQUALITY means that now, in every store, you'll see new mannequins in multiple sizes, and online you can see the styles you love on models in sizes 4, 12 *and* 18. It means a consistent and comfortable fit for every size, 00 through 30, XS through 4X. That's BODEQUALITY — a revolutionized shopping experience, for women everywhere. See Oldnavy.com/bodequality for additional details.   Paypal: To get $10 cashback on your first transaction of $20 or more, just head to your local CVS and pay using your PayPal or Venmo app. That's $10 cashback on your first purchase of $20 or more with the PayPal or Venmo app. To see terms and learn more about how to earn $10 cashback, go to paypal.com/presssend.   Produced by Dear Media

MEMIC Safety Experts
How Workplace Safety Influenced Labor Day - Celebrating the American Worker with Randy Klatt

MEMIC Safety Experts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2021 55:37


Back in 1892, President Grover Cleveland signed a law making the first Monday in September of each year the Labor Day holiday.  Do you know the history and the struggle of the American worker that pre-dates this historic day?  On this podcast, Randy Klatt, Director or Region 2 Loss Control here at MEMIC helps me explore what it was like to be a worker in the late eighteen and early nineteen hundreds and workplace injuries, fatalities, child labor, and deplorable conditions were the catalysts for fair wages, the 8 hour workday, and workplace safety. Wage Trends, 1800-1900 (nber.org)   Age of workers Lewis Hine - Photographer These Appalling Images Exposed Child Labor in America - HISTORY The Photographs of Lewis Hine: The Industrial Revolution and Child Laborers [Photo Gallery] | EHS Today Teaching With Documents: Photographs of Lewis Hine: Documentation of Child Labor | National Archives Search Results: "Hine, Lewis Wickes, 1874-1940" - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (Library of Congress) (loc.gov) Search Results: "" - Prints & Photographs Online Catalog (Library of Congress) (loc.gov)   Achievements in Public Health, 1900-1999: Improvements in Workplace Safety -- United States, 1900-1999 (cdc.gov) History of Workplace Safety — SafetyLine Lone Worker Deadliest Workplace Accidents | American Experience | Official Site | PBS Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire - HISTORY Child Workers and Workplace Accidents: What was the Price Paid for Industrializing America? – Our Great American Heritage (1857) Frederick Douglass, "If There Is No Struggle, There Is No Progress" • (blackpast.org) Haymarket Riot - HISTORY https://www.dol.gov/general/laborday/history Labor Day 2021: Facts, Meaning & Founding - HISTORY History of Labor Day | U.S. Department of Labor (dol.gov) Deadliest Workplace Accidents | American Experience | Official Site | PBS History of the Holidays: Labor Day | History #82 - Comparative wages, prices, and cost of living : (from the Sixteenth ... - Full View | HathiTrust Digital Library History of The US Minimum Wage - From The Very First Minimum Wage (bebusinessed.com) Profile of work injuries incurred by young workers (bls.gov) History of Workplace Safety in the United States, 1880-1970 (eh.net) Peter Koch: [00:00:04] Hello, listeners, and welcome to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast. I'm your host, Peter Koch, as we're about to celebrate Labor Day. I expect that you're getting up and gearing up for family and friends around the pool, the barbecue, the yard, getting people together, trying to enjoy that day off. Well, while you're doing that? Have you ever thought about where we get the Labor Day holiday from, where did it hey come from? Why do we have it? Why was it even started in the first place? So for today's episode, how workplace safety influenced Labor Day and vice versa. Celebrating the American worker. I'm speaking with Randy Klatt, CSP director of Region two, lost control here at MEMIC. Randy leads a team of consultants serving the central and southern Maine area. So, Randy, welcome back to the podcast. I'm excited to have you on to talk about Labor Day today. Randy Klatt: [00:00:55] Thank you, Peter. It's always great to talk to you. Happy holiday. Peter Koch: [00:00:59] Yeah, it's coming [00:01:00] right up here. And, you know, I was thinking about, well, the podcast and MEMIC and what our mission is to get out there and to work with companies to help keep workers safe. And I was thinking about the Labor Day holiday. And I'm like, you know what? I've enjoyed the Labor Day holiday now. I've enjoyed time off or on the Labor Day holiday. But what is it? Where to come from? And that got me to thinking having a conversation with you actually around. Well, what was it like to be a worker? Well, before our time being a worker, before our parents, and probably before our grandparents, maybe around the time of our great grandparents, because prior to, you know, the early nineteen hundreds. Labor Day didn't exist. And I think we kind of take it for granted. So let's talk about that. What was it like to be a worker in, say, the late eighteen hundreds and what were the conditions? What was going on? And I know [00:02:00] you've been doing a little bit of reading. I've been doing some reading, too. We certainly don't have any firsthand experience, even though we're both a little grayer than we were last year. We're not that gray yet. But there are some fascinating history about work in the late eighteen hundreds. What do you think it was like out there? Randy Klatt: [00:02:18] Oh, I think it was pretty horrible, quite frankly. And there is plenty of gray. In fact, I am all gray now. So thanks for the plug. But that's the way it is. Yeah, it we when we think of the industrial revolution, we sometimes think about progress and automation and heavy machinery and, you know, the wonderful products and everything that we developed and could put out there. What we don't really think about often enough is the workers who actually made all that happen. And often the horrendous conditions that they had to work under and for what we would really call minimal pay and no benefits whatsoever. [00:03:00] Peter Koch: [00:03:01] So some of the benefits you got to go home maybe at the end of the day. Randy Klatt: [00:03:06] Yeah, that was your benefit. Maybe one day off a week and maybe enough money to put a little food on the table and keep a roof over your head, if you were lucky. It was really quite horrendous. If you look at some of the statistics regarding how much people were paid in your average manufacturing facility and, you know, the textile mills or the steel mills. It's an eye opener, even in today's standards, if you adjust these things for inflation and when you're when you're making 55 cents an hour in 1860, I'm sorry, per day. That's easy to confuse, isn't it? Fifty five cents a day. Not per hour. You know, bring that to today's standards. It's still poultry. It's just amazing. [00:04:00] Peter Koch: [00:04:00] Yeah. It's really hard to think that you could live on that. And I think that's why you had multiple people in the same family, from dad to mom many times, all the way down to the kids going out and getting a job instead of going to school or maybe after school if they had the opportunity to go to school, because, you know, you add 55 cents a day up and it doesn't go very far when you've got to purchase food and pay for rent and mend clothes and all of the things that come with just the daily burden of life. Randy Klatt: [00:04:39] Right. And you add to that the strenuous physical labor that was involved in most cases, and then the hazardous conditions. We go into manufacturing facilities today and we see some things that are well in our world. They're pretty scary. Oh, my gosh. You really need a guard on that in [00:05:00] running nip point. Well, take that back a hundred and twenty years ago, and there were things spinning and turning and pulling every which way all over the building, and no one gave it a second thought. And you sent people in there to work in close proximity to all of that every day and just accept it, because if you don't want this job for fifty five cents a day, then someone else will. Yeah. So you're almost a commodity to me is if you're not going to work, then we'll find someone else who will. Because these are good jobs. Fifty five cents a day. Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:05:38] And really, some of the only jobs, you know, when we started to see the advent of us moving from that agrarian society to the advent of the industrial revolution and people moving into cities and towns to be closer to where the work is, because they couldn't find jobs or the jobs were too taxing in the agrarian culture, [00:06:00] in agriculture and farming, getting those better jobs in manufacturing and textiles and steel and construction and carpentry, just kind of looking more at some of those wages. You know, the difference in that that textile manufacturing, daily wage of 55 cents in 1860, you could make a whole dollar, 40 a day as a skilled carpenter. Just a few years later, in in the later eighteen hundreds. So depending on what job you had, I mean, you could you could earn some decent wages rather than just being a farmhand for a while or again, dealing with all the hazards that we knew about within the agricultural society and working on a farm, getting kicked by a cow or getting caught up in some of the horse or ox driven equipment to plow the fields and the hours that were there moving into the or moving into the cities. Sometimes, [00:07:00] you know, you're trading maybe one evil for another, but you're getting paid more for it. Randy Klatt: [00:07:08] Yeah. And if not more, you're actually being paid if you work a full day in most cases. Anyway, you were actually paid for that day. When you're on the farm, any farmer out there today understands this. Clearly, it's still the case. Mother Nature rules the day. And you just might not have the crop this fall or to harvest. And you don't have enough to feed your family, much less to sell to actually make a living. So seeing these jobs was an attraction for people. Nevertheless, it was still not what we would call desirable in the way of a job today. I was interested how Andrew Carnegie got his start. Most people know who Andrew Carnegie was. And, you know, the forerunner to U.S. Steel Corporation, my gosh, in [00:08:00] the railroads and all kinds of industry. And at one point was the richest man in America. He actually started his first job in this country in 1848 at the ripe old age of 12. And he was a bobbin boy, changing the spools of thread in a cotton mill. And he had to work 12 hours a day, six days a week. So he did have one day off. And for that, what, 72 hours of labor for a 12 year old boys starting wage was a dollar twenty per week. So even adjusted to it by inflation or with inflation over the years, that equal that's equivalent to about thirty six dollars in today's numbers. Can you imagine telling a 12 year old today that I'd like you to work 72 hours this week and I'm going to pay you thirty six dollars to do it? Peter Koch: [00:08:59] I think the conversation [00:09:00] would have stopped at work. Randy Klatt: [00:09:04] Well, quite possibly. Peter Koch: [00:09:06] Good. And then you get into all the rest of the reasons you don't want to work is the limited wage. And how come I don't have a day off and. Well, you have one day off but it's not enough days off. And yeah, there's a lot of challenges out there. Randy Klatt: [00:09:20] Yeah, you probably have to pay your babysitter thirty six dollars to watch your kids for a couple, two or three hours when you go out for an evening. Peter Koch: [00:09:27] For sure. Randy Klatt: [00:09:28] Can you imagine that Peter Koch: [00:09:31] You had mentioned this just a bit ago, too, about the conditions that you'd work in. And I doing some research for this looking or you can find so many different really amazing images of workers from this time frame. And one of the most prolific photographers that were out there is Louis Hine. And some of the most famous pictures that he has are from like the steelworkers having lunch [00:10:00] on the suspended beam. Therefore, I'm not sure what they were building, you remember what they were building in that particular picture, I can't recall. Randy Klatt: [00:10:08] I don't remember which building it was. I believe it was New York City. Peter Koch: [00:10:11] Yeah, I think it was to regardless. But that's the picture that people think of when they think of Louis Hines. However, when you start to look at other photos that he took, it's really representative of the American worker in the late. Eighteen hundreds, early nineteen hundreds. And there are thousands of photos which depict kids, really young kids, women, children, men all working together in some very dangerous occupations, whether it be textiles or in the fishing industry or in some of the other manufacturing industries where, you know, those in running nip points, you're surrounded by in running nip points. There's one of those photos we were talking about earlier [00:11:00] where there's a couple of kids standing on a mechanical loom right next to all the bobbins. And the caption is, they had to stand on the loom because they weren't tall enough to reach the bobbins that they had to change out. Randy Klatt: [00:11:17] Yeah, exactly. So eight year olds, nine year olds working these 60, 70 hour weeks around this equipment with absolutely no regard to their safety, simply get the job done. And we see that mentality some today. You know, we've got to get the job done. So we bypassed some things, but certainly not to the scale that we were doing back then, and not just with adults, but with children full time employed as fish cutters. And yeah, they cut their hands a lot. But, you know, that's part of the job. We're going to just overlook that piece because we're paying them by box. [00:12:00] So, you know, piecework was also something that was fairly prevalent, too. So it simply encouraged people to do things quicker, faster, which, of course, is often less safe. But as long as they got the job done, then they were happy to go home with their twenty five cents because they were able to get four boxes of fish cut for the day and they were paid five cents a box. So woohoo. Yeah. And you just Peter Koch: [00:12:26] Bring that extra money home to help the family get by for the week. And in those photos, you know, you often see adults with bandages or with a missing limb or a digit. And kids as well. There's a couple of images that I saw where, you know, it's captioned. You know, they're talking about the kid who has a big bandage on his hand, one of those fish cutters. And there's another photo there of all of the fish cutters, all the kids that were probably in one particular factory. And they all had knives [00:13:00] and some of the knives were as big as a kid's forearm, for crying out loud as long as the kids for he's holding this enormous knife out there. And you would be scared and today to hand a kid a knife like that. But if the kid came to work and he was part of the workforce, here you go. And the kids were proud of what they did. I mean, you can't take that away from the kids those days. I mean, they were working for their family. They were working for the wage. They were trying to do the best they can in some fairly deplorable conditions. Really challenging conditions. Randy Klatt: [00:13:35] Absolutely. And it wasn't just the manufacturing facilities either. There some great photos of the newsies. You know, there was one of the most enjoyable musicals I've seen in the theater was newsies about a young boy selling newspapers. But the reality is you have seven and eight year olds out running around the streets before dawn trying to sell newspapers, and they're getting [00:14:00] paid pennies to do so. So industry during these this time and we're talking anywhere from eighteen fifties or sixties up through the turn of the century into 1920s, it was pretty darn brutal for most people in most occupations. Not to say that it was everyone, but a lot of people made some money. Mm hmm. Including Mr. Andrew Carnegie. There is a reason he became a multimillionaire and the richest man in America. Peter Koch: [00:14:39] Certainly. And I think that's part of what we're celebrating today is we are celebrating. You know, the labor that the American worker, that through the courage and determination in some of those really challenging places allowed our country to be where it is today. And granted, we [00:15:00] are not in. The best place all the time, but we can certainly look at, especially around work, the work that we do and the innovations that have come out of the American worker and the labor force that's there. There's a lot that they've done and a lot that they've allowed us to do. And that we take for granted today. A lot of those things that we take for granted today, whether it be a day off or equal wage or a living wage, are things that came out of the labor force and is part of what Labor Day really is. And we'll talk about more of that kind of later on as we go, because we certainly didn't end with a photographer taking pictures of kids with bandages on their hands. That got us to Labor Day because there were you know, there were injuries and there are definitely fatalities that occurred. And individual fatalities happened probably more frequently than we thought. They're doing a little research. Again, there's [00:16:00] the death calendar. If you if you want to look it up and talking about an article about from achievements in public health. Nineteen hundred through 1999 and improvements in workplace safety. So there's a death calendar in industry. So all industries for Allegheny County. And it has the months of July through June in that order. And they have little red x's in each of the boxes where somebody has died. And sometimes there's one, sometimes there's multiple. And this is just one county where it occurred. And there are very few days that are blank or that do not have a red X in that calendar. It's a fairly stunning graphic to think about that back in that back in that time frame, Randy Klatt: [00:16:49] I was really impressed with the impact that that calendar has. Well, first of all, how many times have we ever seen a death calendar? [00:17:00] I mean, that's just the topic. The title itself is pretty indicative of disaster. But nineteen O' six July through nineteen O' seven and June five hundred and twenty six workers. And you're right, it's hard to find a date there where there's no red X and many of them have multiple. That's just inconceivable. And that's, like you said, one county, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:17:31] There's one week, August 19. Oh six where? Twenty one through twenty four. Those three days in there. Four days in there. There's an average, I think of probably four X's in each of those days, if I can peer through some of the blurriness of the reproduced image. So like one week you're talking close to 20 people, 20 people, different days, probably different occupations passed. [00:18:00] And never came back home from work. So there's that part again, where, you know, you have that that vision of leaving for work, kissing the family goodbye, saying goodbye to your girlfriend, your wife, kissing the kids, whatever, with the intent that you're going to be able to come back home and enjoy something of your labors for that day and your family to for you to come back home to. And you never do. Five hundred and twenty six people in that year in that county didn't come back in 1906, 1907. Randy Klatt: [00:18:36] Yeah. When we look at the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as you alluded to earlier, statistics weren't well, they certainly weren't to the point where they are today. So much of it was manual and so much of this was undocumented. So who knows really how many people died. Those, I guess, are the ones that were identified. It could have been a whole lot more. But [00:19:00] we're talking twenty three thousand people a year, in some cases, working out through an equivalent of somewhere around sixty one deaths per 100000 workers. Today's rate is somewhere just over three. So we have certainly come a long, long way since those days. Peter Koch: [00:19:24] Yeah, I think so. And you bring up a really good point around, you know, injuries, statistics being important because, you know, individual injuries and even individual fatalities will have you know, people will get focused on that and then you'll move off to the next thing. It was one person who got injured. It was one person who didn't come home. And it is a tragedy. But we don't tend to look at those individual incidences as critical. But only when you start to pull all of those statistics [00:20:00] together and you look at it as a whole. Did they become really powerful like the image that we were just talking about? So if you get a chance, go up and Google, search that death calendar for an industry for Allegheny County, and it'll pop up and you'll take a look at. And that's a really powerful image when you see all of those red Xs, because we live in an age where information is plentiful and it's easy to pull that trend together. It wasn't always that easy like you talked about before. And sometimes it really took like a mass casualty incident for workplace injuries or fatalities to get noticed beyond the immediate family and friends and the workers that it truly affected. Peter Koch: [00:20:38] And our history of work is really riddled with those issues. And again, we didn't start keeping good records probably until the eighteen hundreds and into the nineteen hundreds. But you get back you know, there are some statistics back there from a website [00:21:00] called The Deadliest Workplace Accidents in the American Experience. So back in the late 60s in Lawrence, Massachusetts, the Pemberton mill, large cotton goods factory collapsed without warning and it killed one hundred and forty five workers and injuring another one hundred and sixty six. And again, an injury back in 1860 is not like an injury. It is today in two thousand twenty one. We're going to go to the doctor, going to get good treatment. Chances that you're going to make it out of the hospital whole and return to the workforce is pretty high. Back then, you had an injury. There's a good chance you never return to the workforce. And then instead of being part of the family growing, you became a burden because they needed to support you and you could no longer go back to work. Randy Klatt: [00:21:49] Yeah. At that point, you became a real liability for everyone else, right? Yeah. We weren't talking about days of health insurance and disability insurance [00:22:00] and EMS coverage for your community. So you have emergency responders and fully manned fire departments. And we just that wasn't there. You get hurt. What are the odds that that's going to become infected or you're not going to get the right care? It could have been treated properly and you might get back to work, but there was no way to access the care. So you ended up with a disability for the rest of your life and no way to be compensated for that. It really is a sad part of this industrial revolution that we don't often think about. What did it really take and what are those mass casualty incidents that we really should know about? And then on Labor Day, look back and appreciate what people went through to get to where we are today. Peter Koch: [00:22:53] Yeah, because even after Labor Day was thought about and initially [00:23:00] celebrated, Labor Day, initially was celebrated in the late eighteen hundreds, so 1882 was that first Labor Day celebration in New York. And there's a couple of myths out there, not myths, but stories out there about competing people who suggested that you gather the laborers together to celebrate labor and to hear people talk about labor and organized labor and what you could do as a as a community of laborers. Well, yeah, that's the first the first celebration, 1882. And they talk about Peter J. Maguire being from the Carpenters Union and then Matthew Maguire from the Machinists Union were the two guys that are credited with first bringing Labor Day into the forefront here in the Americas. Randy Klatt: [00:23:50] Which obviously came from labor. And this wasn't recognized by anyone else, by the federal government or state government [00:24:00] or any other organization. It was the laborers who actually took the day off in 1882 unpaid to parade, to celebrate their accomplishments or to at least try to make people aware of the significant contribution they have. Peter Koch: [00:24:16] Yeah, so and the power that you have together that the power that you have as a group to recognize that there are some challenges out there and to really fight for the rights of the American worker back then. And there was a lot to fight for back then. And still even after they celebrated Labor Day. And again, you alluded to it took the day off, not were given the day paid to have off and celebrate Labor Day with your family. The first labor days were people didn't go to work. It was almost like a protest. They didn't show up that day. They went to New York and they marched the Labor Day parade to go to Union Square in New York City and march, [00:25:00] almost in protest. So, yeah, it's an interesting piece. We celebrate Labor Day today as a holiday or as an opportunity. And they celebrated Labor Day really as a chance back then, which is pretty interesting. Randy Klatt: [00:25:15] Indeed it is. And we're talking 1882. But if you look up some of the worst disasters in history and you started to read some of those, at least one of those on that list, there are all many years after those first Labor Day celebrations and even after it was actually a recognized federal holiday. So there were still a lot of struggles to be had down the road by workers to reach that equitable pay and equitable treatment and safer workplaces and all those things of the livable wage you mentioned earlier. Peter Koch: [00:25:54] Yeah, Randy Klatt: [00:25:54] It was still worth fighting for. And you still [00:26:00] had a pretty good chance of not coming home after going to work, especially if you were in heavy industry is still working in mining in particular. Oh, my gosh. Imagine being underground in a mine with the conditions they were in around the turn of the century. Peter Koch: [00:26:18] Oh, my gosh. No, I can't. And some of those pictures from Lewis Hine were showed groups of boys, young boys who were working in the mines. And you read some of those descriptions and what they did and they were they were the ones that went places in the mines that are grown adult couldn't go. So not only were they exposed to all of the same exposures that are hazards that an adult would be in a mine, which back then was a myriad of things that weren't controlled, everything from air quality issues to explosives to all sorts of things that never really came into play until labor [00:27:00] started to look into it and say, we need to do something about this. But the boys were then, for like I guess lack of a better term, allowed to go wiggle their way in the places and place charges and find different passages where a full grown adult couldn't go. Being a little claustrophobic myself, I'm not sure that I could do that. Randy Klatt: [00:27:22] Yeah, that wouldn't be on my list of to dos, that's for sure. And the worst mining disaster in American history occurred in nineteen O' seven. So just a few years after the turn of the century. And the wording just kind of gets to me when it describes this, the underground explosion. This was in West Virginia that kills three hundred and sixty two out of the three hundred and eighty men and boys working that day.  Oh, my goodness. Peter Koch: [00:27:55] That's it's almost a whole a whole community of people that were wiped out. You [00:28:00] know, it's three hundred men and boys, three hundred men and boys that, you know, had families to go back to. You've just cut out half of the population of probably a mining town, you know, within that one particular event that occurred. Randy Klatt: [00:28:16] Exactly. Peter Koch: [00:28:17] And it didn't stop there. And it wasn't just in the mines where things were really challenging. And we found a lot of a lot of people getting injured or killed. We talk about this often, especially if we're talking about the history of OSHA and where OSHA came out of and safety in America. One of the watershed moments, I think, in workplace safety came out of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire disaster that happened back in or on March 25th in 1911, which the history of that particular fire. Not even looking at pictures, just reading a [00:29:00] description of it can almost cause nightmares. It's pretty can be pretty scary. Randy Klatt: [00:29:04] It sure can. And a well known incident that we've learned a lot about being in the worker's comp industry and knowing that this was one of the key moments that brought forth the need for some sort of compensation for injured and fatally injured workers. But I agree. You read the read the description of what happened when this factory started to burn and where the people attempted to evacuate when there are 600 workers in this building. And of course, the fire hoses weren't working because they were rotted and the bowels were rusted shut. And so their panic ensued as they tried to get out and only a few people could fit into the elevator at a time. So, of course, eventually that broke down with many people still trapped in the building. So many fell to [00:30:00] their deaths in the elevator shafts, trying to somehow escape the floor that was on fire. And so many died in the building. But then just to learn that there were 58 people who died jumping to the sidewalks from the building, it's just that is horrifying to think about the loss, a total of a hundred and forty six people. Peter Koch: [00:30:22] Yeah, and in those the conditions in in how this all came about is the tragedy. I mean, I think I know when I've described part of this in a class before, people immediately think about 9/11 and those iconic images of people plummeting from the Twin Towers. And, you know, that's that is a horrible image to have fixed in your mind. And it is a horrible reason for those things to happen, to have a plane, a terrorist attack happen on our home soil [00:31:00] for that to occur. But in the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, we did this to ourselves. Right. So the doors the exit doors were chained closed because management didn't want people taking breaks when they shouldn't be taking breaks. You know, I guess having someone work 12 hours a day, six days a week just isn't enough. Right. So. Got to make sure that they're not taking a break when they shouldn't. You know, the fire started in a rag bin. Right. So we look at this often. We go different places and we see a bin full of used oily rags in a maintenance facility. And we talk to people about, hey, this is going to combust at some point in time, like, yeah, we'll take care of it. We'll take care of it at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, something that we take for granted, the exit routes. Right. So your fire escapes were too narrow. There wasn't enough room on the fire escape to handle the occupancy [00:32:00] of the floor of the building. So when people went out to the fire escape, the fire escape collapsed. So consider that like oh fire. Right. So I'm going to go out and I'm going to go out. What I know is the fire escape, and I'm going to walk onto that. And I'm assuming that fire escape is going to hold me and it doesn't. And it collapses and prevents everyone else from escaping. And then considering the response and you said this early on, like we didn't we had some organized EMS, we had some especially in the cities, there was fire response. A lot of it was volunteer, some of it was professional. But the fire occurred on the eighth floor. The hoses only reached to the seventh floor like. So that math just doesn't add up. Right. So there's lots of things that we take for granted today that came out of these. Disasters. [00:33:00] One of those is workplace safety. In a in a focus on workplace safety, another one is building code and making sure that the building is able to support the number of people and what they're doing in there and how do they get out in the in the event of an emergency. And we tend to forget that these rules aren't there just so that our jobs can be more annoying. But they're there because there has been substantial issues. And they talk about this in the history of Triangle Shirtwaist, too, with like 18 minutes from the time of the fire to the time that was all done and all. One hundred and forty six people died. Eighteen minutes. That's crazy to think that that many people would die almost in an instant. Peter Koch: [00:33:47] Let's take a quick break. Maybe you didn't know, but MEMIC is committed to making workers' comp work better for everyone. It's been our hallmark since day one. And through compassion, partnerships and a relentless commitment to workplace [00:34:00] safety, we make an impact, whether it's our claim specialist, connecting injured workers with the best medical care and helping them understand the worker's comp system or our safety specialist conducting training for frontline staff and workplace assessments with your supervisors. We understand your industry and how a robust safety program is a pillar of any successful company. Already a MEMIC policyholder. Then reach out to your MEMIC safety management consultant for more information about resources that can help. And if not, and you're interested in how MEMIC can partner with you for workplace safety. Contact your independent insurance agent. Now, let's get back to today's episode. Randy Klatt: [00:34:45] It is crazy. And as you said, self-induced. And we see that to some degree in business today when we do mention something about the regs or the exit was partially blocked or you can't get to the fire [00:35:00] extinguisher. And, you know, those sorts of things that we always point out. And it's the overriding philosophy of, yeah, we'll get to it, but really, we have to do business first and it's not going to happen. What are the odds? Right. What are the odds that this building is going to catch on fire, that we're going to have a problem and that's not the right way to look at workplace safety. And we should have learned from these incidents. Every manager, every supervisor, every business owner should have a real good appreciation of history. So we don't repeat it. Peter Koch: [00:35:39] It's that's a very good point. There's a phrase out there for those who don't know their history are destined to step in it again. Right. Or fall into it again, or however you want to finish that particular phrase. And there's an author out. There was this quote came out of another website that we're looking through, the [00:36:00] article called Child Workers and Workplace Accidents. What's the price paid for Industrializing America? They talk about how between the years of 1830 to 1880, there's this overworks generation of Americans that reached adulthood with hunchbacked weakness, both legs, damaged pelvises, missing limbs from working in those conditions for so long. And you have a generation that has human damage that doesn't allow them to interact in the same way with everyone else that we take for granted today. And I thought it was an interesting connection, because if we just take the example of how industrial technology back in the eighteen hundreds changed a generation and moved that same phrase to today and how technology take the industrial out of it, technology has changed a generation. What kind of injuries [00:37:00] are we seeing in a lot of young people today? And it might not always be work related. It might be just someone going to the doctor because they've got aches and pains, but it's neck injuries, it's wrist injuries, it's overexertion injuries. And most of it's coming from the phone posture. The technology posture of the hunched back, the rounded shoulders, the hands together, typing with their thumbs, staring at a small screen for hours a day. And you're seeing injuries or challenges to people that are really we saw similar things from introduction of technology back in the eighteen hundreds to. So, again, that whole concept of we need to understand our history to be able to see our current day and possibly even the effect of the current day on the future accurately, too. So there's a lot in this history that we can really take forward. [00:38:00] Randy Klatt: [00:38:00] Right. That's those are great points. It's all about those musculoskeletal disorders that take place over time and know. One hundred and fifty years ago, it was manual labor in horrible conditions and long hours and no days off. That resulted in these injuries and these long term problems that people had today. We still have a lot of people working in industry and construction and such. But you're right, there are a lot more people using the computer or using a phone or a tablet. And we actually have young people who are starting to grow spines out of their cervical spine. So like bone spurs that are developing, which is not that uncommon with elderly people because you do have to hold your head up. Right. The human head weighs 12 pounds, 15 pounds, give or take. And [00:39:00] that takes some effort to hold up. We don't really think about it until we put our head down looking at the phone. Then after a few hours, our neck really starts to hurt and we ignore it. And over time, we forget the pain and we just deal with it. And we're actually starting to grow these things out of our spine that are being found in teenagers when normally they wouldn't be found until you're in your 70s. So there are workplace challenges today that we really need to face that are, you know, from different causal factors. But again, looking at history, we should be able to learn from them and find a better way. And let's listen to your safety consultant when they make recommendations. Gosh darn it, Peter Koch: [00:39:50] Every once in a while. Don't delete the email. Read it through. Think about it before you delete it, possibly, right? Randy Klatt: [00:39:55] That's right. We know what we're talking about. So interesting [00:40:00] that that even in 1911, we see this disaster and it did spur a lot of work in building codes and, you know, the sort of standards for the workplace. But it was still another 60 years before OSHA was founded. The Occupational Safety and Health Act was founded. So it took a long time even to get to that point where we actually had federal regulations about workplace safety. Peter Koch: [00:40:35] Yeah. And even beyond or even before that. So OSHA, from a workplace safety standpoint, which is near and dear to our hearts, but just from a fair labor part, like what's fair, what's fair work, what constitutes fair work that even get passed until 1938, the Fair Labor Standards Act, where they addressed child labor and they addressed [00:41:00] the workday and they addressed fair wages and living wages, all which kind of come together to help the American worker be a more valuable component of the success of America. Randy Klatt: [00:41:13] It did take a long time, way too long. Peter Koch: [00:41:17] Way too long. And, you know, like we said it before, our current workplaces aren't free from problems. They're not free from hazards or free from people getting injured. We have come, like you said, we've come a long way. But the way there was really hard won. And whenever you've got struggle, there's going to be some progress. And to flip that around, Frederick Douglas, it's a quote that comes out of the, uh, around 1857. If there is no struggle, there is no progress. So you look at all the challenges that occurred back there and that started the labor union. It started to pull organized the different factions, not [00:42:00] factions, but the different groups from the different industries to come together and start to advocate for better conditions in the workplace. And those unions came forward and they fought for better hours, equal pay and safer working conditions. And actually, you know, Randy, when you think about it, that's somewhat on how MEMIC was actually formed and not on that, you know, not out of that particular quote. But really, there was a struggle in Maine in the early 1980s through the early nineteen nineties and through those struggles MEMIC was actually formed. It was it didn't come out of it wasn't somebody's brainchild because they thought it would be an awesome idea. It was a response to a crisis like a lot of this. Right. So the [00:43:00] the Labor Standards Act and the building codes and OSHA you hear many times that OSHA standards were written in blood because they were there's every standard in that OSHA standards book is because there's somebody or some body part that's attached to that, that didn't make it home or didn't make it home with the person after the incident occurred. Randy Klatt: [00:43:27] Yeah. And then early 1990s, Maine had one of the worst, if not the worst, workplace injury records. Our injury rate was really high and worker's compensation insurance was extremely expensive. And insurers were, in fact, withdrawing from the state. And we got to a real crisis point with the businesses in Maine and something had to be done. So thank goodness MEMIC was founded. An initial [00:44:00] mission statement really did talk about not only providing great insurance and great safety services, but we wanted to promote fair and equitable treatment for all workers. And that's still true today. We've updated the mission statement and our vision and values and all that along the way. But that's still at the core of what we do is taking care of people. And ideally, we take care of people before there's an injury. That's our role as a safety consultant, is to get out there and find those issues, find those emergency exits that are blocked and make sure that they're taken care of. So in the event of a disaster, we actually get people out of the building instead of trapping them inside. But when injuries do occur, MEMIC is also there to provide the insurance benefits and medical care so that people can get back to work healthy and happy as soon as possible. So it is an important mission. I never conceived of myself [00:45:00] working for an insurance company. I know I don't like to pay insurance premiums any more than anybody else does. But this is an important piece of every worker's life, and it is important. Peter Koch: [00:45:14] Yeah. And we're not saying that, you know, MEMIC was formed so that you could celebrate Labor Day, but I think it fits within the whole the whole thought of, you know, Labor Day came out of a struggle. And there's good things that come out of a struggle. And we have a long history of struggling for things and to things in America. You know, after those first two celebrations in New York in 1882, it still wasn't a national holiday like you didn't once. They all met together and had the parade in New York and they figured out which McGuire was the one to recognize as the person who suggested Labor Day still wasn't a national thing. I mean, that was [00:46:00] just New York City. And it took five more years for the first state in the Union to actually recognize Labor Day as an official holiday. And I don't have a lot of information about that. But Oregon was the first state back in 1887 to make Labor Day an official holiday. So I'd be curious if we can go back in time and kind of look at that first Labor Day. And was it just the day off or was it like our current Labor Day and certain companies you get that benefit of having a paid day off. So I'm not sure all of the labor in Oregon were paid for that first Labor Day holiday, but that was the first state to declare Labor Day a holiday. Oregon in 1887. Randy Klatt: [00:46:50] Oh, go Oregon. Peter Koch: [00:46:51] There you go. Randy Klatt: [00:46:52] Go Ducks! Peter Koch: [00:46:52] And even after that, it still didn't catch on. It's still a number of years, another five or six years [00:47:00] for more states to sign things into law. There again, seven more years. Grover Cleveland, are the president at the time finally signed the Labor Day holiday into law. So then it was a national holiday. And prior to that, in between 1887 and 94, 23 other states had adopted the holiday. And then Grover Cleveland signed it into law because it was becoming a trend, I guess, across the nation. Randy Klatt: [00:47:32] Ya he saw the inevitable, huh? Yeah. Yeah. Looked at it, decided to do the right the right thing for a change. Peter Koch: [00:47:38] And that's even that's an interesting history, because there, you know, prior to that, in that same year was the Pullman strike where the railroad workers were on went on strike for two, almost three months. And it was pretty nasty. There was a lot of violence and [00:48:00] some deaths, both on the strikers side and on the government side that tried to break it up. But ultimately, the labor won it out, but it was still, you know, still a violent part of our history. So, you know, again, 1894, a watershed time in our history to signing Labor Day as a holiday into law. But there is still a lot of struggle around that just to make it happen. Randy Klatt: [00:48:30] Yeah. Can you imagine having to riot and to get into gunfights on the streets and calling in the Pinkerton agents to protect your facility and all those kinds of things just because you're not willing to pay a fair wage or workers are complaining of unsafe working conditions? Peter Koch: [00:48:54] Sure, I don't think I can. I don't think I can. And I think it [00:49:00] highlights, you know, as we think about Labor Day and we think about the roots of Labor Day, it highlights, again, the need for both parties to come to the table rationally to talk about what's right and not what's just good for the one, but what's good for more than just the one. How are we going to be successful as a company as well as be successful as the individual? Because, you know, there are many cases where when you just focus on the company being successful and not the workers being successful, you're not going to end up being successful as a company. And we've talked about a lot of challenges, there's hundreds, if not thousands of companies out there that have not been able to be successful for one reason or the other, and sometimes it is because they didn't have the right priorities in mind when they started looking at labor. Randy Klatt: [00:49:59] After [00:50:00] all, who is the company? We want to make the company successful. And I don't know of any company that will be successful if their workforce isn't successful. They're the ones that make it happen. So protecting those workers is not only the right thing to do from an ethical standpoint, but certainly the right thing to do from an economic standpoint. We all know just the small part of that whole pie being the worker's compensation insurance premium and how much that costs of business. And just like any insurance, the more you use it, the more it costs. So you can drive those direct costs of an injury through the roof pretty darn quickly. And it would be far less expensive to get ahead of the game and take care of those workers in the first place so that that doesn't happen. Safety is always a pay me now or pay me later proposal and [00:51:00] now is going to be a lot less expensive than later. It's just that's the way it always works. Peter Koch: [00:51:06] It always does. And we can be really short sighted. And think about the not putting out a little bit now, but it's like you said, it's going to come around later. Back to you. Well, so we've been talking about Labor Day here for almost an hour. And I think it's good for us to recognize. Right. So back before 1994 or excuse me, back before 1894, even farther than 1994, right back before 1894, Labor Day didn't exist. We didn't recognize the success of and the input of the American worker, that construction worker, the textile worker, the manufacturing person, the firefighter, the police officer, the nurse, the doctor, the whoever it is, the [00:52:00] American labor, the person that's out there doing things and making things for to make America successful and then to try to be successful on their own. That symbiotic relationship between the work that needs to be done and the worker that's going to do it. And the history of Labor Day is just filled with struggle, courage, defiance, injuries. And as we've talked about, even death out there today, we celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday of September. And most of us will enjoy a day off from work sharing time and maybe a meal with friends and family. Peter Koch: [00:52:34] And it's become the last hurrah before summer ends and the school year starts in earnest. So people are celebrating a lot of things. And when we do it, it's easy to forget the history of our modern workplace and how we got the eight hour workday overtime pay holidays or even machine guards, air quality monitoring respirators, lock out tag out, fall protection, all of the tools and standards [00:53:00] that give us the opportunity to come home after work and see those friends and family. So when you're celebrating, don't forget the thousands of workers out there in retail, hospitality, food service, emergency services and health care that are going to celebrate Labor Day by working for us or in some cases with one of our loved ones. So this Labor Day, remember that it's not just a holiday from work, but it's a holiday about work. And without the lives and the limbs of the workers that came before us and the unions and officials that spoke out, we would not have the day to celebrate. There's a good chance more of us would be spending this first Monday of September in the hospital or worse yet, in the morgue. Peter Koch: [00:53:49] Thanks again to everyone for joining us. And today on the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast. We've been speaking about the history of Labor Day and how it has influenced safety with Randy Klatt, director of Region two here at MEMIC. If you have any suggestions for a safety related podcast [00:54:00] topic or we'd like to hear more about a topic we've touched on. Email me at podcast@MEMIC.com Also, check out our show notes for today's podcast at MEMIC.com/podcast where you can find links to the articles and resources we used for today and our entire podcast archive. And while you're there, sign up for our safety net blog so you never miss any of our articles and safety news updates. And if you haven't done so already, I'd appreciate it if you took a few minutes to review us on Stitcher, iTunes or whichever podcast service that you found us on. If you've already done that. Thanks. Hope you've subscribed because it really helps us spread the word. Please consider sharing this show. With a business associate friend or a family member who you think will get something out of it. And as always, thank you for the continued support. And until next time, this is Peter Koch reminding you that listening to the MEMIC Safety Experts podcast is good, but using what you learned here is even [00:55:00] better.  

Mason and Friends show
Episode 577: episode 577

Mason and Friends show

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 29, 2021 53:18


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PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight
Why Bill Belichick Was Trying to Hide Brian Flores from the NFL | Wed. Aug 25, 2021

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 19:48


The Miami Dolphins were tasked with narrowing their roster size to 80 players this week, so in this edition of the show, we look at who was released and what other surprising roster moves the team made. We touch on that, as well as the continued disrespect shown to the Miami Dolphins, and this time specifically, Xavien Howard. To wrap the show, we play a clip from a recent interview of Head Coach Brian Flores, where it is revealed that Bill Belichick may have been trying to hide the young coach from the NFL world. We'll get into all of it so strap up, and let's dive in!

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight
Takeaways from the Dolphins Dominant Display | Tue. Aug 24, 2021

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 24, 2021 28:21


The Pod is back and better than ever, mostly thanks to an amazing showing from Tua Tagovailoa and the Miami Dolphins in their second preseason game. Miami faced the Atlanta Falcons at home, and the game was never close. Albeit against backups, the Dolphins offense marched the ball up and down the field with ease and Tua looked far sharper and more confident. Join us as we look at Tua's performance, as well as the rest of the offense. From starters to promising backups who could earn a larger role, don't miss this one! We talk defense, and where there could still be some worry, and so much more. Let's get to it, and let's dive in!

Big Blue Banter
Giants-Browns joint practices: Good signs from Garrett, Defense ‘on fire' vs. NFL's No. 1 OLine, more

Big Blue Banter

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 21, 2021 77:02


Dan and Nick break down both joint practices for the New York Giants against the Cleveland Browns. They get into the nitty-gritty of the schematics -- Xs and Os stuff they like seeing from the offense and what the defense can be if the pass rush plays in the regular season like it did in these practices. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight
The Miami Dolphins Begin to Shape Out Their Roster | Wed. Aug 18, 2021

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 18, 2021 18:01


With the new CBA, the NFL Preseason has changed. Rather than just one big day of cuts, the team has to spread out their releases, allowing them to give guys more meaningful reps as they fight to make the final 55 man roster. The team had to get to 85 players, and in this episode, we talk about the cuts, as well as some help the Dolphins received on the offensive line. The trade for Gregory Little could expose the weaknesses of Chris Grier's ability to draft lineman, we go through his history to see if we should be concerned. Additionally, we touch on other Miami Dolphins news and notes, join us, and let's dive in!

The CJ Silas Show on ESPN Radio 1280

Former NFL Quarterback Don McPherson joins CJ for this weeks show. However instead of a typical Xs and Os conversation, the pair talks about topics that are bigger than the game. Thanks to all my partners: Dr. Daniel Lapidus & Larry Ackerman, Dr. Brad Kurgis of Kurgis Dermatology, California Fresh Markets, Rex Stevens @ The SLO Wellness Center, Costa de Oro Winery, Avila Bay Athletic Club & Spa, Joy of Shell Beach, & Michael Moore Sports Recovery.

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight
Diving Into the Miami Dolphins Preseason Depth Chart | Wed. Aug 11, 2021

PhinsPod: Miami Dolphins News & NFL Insight

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2021 21:02


As the Miami Dolphins travel up to Chicago to take on the Bears, we look into the released depth chart showing exactly where guys stand at this moment in time. Now obviously, it's a tentative ranking, but nonetheless Moose talks about who has an opportunity to showcase themselves and those who may be fighting for their NFL lives. Listen now and learn about Mike Gesicki's status, how this offense will function in 2021, and how many snaps we could expect to see the starters play on Saturday afternoon on Soldier Field.

How Long Gone
218. - Chris & Jason

How Long Gone

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 58:21


One-on-one pod today, TJ calls in from Las Vegas for a full scene report. We chat about an odd character on the flight over, Morrissey's Encore Beach Party, traveling to Vegas in a cage, Chris hating “off the strip guy,” the adult pool, exploring some of Nevada's natural wine, pregaming Red Bull and vodkas at the slots, visiting Diplo live at XS, what to say on the mic, Agenda trade show, Mark Ronson's new show, Limp Bizkit vs Sublime, and what to expect at the Jabawockeez matinee. twitter.com/donetodeath twitter.com/themjeans --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/howlonggone/support

Scarlet Velocity: A Flash Podcast
Scarlet Velocity #719: Summer Special 21

Scarlet Velocity: A Flash Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 69:26


Season 7 of The Flash was like no other. Between schedule delays, casting changes, health restrictions, and more, the cast and crew had their work cut out for them. The boys talk about each episode and break down the successes and near-misses. They look at all the villains, guests, and what could be coming next year. Jay and Josh sign each other's yearbooks for a season to remember on the first Scarlet Velocity Summer Special of 2021.

THE ED MYLETT SHOW
Unrivaled Clemson Culture w/ Coach Dabo Swinney

THE ED MYLETT SHOW

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 15, 2021 70:14


First , let me just tell you upfront…THIS IS A TRULY INCREDIBLE CONVERSATION! This is a Master Class on LEADERSHIP, FAITH , CULTURE and LIFE Even if you are only a casual follower of college football, you're undoubtedly familiar with Clemson Tigers head coach Dabo Swinney. Over the past three decades few coaches can rival the SUCCESS Coach Swinney has enjoyed. You learn a lot about LIFE and what it takes to succeed as a player and a coach in college football. And Coach Swinney learned a long time ago about what it takes to be a WINNER. He became Clemson's head coach in 2009 and has built an ASTONISHING legacy since that time. Coach Swinney's teams have won 81% of their games going 140-33. He also led the Tigers to national championships in 2016 in 2018. And for the past three seasons, he's coached Trevor Lawrence, who many consider the finest quarterback coming out of college football in quite a long time. To enjoy such a high level of success for an extended period you must have STANDARDS and a CULTURE in place that let's players EXCEL to their HIGHEST CAPACITY. Coach Sweeney talks about what that culture is and how Clemson's culture actually turned into a brand that has made it easier to continue to RECRUIT THE BEST TALENT in the nation. Coach Swinney is also a man of FAITH. And he has infused his coaching style and his relationship with his players with faith-based principles that have also significantly contributed to the positive culture at Clemson. One of the best ways you can learn to be SUCCESSFUL in your own life is to learn from others who have enjoyed the highest levels of success in their life and in the teams they coach. Coach Swinney goes way beyond the Xs and Os to deliver an INSPIRING and INSIGHTFUL exchange of ideas that you will not want to miss.