Podcasts about Audubon

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Best podcasts about Audubon

Latest podcast episodes about Audubon

KJAN
CAM runs away from Audubon for big district win

KJAN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 24, 2022 3:44


The CAM Cougars started hot out of the gate and rolled to a 42-8 Homecoming win over the Audubon Wheelers on Friday. Austin Williams ripped off a 53-yard touchdown run on the Cougars first offensive play to set the tone. Audubon answered that early CAM touchdown with a 65-yard shovel pass for a score from Aaron Olsen to Manny Beisswenger. That would be the end of the Audubon offensive effort in the first half though. The Cougars took the lead back two possessions later on a 47-yard pass from Chase Spieker to Jack Follmann. Then the Cougar defense took control. Audubon didn't have a first down the entire half and lost yardage after that early touchdown play. CAM led 28-8 by halftime and fully closed the door to start the second half. Jack Follmann ran for a 65-yard touchdown on the first play of the half to put CAM up 34-0. He would later add a 47-yard score to finish the scoring in the game. Austin Williams finished with 132 yards and 2 touchdowns. Follmann had 132 yards and two scores on the ground and 57 yards receiving with two more scores. Chase Spieker finished 7 of 9 passing for 112 yards and 2 touchdowns. The Cougars improved to 3-2 on the season and 1-1 in District 10. Audubon falls to 2-4 on the season and 2-1 in District 10. Listen to the postgame interviews with Austin Williams and Barry Bower below. Watch the full game replay HERE on the CAM Cougar Channel.

Dead Drifters society: A fly fishing podcast
#35 Life & Fly Fishing With Tom Rosenbauer

Dead Drifters society: A fly fishing podcast

Play Episode Play 49 sec Highlight Listen Later Sep 23, 2022 61:38


On the episode, we sit down with Tom Rosenbauer.  First, taking a look into Tom's life and how things got started with Orvis. We dive into behind the scenes of content creating, his podcast “The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide”, the books he's written, and lets not forget the fly fishing! Tom Rosenbauer has been with the Orvis Company for 44years, and while there has been a fishing school instructor, copywriter, public relations director, merchandise manager, and was editor of The Orvis News for 10 years. He is currently their chief marketing enthusiast, which is what they call people when they don't know what else to do with them..  As merchandise manager, web merchandiser, and catalog director, the titles under his direction have won numerous Gold Medals in the Multichannel MerchantAwards.   Tom was awarded Fly Rod & Reel's “Angler of the Year Award” for 2011 for his educational efforts through his books, magazine articles, and podcasts. Tom has been a fly fisher for 50 years, and was a commercial fly tier by age 14.  He has fished extensively across North America and has also fished on Christmas Island, the Bahamas, Belize, in Kamchatka, Chile, and on the fabled English chalk streams .  He is credited with bringing Bead-Head flies to North America, and is the inventor of the Big Eye hook, Magnetic Net Retriever, and tungsten beads for fly tying.  He has about 20 fly fishing books in print, including The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide, Reading Trout Streams, Prospecting for Trout, Casting Illusions, Fly-Fishing in America, Approach and Presentation, Trout Foods and Their Imitations; Nymphing Techniques; Leaders, Knots, and Tippets, The Orvis Guide to Dry-Fly Techniques, The Orvis Fly Fishing Encyclopedia, and The Orvis Fly-Tying Guide, which won a 2001 National Outdoor Book Award .  His collaboration with photographer Andy Anderson, Salt, also won a National Outdoor Book Award in 2014.  He has also been published in Field & Stream, Outdoor Life, Catalog Age, Fly Fisherman, Gay's Sporting Journal, Sporting Classics, Fly Rod & Reel, Audubon, Men's Journal, and others. His latest book, Fly Fishing for Trout—The Next Level, was published in November of 2016.  Tom is the writer and narrator of “The Orvis Fly-Fishing Guide Podcast,” one of the top outdoor podcasts on ITunes.   He lives with his wife and son in southern Vermont on the banks of his favorite trout stream.Go follow along with Tom's Adventures on Instagram. https://instagram.com/rosenbauert?igshid=ODBkMDk1MTU=The Orvis Fly Fishing Guide :https://open.spotify.com/show/6UWo8WWWiCIkeB4pz2viFN?si=-xUs68A_S4CS6wiJivWedwFly Fishing For Trout- The Next Level:https://www.amazon.ca/Fly-Fishing-Trout-Next-Level/dp/0811713466/ref=asc_df_0811713466_nodl?tag=googlemobshop-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=292950747067&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=10705630291467607253&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=m&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9001605&hvtargid=pla-564221841045&psc=1&dplnkId=9a0e3819-9438-4d29-87a7-b240a8284103

Upon Further Review
UFR SEAN BIRKS AUDUBON FB WEEK 5

Upon Further Review

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 22, 2022 6:16


KJAN
Audubon grabs statement win over Exira-EHK

KJAN

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2022 5:35


Aaron Olsen Audubon played a near perfect first half and grabbed a big 64-30 win over Exira-EHK on Friday night at Chis Jones Field. The two teams traded scores on the first four drives of the game, but then the Wheelers got some stops and kept punching scores in. On Exira-EHK's third possession Izik Sorensen blocked a Spartan punt and set the Wheelers up at the 7 yard line. Two plays later the Wheelers scored to go up 24-14. They would force a turnover on downs for the Spartans the next possession. Manny Beisswenger then ripped off a 45-yard touchdown run. Aaron Olsen added two more touchdown runs before the half and the Wheelers led 44-14 at the break. Olsen finished with 5 touchdown runs and 2 touchdown passes. Both of the passes were to tight end Edward Miller, the first was a 61-yard strike on their first offensive possession. The Wheelers improved to 2-3 overall and 2-0 8-Player District 10. Next up the Wheelers have another big district battle at CAM. We'll have that game on KJAN. Exira-EHK was led by two touchdown runs and one TD pass from Trey Petersen. The Spartans fall to 2-2 overall and 0-2 in District 10. Next up for Sparty is a trip to Bedford. Listen to the full postgame interviews with Audubon Head Coach Sean Birks and quarterback Aaron Olsen below.

Books & Writers · The Creative Process
Carl Safina - Ecologist - Founding President of Safina Center - NYTimes Bestselling Author

Books & Writers · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:30


Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace."What we call killer whales or orca whales, they travel about 75 miles a day. Where they travel, the visibility is almost never more than about 50 feet, and yet they go to different destinations that may be hundreds of miles apart from where they've been before. And two or three decades after somebody has started to study a particular group, they will see the exact same individuals still together because they recognize their voices in the ocean when they cannot see each other, and they know who is in their group and what group they belong to. And that is not an accident. If a whale is next to the same whale it was next to 30 years ago after traveling thousands of miles in the ocean, it's because they have lives. They're not just bumbling around. They're not just unconsciously swimming forward, gulping down things that they're motivated to eat. They do understand a lot about what they're doing in the moment." www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.infoPhoto: Carl Safina in Uganda

The Creative Process Podcast
Carl Safina - Ecologist - Founding President of Safina Center - NYTimes Bestselling Author

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:30


Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace."So we tend to take living for granted. I think that might be the biggest limitation of human intelligence is to not understand with awe and reverence and love that we live in a miracle that we are part of and that we have the ability to either nurture or destroy.The living world is enormously enriching to human life. I just loved animals. They're always just totally fascinating. They're not here for us. They're just here like we're just here. They are of this world as much as we are of this world. They really have the same claim to life and death and the circle of being."www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.infoPhoto: Carl Safina in Uganda

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast
Highlights - Carl Safina - Author of “Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace”

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:10


"At the Safina Center, we're trying to work on values. Values I think are the fundamental thing. If you resonate with the values we're expressing, you would feel differently about the prices of things, just, for instance, oil and coal are really very cheap. They are priced cheaply. The price, the value, and the cost of things are three really different things.So the price of oil and coal is very cheap, but the cost of those things involves, well, let's just say coal for one example, it involves blowing the tops off of mountains throughout Appalachia, occasionally burying a few people, giving lots of workers lung disease, changing the heat balance of the entire planet, and acidifying the ocean. That's the cost of it. It's nowhere in the price."Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast
Carl Safina - Ecologist - Founding President of Safina Center - NYTimes Bestselling Author

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:30


Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace."At the Safina Center, we're trying to work on values. Values I think are the fundamental thing. If you resonate with the values we're expressing, you would feel differently about the prices of things, just, for instance, oil and coal are really very cheap. They are priced cheaply. The price, the value, and the cost of things are three really different things.So the price of oil and coal is very cheap, but the cost of those things involves, well, let's just say coal for one example, it involves blowing the tops off of mountains throughout Appalachia, occasionally burying a few people, giving lots of workers lung disease, changing the heat balance of the entire planet, and acidifying the ocean. That's the cost of it. It's nowhere in the price."www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.infoPhoto: Carl Safina in Uganda

One Planet Podcast
Highlights - Carl Safina - Author of “Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace”

One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:10


"What we call killer whales or orca whales, they travel about 75 miles a day. Where they travel, the visibility is almost never more than about 50 feet, and yet they go to different destinations that may be hundreds of miles apart from where they've been before. And two or three decades after somebody has started to study a particular group, they will see the exact same individuals still together because they recognize their voices in the ocean when they cannot see each other, and they know who is in their group and what group they belong to. And that is not an accident. If a whale is next to the same whale it was next to 30 years ago after traveling thousands of miles in the ocean, it's because they have lives. They're not just bumbling around. They're not just unconsciously swimming forward, gulping down things that they're motivated to eat. They do understand a lot about what they're doing in the moment." Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

One Planet Podcast
Carl Safina - Ecologist - Founding President of Safina Center - NYTimes Bestselling Author

One Planet Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:30


Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace."What we call killer whales or orca whales, they travel about 75 miles a day. Where they travel, the visibility is almost never more than about 50 feet, and yet they go to different destinations that may be hundreds of miles apart from where they've been before. And two or three decades after somebody has started to study a particular group, they will see the exact same individuals still together because they recognize their voices in the ocean when they cannot see each other, and they know who is in their group and what group they belong to. And that is not an accident. If a whale is next to the same whale it was next to 30 years ago after traveling thousands of miles in the ocean, it's because they have lives. They're not just bumbling around. They're not just unconsciously swimming forward, gulping down things that they're motivated to eat. They do understand a lot about what they're doing in the moment." www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.infoPhoto: Carl Safina in Uganda

Books & Writers · The Creative Process
Highlights - Carl Safina - Author of “Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace”

Books & Writers · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:10


"What we call killer whales or orca whales, they travel about 75 miles a day. Where they travel, the visibility is almost never more than about 50 feet, and yet they go to different destinations that may be hundreds of miles apart from where they've been before. And two or three decades after somebody has started to study a particular group, they will see the exact same individuals still together because they recognize their voices in the ocean when they cannot see each other, and they know who is in their group and what group they belong to. And that is not an accident. If a whale is next to the same whale it was next to 30 years ago after traveling thousands of miles in the ocean, it's because they have lives. They're not just bumbling around. They're not just unconsciously swimming forward, gulping down things that they're motivated to eat. They do understand a lot about what they're doing in the moment." Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Education · The Creative Process
Highlights - Carl Safina - Author of “Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace”

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:10


"Our economy doesn't really care about education. What we care about is making consumers in the United States. We have free education, a form of socialism for everybody until grade 12. At grade 12, they're not really skilled at anything except buying stuff. And then we say, Okay, that's the end of your free education. If you want to be a better citizen and more educated, you're on your own now. Good luck. And that has a lot to do with the pricing of things and where we put our money based entirely on our values. If we really cared about having an informed citizenry that was skilled and creative, we would simply extend free education through college."Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society
Carl Safina - Ecologist - Founding President of Safina Center - NYTimes Bestselling Author

The Creative Process in 10 minutes or less · Arts, Culture & Society

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:10


"So we tend to take living for granted. I think that might be the biggest limitation of human intelligence is to not understand with awe and reverence and love that we live in a miracle that we are part of and that we have the ability to either nurture or destroy.The living world is enormously enriching to human life. I just loved animals. They're always just totally fascinating. They're not here for us. They're just here like we're just here. They are of this world as much as we are of this world. They really have the same claim to life and death and the circle of being."Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Education · The Creative Process
Carl Safina - Ecologist - Founding President of Safina Center - NYTimes Bestselling Author

Education · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:30


Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace."Our economy doesn't really care about education. What we care about is making consumers in the United States. We have free education, a form of socialism for everybody until grade 12. At grade 12, they're not really skilled at anything except buying stuff. And then we say, Okay, that's the end of your free education. If you want to be a better citizen and more educated, you're on your own now. Good luck. And that has a lot to do with the pricing of things and where we put our money based entirely on our values. If we really cared about having an informed citizenry that was skilled and creative, we would simply extend free education through college."www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.infoPhoto: Carl Safina in Uganda

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
Highlights - Carl Safina - Author of “Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace”

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:10


"We are the extreme animal. We're certainly, technologically speaking, there's no comparison to what humans can do among all the animals that make some tools, even though we should keep in mind that for close to 200,000 years, humans who were essentially identical to us had no tools that were more complicated than a bow and arrow.I think the most crucial thing is that while we are such extraordinary tinkerers that we can keep creating unbelievable kinds of technologies, we are not very smart about what we do with those things or seeing them through to the implications of what happens when we do these things. If we were wiser about it, we would conduct ourselves much more differently than the all-out charge that we conduct, where often we just follow some technology along without worrying about the implications of what will happen ultimately, or caring about what will happen ultimately, or denying what is happening as a result of the overuse of those technologies or the overpopulation of the world by human beings. And those are causing many of the problems that we have."Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.infoPhoto: Carl Safina in Uganda

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process
Carl Safina - Ecologist - Founding President of Safina Center - NYTimes Bestselling Author

Tech, Innovation & Society - The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:30


Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace."We are the extreme animal. We're certainly, technologically speaking, there's no comparison to what humans can do among all the animals that make some tools, even though we should keep in mind that for close to 200,000 years, humans who were essentially identical to us had no tools that were more complicated than a bow and arrow.I think the most crucial thing is that while we are such extraordinary tinkerers that we can keep creating unbelievable kinds of technologies, we are not very smart about what we do with those things or seeing them through to the implications of what happens when we do these things. If we were wiser about it, we would conduct ourselves much more differently than the all-out charge that we conduct, where often we just follow some technology along without worrying about the implications of what will happen ultimately, or caring about what will happen ultimately, or denying what is happening as a result of the overuse of those technologies or the overpopulation of the world by human beings. And those are causing many of the problems that we have."www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.infoPhoto: Carl Safina in Uganda

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process
Highlights - Carl Safina - Author of “Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace”

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:10


"So we tend to take living for granted. I think that might be the biggest limitation of human intelligence is to not understand with awe and reverence and love that we live in a miracle that we are part of and that we have the ability to either nurture or destroy.The living world is enormously enriching to human life. I just loved animals. They're always just totally fascinating. They're not here for us. They're just here like we're just here. They are of this world as much as we are of this world. They really have the same claim to life and death and the circle of being."Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process
Carl Safina - Ecologist - Founding President of Safina Center - NYTimes Bestselling Author

Spirituality & Mindfulness · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 59:30


Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace."So we tend to take living for granted. I think that might be the biggest limitation of human intelligence is to not understand with awe and reverence and love that we live in a miracle that we are part of and that we have the ability to either nurture or destroy.The living world is enormously enriching to human life. I just loved animals. They're always just totally fascinating. They're not here for us. They're just here like we're just here. They are of this world as much as we are of this world. They really have the same claim to life and death and the circle of being."www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.infoPhoto: Carl Safina in Uganda

The Creative Process Podcast
Highlights - Carl Safina - Author of “Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace”

The Creative Process Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2022 11:10


"So we tend to take living for granted. I think that might be the biggest limitation of human intelligence is to not understand with awe and reverence and love that we live in a miracle that we are part of and that we have the ability to either nurture or destroy.The living world is enormously enriching to human life. I just loved animals. They're always just totally fascinating. They're not here for us. They're just here like we're just here. They are of this world as much as we are of this world. They really have the same claim to life and death and the circle of being."Carl Safina's lyrical non-fiction writing explores how humans are changing the living world, and what the changes mean for non-human beings and for us all. His work has been recognized with MacArthur, Pew, and Guggenheim Fellowships, and his writing has won Orion, Lannan, and National Academies literary awards and the John Burroughs, James Beard, and George Rabb medals. Safina is the inaugural holder of the endowed chair for nature and humanity at Stony Brook University, where he co-chairs the steering committee of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science and is founding president of the not-for-profit Safina Center. He hosted the 10-part PBS series Saving the Ocean with Carl Safina. His writing appears in The New York Times, National Geographic, Audubon, CNN.com, National Geographic News, and other publications. He is the author of ten books including the classic Song for the Blue Ocean, as well as New York Times Bestseller Beyond Words: What Animals Think and Feel. His most recent book is Becoming Wild: How Animal Cultures Raise Families, Create Beauty, and Achieve Peace.www.safinacenter.orgwww.carlsafina.orgwww.oneplanetpodcast.orgwww.creativeprocess.info

AgEmerge Podcast
092 AgEmerge Podcast Russ Conser - CEO of Blue Nest Beef

AgEmerge Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2022 68:30


Thanks for joining us, today we welcome Russ Conser. Russ is the CEO of Blue Nest Beef, an e-commerce startup bringing 100% grassfed beef from Audubon-certified bird-friendly land direct to consumer doorsteps nationwide. Theirs is a story of farmers and consumers co-creating a new and better food system that enhances the health of both people and the planet. This conversation really gets us excited not only about what is currently happening but what is on the horizon for improving soil and human health. Isn't it amazing all the pieces and people that are working together to build such a great legacy? Russ Conser is CEO of Blue Nest Beef - an e-commerce startup bringing 100% grassfed beef from Audubon-certified bird-friendly land direct to consumer doorsteps nationwide. Blue Nest Beef spotlights birds as treasurer and measure in a bigger story of farmers and consumers co-creating a new and better food system that enhances the health of both people and planet. Russ is originally a mechanical engineer who spent 30 years at Shell and is now a regenerative agriculture entrepreneur and scientist. Having spent the 1st half of that career in big oil finding and extracting dead carbon from the deep earth, he spent the 2nd half investing in scientists and innovators developing novel energy technologies ultimately leading Shell's innovative “GameChanger” program. Russ retired from Shell in 2013 and has since been focused on the science and business of putting living carbon back into the shallow Earth by working to scale up proven regenerative agriculture practices. He is currently President of The Grassfed Exchange - a non-profit regenerative agriculture educational foundation focused on farmer-to-farmer knowledge exchange. https://bluenestbeef.com/ https://www.instagram.com/bluenestbeef/ https://www.facebook.com/BlueNestBeef/ https://twitter.com/BlueNestBeef Got questions you want answered? Send them our way and we'll do our best to research and find answers. Know someone you think would be great on the AgEmerge stage or podcast? Send your questions or suggestions to kim@asn.farm we'd love to hear from you.

City Lights with Lois Reitzes
“Playscapes” at Piedmont Park / The Chess Jawa / Georgia Audubon

City Lights with Lois Reitzes

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2022 52:04


Dakin Hart, the curator of the Noguchi Museum and Foundation in New York, shares the history behind Isamu Noguchi's Piedmont Park playground sculpture, "Playscapes." Plus, Dragon Con might be over for the year, but the stories left behind are just beginning. Today we hear about a young chess playing Jawa who raises thousands of dollars for charity each year at the Con. And Georgia Audubon's Dottie Head and Gabe Andrle tell us about the upcoming events surrounding "Georgia Grows Native for Birds Month."See Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

KPCW This Green Earth
This Green Earth | September 6, 2022

KPCW This Green Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 6, 2022 51:36


In this episode of This Green Earth today's guests are: (00:13) Sageland Collaborative Conservation Ecologist, Janice Gardener, and the Saline Lake Outreach Associate from Audubon, Max Malmquist. They discuss the results of the recent Intermountain West Shorebird Survey. Then, (34:48) Jordan Clayton from Utah Snow Survey breaks down the water report from August and talks about what is forecasted for the fall.

Lesson Ideas
Lesson Idea 6: Flying with Falcons!

Lesson Ideas

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 31, 2022 12:41


Show Notes:See the article about peregrine falcons and additional resources here. Other articles about how organisms are adapting to climate change can be found here.Find out more information about: Peregrine Falcons, Bird migration, Audubon's Audubon's Migratory Bird Initiative, Audubon's Lights Out Program.Explore NOAA's website on Climate Change Impacts and NASA's Climate Kids website. Watch these animations and Visualizations: NASA climate change spiral, World temperature change, Arctic sea ice meltingAmerican Museum of Natural History Polar Climate Change lesson plans.Check out the “Why are the Glaciers Melting?” Lesson.Look at NASA's albedo experiment for an additional hands on climate change experiment.Don't forget to sign up for our monthly newsletter to stay up to date on our current content! This is a public episode. If you would like to discuss this with other subscribers or get access to bonus episodes, visit sciencejournalforkids.substack.com

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS
Marshall Miles Interviews-Bethany Sheffer: Sharon Audubon Upcoming Events And Their Mushroom Program

ROBIN HOOD RADIO INTERVIEWS

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 14:14


Bethany Sheffer Volunteer Coordinator and Naturalist Favorite Bird: “I'd have a long list if I could choose from categories, as I do have my favorites in each group. However, when narrowed down to just a single species, no other bird sets my soul ablaze like the Common Loon. Its haunting call, its unmistakable silhouette…I find every aspect of the bird simply enchanting.” The Fantastic World of Fungi Saturday, September 10, 2022 10:00am - 12:00pm EasternSharon, Connecticut Location Details 325 Cornwall Bridge Road, Sharon, 06069, CT Program leaders will meet participants in the Sharon Audubon Center parking area. Join mycology enthusiast John Wheeler in a discussion and exploration of our region's fungal diversity. Participants will learn about species common to CT's NW corner in a preliminary photo presentation before taking a stroll on the property to discover mushrooms in their habitat. This workshop will be very hands on, as participants will learn how to categorize specimens into their appropriate families for identification. Leave your collection baskets at home, but do bring any field guides you would like to use and your curiosity! John Wheeler has been passionate about our local fungi for about 34 years. In 2000, he and two fellow mycophiles started the Berkshire Mycological Society and he became president in 2008. He has been an enthusiastic booster and teacher of all things fungal and would love to share some photos, lore, and insight about the world of fungi around us. Fee: $20/adult, $10/childSuitable for ages 8+Space is limited and pre-paid online reservations are required. Call 860-364-0520 or email Bethany at bethany.sheffer@audubon.org with questions. » SEP 16 Program | Friday, September 16, 2022 - 9:00am Eastern End of Summer Yoga Savor the late summer morning and wake up to the wonder of the landscape and soundscape while practicing yoga on the lawn at Sharon Audubon Center.Details » SEP 17 Program | Saturday, September 17, 2022 - 10:00am Eastern Mindfulness and Nature: Miles through the Seasons Curious about mindfulness practices and nature observation? Join guest instructor Stephanie Landau, M.S.Details » SEP 24 Bird Walks | Saturday, September 24, 2022 - 7:00am Eastern Fall Bird Tour Join Sharon Audubon Naturalist, Bethany Sheffer, and George Wallace of the American Bird Conservancy on a guided bird tour around Miles Wildlife SaDetails » OCT 01 Birding | Saturday, October 1, 2022 - 7:00am Eastern Fall Bird Tour Join Sharon Audubon Naturalist, Bethany Sheffer, and George Wallace of the American Bird Conservancy on a guided bird tour

Round Guy Radio
Southeast Warren Warhawks 44 Audubon Wheeler's 20

Round Guy Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 11:46


Warhawks Coach Rowlands --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO
Marshall Miles Interviews-Bethany Sheffer: Sharon Audubon Upcoming Events And Their Mushroom Program

ROBIN HOOD RADIO ON DEMAND AUDIO

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 30, 2022 14:14


Bethany Sheffer Volunteer Coordinator and Naturalist Favorite Bird: “I'd have a long list if I could choose from categories, as I do have my favorites in each group. However, when narrowed down to just a single species, no other bird sets... Read More ›

BirdNote
Cedar Waxwings - Sleek and Handsome

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2022 1:41 Very Popular


When courting in spring, male and female Cedar Waxwings communicate with distinctly different calls and, perched side by side, often pass back and forth between them a berry or other small fruit or even a flower petal. Waxwings display a wealth of eye-catching plumage. If you relish the company of Cedar Waxwings, plant fruit-bearing trees and shrubs. Find native plants for your garden at Audubon's Native Plant Database.More info and transcript at BirdNote.org. Want more BirdNote? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter. Sign up for BirdNote+ to get ad-free listening and other perks. BirdNote is a nonprofit. Your tax-deductible gift makes these shows possible.

Animal House w/Deborah Roberts
Audubon Center for Birds of Prey

Animal House w/Deborah Roberts

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 26, 2022 13:43


Daisy Fiore, Senior Coordinator for Education at the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey, introduces us to a 5-month-old fledgling Barred Owl that has melanism, which turns his normally grey feathers into a dark brown. He fell out of his nest as a baby and broke his wing, so he cannot be released back into the wild, but now spends his days helping to teach people. She also invites everyone to the Audubon's ‘Back to School Bird Bash,' Saturday, August 22nd, 2022, as well as a naming contest for their newest Ambassador. To buy tickets and more, go to cbop.audubon.org or call (407) 644-0190.

Les.Chat Podcast
31. Interracial Dating FT Brennah

Les.Chat Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 22, 2022 83:18 Very Popular


Happy Monday everyone! In this episode we feature Brennah, 25-year-old owner and chef of LesbiVeggies, a Black-owned, LGBTQ+ friendly, all-vegan restaurant in Audubon, NJ! We talk a little bit about her entrepreneur journey but we also get into some interesting topics on dating outside our race, dating stories, zodiac signs, pronouns and lesbian stereotypes! We also discuss, - How our home background/environment affected us being comfortable with our sexuality. - Some differences we learned in dating/being friends with people of other ethnicities/races - Do lesbian recruit straight women? - Are most lesbians are vegans? - Are marcs the better cooks? Check out this article by Edible Philly on LesbiVeggies! - https://ediblephilly.ediblecommunities.com/eat/brennah-lambert-expanding-vegan-lifestyle-lesbiveggies https://www.veganrestaurantaudubon.com/ IG: @brennahlambert_ @lesbiveggies Family Meeting Questions: "What should I do if I really love my girlfriend but I don't like eating her out because sometimes I don't like the way she tastes?" "I am a baby gay who's been on many dates with a woman but has never kissed or got sexually involved with a woman. How soon should I share that I'm inexperienced? "

Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast
EP 6:04 Breaking Barriers Between Car Dealerships and the Hispanic Community

Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2022 55:02


This week on the Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast, Sean V. Bradley, CSP talks about dealership relationships with the Hispanic community. Nationally, dealerships are vastly underprepared to bring in the Hispanic community. Spanish customers struggle and feel uneasy communicating in person, over the phone, not understanding the paperwork, or the ads surrounding the products. How can dealers get prepared and make customers feel welcome and comfortable to return again and again? Joining Sean this week is V Vega, a Performance Coach at Dealer Synergy in Audubon, NJ. V has a unique perspective on the dealership and Spanish community interactions based on her time in the automotive industry and as a consumer. Curious on how this inside point of view can improve your customer relations? Listen to the full podcast to get the answers to set your Dealership above the rest.   About V Vega  Vaesly “V” Vega was born and raised in Cayey, Puerto Rico. When she was 17 years old, she moved to the United States to pursue her educational and college career. Flash forward, Vaesly is simultaneously balancing college and a blossoming BDC career! Being bilingual in English and Spanish, Spanish being her primary language, skyrocketed her Automotive Career and gained her "The #1 BDC District Representative" within the Auto Group she was employed for. Now, Vaesly takes on the side of consulting and takes her place as Performance Coach at Automotive Industry's #1 Award-winning Automotive Training, Consulting, and Accountability Firm - Dealer Synergy!   About Dealer Synergy Dealer Synergy is an Award-Winning Training, Consulting, and Accountability firm that has built the most profitable Internet Sales and Business Development departments for Automotive Dealerships across North America. Clients will have access to live support from our expertly trained Management Team, our Technology Team, to assist with all website, graphics, video production, and social networking needs, and our team of analysts who excel in human resources, mystery shopping, and phone training!   Resources Dealer Synergy & Bradley On Demand: The automotive industry's #1 training, tracking, testing, and certification platform and consulting & accountability firm. The Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast: is the #1 resource for automotive sales professionals, managers, and owners.  Also, join The Millionaire Car Salesman Facebook Group today! The Against All Odds Radio Show: Hosting guests that have started from the bottom and rose to the top.  Also, join The Against All Odds Radio Show Guests & Listeners Facebook Group for the podcasted episodes. For more interactivity, join The Millionaire Car Salesman Club on Clubhouse. Win the Game of Googleopoly: Unlocking the secret strategy of search engines.   The Millionaire Car Salesman Podcast is Proudly Sponsored By:  AutoWeb: Visit AutoWeb.com/dealers for help in revolutionizing your business to help you sell more cars.

The Official Do Good Better Podcast
Audubon Dakota: Connecting People With Nature | The Official Do Good Better Podcast #230

The Official Do Good Better Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 11, 2022 21:13


Today's 5-Star Guest is Sarah Hewitt, Director of Conservation of Audubon Dakota.  Sarah has been with Audubon Dakota since August 2015, beginning as a program coordinator, in the Fargo, ND office. Sarah's role includes managing and fundraising for the local, regional, and statewide conservation programming offered by Audubon Dakota. At the regional level, Sarah manages and coordinates the Audubon Dakota's extensive working lands programs, which include the Audubon Conservation Ranching Initiative, Prairie Management Toolbox, ND Prescribed Fire Cooperative, and the newly funded ND Conservation Forage Program. At the local level, Sarah oversees the implementation of Audubon Dakota's bird-friendly communities programming which focuses on woodland enhancement and prairie restoration in major urban centers across North Dakota and Moorhead, MN for the Urban Woods and Prairies Initiative, spanning nearly 1,000 acres.  Learn More About Audubon Dakota:  https://dakota.audubon.org/ Support This Podcast! Make a quick and easy donation here:https://www.patreon.com/dogoodbetterSpecial THANK YOU to our sponsors:Donor Dock - The best CRM system for your small to medium sized nonprofit, hands down! Visit www.DonorDock.com and use the Promo Code DOGOODBETTER for a FREE month!One Cause - The most intuitive event and online fundraising software available! Visit www.OneCause.com to help make your busy event-planning life less stressful and more successful!Brady Martz - The Nonprofit Audit Specialists! Visit www.BradyMartz.com to connect with folks to make your fiscal life a heckuvalot easier!iTunes: https://apple.co/3a3XenfSpotify: https://spoti.fi/2PlqRXsYouTube: https://bit.ly/3kaWYanTunein: http://tun.in/pjIVtStitcher: https://bit.ly/3i8jfDRFollow On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DoGoodBetterPodcast/Follow On Twitter: @consulting_do #fundraising #fundraiser #charity #nonprofit #donate#dogood #dogoodBETTER #fargo #fundraisingdadAbout Host Patrick Kirby:Email: Patrick@dogoodbetterconsulting.comLinkedIN: https://www.linkedin.com/in/fundraisingdad/Want more great advice? Buy Patrick's book! Now also available as an e-book!Fundraise Awesomer! A Practical Guide to Staying Sane While Doing GoodAvailable th

Faith in the Family Podcast
Episode 31: Tips From a Ministry Couple (feat. Pastors Ed and Lisa Crenshaw)

Faith in the Family Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 10, 2022 49:28


Jamilla and Bryan are delighted to be interviewing Rev. Dr. Ed and Rev. Lisa Crenshaw. This husband-and-wife pair of pastors lead Victory Church in Audubon, PA and have joined the show to share some of the wisdom they've accrued from their decades of marriage and ministry! Check out Victory Church: https://getvictory.net --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app --- Send in a voice message: https://anchor.fm/faith-in-the-family/message Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/faith-in-the-family/support

Round Guy Radio
Audubon Wheeler's Football

Round Guy Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2022 29:56


Coach Birks breaks down his team and the week zero double header Saturday Aug. 20th in Martensdale Iowa vs WMU. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app

The Tim DeMoss Show Podcast
Paul Byrd (Sports broadcaster) & Sonia Manzano (Sesame Street)

The Tim DeMoss Show Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 5, 2022 48:06


Today on the Tim DeMoss show, it's our Famous Friday program! we're joined by former Phillies pitcher Paul Byrd! Byrd currently is a TV sports broadcaster for the Atlanta Braves games on Bally Sports Southeast. He talks Phillies and Braves baseball, and more about the passing of baseball broadcasting legend Vin Scully, who passed away on Tuesday at the age of 94.  Our other special guest, Sonia Manzano, joins us later on in the show. Manzano is best known for playing Maria on Sesame Street, from 1971 until her departure in 2015. She reminisces about her time on the hit children's TV show, and shares more about her new book, Coming Up Cuban: Rising Past Castro's Shadow. We cap the Famous Friday Show off with our Now THAT'S Punny segment! Sports clips: Philadelphia Phillies Interim manager Rob Thomson New Philadelphia Phillies pitcher Noah Syndergaard Sonia Manzano photo credit: Edwin PaganSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 633 (8-1-22): Two Great Waterbirds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2022


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (3:58).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-1-22. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of August 1 and August 8, 2022.  This is a revised repeat of an episode from August 2015. SOUNDS – ~4 sec – call from Great Egret then from Great Blue Heron. In this episode, we feature two mystery sounds, and a guest voice, to explore two striking birds—striking in looks, and striking in how they hunt.  Have a listen for about 30 seconds, and see if you can guess these two long-necked, long-legged wading birds. SOUNDS AND GUEST VOICE – ~30 sec – Voice: “At once he stirs and steps into the water, wading with imperial self-possession on his three-pronged, dragonish feet.  The water could not tremble less at the passage of his stilt legs as he stalks his dinner.  His neck arches like the bending of a lithe bow, one of a piece with the snapping arrow of his beak.” If you guessed, egret or heron, you're right!  The first call was from a Great Egret and the second from a Great Blue Heron.  The guest voice was Alyson Quinn, reading part of her “Lesson from an Egret,” inspired by a September 2007 visit to the Potomac River.  The word “egret” derives from an old German word for “heron,” a fitting origin for the many similarities between these two big birds.  The Great Egret and the Great Blue Heron are the two largest of 12 North American species of herons, egrets, and bitterns.  The Great Egret is strikingly white, while the Great Blue has only a partially white head over a bluish-gray body.  But a white subspecies of the Great Blue, called the Great White Heron, occurs in Florida.  Great Egrets and Great Blues both typically feed in shallow water, taking fish, amphibians, and other prey by waiting and watching quietly, then quickly striking with their long, sharp beaks.  The two species also share a history of having been widely hunted for their long plumes in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; the impact on their populations helped lead to nationwide bird-conservation efforts and organizations. Distinctive looks, behavior, and history make these two “Greats” a memorable and meaningful sight along Virginia's rivers, ponds, marshes, and other areas.  Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use this week's sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, and thanks to Alyson Quinn for permission to share her “Lesson from an Egret,” which gets this episode closing words. GUEST VOICE – ~18 sec – “I want to be more like the egret, with the patience to be still without exhaustion, to never mind the idle currents or be dazzled by the glamour of light on water; but, knowing the good thing I wait for, to coil my hope in constant readiness, and to act in brave certitude when it comes.” SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 277, 8-10-15. The sounds of the Great Egret and the Great Blue Heron were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Excerpts of “Lesson from an Egret” are courtesy of Alyson Quinn, from her blog “Winterpast” (September 21, 2007, post), available online at http://www.winterispast.blogspot.com/, used with permission.  Ms. Quinn made the recording after a visit to Algonkian Regional Park, located in Sterling, Va. (Loudoun County), part of the Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority.  More information about the park is available online at https://www.novaparks.com/parks/algonkian-regional-park. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES (Except as otherwise noted, photographs are by Virginia Water Radio.) Upper two images: Great Egret along the New River near Parrott, Va. (Pulaski County); photos by Robert Abraham, used with permission.  Third image: Great Blue Heron in a marsh at Wachapreague, Va. (Accomack County), October 5, 2007.  Bottom image: Great Blue Heron in a stormwater pond on the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, July 28, 2015. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT GREAT EGRETS AND GREAT BLUE HERONS The following information is excerpted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service”: Great Egret “Life History” entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040032&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202; and Great Blue Heron “Life History” entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040027&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202. Great Egret Physical Description“Large, heavy, white heron with yellow-orange bill, black legs, long, slender neck, and long plumes extending beyond tail….” Behavior“Male selects territory that is used for hostile and sexual displays, copulation and nesting.  Adjacent feeding areas vigorously defended, both sexes defend.  …Migration occurs in fall and early spring along coast; winters further south than Virginia. …Foraging: alone in open situations; prefers fresh or brackish waters, openings in swamps, along streams or ponds; wader: stalks prey; known to participate in the 'leap-frog' feeding when initiated by cattle egret (Bubulcus ibis).  Prey are taken in shallow waters; prey usually includes insects, fish, frogs (adults and tadpoles), small birds, snakes, crayfish, and many others.  Nesting: in trees or thickets, 3-90 ft. above water in willows, holly, red cedar, cypress, and bayberry on dry ground in marshes.” Population Comments“Dangerously near extermination in early part of [20th] century due to plume hunting; population comeback hampered by loss of habitat, exposure to DDT and other toxic chemicals and metals. …[Predators include] crows and vultures….” Great Blue Heron Physical Description“Large grayish heron with yellowish bill, white on head, cinnamon on neck, and black legs,” Behavior“Territoriality: known to have feeding territory in non-breeding seasons, defended against members of same species.  Range: breeds from central Canada to northern Central America and winters from middle United States throughout Central America; in Virginia, is a permanent resident of the Coastal Plain. …Foraging: stands motionless in shallow water waiting on prey; occasionally fishes on the wing along watercourses, meadows and fields far from water.  They also take frogs, snakes, insects, and other aquatic animals.  Nesting: predominately in tall cedar and pine swamps, but may also be found on the ground, rock ledges, and sea cliffs; nests on platform of sticks, generally in colonies….” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations“Salt or fresh shallow waters of lakes, ponds, marshes, streams, bays, oceans, tidal flats, and sandbars; feeds in surf, wet meadows, pastures, and dry fields.” SOURCES Used for Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home  (subscription required). Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, 2006. Merriam-Webster  Dictionary:“Egret,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/egret;“Heron,” online at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/heron. National Audubon Society, “History of Audubon and Science-based Bird Conservation,” online at http://www.audubon.org/content/history-audubon-and-waterbird-conservation. Oxford Dictionaries/Oxford University Press:“Egret,” online at http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/egret;“Heron,” online at http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/us/definition/american_english/heron. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/:Great Blue Heron entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040027&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202;Great Egret entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040032&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19202;“List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf.The Waterbird Society, online at https://waterbirds.org/. Joel C. Welty, The Life of Birds, W. B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, Penn., 1975. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world.  RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on birds in the family of herons, egrets, night-herons, and bitterns.Episode 118, 7-9-12 – Summertime sampler of birds, including Great Blue Heron. Episode 127, 9-10-12 – Green Heron. Episode 235, 10-13-14 – Black-crowned Night Heron.Episode 381, 8-14-17 – Midnight sounds near water, including Great Blue Heron.Episode 430, 7-23-18 – Marsh birds in Virginia, including Great Blue Heron and Least Bittern.Episode 478, 6-24-19 – Little Blue Heron.Episode 603, 11-15-21 – Fall bird migration, including Green Heron and Snowy Egret. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post.2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes1.5 – Animals, including humans, have basic life needs that allow them to survive. 2.5 – Living things are part of a system. 3.4 – Adaptations allow organisms to satisfy life needs and respond to the environment. 3.5 – Aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems support a diversity of organisms. 4.2 – Plants and animals have structures that distinguish them from one another and play vital roles in their ability to survive. 4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources.

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