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Latest podcast episodes about National Audubon Society

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 664 (9-18-23): Grebes Sink AND Swim

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 18, 2023


Click to listen to episode (3:54).Sections below are the following:Transcript of AudioAudio Notes and AcknowledgmentsImagesExtra InformationSourcesRelated Water Radio EpisodesFor Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.)Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 9-15-23. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the weeks of September 18 and September 25, 2023.  This is a revised version of an episode from September 2014. SOUNDS - ~6 sec – Pied-billed Grebe call. This week, we feature some raucous mystery sounds from a family of diving birds.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you can guess what's making these calls.  And here's a hint: you'll get grief if you miss this name by only one letter's sound. SOUNDS - ~ 22 sec. If you guessed grebe, you're right!  Those were some of the sounds made by the Pied-billed Grebe, Horned Grebe, and Red-necked Grebe.  Out of 22 grebe species worldwide and seven in North America, these three species are found commonly in many aquatic habitats in Virginia, with two others—the Eared Grebe and the Western Grebe—seen occasionally within the Commonwealth.  Horned Grebes and Red-necked Grebes are regular winter residents on Virginia's coasts, while the Pied-billed Grebe is typically a year-round resident on the coast and a winter resident in other regions. Grebes are known for their swimming and diving abilities; for example, the Cornell Lab of Ornithology's “Birds of the World” Web site says quote, “[g]rebes rocket through the water by compressing water behind them with coordinated thrusts of their muscular legs,” unquote; and Cornell's “All About Birds” site calls the Pied-billed Grebe “part bird, part submarine.”  Lobed toes set far back on their bodies adapt grebes for swimming, and their ability to add or remove water and air from their feathers and internal air sacs helps them to float or, as needed, to submerge to escape danger or to feed.  Grebes feed on a variety of aquatic animals like fish, crustaceans, and insects; on aquatic plants sometimes; and—notably—on their own feathers.  In turn, they may be eaten by such predators as raccoons, snakes, and birds of prey. Grebes call and act aggressively during breeding season, but they may be quieter and much less noticeable during non-breeding season.   In fact, a calm pond surface might conceal a hiding grebe with only its nostrils exposed to the air, or that surface might be broken—almost silently—by a grebe emerging with a fish in its bill. Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the grebe sounds, from the Stokes' Field Guide to Bird Songs, and we let the Pied-billed Grebe have the last call. SOUNDS - ~6 sec. SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of “Cripple Creek” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 233, 9-29-14. The sounds of the Horned Grebe, Pied-billed Grebe, and Red-necked Grebe were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at “The Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Two Pied-billed Grebes on a pond in Blacksburg, Virginia, September 28, 2014.  Photo by Virginia Water Radio.Pied-billed Grebe at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge in Wyoming, April 2016.  Photo by Tom Koerner, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for the photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/23453/rec/4, as of 9-18-23.Horned Grebe with chick, at Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, June 2005.  Photo by Donna Dewhurst, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for the photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/411/rec/41, as of 9-18-23.Red-necked Grebe pair, at Anchorage Coastal Wildlife Refuge in Alaska, May 2005.  Photo by Donna Dewhurst, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov; specific URL for the photo was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/20/rec/37, as of 9-18-23. EXTRA INFORMATION ABOUT THE PIED-BILLED GREBE The following information is quoted from the Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/, primarily the “Life History” section of the the Pied-billed Grebe entry, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040008&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19612. The scientific name of the Pied-billed Grebe is Podilymbus podiceps. Physical Description “This species is 12-15 inches (31-38 cm) long with a 23 inch wingspread.  It is a small, stocky bird distinguished by its short, blunt bill encircled by a broad black band with the upper portion of the bill curved downward; it is often described as chicken-like.  ...Grebes have lobed toes, feet that are placed far back on the body, and a short rudder-like tail to aid in pursuing prey underwater.” Reproduction “The nest is built by both members of the pair and is made up of flags, rushes, sedge, algae and mud and is attached to grasses, reeds or bushes in the water. ...The eggs are laid from March to September, are blue-white initially, and then turn brown.  The brown color results from the adults covering the eggs with wet organic matter when they are foraging or defending the territory.  ...There may be up to 2 broods per year.  Incubation takes about 23 days and begins with the first egg laid.” Behavior “Nest attendance is shared equally by the male and female during egg-laying and post-laying periods.  Incubation however, is carried out mostly by the female.  The streaked or spotted chicks can swim almost immediately after hatching.  The young will usually travel on the parents back or will cling to their tail.  The parents may feed the chicks and even dive while chicks are on their back.  The parents will return to the nest frequently with the young.  Young grebes fledge at about 35 days.  ...[This species] rarely flies, and it escapes by diving with a short leap or by slowly submerging.  It is the most solitary of the grebes.  It is the first grebe to arrive north in the spring and the last to leave in the fall.  It migrates in closely-massed flocks. ...” Feeding “Diet consists primarily of fish including eels, carp, and catfish as well as sticklebacks, sculpins, silversides, and minnows.  [It will also] forage on crayfishes, aquatic insects, snails, spiders, frogs, tadpoles, some seeds and soft parts of aquatic plants, ...[and] on shrimp in saltwater bays and estuaries.  [It ingests] large numbers of their own feathers.  This may serve to protect the stomach from puncture by indigestible parts and prevent hard items from entering the intestines.  Feathers also provide the base material of regurgitated pellets that contain undigested material such as fish bones.” Aquatic/Terrestrial Associations: “In Virginia, pied-billed grebes have been observed foraging with snowy egrets.  Mutualistic foraging enhances opportunities for obtaining prey.  Limiting factors: The greatest losses of nests and eggs resulted from wind, rain, waves, and storm tides.  Predators of eggs and young include raccoons, laughing gulls, water snakes, snapping turtles, and peregrine falcons.” SOURCES Used for Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.The Horned Grebe entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Horned_Grebe/;the Pied-billed Grebe entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Pied-billed_Grebe/;the Red-necked Grebe entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Red-necked_Grebe/. National Audubon Society, “Taxonomic Family: Grebes,” online at https://www.audubon.org/bird-guide?title=Grebe&family=6460. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home.  (subscription required).The entry for the taxonomic family of grebes, Podicipedidae, is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/podici1/cur/introduction; this is the source of the quote in the audio.The Horned Grebe entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/horgre/cur/introduction;the Pied-billed Grebe entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/pibgre/cur/introduction;the Red-necked Grebe entry is online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/rengre/cur/introduction. Indiana Audubon, “Pied-billed Grebe,” by Annie Aguirre, July 1, 2018, online at https://indianaaudubon.org/2018/07/01/pied-billed-grebe-2/. Angela Minor, “Birds of the Blue Ridge: Pied-billed Grebe,” Blue Ridge Country, December 27, 2022. Chandler S. Robbins et al., A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, N.Y., 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Horned Grebe entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040005&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19612;the Pied-billed Grebe entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040008&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19612;the Red-necked Grebe entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040004&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=19612. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2022,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Joel C. Welty, The Life of Birds, 2nd Edition, W.B. Saunders Company, Philadelphia, Penn., 1975. For More Information about Birds in Virginia or Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/critters?s=&fieldGuideType=Birds&fieldGuideHabitat. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org.Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at https://xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides sounds of birds and other wildlife from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” subject category. Following are links to some other episodes on diving birds. American Coot – Episode 391, 10-23-17.Cormorants – Episode 467, 4-8-19.Loons – Episode 445, 11-5-18

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Dream Job with Danielle Cobo Podcast
Choices That Build Resilience with Yasmene Mumby

Dream Job with Danielle Cobo Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 13, 2023 19:25 Transcription Available


Are you feeling like life's treadmill has you sprinting toward burnout?  In this episode, we delve into topics that are often ignored, yet are integral to achieving not just success, but a well-rounded, fulfilling life. We'll explore how physical and mental health are closely linked, and why ignoring one can spell disaster for the other. We'll dissect the importance of pacing yourself, even when ambition courses through your veins. We'll talk about why it's crucial to interrogate your choices and how a sudden jolt—changing your environment or habits—can propel you out of unhealthy patterns.After this Episode, You Will Be Able to:Master your physical and mental well-beingSeize control of your timeAchieve a well-rounded, fulfilling lifeFree Resources: Thank you for taking the time to write a review and for sharing the podcast with your friends. To claim your free resources send a screenshot of your review to UnstoppableGritPodcast@DanielleCobo.com. We appreciate your support!Want to work with Danielle? Schedule your call today: https://bit.ly/3OnuLLOLet's Connect!LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/daniellecobo/Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MsDanielleCoboInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedaniellecobo/?hl=enTwitter: https://twitter.com/DanielleCoboWebsite: www.DanielleCobo.comJoin the Unstoppable Grit Podcast Facebook Community: www.facebook.com/groups/unstoppablegritpodcastcommunity/Book Recommendations:  https://www.amazon.com/shop/influencer-de49157c/list/2W8I8NWS6N4CJAbout the guestDr. Yasmene Mumby is a sustainable leadership advisor and writer.Purpose-driven teams invite Dr. Mumby and her firm, The Ringgold, to consult and collaborate on their mission-critical organizational ambitions.She weaves in her framework, The Easeful Leader, for high-performing leaders who are looking to reclaim their time, lead with ease, and build better teams. She combines her background in academia and wellness to coach ambitious high-level executives, leaders, and business owners to move away from burn out and exhaustion towards sustainable leadership for themselves and the teams they lead.She's worked with some of the most impactful organizations in the country and world including, the ACLU, The International Rescue Committee, Harvard Radcliffe Institute, Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, National Audubon Society, Faith in Action, and Working Families Party.Her work and commentary on leadership and wellbeing have appeared in various publications including Entrepreneur, CNBC, Fortune, Essence, Black Enterprise, Yahoo Finance, and Poosh.A graduate of the McDonogh School, Yasmene earned her Bachelor's in International Studies and Master's in Teaching from The Johns Hopkins University, along with a JD from University of Maryland School of Law and a Doctorate in Education Leadership from the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Besides that, she's also completed over 1500 hours of training in vinyasa, meditation, yin, and prenatal yoga and teaches with HealHaus and Ompractice.Connect with Yasmene:LinkedIn Page Link: https://www.linkedin.com/in/yasmeneInstagram Page Link: @‌yasmene_Website: Dr. Yasmene Mumby - Writer | Leadership Adviso

No Ordinary Adventure
The Heartbeat of Nature: A Deep Dive with Amy Gulick

No Ordinary Adventure

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 15, 2023 70:05


Join us for a journey into the wild as we sit down with renowned American nature and wildlife photographer, Amy Gulick. A founding Fellow of the International League of Conservation Photographers, Gulick's award-winning images have graced the pages of some of the most respected environmental publications like National Audubon Society, National Wildlife Federation, and the Sierra Club, among others.In this episode, we journey back to 2001, as Amy details her three-week photography expedition to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge – a monumental effort that secured her the coveted Lowell Thomas Travel Journalism Award the following year. Gulick also reflects on the prestigious accolades she's garnered throughout her illustrious career, including the Daniel Houseberg Wilderness Image Award and the Phillip Hyde grant.Intrigued by the unique symbiotic relationship between the people of Alaska and the wild salmon, Amy embarked on a journey that became the foundation of her new book, "The Salmon Way: An Alaska State of Mind." Venturing into the Alaskan frontier, she delves deep into the web of human relationships revolving around these majestic fish. From working alongside commercial fishermen and learning the rhythms of the sea to immersing herself in Alaska Native traditions of fish preservation and cultural heritage, she sought to capture the essence of a state of mind unique to this region. Sport fishing guides expanded her horizons, teaching her not just the art of the catch but also the philosophy inherent in their way of life. Everywhere she turned, Amy encountered the generosity of the Alaskan spirit, where people from all walks of life shared their salmon-rich lives in kitchens, cabins, and remote fish camps. This is the "salmon way," a testament to the indomitable spirit of Alaska and its people.Her book, "Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska's Tongass Rainforest" is also an intimate portrayal of one of Earth's rarest ecosystems, the book takes readers on a vivid exploration of the symbiotic relationship between salmon and the towering trees of the Tongass rainforest. With bears, misty islands, salmon streams, and native cultures as its backbone, the book is a testament to the delicate balance of nature and the looming threats posed by global demands.Gulick shares behind-the-scenes anecdotes, from encounters with native communities to the awe-inspiring sight of humpback whales cruising the forested shorelines.Tune in to discover the beauty, challenges, and stories she has.For news, photography, contact, and engagements: Amy Gulick Images and StoriesTo purchase Gulick's books: The Salmon Way: An Alaska State of Mind — Books (mountaineers.org)Follow No Ordinary Adventure and UnCruise Adventures:YouTube: UnCruise Adventures Twitter: https://twitter.com/UnCruise Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/UnCruise 

Nothing much happens; bedtime stories for grown-ups
Stone Fruit

Nothing much happens; bedtime stories for grown-ups

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 31, 2023 30:24 Transcription Available


  Our story tonight is called Stone Fruit and it's a story about a sweet part of the summer season. It's also about how many pecks make a bushel, lovely silly kid logic, apple blossoms and vanilla and picking the best peach with your own two hands. We give to a different charity each week and this week we are giving to the National Audubon Society https://www.audubon.org/ “We protect birds and the places they need.” Purchase Our Book: https://bit.ly/Nothing-Much-HappensSee omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Kathy Sullivan Explores
The Actor's Craft with Jane Alexander

Kathy Sullivan Explores

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 27, 2023 56:21


 Jane Alexander is an actress, author, and former Chairperson of the National Endowment of the Arts. In 1969, Jane received a Tony Award for her performance as Eleanor Bachman in the Broadway production of The Great White Hope. Jane received her first Emmy nomination for her role as Eleanor Roosevelt in Eleanor and Franklin. Over her career, she has received two Primetime Emmy Awards—as well as nominations for eight Tony Awards, four Academy Awards, and three Golden Globe Awards—and was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame in 1994. Today, Jane is involved in conservation efforts and has served on the boards of the Wildlife Conservation Society, the National Audubon Society, and Project Greenhope, among others. She is the author of Wild Things, Wild Places and Command Performance. Today, you'll hear Jane discuss how she grew up loving the beauty of the land while living in Massachusetts. She shares how watching a ballet performance for the first time sparked her love for theater and the performing arts. She outlines her process for inhabiting a character or a role and describes how she studied her role as Eleanor Roosevelt in Eleanor and Franklin. Jane also highlights what it's like to be an understudy, details her experience serving as the chairperson of the National Endowment of the Arts, and offers advice to young people about pursuing their passion. “The whole business of exploration—which caught me as a child in the outside world, exploring the sunken garden—transitioned to the exploration of the mind and the human body in acting.” - Jane Alexander This week on Kathy Sullivan Explores: ●     Jane's background and early years in Massachusetts●     How Jane's parents reacted to her pursuit of theater as a career●     Her studies in mathematics and computer programming●     Her time at the University of Edinburgh and performances as Ophelia in Hamlet and as Nora in The Plough and the Stars●     What it was like to hang out with Dudley Moore and John Gleeson as university students●     Jane's experience as an understudy and what stand-ins do when they're not performing●     Her first leading roles and focus on the classics●     Jane's process for inhabiting a role or character●     Why Jane declined to be part of The Actors Studio●     How Jane played Eleanor Roosevelt in Eleanor and Franklin ●     Handling negative receptions of performances●     Jane's service as the chairperson of the National Endowment of the Arts●     Today's public support for the arts and Jane's work in conservation Our Favorite Quotes: ●     “Art is part of everybody's persona and privilege.” - Jane Alexander●     “We are put on this Earth to witness and experience all the joy that we can give to each other—that includes the things that grow and live.” - Jane Alexander Connect with Jane Alexander: ●     Jane Alexander Website●     Book: Command Performance: An Actress In The Theater Of Politics●     Book: Wild Things, Wild Places: Adventurous Tales of Wildlife and Conservation on Planet Earth●     Jane Alexander on Twitter Spaceship Not Required I'm Kathy Sullivan, the only person to have walked in space and gone to the deepest point in the ocean. I'm an explorer, and that doesn't always have to involve going to some remote or exotic place. It simply requires a commitment to put curiosity into action. In this podcast, you can explore, reflecting on lessons learned from life so far and from my brilliant and ever-inquisitive guests. We explore together in this very moment from right where you are--spaceship not required. Welcome to Kathy Sullivan Explores. Visit my website at kathysullivanexplores.com to sign up for seven astronaut tips to improving your life on earth and be the first to discover future episodes and learn about more exciting adventures ahead! Don't forget to leave a rating and review wherever you get your podcasts! Spotify I Stitcher I Apple Podcasts I iHeart Radio I TuneIn I Google I Amazon Music.

Outdoor Adventure Series
Ashley J. Peters, Passionate Writer, Conservationist, and Servant Leader

Outdoor Adventure Series

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 13, 2023 42:35


Ashley J.  Peters is our guest on the Outdoor Adventure Series Podcast today. Ashley is a passionate Writer, Conservationist, and Servant Leader. She is the Communication Manager at the Institute on the Environment at the University of Minnesota, an Outdoor Writer, and a Conservationist. She is also on the board of many organizations, including the Outdoor Writers Association of America (OWAA).Ashley has spent time at Americorp, the State of Minnesota, Dept. of Natural Resources, The National Audubon Society, Audubon Minnesota, and the Ruffled Grouse Society.TOPICS WE DISCUSSED 1. When did Ashley become interested in Natural Resources Conservation2. How long has Ashley been an Outdoor Writers Association of America (OWAA) member?3. What are your responsibilities as an OWAA Board Member?4. You were appointed by the Minnesota Governor to the Lessard-Sams Outdoor Heritage Council. What will this mean for you?LEARN MORETo learn more about Ashely and her work, you can connect with her on LinkedIn and follow her on Twitter or TikTok. LinkedIn TwitterTikTok NEXT STEPSIf you enjoy podcasts devoted to the outdoor adventure space, find us online at https://outdooradventureseries.com. We welcome likes and comments, and if you know someone who is also an outdoor enthusiast, go ahead and share our site with them too.#Conservation #EnvironmentalStewardship #NaturalResources #HabitatConservation #WildlifeConservation #Americorp #NationalAudubonSociety  #MinnesotaDepartmentOfNaturalResources #MinnesotaAudubon #RuffledGrouseSociety #ServantLeader #OWAA #OutdoorAdventureSeriesPodcast produced using DescriptPodcast hosted by BuzzsproutShow Notes powered by CastmagicWebsite powered by Podpage

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process
JANE ALEXANDER- Tony & Emmy Award-Winning Actress, Conservationist, Author

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2023 61:12


Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

Film & TV · The Creative Process
Highlights - JANE ALEXANDER - Tony & Emmy Award-Winning Actress, Conservationist, Author

Film & TV · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2023 10:09


Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

Film & TV · The Creative Process
JANE ALEXANDER- Tony & Emmy Award-Winning Actress, Conservationist, Author

Film & TV · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2023 61:12


Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process
Highlights - JANE ALEXANDER - Tony & Emmy Award-Winning Actress, Conservationist, Author

Feminism · Women’s Stories · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2023 10:09


Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

Theatre · The Creative Process
Highlights - JANE ALEXANDER - Tony & Emmy Award-Winning Actress, Conservationist, Author

Theatre · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 12, 2023 10:09


Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

PBS NewsHour - Science
2 out of 3 North American bird species face extinction. Here's how we can save them

PBS NewsHour - Science

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2023 7:11


As the climate crisis worsens, so does pressure on wildlife. The number of birds in North America has declined by 3 billion in the last 50 years. Brooke Bateman, director of climate science at the National Audubon Society, joins Ali Rogin to discuss why and what can be done to preserve and renew the populations of bird species at risk of extinction. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

PBS NewsHour - Segments
2 out of 3 North American bird species face extinction. Here's how we can save them

PBS NewsHour - Segments

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 11, 2023 7:11


As the climate crisis worsens, so does pressure on wildlife. The number of birds in North America has declined by 3 billion in the last 50 years. Brooke Bateman, director of climate science at the National Audubon Society, joins Ali Rogin to discuss why and what can be done to preserve and renew the populations of bird species at risk of extinction. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

Theatre · The Creative Process
JANE ALEXANDER- Tony & Emmy Award-Winning Actress, Conservationist, Author

Theatre · The Creative Process

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2023 61:12


Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

Mission-Driven
Sean O'Connor '92

Mission-Driven

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 7, 2023 52:40


In this final episode of Season three, Siobhan Kiernan from the class of 2021 speaks with Sean O'Connor from the class of 1992. As a fundraiser and member of the Holy Cross Annual Fund Team, Siobhan talks with Sean about his accomplished career in fundraising. Today, he continues to make a difference as the Chief Development Officer at the National Audubon Society. Their conversation gives you a behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to support the nonprofit organizations that we love. The Holy Cross mission of serving others is central to the work that they do. As people foreign with others, their careers modeled the idea of doing well while doing good. Interview originally recorded in August 2022. --- Sean: When I'm being reflective of the relationship between the effort and the work that I've applied my daily profession to the outcome, it completely aligns with my worldview of actually helping other people and helping organizations and helping the world. Whether it's through art, or healthcare or science or human rights or conservation, I feel pretty good about that. Maura: Welcome to Mission Driven, where we speak with alumni who are leveraging their Holy Cross education to make a meaningful difference in the world around them. I'm your host, Maura Sweeney, from the class of 2007, Director of Alumni Career Development at Holy Cross. I'm delighted to welcome you to today's show. In this final episode of Season three, Siobhan Kiernan from the class of 2021 speaks with Sean O'Connor from the class of 1992. As a fundraiser and member of the Holy Cross Annual Fund Team, Siobhan talks with Sean about his accomplished career in fundraising. After a year in the Jesuit Volunteer Corps, Sean accepted a role raising funds for a small Catholic school on the Lower East Side of Manhattan. Thanks to the support and encouragement of some Holy Cross alumni, he accepted a position with CCS fundraising, which brought his fundraising overseas and greatly expanded the scope of his work. Today, he continues to make a difference as the Chief Development Officer at the National Audubon Society. Their conversation gives you a behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to support the nonprofit organizations that we love. The Holy Cross mission of serving others is central to the work that they do. As people foreign with others, their careers modeled the idea of doing well while doing good. Siobhan: Hello everyone. My name is Siobhan Kiernan and I am a 2021 Holy Cross grad, and current member of the Holy Cross Fund Team. And I'm joined here with Sean O'Connor. Hello, how are you? Sean: Hi Siobhan. Good to see you again. Siobhan: Yeah, you too. Where are you zooming from? Sean: I'm zooming from Goldens Bridge, New York, which is Northern Westchester County near Bedford and North Salem. Siobhan: Nice. Oh my gosh. I'm zooming from New York City, so... Sean: Oh wow. Whereabouts? Siobhan: In like little... I'm on the Upper East Side right now. It's where I grew up. Sean: Oh, that's right. I grew... For a while. I lived on 83rd and third when I did all this. Siobhan: Oh yes, we talked about this. Sean: Yeah, right. Siobhan: Oh, that's awesome. Are you from New York? Sean: No, I actually grew up in Worcester, Massachusetts where there's a school called Holy Cross, is there I think. And I in that way was born at St. Vincent Hospital and then grew up really in Holden, Massachusetts, which is just north of Worcester. And I went to Wachusett Regional High School. And I know your next question is why I don't have an accent, but for some reason I dropped the Worcester accent. When I went to Holy Cross, actually, ironically, I think my accent started to go away. Siobhan: They ironed it out of you. Sean: They must have ironed it out of me, yes. I could put on the Worcester accent, but only under severe pressure. Siobhan: That's so funny. I've been told that I don't have a New York accent either. Sean: No, you don't. Siobhan: So I guess there's something about Holy Cross and taking out accents. So you kind of really just started this, I guess, but why Holy Cross? I mean, I know you're from Worcester, but some people I know probably wouldn't have wanted to go to a school in their hometown. So why did you stay, and what about Holy Cross made you want to go there? Sean: It is a family school. For me, my grandfather was class of '31 and my father was class of '66. My uncle was class of '62. I think even have one of my other father's relatives went there. And so I always had heard about Holy Cross. And I lived on campus, I didn't commute even though I was about 10 miles away from Worcester, or from home rather. But it was obviously one of the most important decisions I made as a young person. And then probably, in truth, is probably the best school I got into when I was applying for colleges. That was another part as well. Siobhan: No, but that worked out. The one thing I love about Holy Cross is that you can feel very much away even if you are local. Sean: Right. Siobhan: I have friends who lived off campus and I remember I always lived on campus and my thought process was, you have your whole life to live outside the gates of Mt. St. James. Why would you want to go now? Sean: Right, for sure. But I enjoyed it. It was great. Siobhan: Yeah. So what was your time on campus? What did you do? What did you major in? What activities did you like to do? Sean: I was a history major, and I took my academics semi-seriously, I think. I'm a lifelong reader and I probably am still interested in history and read a lot of William Durant history surveys when I'm on the plane on a tarmac or something like that. So I still enjoy learning, but I spent a lot of time on extracurricular activities. I didn't play sports, and maybe once in a while would play a soccer pickup game if one existed. But I was involved in the radio station, I was the station manager for a year. Siobhan: Oh cool. Sean: And a DJ. And then I was involved, I think in one of the campus activity boards, I think my senior year. Is it called SS or something? I'm trying to remember then what the acronym was. Siobhan: Or is it CAB? I mean, today I think it's probably the equivalent. Sean: Something like that. I would put on concerts at Hogan. I did one concert. I think I almost got kicked off campus because I did not go through the proper channels of getting permits and things like that. So I learned a lot at college about doing things like that. We had a band called The Mighty, Mighty Boss Tones playing in the basement, which was a fun, legendary show. And then when I was at the station, radio station, we did a kind of benefit concert for the Worcester Coalition for the Homeless in Worcester. There was a band named Fugazi that we brought up to Worcester and did a show, which is fun. So we did some fun stuff connecting Worcester where I grew up to Holy Cross. I was also a resident assistant in the Mulledy basement. So yeah, it was a fun four years. Siobhan: Wow. So you mentioned you were a history major. I'm always curious, because I did economics, why history? And did you have a favorite class? Sean: I kind of go back and forth between really US history and European history or world history. And I did take an African history class, which is pretty influential. Professor David O'Brien was my advisor and he's kind of a labor and Catholic historian. And I still am interested in labor history. I can get really geeky I suppose, about history. I just really do enjoy it in terms of understanding patterns and issues and big issues that we're facing now as a country, and what are the historical analogs, and what has happened in the past that informs where you are right now. And all my family were English majors or our English majors. I think my daughter is an English, is going to become an English major, not a history major. My son was a poly sci major at Bucknell and a film major. But history is, I just enjoy it. And I go back and forth. I probably read more non-US history these days, but it's an escapism too for me. Dealing with everything else, it's kind of fun to read about the Age of Enlightenment or something like that, and just learn about different thinkers and different parts of history that you weren't aware of. And then if you get really excited, you can go deep on those things and get really geeky. Siobhan: I took one history class in Holy Cross, and I found that I almost felt like an investigator, like a detective, which as an economics major it is... That's a different way of thinking. So actually I have a lot of respect for the history department. Cause you very much have to tell a story, and really unpack documents and things. And I think that's... Sean: Yeah, for sure. Siobhan: And you mentioned your professor. I always love to hear about, because the school is so small and the community is so great. Is there anyone that comes to mind who had a meaningful impact on you at Hogan? Sean: Academically, David Chu, who is my accounting professor, and I just didn't do as well in accounting, but that taught me a lot about the importance of studying, actually. There was a professor Whall when I took my early survey class in history, which kind of awakened me to academic writing in a different way. And I lifeguarded at the pool, so got to hang out with the late Barry Parenteau who just passed away. And that was fun times there. And then some of the student life people, I think Dean Simon, I'm trying to remember his name, but he was the one that I worked with a little bit in my senior year. He was the Student Life Dean, if I remember correctly, out of Hogan. And then actually career advisors towards the end. I think one of the more influential people in my career, if we segue into that section, is this John Winters, who is there as a career advisor who really got me on the pathway of where I am right now. Siobhan: Oh, fabulous. Actually, that was a great segue. That was actually my next question was going to be, could you just take me through from commencement to where you are? Sean: Sure. Siobhan: Your journey. I did look into your bio a little bit and you had a very vast career so far, but I want to hear about it from you, your whole journey. Sean: So when I got out of school, I remember second semester, senior year, gosh knows what you're going to do. But I think I interviewed, think at some advertising agency, Leo Burnett, that has historically hired Holy Cross grads and did not get the interview. But I was able to go to Chicago for that all day interview, which was kind of fun. Get to stay in the fancy hotel for the first time. And then when I got out of school I ended up going to Jesuit Volunteer Corps. So I did the Jesuit Volunteer Corps in the northwest and was stationed, or placed, I guess is the language in Auburn, Washington, which is between Seattle and Tacoma. And my placement, or my job, the volunteer job was working at a residential youth shelter for physically and sexually abused kids. And I was doing that for a year. And so my job was to take to care of them, drive them to school, make them dinner, take them on field trips, and then talk to them. And then, learning what it meant to be a social worker and would write about my day and my interactions to help the therapists and the psychologists who are helping them connect the dots about what issues they were facing. They were typically there for a couple of weeks. It was transitional short term, before they might have been between foster placements or they might have been just removed from the home. And the state was trying to figure out what to do with them. So it was a very eye-opening experience, making $20 a week living in a community in the Jesuit Volunteer Corps. But that moment I was actually really interested in understanding how nonprofits were financed. I was like, all right, so how did they actually get the money to do the work? How does it actually work? So I was able to understand a little bit about the particular organization I was volunteering at. It was called Auburn Youth Resources. And they would receive a lot of money from the King County, which is the local county outside of Seattle. But the philanthropy piece, that people would give them money was relatively small. And anyways, it was, it's an opportunity for me to think about that. I wanted to do good but also do well. And I think a lot of this has to do with Holy Cross, but also that my parents or both teachers. My brother's a teacher, my sister's a teacher, my other sister who went to Holy Cross works in nonprofits as well, she was class of '95. So I think that, my family upbringing and combined with Holy Cross in terms of its ethos of men and women for others, I think really kind of pushed me into this career, which wasn't really a career back then. I don't know if you want me to keep going, but when I got back from the year of volunteer work and I came back to the East Coast, I didn't know what I wanted to do. I lived in Worcester, outside of Worcester. I thought I wanted to move to Boston where, because I was nearby that was a big city, or move to Washington DC where a lot of my roommates were and friends. But John Winter in the Career Center said, did you ever think about development? And I said, what's development? And we talked more about it, what that actually meant. And he connected me with a guy named Pat Cunningham, who I think is class of '85. And Pat Cunningham worked in New York City, and at the time he worked for the Archdiocese of New York. And the program there was that they were trying to help small Catholic parochial schools become sustainable. So small Catholic schools in New York City were always a big deal for helping teach kids and families who didn't have a lot of money, but get a good education. The outcomes were terrific. Typically, a lot of the kids went on to college. But the financial model was becoming challenging, because the religious communities who would tend to teach at those schools was diminishing. So they would have to hire lay teachers, you don't have to pay a Sister as much as you have to pay a layperson. So I think that caused like, oh my goodness, tuition is not covering the cost. And so they were trying to figure out a way could they raise money? Like private high schools, like St. John's in Shrewsbury or St. John's in Danvers, as BC High or Notre Dame Academy, they tend to raise money from their alums or parents. Pat Cunningham's job was to figure that out with some parochial schools in New York. There was a philanthropist who just passed away a couple of years ago, a guy named Richard Gilder, who was a Jewish, who founded a company Gilder, Gagnon, & Howe. Anyways, he believed in Catholic education and funded a lot of these schools. He believed in the outcomes and giving back in the community. And so he was essentially underwriting director and development positions. So the salary that a director of development would require. So there was an opportunity for me to work at a school called St. Columba Elementary School, which is on 25th between eighth and ninth without any experience at 23 years old. Siobhan: Is it still there? Sean: It is still there. But unfortunately, the school is closed and is now probably a private or a charter school. It Is the school... Had a couple famous alums, Whoopi Goldberg, graduated from... it's the school Whoopi Goldberg graduated from St. Columba, and as well as a singer from the sixties and seventies, Tony Orlando went to St. Colo. He's a guy who sang Tie A Yellow Ribbon and Knock Three Times. You ever hear those songs? No. Knock three times on the ceiling. Siobhan: Maybe. Sean: Yeah. I don't want to sing it. So what I had to do is work with the sisters and figure out a way to help raise money. And I learned a ton. It was fun. I started talking to some of the colleagues who were doing the similar work in the city, and we created a consortium of colleagues, I think we called it ourselves development, gosh, I forgot what we called it. Ourselves like Development Resources, Development Resource Group, I think DRG maybe. In any case, we would meet and just try to do some brainstorming and figure out how to solve problems. And we actually got some funding to actually help our little mini consortium. And I was there for about a year. It was fun. Siobhan: And then I know that you also did some foundation work, correct? Sean: Yeah. So after what? So I was doing that for a year, and then I had heard about this big company called CCS Fundraising and it's called... At the time it was called Community Counseling Service. And it's still around. It's a big, big fundraising company. And at the time, back when I was there, it's probably quadrupled since I was working there. Any case, we didn't have any money at St. Columba for professional development. So there was this big conference in New York called Fundraising Day in New York. And it is held every, it's the third Friday of June every year. So it's like a one day, it's one of the biggest fundraising conferences in New York. But to go to it, you know, it's like $600 or something like that. And we didn't have any money at St. Columba to do that. And so there was a scholarship opportunity. So if I wrote an essay to the committee that they would send scholarships out. So I wrote an essay to the committee and they underwrote my admission. So I was able to go to the event. And at the event I ran into an executive at CCS Fundraising and talked to him. He encouraged me to apply to CCS, which I did. And then I got a job with CCS Fundraising, which really did change my career for the good. And they sent me all around the world and helped train me in fundraising. And it was great. I was there for a long, long time. And that's where I did do some foundation work. So to continue on that, so when I got to CCS, I went to Yorkshire, England to do some work for the Diocese of Leeds and raise money there. So essentially CCS as a company that would get hired by nonprofits to actually help them raise money. Siobhan: Like a consultant. Sean: A hundred percent like a consultant. And it's weird because you'd be 24 years old or 25 years old and you're a consultant. And I remember a lot of my family friends is like, what do you know? You're just a kid. And there was a lot of truth in that, because I didn't know what I was doing. But the way the model worked at CCS was that they would train you, and there was actually different levels of consulting. And actually modern consulting firms like McKinsey have a similar model where you have the partners who are the thought leaders, and the business development people who actually find the clients. And they just need people to do the work. And those are the directors, the associate directors who essentially just took direction from the leadership. And in the case of going to the Diocese of Leeds, my charge was to work with parishes and coordinate, manage, design and execute what I would call mini-campaigns for each of those parishes. So I would go to the priest, I would orient the priest on the plan, we'd recruit a leadership team and go out and raise money. It was a very, very difficult assignment, but I learned a lot about resilience and persuasion and problem-solving and persistence and all that stuff, because it was a very intense five or six months. But it was fun. Get to live in Yorkshire in the middle of the winter when you're 24, 25 years old. That was great. Siobhan: I was going to say, that also just sounds really cool because you kind of get to dabble in so many different types of advancement. I know in development, I remember when I first learned about it, I was like, oh, that's like for schools. And I'm like, wait, no. There's fundraising for hospitals and political campaigns and nature organizations, which I want to get to eventually. Sean: And human rights organizations or arts and cultural groups. I think that that's a really good point, Siobhan, because where I got really lucky was that I, and it really serves me well right now at this stage in my career that I have a very diverse set of experiences and what we call multi-sector kind of experience. I'm not just a higher ed fundraiser, I've done every single type of nonprofit fundraising. And when you do that, you get to see where the commonalities are, and what the challenges are. Everything from a museum on Japanese sculptor named Isamu Noguchi, or to Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in Long Island, with Dr. Watson, who just basically discovered DNA. So I've been very blessed with having been exposed, and working with very different kinds of organizations. And I know that at this point in my life, there's not a lot of people who have that kind of experience. And so that kind of becomes my professional marker, I guess. So the person who's done a lot of big complex organizations, but also a lot of small organizations too. Siobhan: So I have two questions on that. The first is, it's a soft question. In all of those different types of fundraising, which was your favorite, I guess what kind of fundraising was most enjoyable for you? Sean: I do the arts and cultural world because I find the board and the people to be very interesting and fun to work with. It is perhaps the hardest sector to work on because a lot of what we do is 400 billion is given away by people and corporations and foundations every year. And the top sector, it's religion, is probably the largest recipient of philanthropy, healthcare and education come in pretty close after that. So you're going to get a lot, it's not saying it's easier to raise money in higher ed, in healthcare, but in some ways it is because in healthcare it typically centers around solving a problem or the so-called grateful patient. "Dr X saved my life, I'm going to give him all my money or a lot of my money" and higher education is "professor Y saved my life and got me on the right path, so I'm going to give money there." Arts and cultural tends to be not necessarily the top priority people. It could be second or third or maybe sometimes fourth. And so it's harder sometimes, but I find it to be more interesting. And then in terms of my most enjoyable experience, probably when I worked in London again in 2000, when I got to do some work with the International Accounting Standards Board, which sounds very boring, but the job was very exciting because what the job was, was to raise money for an organization that was trying to harmonize accounting standards around the world. Siobhan: Oh, cool. Sean: I got to travel around Europe to actually interview executives on their willingness to support this cause, this kind of new plan. And it was just fun working on that kind of scale. One of the great things about this, that I've enjoyed about my career is that I have to learn about every kind of thing. I'm not an expert on accounting, but I have to be able to have a conversation about it. I'm not an expert on art museums, but I have to be able to at least have a conversation about it. And here at Audubon, I'm not an ornithologist, but I have to be able to talk about climate change and the importance of eelgrass in San Francisco Bay. Because what I'm doing is representing these organizations, and serving as the middle person between philanthropy and good causes. And that's on thing I think my profession's about. It's not about asking for money, in a weird way. It's really about creating an environment where you create opportunities for people who have money, who want to give away money, to do it in a way that they feel comfortable doing it. Siobhan: No, I feel the same way, especially in connecting with alums. It's not about asking them for money. It's about what did you love about Holy Cross and how can you support that again? Sean: Exactly. Siobhan: But you mentioned Audubon. And I just, so again, with advancement just being so vast, if I'm being honest, I didn't know that such an organization existed. When I saw that that's where you work, I was like, oh my God, of course that would exist. Sean: I'm going to have to do more work then, Siobhan to make sure you hear about this. Siobhan: But it makes sense. Birds are so important, and the environment is such, no pun intended, but a hot topic right now. But how did you, I guess, find that organization and what brought you there? Sean: Yeah. Siobhan: Is that one of your passions too? Is the environment something that strikes... Sean: It is, I think certainly climate change and birds over time. The truth is that they found me and reached out to me. And then, right now at this stage of my career, I think when I was a little younger... And I have some advice about careers too, but, and this is what I share with people, is that you really do want to go to a place where the people, you kind of vibe with the people that you're going to work with. I think mission is very important, but as you're building a career, it's very important to find people that believe in you, give you the resources to be successful in where you can learn. At Audubon, at this stage of my career, because I have a leadership role, I can control some of those things. I can control the type of culture I'm trying to create with my team, and which I think is very, very important for fundraisers. For fundraisers to stay, is actually understanding what makes motivates fundraisers and what motivates development. Because I think a lot of this is, there's some similar aspects I think to a really good fundraising personality. But Audubon, I think the reason why I'm here is because they wanted to grow. And one of the things I've learned about my career recently is that there's some people who are comfortable in a status quo environment. And then there's some people who just like to build things. And I'm certainly in the ladder, and part of this is because of my consulting background. I like to solve problems, and figure out a way to grow. I know that sounds like every organization wants to do that, but not necessarily. Because I think in order to do that, there has to be an alignment between the board and the leadership of the organization, and actually a really good case of why growth is needed. And then of course they need to invest. So you need to spend money to raise money. All those elements were in place when I was talking to Audubon about five and a half years ago with leadership. So if I see alignment between the Chair of the Board and the CEO, and if they kind of align with the Chief Development Officer or the person who's in charge of raising money, that's when really great things can happen. Because this is never, in my view, a money issue. There's plenty of money in this world right now. This is always a strategy problem. How are we getting the money? How are we telling our story? Do we have the mechanical pieces in place? Do we have the right people? Are they trained? Do we have the right leadership in place? Those are the things that staff ultimately control. And if they are in the right spot, and doing it the right way, the money should come. It's very difficult to get all that stuff figured out. And that's really, at the end of the day, that's what the work is. Is that I think good fundraisers have a vision for what the word will look like or feel like. At any given day, I know what kind of meeting I'm trying to design between a board member and my CEO, and I know what I want them to say and I know who I want in the room. So I'm always trying to get to that point. Not as easy as it sounds, because it just takes time to get all those things in place, and to make sure that the conversation's happening. And making sure you have answers to all the questions that funders want. So for instance, at Audubon we're... Bezos gives a wait a lot of money for climate, we spend a lot of time trying to figure out how to make that approach happen the right way. I don't want need to digress, but that's a lot of it how I think of it. Siobhan: No, and that's awesome. Actually, so I have a few questions that are going in different directions, so I'll see if I can loop them all together. So the first one is, I guess, what keeps you in this work? What drives your day? What kept your passion in the work that you're doing? Sean: Well, yeah, there were times, I remember in 2000, 2001 during the first dot com boom, I remember I would've been about 30 or so, there was a lot of people in my peer group trying to go to dotcom and early in internet stage companies. And I did talk to some people, this is after I got back from London. And I remember talking to some, what I would call philtech. Phil, P H I L technology, so philanthropy technology companies that were starting at that time and ultimately did not pursue them. And then on occasion, during the late two thousands or before the 2008 recession, could I parlay this experience into some kind of for-profit thing? I think ultimately, what kept me is, which is what you hear when you hear people give career advice when you're younger is, and I think there's a lot of truth to this, is if you actually like what you do and eventually you become good at it, then everything else takes care of itself. So I really do like what I'm doing, and I've become pretty good at it. And so then everything else takes care of itself. And being intentional about the different moves you make. And because designing a career is... I'm not saying it's a full-time job, but you cannot approach that casually. You have to be attainable about it. And what I mean by that is that whenever you go to an organization, and it doesn't really matter what sector we're talking about, but certainly in the fundraising sector, you want to understand not only how you're going to be successful there, but what will it lead to? What if you're successful at XYZ organization, will it give you an opportunity to grow within the organization or maybe even go to another organization, that type of thing. Depending on what you ultimately want to do. You don't have to become a Chief Development Officer. You can become the best frontline fundraiser in an area that you really, really love. And that's the great thing about this sector is that there's a lot of different diverse job functions. You have the development operations side, which is very much oriented towards tech people and people who are data-driven. The foundation relations kind of world, which really solid writers do well in that sector or that section of the work. And then frontline fundraisers are really usually a kind of sales salesperson orientation. Siobhan: I was going to say, as someone who is on the soliciting end of things, I feel like I'm a salesperson for Holy Cross, which I love because as someone, and you get this as someone who benefited from the product, it almost makes the job easy. But I was curious, so as someone, you weren't on both ends of the spectrum, so the soliciting side, which we've said isn't all about asking for money, but sometimes it comes down to, okay, here's my wallet. And then also the giving away of money. How would you, I guess, compare those roles? Because right now, as someone who's just starting out, I find the idea of grant giving and the other side of the work to be intriguing. Sean: It is intriguing. So my experience and foundations, I did some work with the MacArthur Foundation and the Gates Foundation, both those opportunities, I got to obviously work closely with them to understand more how they work. And over my career, I've got to work closely with some foundations. And over my career, I've probably felt the same thing that you're feeling, oh, it would be fun to get away money. But it's funny, they kind of have the same challenges in some ways because they... And I think that that actually helps you become a good fundraiser with foundations. To kind of boil this down, everyone has a job and everyone has to do things. So if you're a foundation officer, you have to do things, you have to give away money. And it is hard to give away money, because you're going to be evaluated on how the partnerships that you developed, did you squander the money or did you give the money away smartly? And if you gave the money away, did you do a good job following up in a and actually evaluating their efficacy? And that is hard. And there's a lot of pressure. And so if you orient yourself as a, now I'm going on the solicitor side, if you orient yourself to, I'm going to make this person's life easier, then you're talking to them like a person and you're creating a partnership. How can I help you with your job, or what you have to do? We're a good organization, we're going to communicate with you, we're going to spend your money the right way. Then it's a great thing. So you're not really asking them for money, you're really creating a partnership. And I think that that makes all the things in the world. But then if you think about designing strategies for a billionaire who wants to, some billionaire from Holy Cross calls you Siobhan and said, Siobhan, I want you to run a foundation for me and figure out... I want to give away money to human rights organizations and arts organizations in South America, and I'm going to give you a budget and you figure it out. So what would you do? You would probably start creating a network. You would go travel and see some, understand the issue. Go to South America, go visit museums, create a network of people, and then start to give away money. Yes, that would be fun. That would be really fun. But going to a big foundation and running a program, you do have to be a subject matter expert. Oftentimes, not all the time, because now there are a lot of foundations out there that I've been encountering that will hire a friend, someone they trust to actually help them with their foundation. I met this foundation recently where, all of a sudden they found themselves with a whole lot of money and they wanted to create this foundation because that's what the estate had directed them to do. And they're going to find the person that they trust. And so sometimes that person's not a subject matter expert, but they're a trusted advisor to the family. But if you're a subject matter expert in human rights, you're coming at it from a different direction. You're an academic that goes into a foundation. But I do think it's a growing, obviously a growing field as the wealth inequality continues to increase. I'll just give you a little tidbit on, this is one of my favorite facts. When I started in the business, mid-nineties, I would always go to the Hudson News in Grand Central and buy the Forbes 400, which would come out, I guess it would come on the fall. I'm trying to remember when it did. But I always loved that because I would go home on the train and just read it, and learn about the families who had wealth. And I quickly learned that not everybody, wealth and philanthropy are not the same thing. People with money and people who are philanthropic, there's like a Venn diagram in the middle. But to be the four hundredth, wealthiest person on that list, right back in the mid-nineties, the net worth was 400 million or something like that. It's a lot of money. What do you think it is today? Siobhan: It's more. Because I feel like... I was going to say, I feel like, because nowadays, and maybe it's because I work in fundraising, a million dollars doesn't seem like that much money anymore. Sean: Something like 1.7 billion. Siobhan: I was going to say at least a billion dollars. Sean: So why that's extraordinary. Not only how much it's gone up. Might be 1.4, but I know it's something like that. There's a whole lot of people below that. We don't even know who those people are. Siobhan: Wow. Sean: They're not necessarily publicly known. So the amount of people... It used to be rather, you used to be able to understand where the wealth was. And now I think you just don't, A very interesting world we live in now in terms of the relationship between wealth, philanthropy, and our business. There's a lot of new philanthropists coming on board that are coming out of the nowhere, partly because they're just not as well known. It's just more. There's more opportunity. That's why we're not really at a wealthy, it's not about money, it's about strategy. Siobhan: I was also going to say, I find... At least I can relate to least the capacity because sometimes, you use all the data that you have and you assume that someone has this profile, but you could either be over assuming, but then you could also be easily under assuming too. There are probably people that you don't think they would give maybe over a thousand dollars. But if you go about it, as you were saying, strategy, if you talk to them, if they're into music and you talk to them about the new performing arts center, you might inspire their generosity more than if you're talking to them about a new basketball court. Sean: I think that that's a hundred percent right. And I think, that's why I think it sounds a little old school. I think research can be a little overdone. I love research by the way. I think that my research team, they call me an, I'm an honorary researcher because on occasion, if I'm sitting in front of the TV or something like that, I'll go deep on some name and I just love finding these little nuggets of information. I'll send our director of prospect research these random emails. I said, look into this, look into that. Because at least at Audubon, I'm looking into people who care about climate, who care about birds, who care about... Siobhan: Again, that is so unique. Sean: Well, there's one, if you look on... Here's one of the cool things about birds besides the fact they're cool. If you go to... The Fish and Wildlife Service did a report on one of the most common outdoor activity, obviously gardening is actually probably the top. Birding is actually second or so. They estimate over 40 million people at one point in their life have gone out and watched birds, whether it's in their backyard or something like that. It's an awful lot of people. Siobhan: It is a lot of people. That's a fun fact. Sean: Yeah, it drives our work for sure. And we're doing this cool thing. This is kind of a little bit out of sequence, but we have this thing called Bird Song, which is this project we're doing. In fact, you can look on Spotify, and this has been in the New York Times. A music supervisor, a guy named Randall Poster who works with Wes Anderson and Martin Scorsese approached Audubon, and he got the bird bug over the pandemic because he was at home and listening to birds. He approached all of his musician friends, people like Jarvis Cocker and Yo-Yo Ma and Yoko Ono and Karen O and Beck to do songs inspired by Bird Song. And so he has 180 tracks. He's also asked his actor friends like Liam Neeson and Matthew McConaughey and Adrien Brody to read poems that are about birds, including a bird poem written by another Holy Cross alum, Billy Collins, who is a poet who wrote a poem about sandhill cranes in Nebraska. He has Conor Oberst from Bright Eyes reading that poem. Anyways, there's going to be a big album, a box set release, and all the money's going to go to Audubon. Siobhan: That's awesome. Sean: Birds are having a moment. Siobhan: Birds are having a moment. It's a bird's world and we're just living in it. Sean: It is. That's a good way of putting it, I'm going to borrow that. Siobhan: You can totally, as long as you give me copyright credit. Sean: I'll absolutely give you copyright, and all the royalties. Siobhan: Exactly. And I do want to just be cognizant of time, but as the podcast is about Holy Cross's mission and how it influenced your life, and I know you did talk about this a little bit at the beginning. I just wanted to hear more about how Holy Cross impacted your life and your work, and maybe Holy Cross' mission in addition to being men and women for others. Sean: I found a profession that I think in the beginning it might not have made sense, but I have to tell you now, at my age, there's a lot of people, a lot of friends who went to all lacrosse and other places are some ways jealous of this career because... So I have this ability to do well and do good. Use persuasion techniques or skills that could be implied to advertising or banking or some other sales job. But when I'm being reflective of the relationship between the effort and the work that I've applied my daily profession to the outcome, it completely aligns with my worldview of actually helping other people and helping organizations and helping the world, whether it's through art or healthcare or science or human rights or conservation. I feel pretty good about that. And I also feel very fortunate because I don't think I'd be in this profession if it wasn't for Holy Cross, partly because combined with how I was raised and also Holy Cross reinforcing some of those values and elevating them. And then, really the specific moment when Jonathan Winters actually said, hey, you should look into this job. And really made the connection between me as a recent alum and an opportunity with another Holy Cross person. So if Pat Cunningham's listening to this podcast, and I reach out to him once in a while, was a very influential person in terms of where I'm at right now, and I'm very grateful for that. So it's a fun profession. I encourage, I do a lot of connecting with other Holy Cross grads that have helped people. And there's a lot of Holy Cross people that I've met who are in this business, and you try to get together. Because I think there's a really interesting theme here in terms of what we do. And a lot of us are doing, in pretty good organizations, doing really, really good work. So celebrating that as a profession would be fun to do. I actually, Danita Wickwire, who is class of '94 joined my team recently. Which is incredible, because I told her, she reminds me a little bit of why I'm in this profession. Because if you go into this world of fundraising, it's hard to keep up with everything. But then, because she's here and because of our common history at Holy Cross, it's nice to have her because we were able to align around that a lot. And I think she participated in one of these podcasts as well. And she's a really, really influential and important leader in this space as well. Siobhan: Oh, that's awesome. She is an outstanding volunteer and name in our office. So our office is a big fan of Danita, she's great. Also, what I really like too that you said is, I don't know, I find that the job doesn't really feel like work and it's comforting to hear that doesn't change. Sean: It doesn't really. No, it doesn't change. I mean, listen, it's not saying it's easy all the time, but it's certainly fun. Siobhan: And then I guess you kind of touched upon this, but for someone starting out in this work, what is some advice you would give? And then I guess also, looking back on your journey that got you here, is there anything that you would've done differently? Sean: I don't think I have any regrets about choices I've made, also philosophically don't believe in that because I don't think it's helpful. But I think in terms of advice, I do think, and I know this sounds slightly cynical, so I soften this a little bit, but I really do feel it's important to go to a place where your boss and your colleagues believe and align with how you think about this work. I think often, sometimes I see folks make a mistake going to an organization for the mission only, and then what ends up happening sometimes, not all the time, is that the expectations aren't there. And then it can really be a hard place to be. One of the hardest things about this business is... It's a very optimistic, enthusiastic person, but I also know how hard this is and things can go wrong, and you might not have control over certain things. And so educating non-fundraisers, or orienting them about how this work actually unfolds happens with experience. So I'm able to do that with a little bit more ease than I did when I was younger. But be very intentional about your career. If you have a lot of the elements in place, that's great. If you're able to grow, that's great. Don't go for the money, so to speak, or for the mission, make sure everything else is in place. That's my advice. Siobhan: That's very deep. I think that's applicable to anything too. Sean: It is. But I remember, I give a lot of career advice and sometimes I see people, it looks really good, but you got to ask all the right questions, make sure you're asking the questions so you have it all figured out. Siobhan: Yeah. Then I guess, is there any type of organization that you haven't worked with yet that you'd want to? You said you've worked with most of them, but is there anything that maybe in your journey that you've seen... Sean: I was in Columbia last week, the country, because we do a lot of work hemispherically, so I was in Bogota and Cali. I really enjoy, where I think this is headed, and maybe it would be fun, is like this orientation about raising money in other parts of the world. I've done it before, I've done it in England, and it's different in every country and it's evolving and this cultural barriers of this and all that stuff. But I like the way the globalization in terms of how we're thinking about the NGO, bottom up. And also the importance of diversifying our space. Our profession has to be more intentional about how to do that and create space and opportunities for people of color and other backgrounds because there's a lot of history and reasons why it is what it is. And we have to continue to try to figure out ways to open up doors and opportunities that are just not going to happen naturally. You have to be forceful about that. So any place that is in that space. You know what, the weird thing about this space, and I talked to Ron Lawson about this, who's a Chief Operating Officer of a coalition, homeless coalition in New York. It's in a weird way, it's really hard to raise private philanthropy for some social justice issues like homelessness and hunger. Hunger, not as much as it used to be. But I'm always curious about why that is. And there are some organizations that kind of outperform. There's so much money that's given away and there's some sectors that are just not there yet. And that would be fun to understand more why that's happening and help with that too. Siobhan: Cool. I just wanted to see where you were headed next. Sean: I don't know. Siobhan: Nonprofit. Sean: Yeah, it's fun. I'm glad you're in this space and you should keep in touch, Siobhan, it'd be fun to see where your career's going to take you. Siobhan: I was going to say, I'll have you on speed dial. Sean: Good. Awesome. Siobhan: Awesome. And before I let you go, I just wanted to end on a fun little speed Holy Cross round. Sean: Sure. Siobhan: Very quick. Okay. What was your freshman dorm? Sean: Mulledy Siobhan: What was your hardest class? Sean: That economics class with Professor Chu. No, actually accounting class with Professor Chu. Yeah. Siobhan: Nice. Best professor you've ever had? Sean: Probably Professor Chu Siobhan: I see him sometimes, so I'll be sure to let him know. Sean: I think he just retired actually. I thought I just saw that he's retiring soon. Siobhan: He is, but he has his little research. Sean: Yeah, you can tell him that. Tell him, gave him a shout-out. I think I was, it might have been... That was his first year he got here, I think. Siobhan: Oh, that's so funny. Senior dorm? Sean: Carlin. Siobhan: Oh, nice. Sean: Yeah, Carlin Siobhan: Favorite spot on campus? Sean: I guess I liked the radio station. That was a great place to escape. Siobhan: Oh, cute. First meal you think of when you think of Kimball. Sean: Ah, that's good. Probably just like chicken fingers, I guess. They actually existed, I think that they did. Or that Turkey. There's like some kind of Turkey meal that was good there. Siobhan: Oh my goodness. The Thanksgiving Turkey dinner slaps. Best restaurant in Worcester. This is good because you're a local. Sean: Yeah, well the best restaurant right now that I was just like, wow, this is a pretty good restaurant. There's that sushi place on Park Avenue is really, really good actually. And then when I was there, I guess Arturo's was a great Italian place, but that's not, I think that's closed now. Best Breakfast place is probably Lou Roc's on West Boylston Street, which is a really, really good diner. Siobhan: Good to know. Everyone always talks about Miss Worcester's, I'll have to... Sean: Miss Worcester's is good, but Lou Roc's is a little further out, but it's excellent, excellent. Yeah. Siobhan: Oh, fabulous. All right. Your go-to study spot? Sean: The Library right side, as you're walking on the right side. Yeah, not the left side. Siobhan: Okay. And if you were going to campus right now, where are you going first? Sean: I am going to check out this new performing arts center which is the coolest looking building in Worcester, I think. Siobhan: Right? It kind of looks like an airport, but in a good way. Sean: It's a very cool, it's one of the coolest architecture buildings I've seen. And it's certainly one of the coolest things in Worcester. I think it's awesome. I want to go inside it. Siobhan: And then last question, your fondest Holy Cross memory. Sean: Fondest Holy Cross memory? Oh, I don't know. I really enjoy fall at Holy Cross. That's what I enjoyed the most. Yeah, and I like fall in Worcester. Yeah, for sure. Siobhan: That's a good answer. Sean: Yeah. Siobhan: Especially fall at Holy Cross is beautiful. Sean: Yeah, like a football game in the fall. That's probably it. Siobhan: Nice. Wow. Thank you so much for chatting with me. Sean: Thanks Siobhan. Siobhan: Taking the time out of your today. Sean: That was great, thanks. Thanks for the opportunity. Maura Sweeney: That's our show. I hope you enjoyed hearing about just one of the many ways that Holy Cross alumni have been inspired by the mission to be people for and with others. A special thanks to today's guests and everyone at Holy Cross who has contributed to making this podcast a reality. If you or someone would like to be featured on this podcast, then please send us an email at alumnicareers.holycross.edu. If you like what you hear, then please leave us a review. This podcast is brought to you by the Office of Alumni Relations at the College of the Holy Cross. You can subscribe for future episodes wherever you find your podcast. I'm your host, Maura Sweeney, and this is Mission-Driven. In the words of Saint Ignatius of Loyola, "Now go forth and set the world on fire." Theme music composed by Scott Holmes, courtesy of freemusicarchive.org.

BirdNote
Making Wind Farms Safer for Birds

BirdNote

Play Episode Listen Later May 24, 2023 1:45


Climate change poses a big threat to all life on earth, and birds are no exception. Garry George is the director of the Clean Energy Initiative for the National Audubon Society, and he says that wind turbines are essential to meet our carbon reduction goals. But they can also kill birds. Garry and his team at Audubon provide guidance on how to make wind farms safer for birds.More info and transcript at BirdNote.org. Want more BirdNote? Subscribe to our weekly newsletter. Sign up for BirdNote+ to get ad-free listening and other perks. BirdNote is a nonprofit. Your tax-deductible gift makes these shows possible.

City Life Org
NYC PARKS, NYC DEP, AND NATIONAL AUDUBON SOCIETY CELEBRATE COMPLETION OF HOOK CREEK PARK WETLANDS RESTORATION PROJECT IN QUEENS

City Life Org

Play Episode Listen Later May 12, 2023 2:29


Learn more at TheCityLife.org --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/citylifeorg/message Support this podcast: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/citylifeorg/support

Ashley and Brad Show
Ashley and Brad Show - ABS 2023-4-26

Ashley and Brad Show

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 27, 2023 47:09


news birthdays/events is there an app for everything?  ashley needed one the other day...and thinks it's important word of the day news game: $5 trivia best rock bands from the 70's, 80's, 90's  so many stores we grew up with are going away (bed bath and beyond) because of amazon...do you miss any of them? news game: getting to know you chat gpt for travel! do you lose sleep worrying about your job/co-workers etc? news you listen more to your heart or your brain?  has that changed as you've gotten older? things we should clean during "spring cleaning" goodbye/fun facts....audobon day...This day is celebrated in honor of (and marks the birth of) John James Audubon, a French-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter who was well-known for his extensive studies on American birds and their habitats....and this day also recognizes the crucial work done by The National Audubon Society. Spring is an excellent time to observe the birds...  the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service say 45 million people enjoy bird watching.  if you're new to bird watching...simply step outside and observe the birds around you. You can look up details of birds you don't recognize on the Audubon website.  if you have some space in your backyard...design your own bird-friendly locale with native shrubs, trees, pedestal birdbaths, and/or you can hang bird feeders that you've created from plastic bottles, coffee cans, or even milk jugs

Outdoor Adventure Series
From Marine Biology to Birding: The Journey of Cortney Weatherby, Coastal Outreach Manager for Alabama Audubon

Outdoor Adventure Series

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2023 45:50


Cortney Weatherby is our guest on the Outdoor Adventure Series today.Cortney is the Coastal Outreach Manager for Alabama Audubon. She is an environmental educator and conservationist. She loves spending time outdoors in various capacities: birding, fly fishing, kayaking, snorkeling, or diving when the opportunity arises.Questions We DiscussedWhat threats do beach-nesting birds face?How can people help these birds when they visit the beach?Why would you recommend people get into birding?Aha Moment(s)Two stories ---- Cortney led a bird walk for about 20 people, and during the walk, they saw birds that most birders would consider common, but many of these people might have seen some of those birds before but not necessarily known what they were. It was a fun and engaged group, and they had some birds cooperate and stay in view long enough to point out identifying features.Before Christmas, Cortney gave a program about beach-nesting birds to a group of third and fifth-graders at a local school. At the conclusion, when she was answering questions, one of them asked me what college degree they would need to work for Alabama Audubon, and another asked that even though they are young if there was a way for them to help the birds nest on the beach.InSight2GoIf you head to a beach or island that has active bird nesting on the beach, remember two sayings: Fish, swim, and play from 50 yards away. Giving these birds space makes a huge difference. If the birds are squawking, keep on walking! A lot of people ask us how close to the birds is too close...If the birds start shuffling around and making noise at you, you know you are too close!MEDIAhttps://www.outdooralabama.com/articles/alabama-conservation-birds.LEARN MOREThank you to the Alabama Audubon funders, the Alabama DCNR, the AL Trustee Implementation Group (TIG), the National Audubon Society, and the USFWS, who allow the Alabama Audubon to keep doing this important work on the Alabama coast. And to all of their partners who allow them to conduct surveys and monitoring on their property and are working to help preserve the AL gulf coast. Visit the www.alaudubon.org website to learn more about the programs offered or volunteer opportunities, You can also visit the Alabama AuDubon on these social sites:Facebook - www.facebook.com/alaudubonInstagram - www.instagram.com/alaudubon/Get to know the Merlin Bird ID app. to learn more about how to ID birds. To begin planning your beach vacation, getaway, or outing, visit the Gulf Shores and Orange Beach Tourism website at https://www.gulfshores.com/.If you enjoy podcasts devoted to the outdoor adventure space, find us online at https://outdooradventureseries.com. We welcome likes and comments, and if you know someone who is aPodcast produced using DescriptPodcast hosted by BuzzsproutShow Notes powered by CastmagicWebsite powered by Podpage

All THINGS HIP HOP EPISODE #1
EP #262 TRUE SERVANT LEADERSHIP - VICKI CLARK

All THINGS HIP HOP EPISODE #1

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 11, 2023 118:31


THE KELLY CARDENAS PODCAST PRESENTS Vicki Clark is an optimist. She loves people and shows up in the world as a learner and a servant leader. Based in Memphis, Tennessee, Vicki has devoted the past 30 years of her career to building capacity of: for profit and nonprofit organizations and individuals; inspiring community and business leaders to take action.  She is known for her work in the specialty areas of leadership development, diversity, equity, inclusion, accesses and belonging, antiracism and facilitation, board development, strategic planning, volunteer resource development and effective communication. Her work spans dozens of corporate clients, nonprofits and government organizations. She sits on the National Diaper Bank and Youth Volunteer Corps. As a BoardSource Certified Trainer she is a regular facilitator on topics such as Exceptional Boards, Board Best Practices, Imbedding DEIAB into Your Board Culture, Leadership, Leadership Transition for various non profit organizations including United Way, the Association of Junior Leagues International, St. Jude, National Audubon Society, Church World Service, National Association of African American Museums, Sigma Kappa,  American Bar Association, numerous state and local Bar Associations, and the TN Supreme Court .  Her work as a consultant, coach, trainer and speaker have given her infinite opportunities to learn from and share with people from all walks of life. She meets people where they are, never gives up, and believes in the power of prayer. Even at her age and with all that she has experienced, she continues to be A WORK IN PROGRESS.  THE HIDEOUT Be sure to check out my new audiobook SUCCESS LEAVES CLUES (THE 7 P'S THAT CAN SHIFT YOUR REALITY) Thank you to our sponsors PRIVATE MONEY CLUB  USE CODE - KELLY500 MONEY SCHOOL TABLE ONE HOSPITALITY RAVEN DRUM FOUNDATION THE MINA GROUP SECRET KNOCK FAMECAST Findlay Volvo Las Vegas Samaritans Feet Cardenas Law Group Squeeze Dried Agua Hedionda Lagoon Foundation BLING SHINE SERUM-The #1 seller of over 15 years and the only product to be endorsed by my MAMA! MORE KELLY “JOY IS THE ART OF FALLING IN LOVE WITH YOUR CURRENT CIRCUMSTANCES AND ALLOWING MAGIC TO HAPPEN!” EXECUTIVE PRODUCER BROOKLYN CARDENAS --- Send in a voice message: https://podcasters.spotify.com/pod/show/kelly-cardenas/message

Flatlander Podcast
Episode 50: Audubon of Kansas and Prairie Chicken Lek Treks

Flatlander Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 7, 2023 40:03


Audubon of Kansas (AOK) is an independent grassroots nonprofit organization that promotes appreciation and stewardship of natural ecosystems in Kansas and the central Great Plains, with special emphasis on conservation of prairies, birds, other wildlife, and their habitat. It is neither funded nor administered by the National Audubon Society.AOK executive director, Jackie Augustine, joins Tanna and Lyndzee to talk more about the mission of AOK and the annual Kansas Lek Treks Prairie-Chicken Festival.HostsLyndzee Rhine, Tanna WagnerSourcesAudubon of Kansas Audubon of Kansas Facebook PageAOK Kansas Lek Treks and Prairie-Chicken Festival Follow the Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks on Facebook and Instagram. Follow the Kansas Wildlife Federation on Facebook and Instagram.

Science Friday
Mapping An Insect Brain, Climate Education, Audubon Name, Wastewater Methane. March 31, 2023, Part 2

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2023 47:09


Sewage Is A Biological Necessity, And A Methane Minefield In most cities, once you flush a toilet, the water and waste flows through the sewage system to a water treatment plant. Once it's there, it goes through a series of chemical and biological processes which clean it up and make the water safe to drink again. But a recent paper in the journal Environmental Science & Technology finds that some of those sewage plants may be having a greater impact on the climate than previously thought. The anaerobic decomposition of organic material in the waste stream at sewage plants produces methane, a potent greenhouse gas. The researchers used an electric car fitted with a suite of atmospheric gas sensors to sniff the emissions downwind of 63 sewage treatment plants at different times and during different seasons. They found that the wastewater treatment process may release amounts of methane nearly twice that estimated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In a related study, other researchers analyzed data from published monitoring of wastewater treatment facilities around the globe—and arrived at a similar estimate of the methane production. Mark Zondlo, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Princeton University, and one of the authors of the methane-sniffing research, talks with guest host Shahla Farzan about the studies, and about what might be done to mitigate the methane impact of treating our cities' sewage.   Meet The Activist Reimagining Climate Education As a high school student, Sage Lenier remembers being frustrated with the way she was taught about climate change. It left her feeling helpless, contending with the gloomy predictions for a doom-filled future. Despite talking about the problems, she wasn't learning anything about solutions. A year later at the University of California, Berkeley, Sage took it upon herself to create the course she wished she had—one focused on solutions and hope. Nearly 2,000 students have taken her course since, and she recently founded Sustainable & Just Future, a youth-led educational non-profit. Guest host Kathleen Davis talks with Sage about her experiences, why we've gotten climate education all wrong, and how we need to be thinking about our future.   The First Fully Mapped Animal Brain Is The Larva Of A Fruit Fly Understanding how a brain works is one of the most challenging tasks in science. One of the ultimate goals in brain research is to develop brain maps, which catalog which neurons are connected to others, and where. If researchers have a brain map, they can better understand neurological conditions like addiction, and develop more effective treatments. It may even help scientists understand more abstract concepts, like consciousness. The catch? Mapping millions, or even billions, of tiny little neurons is an extremely challenging and expensive task. But a team of researchers at Johns Hopkins University recently completed a 12-year effort to map the entire brain of a fruit fly larva, which is the size of a grain of salt, and contains 3,000 neurons and 500,00 connections. Their results were published in the journal Science. Joining guest host Shahla Farzan is the paper's senior author Joshua Vogelstein, an associate professor of biomedical engineering at Johns Hopkins University. They talk about how exactly his team completed this task, when a human brain map might be completed, and how this could be a meaningful step in understanding how enlightenment works.   National Audubon Society Sticks With Its Name, Despite Namesake's Racism For more than a year, the National Audubon Society—one of the largest bird conservation groups—mulled over a big decision: whether or not they should rename the organization. Its namesake, John James Audubon, is known as the founding father of American birding. But Audubon and his family were anti-abolition and they enslaved nine people in their home. He also actively harmed and looted from Indigenous people. Earlier this month, the National Audubon Society announced its decision to keep “Audubon” in its name, saying that it's important in allowing the organization to keep protecting birds. The open letter also says the organization represents “much more than the work of one person.” The decision to stick with the Audubon name has been met with intense backlash, from birders, local branches, and even its own employees. A handful of locally-run Audubon branches, from New York City to Madison, Wisconsin, plan to change their names to nix the word Audubon. Seattle's branch is renaming itself “Birds Connect Seattle,” and Washington D.C.'s Audubon Naturalist Society is now “Nature Forward.” Guest host Kathleen Davis speaks with Stuart Wells, executive director of Portland Audubon and conservation scientist Corina Newsome about their reactions to the National Audubon Society keeping its name, and how changes are happening locally, including in places like Portland.   Transcripts for each segment will be available the week after the show airs on sciencefriday.com.    

Living on Earth
Microplastics – “A Poison Like No Other,” Climate Scientists Sound the Alarm, Nat'l Audubon Keeps Enslaver's Name and more

Living on Earth

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 31, 2023 51:52


Microplastics are everywhere scientists have looked for them, from the deepest ocean trenches to mountain peaks; in our air, water, and food, even our own bodies. We'll take a deep dive into the world of these tiny pollutants laden with thousands of different chemicals and discuss potential solutions. Also, the world has no time to waste in cutting carbon emissions if we want to avoid the worst impacts of climate change, according to the latest major climate report from the IPCC science agency of the United Nations. What's at stake for the planet and what's necessary to keep warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius. And the namesake of the National Audubon Society was an enslaver, racist and white supremacist, so several local chapters are changing their names in an effort to build a more inclusive birding community. But the leadership of the national group is refusing to change.  -- Announcing our next Living on Earth Book Club event! “Soil: The Story of a Black Mother's Garden” with Camille T. Dungy, on April 26th at 7 p.m. ET. Learn more and sign up at loe.org/events. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Jacqui Just Chatters
Chatting with Eve Simon about being a GenXer and grief part 1

Jacqui Just Chatters

Play Episode Play 35 sec Highlight Listen Later Mar 23, 2023 29:31


Warning, this episode has adult language and includes the sensitive topic of grief. Gen X expert (because she is one) Eve Simon's joins me to talk about the 80s, bacon, adventures in college, technology, and the passing of her father in the last year. Eve touched me with her honesty about facing death and the grief that comes after. Our conversation gets very personal about heartache and how different people deal with grief. Who is Eve Simon? She is a lapsed Philosophy major with an MFA in theatrical lighting design and 27 years of experience in the web design industry, Eve is the executive producer & host of GenX Stories, a podcast about how the lost generation found itself. If that's not enough, by day she is the founder & chief storyteller at Eve Simon Creative, working with small business and agency clients on web design, user experience consulting and other content design projects. Over her career, she has collaborated with exciting brands like The League of Women Voters, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The Huffington Post, The Nature Conservancy, Habitat for Humanity, Orbitz Worldwide, National Trust for Historic Preservation, ALS Association, Ad Council, National Audubon Society, and AOL. She has also spoken at major conferences, including a plenary Ignite talk about her unusual background and three times at South by Southwest Interactive in Austin. Check out Eve's award-winning podcast here –  The GenX Stories PodcastGenX Stories FB group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/GenXstoriesFind her articles referenced in the podcast here –I self isolated for 22 weeks, and all I got was this lousy pandemic. And spies. | by Eve Simon | MediumThanks, Pandemic.. It's been a year since COVID-19 shut… | by Eve Simon | MediumThe problem with caring. Let me apologize before I even write a… | by Eve Simon | Medium Spy video - Not like I've been watching or anything …#rearwindow #neighborhoodspie... | TikTok Connect with Eve:IG: https://www.instagram.com/naieve/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/evesimon/evehsimon@gmail.com Share your thoughts and feelings about grief over at my FBpage. – Jacqui Lents - Author | Facebook#grief  #overcominggrief #evesimon #jacquilents #cancer #80s #genxstories #jacquijustchatters #technology #stories #podcast #podcastcommunity #genx #spies #covid  #parentsThanks to:Ratatouille's Kitchen - Carmen María and Edu Espinalfound's Always - Nesrality Other music: a leaf on the wind - Lexin Musicepic dramatic action trailer - QubeSoundsEmily Clarke for the creation of my logo.

Jacqui Just Chatters
Chatting with Eve Simon about being a GenXer and grief part 2

Jacqui Just Chatters

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 23, 2023 33:39


Warning, this episode has adult language and includes the sensitive topic of grief. Gen X expert (because she is one) Eve Simon's joins me to talk about the 80s, bacon, adventures in college, technology, and the passing of her father in the last year. Eve touched me with her honesty about facing death and the grief that comes after. Our conversation gets very personal about heartache and how different people deal with grief. Who is Eve Simon? She is a lapsed Philosophy major with an MFA in theatrical lighting design and 27 years of experience in the web design industry, Eve is the executive producer & host of GenX Stories, a podcast about how the lost generation found itself. If that's not enough, by day she is the founder & chief storyteller at Eve Simon Creative, working with small business and agency clients on web design, user experience consulting and other content design projects. Over her career, she has collaborated with exciting brands like The League of Women Voters, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, The Huffington Post, The Nature Conservancy, Habitat for Humanity, Orbitz Worldwide, National Trust for Historic Preservation, ALS Association, Ad Council, National Audubon Society, and AOL. She has also spoken at major conferences, including a plenary Ignite talk about her unusual background and three times at South by Southwest Interactive in Austin. Check out Eve's award-winning podcast here –  The GenX Stories PodcastGenX Stories FB group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/GenXstoriesFind her articles referenced in the podcast here –I self isolated for 22 weeks, and all I got was this lousy pandemic. And spies. | by Eve Simon | MediumThanks, Pandemic.. It's been a year since COVID-19 shut… | by Eve Simon | MediumThe problem with caring. Let me apologize before I even write a… | by Eve Simon | Medium Spy video - Not like I've been watching or anything …#rearwindow #neighborhoodspie... | TikTok Connect with Eve:IG: https://www.instagram.com/naieve/LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/evesimon/evehsimon@gmail.comShare your thoughts and feelings about grief over at my FBpage. – Jacqui Lents - Author | Facebook#grief  #overcominggrief #evesimon #jacquilents #cancer #80s #genxstories #jacquijustchatters #technology #stories #podcast #podcastcommunity #genx #spies #covid  #parentsThanks to:Ratatouille's Kitchen - Carmen María and Edu Espinalfound's Always - Nesrality Other music: a leaf on the wind - Lexin Musicepic dramatic action trailer - QubeSoundsEmily Clarke for the creation of my logo.

Main Street Moxie
Episode 28: Jenny Hansell

Main Street Moxie

Play Episode Play 40 sec Highlight Listen Later Mar 20, 2023 50:22


Jenny's moxie is like a snowball that keeps getting bigger! She adds a bit more moxie with every opportunity and experience she encounters. She has worked to improve the lives of others in ways that use her skills and talents while also getting out of her comfort zone and building her own capacities as well as those of the organizations and communities she serves. Having amassed a wealth of knowledge and expertise, Jenny believes in sharing what she has learned with others to help them find their own version of moxie.Jenny is President of Berkshire Natural Resources Council, a county-wide land conservation organization in Western Massachusetts. Since joining the organization in 2018, Jenny has more than doubled the size of the staff to focus more broadly on strategic land conservation goals addressing climate resiliency, habitat protection, and public access; developed a new focus on farmland and ensuring farmers have access to affordable land; and worked to ensure that people from all backgrounds and abilities feel welcome and can enjoy and appreciate the Outdoors.In 2001, Jenny became the Executive Director at the North East Community Center based in Millerton, NY, and serving Eastern Dutchess County and nearby communities in Connecticut. She developed a small village-based organization into a county-wide leader in food security, youth development, and transportation.Before moving to Sharon, CT in 1998, she lived in New York City, where she spent nearly ten years at Creative Arts Workshops for Kids, a grassroots organization that provided holistic, long-term programs and care for homeless and formerly homeless children and their families in East Harlem. While there, Jenny raised funds, developed tutoring programs, conducted art workshops, mentored and trained volunteers, and eventually served as their Executive Director. In 1997 she moved to Sesame Workshop (creators of Sesame Street) where she developed parenting content for the website and helped design the user interface.Jenny's career began at the National Audubon Society in New York; she then became the assistant director of the Council on the Environment of New York City (now known as GrowNYC), where she supported their initiatives in office waste reduction, community gardens, environmental education, and the well-known Greenmarket.She has served on many nonprofit boards; written theater, dance, and film reviews for regional publications; and is an accomplished painter of landscapes, portraits, and other subjects. Her work has been exhibited in the Berkshires and the Northampton, MA area.This episode is sponsored by Elyse Harney Real Estate and North East Ford.

One Life Radio Podcast
FURRY FRIDAY Maura Davies - Spring Storm Safety Tips, Yvette Stewart - Spring Bird Migration

One Life Radio Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 5, 2023


Maura Davies of the SPCA of Texas joins us for Furry, Furbulous Friday to give us some spring storm pet safety tips so we are prepared and our pets stay calm and secure through spring storms. Learn about storm safety on the SPCA of Texas website. Next, Yvette Stewart is back to tell us all about spring bird migration. Yvette Stewart is the Community Outreach Coordinator for Audubon Texas, the state branch of the National Audubon Society. Stewart explains how birds migrate in the spring, and how we all can experience, and even do our part, to help these birds get to their final destinations. Learn more about spring migration at tx.audubon.org, and follow them on instagram @audubontx.Thank you to our sponsors!enviromedica – The BEST probiotics on the planet!Children's Health Defense - Listen every Monday for News & Views with Mary Holland of CHD!KetoCon 2023 - join the world's largest gathering of health and wellness seekers, April 21st-23rd in Austin, TX. sunwarrior - Use the code OLR for 20% off your purchase!The Well Being JournalThorne - Get 20% off your order and free shipping!

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast
Three Cobb wrestlers are repeat state champions

Marietta Daily Journal Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 21, 2023 15:49


Heading into the 2023 traditional state wrestling championships at the Macon Coliseum, Cobb County had three wrestlers who were trying to win back-to-back titles. As of this past weekend, Hillgrove's Zion Rutledge, Kennesaw Mountain's Genevieve An and Lassiter's May Prado can now call themselves two-time state champions. After a bye in the first round, Rutledge, wrestling at 215 pounds, pinned Mountain View's Lex Hennebaul in the first period, beat North Cobb's with an 11-4 decision in the semifinals and then pinned South Forsyth's Cole Williams in the third period of the championship match to claim the title. Rutledge dominated the championship match, as he was up 11-3 in points when the fall occurred. An had been upset in the girls sectional tournament and finished third, and that may have provided enough incentive to take it to another level at state. In four matches in the 170-pound division she recorded four pins, which included two in the first period -- her opening match and then again in the final.  In the championship match, Mia Bernacki of Effingham County lasted only 1:31 into the match before An overpowered her to defend her championship. Prado followed a similar path. After a bye in the first round, she defended her title by recording three straight pins. Only the championship match made it past the first round. Prado was up 11-2 when she finished off Monroe Area's Te'yarah Lett in the second period, 3:47 into the match. In all Cobb came away with seven state champions, two runners-up and three third-place finishers. For a list of champions and top 3 finishers, please check out MDJ Online dot com. Comedian, actor and producer Joe Gatto is bringing shenanigans and antics to the Cobb Energy Performing Arts Centre on Thursday for his "Night of Comedy" tour. The former "Impractical Jokers" star, best known for his decade-long career in making America laugh, is on the road for his 40-city solo tour. From childhood stories as a Staten Island native to the realities of fatherhood, Gatto said attendees will hear it all. In December 2021, Gatto announced on social media that he was leaving "Impractical Jokers" for personal reasons.  Those who haven't seen truTV's hit TV show "Impractical Jokers", Gatto and his three childhood best friends Brian "Q" Quinn, James "Murr" Murray and Sal Vulcano challenge each other to perform outlandish dares in public. Since 2011, the hidden camera prank show chronicled the comedy troupe's overt interactions with strangers. Aside from Gatto's comedy tour, he also co-hosts the "Two Cool Moms" podcast with stand-up comedian Steve Byrne. Joe Gatto's "Night of Comedy" show at the  Cobb Galleria Performing Arts Centre will start Thursday  at 7 p.m. For more information or to purchase tickets, head over to Cobb Energy Centre dot com. The Atlanta Braves announced Friday the Gwinnett Stripers' coaching staff for the 2023 season, and joining the club will be former Pope standout Stevie Wilkerson. The 31-year-old Wilkerson, a Roswell native,  enters his first season with both Gwinnett and the Braves organization as he makes his professional coaching debut. Selected by Baltimore in the eighth round of the 2014 draft out of Clemson University, he played seven seasons in the Orioles organization from 2014-21, including 166 Major League games from 2018-21. Last season Stevie played for the Guadalajara Mariachis of the Mexican League, while also doing a brief stint with the Chicago Dogs of the American Association of Pro Baseball while on loan. With just over a month until the Mableton cityhood elections, south Cobb residents at a town hall Thursday night continued to complain they have more questions than answers about the fledgling city. The county-hosted event was the second town hall on cityhood in the last month, drawing a smaller, less rowdy crowd than a January meeting hosted by state Rep. David Wilkerson, D-Powder Springs. That was perhaps due to the billing of the event, pitched as a general question and answer session on Mableton rather than a rallying cry for the de-annexation movement. Still, de-annexation from the city continued to be a theme, with some residents calling for an outright do-over of the November referendum in which cityhood passed with 53% of the vote. Lisa Cupid, chairwoman of the Cobb Board of Commissioners, and Commissioner Monique Sheffield, who co-hosted the event, suggested they shared in the disgruntlement with the process. Thursday's event came the day after the county announced Governor Brian Kemp will not appoint a transition committee to lead talks with the county before the council is seated. Asked why Kemp made that decision, Cupid shrugged and said that's for him to answer. County Manager Jackie McMorris told the MDJ that without a transition committee, the county at present has no point of contact for the new city. The composition of the Cobb Board of Health  heard from Rachel Franklin, CDPH director of epidemiology on Thursday, about the state of various diseases in the county, including a concerning rise in congenital syphilis. Rachel Franklin told the board bad news about congenital syphilis and tuberculosis, but good news when it comes to flu, mpox (formerly known as monkeypox) and COVID-19. Congenital syphilis occurs when a pregnant person passes on her infection to their baby. Syphilis is curable with antibiotics. But if not detected, it can cause lasting damage. When passed from mothers to infants, it can cause babies to have a low birth weight, or result in stillbirth. Prior to 2021, there were a “couple dozen” cases statewide. In 2021, 93 babies were born with syphilis, Franklin said. About a dozen of those were in Cobb and Douglas counties, resulting in two stillbirths. The infections are especially affecting Hispanic and African-American populations, mostly due to a lack of pre-natal care. The Board of Commissioners recently allocated $3.67 million to a CDPH program, partnering with Wellstar, to provide prenatal care to uninsured women. The syphilis issue is part of a larger trend in increasing transmission of sexually transmitted infections, per Franklin. Areas in Cobb with higher HIV rates also see higher syphilis rates. Franklin added that her staff was alarmed to see, for the first time in more than 15 years, cases of young teen girls with primary and secondary syphilis. The board discussed working with community groups to spread awareness of the issue, and provide recommendations on preventing infection. Franklin said that tuberculosis is “not slowing down either.” CDPH has seen five cases this year. In 2022, there were 18 cases in Cobb. CDPH is working on identifying resources to help people who are infected. At least four red-tailed hawks, two red-bellied woodpeckers, and one difficult-to-spot brown creeper visited Smith-Gilbert Gardens on Saturday, where birding enthusiasts were ready with binoculars to spot them during the annual Great Backyard Bird Count. The international event is organized by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the National Audubon Society and Birds Canada during which anyone can submit data from their own bird watching. The data is used, according to the event's website, to “help scientists better understand global bird populations before one of their annual migrations.” The bird count is held over four days every February. This year, the count began Friday and continued through Yesterday. Smith-Gilbert Gardens, off Pine Mountain Road in Kennesaw, joined the international citizen science event Friday and Saturday by providing guided tours and bird identification tools to visitors. Participants, most of them avid birders, walked around the garden grounds, listening, watching, and recording their findings on their phones. #CobbCounty #Georgia #LocalNews      -            -            -            -            -            The Marietta Daily Journal Podcast is local news for Marietta, Kennesaw, Smyrna, and all of Cobb County.             Subscribe today, so you don't miss an episode! MDJOnline            Register Here for your essential digital news.            https://www.chattahoocheetech.edu/  https://cuofga.org/ https://www.esogrepair.com/ https://www.drakerealty.com/           Find additional episodes of the MDJ Podcast here.             This Podcast was produced and published for the Marietta Daily Journal and MDJ Online by BG Ad Group   For more information be sure to visit https://www.bgpodcastnetwork.com              See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.