Podcasts about National Audubon Society

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  • 97PODCASTS
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  • May 11, 2022LATEST
National Audubon Society

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Best podcasts about National Audubon Society

Latest podcast episodes about National Audubon Society

Earth to Humans!
BEST OF: Dr. Sylvia F***ing Earle!

Earth to Humans!

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 86:20


While Sarinah and Hannah are on vacation, we decided to rebroadcast one of our "best of" episodes with Dr. Sylvia Earle, you'll understand why in a minute... Close your eyes, and picture yourself underwater. See the light sway above you, as it gets darker and darker the further down you go. Welcome to the deep waters of the ocean, a place where today's guest has spent a considerable part of her life, swimming alongside the ocean's many flora and fauna. Dr Sylvia Earle is an icon in marine biology and ocean conservation and has been featured in popular documentaries like Seaspiracy, Mission Blue and Chasing Ice. She has won many awards and accolades including the Carl Sagan Award for Public Understanding of Science, the National Audubon Society's Rachel Carson Award, and has authored more than 150 publications including a new book alongside National Geographic called Ocean: A Global Odyssey.She's also the first woman to walk on the ocean floor.The team here at Earth to Humans is a HUGE fan of Dr. Earle and her work and we've had a hard time containing our excitement in anticipation of this episode's release. We talk octopus intelligence, empathy in science and reasons why there is still so much reason to hope (even though everything seems really f@$%ed). She thinks we humans can overcome the mountain of our environmental negligence, and after this interview, we might be inclined to believe her. Join private conversations with top authors and access exclusive bonus content! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Main Street
"A Dusty Echo" ~ Audubon's Marshall Johnson ~ Bird Flu ~ Teacher Wendy Grote

Main Street

Play Episode Listen Later May 11, 2022 52:59


Wednesday, May 11, 2022 - A Dusty Echo is a true North Dakota story. It won the 1976 North Dakota Bicentennial Playwriting Contest, and it's written by Bismarck native Ev Miller. It focuses on a struggling family farm during the Dust Bowl. Alicia Hegland-Thorpe visits with director Amanda Perry and cast member Patrick Engelhart. A Dusty Echo opens tomorrow at Dakota Stage in Bismarck. ~~~ In an excerpt from the Prairie Pulse television show, John Harris visits with Marshall Johnson, the National Audubon Society's chief conservation officer, who's based here in North Dakota. ~~~ Speaking of birds, the country is in the midst of one of the worst bird flu outbreaks in years. Millions of wild birds and poultry have died. William Brangham has more in this story from the PBS NewsHour. ~~~ Future Business Leaders of America is an organization devoted to inspiring and preparing students to become community and business minded leaders. And it sponsors competition between its chapters. Teacher Wendy Grote is about to retire, and she's doing so after leading her students of the Divide County High School FBLA chapter to 21 state championships!

Inwood Art Works On Air
Artist Spotlight with Steven Hansen

Inwood Art Works On Air

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2022 31:29


Steven Hansen specializes in working for nonprofit organizations and community projects around the U.S. His clients include NBCUniversal Publishing, Comcast, MetroBeat TV, Anythink Libraries, Open Library, The City of Denver, National Audubon Society, The Center for Digital Archeology, and Starbucks.He has also freelanced as a greeting card illustrator, an exhibition designer, and a user-experience reviewer for retail websites. Steve is also the creator of The Happiness Archive; which is a collection of stories, hacks and odd facts that make us happy. Get happy at www.happinessarchive.com

Land Ethic
#29 Whit Fosburgh

Land Ethic

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 18, 2022 61:35


Whit Fosburgh is the president and CEO of the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership, an organization dedicated to advancing America's legacy of conservation, habitat, and access to public lands.Prior to joining TRCP in 2010, Whit spent 15 years at Trout Unlimited. Additionally, he served as fisheries' director for the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, and was a wildlife specialist for the National Audubon Society. Whit grew up hunting and fishing in upstate New York and was a member of Team USA in the 1997 World Fly Fishing Championships. He has a BA in Government from Georgetown University and a Master's degree from the Yale University School of Forestry.We talked all about TRCP and their various areas of focus, from the Farm Bill, to the Colorado River, to Chronic Wasting Disease in deer species. Whit and the TRCP are keeping the spirit and vision of Theodore Roosevelt and the early American conservation movement alive by leveraging the voice of outdoor enthusiasts to influence policy.You can visit their website for more, sign up for their newsletter to stay informed on these issues, and consider a donation to help the cause.

Wild For Change
Episode 17: The National Audubon Society

Wild For Change

Play Episode Listen Later Mar 21, 2022 47:31


If you're a bird lover like me or a lover of nature, you are going to love today's podcast with Tykee James, Government Affairs Coordinator of The National Audubon Society.  The National Audubon Society is a nonprofit conservation organization that started in 1905.  It protects birds and the places they need, today and tomorrow. Audubon works throughout the Americas using science, advocacy, education, and on-the-ground conservation. Audubon believes in a world in which people and wildlife thrive. Birds play an important role in our ecosystems.  They help control pest populations, pollinate plants, and disperse seeds.  But bird populations are being threatened as our landscapes and climate is changing.  In a 2019 National Audubon Society report, it was estimated 2/3 of North American bird species will become vulnerable to extinction if global temperatures continue to rise.  Audubon experts also found an overlap between places that are important for birds' survival and where there are natural carbon stores.  Therefore, protecting bird habitats is equally important for fighting climate change, thus improving our shared quality of life.  As Tykee mentions in the podcast; “Where birds survive, people thrive.”Thomas Lovejoy, an American ecologist stated; “If you take care of birds, you take care of most of the environmental problems in the world.”  and the National Audubon Society is striving to do just that. In this @WildForChange podcast, we learn;How Tykee's path in high school led him to his position The National Audubon SocietyHow Tykee shares his love of birds with staff members on Capitol HillHow climate change is threatening bird populations The key strategies The National Audubon Society uses to maximize conservation efforts for birdsHow we can mitigate the threat of climate change for birds and ourselvesHow we can get involved with The National Audubon Society to make a difference for birds What urban areas are doing to help birds with the Lights Out ProgramWhat we can do to make our backyards more bird friendlyYou can learn more about Tykee James and his progressive movement for birds and wildlife conservation in his podcasts;https://www.wildlifeobservernetwork.com/podcasts/on-word-for-wildlifehttps://www.wildlifeobservernetwork.com/podcasts/brothers-in-birding

Banfield
Linda Evangelista opens up after botched surgery, birds fall from the sky in Mexico

Banfield

Play Episode Listen Later Feb 17, 2022


Linda Evangelista is an international cover girl who has graced Vogue 11 times. But after a botched procedure, she went into seclusion

The Creative Process · Seasons 1  2  3 · Arts, Culture & Society

Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

The Creative Process · Seasons 1  2  3 · Arts, Culture & Society

Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

The Backyard Naturalists
The Great Backyard Bird Count

The Backyard Naturalists

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 22, 2022 26:45


The Great Backyard Bird Count began in 1998 and quickly became one of The Backyard Naturalists favorite events and times of the year. Serving as a collaboration between the  National Audubon Society and Cornell's Ornithology Lab, the Great Backyard Bird Count is a community science project to collect data on wild birds, on an international basis. If you're  a first-timer or new to birdwatching, it's quite alright. Being a professional bird watcher certainly isn't a requirement to participate. Beginning bird admirers will find it easier by using the Merlin Bird ID app. Previous participants can consider using the eBird mobile app or the eBird website. Learn more about the Great backyard Bird Count via a free webinar February 16 at 2:00 p.m. EST. You can register for the webinar here. Connect with the Backyard Naturalists on the Web, Facebook and Instagram. Please visit and support our presenting sponsor, Backyard Birds at http://wwww.thebirdfoodstore.com. A mecca for bird lovers and bird watchers, Backyard Birds is an independent family-owned business located in Matthews, NC (next to Dairy Queen), just southeast of Charlotte. Thanks for listening to The Backyard Naturalists.  We hope you have a day filled with the wonders of nature. Get outside and take a walk on the wild side! Please don't forget to leave a 5-star review for The Backyard Naturalists podcast. Production services for The Backyard Naturalists podcast are provided by Downtown Podcasting. To start a conversation on how you can have a podcast, simply send an email to info@downtownpodcasting.com.

Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg
300. Marshall Johnson talks about the National Audubon Society's Conservation Ranching Initiative.

Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 20, 2022 33:26


On “Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg,” Dani talks with Marshal Johnson about the National Audubon Society's Conservation Ranching Initiative. The initiative is a market-based approach to grassland and bird conservation. A partnership between the Audubon Society and cattle ranchers promotes good land stewardship, grass-fed cattle and species conservation. A certification scheme empowers consumers to choose foods that are better for them and the planet.   While you're listening, subscribe, rate, and review the show; it would mean the world to us to have your feedback. You can listen to “Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg” wherever you consume your podcasts.

Science Friday
Omicron News, COVID Severity Questions, Bird Count. Jan 7 2022, Part 1

Science Friday

Play Episode Listen Later Jan 7, 2022 46:58


Omicron Variant Drives Winter COVID Surge The United States set a global record this week, recording roughly one million new coronavirus tests in a single day. The current surge in cases is mostly driven by Omicron. The highly contagious variant accounted for about 95% of new cases last week. And, to top it all off, tests are in short supply, the CDC changed its quarantine guidelines, and some schools have returned to remote learning. Virologist Angela Rasmussen joins Ira to help make sense of the latest deluge of Omicron news. Rasmussen is a research scientist at VIDO-InterVac, the University of Saskatchewan's vaccine research institute in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.   Is Omicron A Less Severe Variant Of COVID-19? Over the past few weeks, a common refrain has popped up in reports about the Omicron variant of COVID-19: The variant seems to be “less severe” than earlier forms of the virus. But as hospitals fill up with coronavirus patients and infections skyrocket, there's some context needed to understand what the full impact of a less-severe variant might be. An important recent discovery sheds light on the severity of the variant, finding that at least in hamsters, Omicron spares the lungs in a way earlier variants have not. This infection appears to be predominantly in the upper respiratory system, largely in the mouth, throat, and windpipe. But even though a fewer percentage of cases may experience severe disease than with earlier variants, the sheer volume may still threaten hospital capacities. Joining Ira to talk about the severity of the Omicron variant in the body is Dr. Michael Diamond, virologist, and immunologist at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Also joining the conversation to talk about Omicron's toll on the healthcare system is Dr. Saskia Popescu, infectious disease epidemiologist and infection prevention expert at the University of Arizona College of Public Health in Phoenix, Arizona.   How Christmas Bird Counts Help Shape Science This winter marks the 122nd annual Christmas Bird Count, a project of the National Audubon Society, which is self-described as the longest-running community science project in the country. What started as a few dozen volunteers in 1900 has grown to tens of thousands of birders, spreading out in 15-mile circles across the country to count every bird insight on one midwinter day. From this record, scientists can draw insights about everything from the abundance of species to how species' ranges are shifting from year-to-year and decade-to-decade. Ira talks to Audubon's bird count director Geoff LeBaron, and director of quantitative science Nicole Michel about the value of the annual community science project and some of their more joyful winter sightings. Plus, how the data provide clues to which birds are most likely to adapt as human habitat disruption and climate change continue.  

Q-90.1's The Environment Report
12/17/21 - Christmas Bird Count; Great Lakes Warming

Q-90.1's The Environment Report

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 20, 2021 3:25


The National Audubon Society is conducting its Christmas Bird Count, a long-term study published this year found the deep waters of the Great lakes are warming.

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 607 (12-13-21): A Winter Holidays History of Counting Birds

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to listen to episode audio (4:08).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments ImagesExtra Information Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 12-10-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of December 13, 2021.  This revised episode from December 2015 is part of a series this year of winter-related episodes. SOUNDS – 7 secThis week, the sound of Mallard ducks on a December day in Blacksburg, Va., is the call to explore the annual Christmas Bird Count, organized by the National Audubon Society.Since 1900, the Society has helped organize volunteers to hold local daylong bird counts between December 14 and January 5.  On any single day within that period, volunteer counters follow specific routes within a 15-mile diameter circle, counting every bird they see or hear.  The count provides a snapshot both of the species encountered and of the numbers of individuals within each species.  According to the Society, this effort is the “longest running community science bird project” in the United States, and it actually takes place now in over 20 countries in the Western Hemisphere.  The results of such a long-term inventory help show the status of bird populations and the impacts of changes in habitat, climate, and other environmental conditions. Of course, birds living around water and wetlands are part of the annual count; in fact, the Audubon Society's founding in the late 1800s was due largely to concerns over commercial use of plumes from egrets and other wading birds.  [Additional note, not in audio: This refers to the founding in 1896 of the Massachusetts Audubon Society, the first state-level affiliate of the National Audubon Society, founded in 1905.  For more information on this history, see the Extra Information section below.] So what kinds of water-related birds might Virginia Christmas bird counters find?  Have a listen for about 20 seconds to this sample of four possible species.SOUNDS - 23 secThe Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs are among the many water-related birds that inhabit parts of Virginia during winter, including shorebirds, ducks, herons, and lots of others.  Keeping track of these and other feathered Virginia winter residents is a holiday tradition for many Commonwealth citizens with patience, binoculars, and attentive eyes and ears.Thanks to Lang Elliott for permission to use the eagle, kingfisher, gull, and yellowlegs sounds, from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs. Here's hoping that Virginia's Christmas bird counters find good variety and high numbers this year.  We close with a U.S. Fish and Wildfire Service recording of another Virginia water-related winter resident, the Common Loon, a species that some diligent coastalVirginia counter might spot or hear on a winter day or night. SOUNDS - ~6 sec SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Ben Cosgrove for his version of “Shenandoah” to open and close this episode.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 294, 12-14-15. The Mallard sounds were recorded by Virginia Water Radio at the Virginia Tech Duck Pond in Blacksburg on December 10, 2015. The sounds of the Bald Eagle, Belted Kingfisher, Ring-billed Gull, and Greater Yellowlegs were taken from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern RegionCD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott, whose work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The Common Loon sounds were taken from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife National Digital Library, http://digitalmedia.fws.gov/cdm/; the specific URL for the loons recording was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/audio/id/57/rec/1, as of 12-13-21. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (2 min./22 sec.) of the “Shenandoah” arrangement/performance by Ben Cosgrove that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Cosgrove is available online at http://www.bencosgrove.com. IMAGES Mallards (several males, plus one female on right) on Virginia Tech Duck Pond, Blacksburg, December 10, 2015.Great Blue Heron in a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 16, 2021.Canada Geese beside a stormwater pond near the Virginia Tech Inn and Alumni Center in Blacksburg, December 11, 2021. EXTRA INFORMATION On Bird Counts Another nationwide count is the Great Backyard Bird Count, held each February and organized by Audubon, the Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, and Birds Canada.  This count calls on volunteers to watch birds for 15 minutes or more, at least once over four days (February 18-21 in 2022), and record the species and numbers of all the birds seen or heard.  Its results also contribute to large-scale and long-term understanding of bird species distribution and health.  For more information, visit http://gbbc.birdcount.org/.On Audubon Society History and Waterbirds “Outrage over the slaughter of millions of waterbirds, particularly egrets and other waders, for the millinery trade led to the foundation, by Harriet Hemenway and Mina Hall, of the Massachusetts Audubon Society in 1896.  By 1898, state-level Audubon Societies had been established in Pennsylvania, New York, New Hampshire, Illinois, Maine, Wisconsin, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Ohio, Indiana, Tennessee, Minnesota, Texas, and California. ...In 1901, state-level Audubon groups joined together in a loose national organization....  In 1905, the National Audubon Society was founded, with the protection of gulls, terns, egrets, herons, and other waterbirds high on its conservation priority list.” – National Audubon Society, “History of Audubon and Science-based Bird Conservation, online at http://www.audubon.org/content/history-audubon-and-waterbird-conservation.On Loon Calls in Winter“Generally loons are silent on the wintering grounds, but occasionally on a quiet winter night one will hear their primeval, tremulous yodel.” – Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay (Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006), p. 285.“All calls can be heard in migration and winter, but compared to the breeding season, they are uncommon.” – Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and American Ornithologists' Union, “Birds of North America Online/Common Loon/Sounds,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/species/comloo/cur/sounds (subscription required for access to this Web site). SOURCES Used in Audio Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home (subscription required for this site). Alice Jane Lippson and Robert L. Lippson, Life in the Chesapeake Bay, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2006. National Audubon Society, online at http://www.audubon.org/. National Audubon Society, “Christmas Bird Count,” online at http://www.audubon.org/conservation/science/christmas-bird-count. Kathy Reshetiloff, “Listen for the haunting call of loons on Bay's frigid winter waters,” Bay Journal, 12/8/14, updated 3/31/20. Chandler S. Robbins et al. A Guide to Field Identification of Birds of North America, St. Martin's Press, New York, 2001. Stan Tekiela, Birds of Virginia Field Guide, Adventure Publications, Inc., Cambridge, Minn., 2002. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):Fish and Wildlife Information Service, online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/.The Bald Eagle entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040093&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Belted Kingfisher entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040220&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Ring-billed Gull entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040170&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Greater Yellowlegs entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040130&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974.The Common Loon entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040001&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18974. For More Information about Birds in Virginia or Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online athttps://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird.  Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds” and “Weather/Climate/Natural Disasters” subject categories. Following are links to several other winter-related episodes, including episodes on some birds that reside in Virginia typically only in winter (listed separately).  Please note that some of these episodes are being redone in late 2021 and early 2022; in those cases, the respective links below will have information on the updated episodes. Frost – Episode 597, 10-4-21.Freezing and ice – Episode 606, 12-6-21 (especially for grades K-3).Ice on ponds and lakes – Episode 404, 1-22-18 (especially for grades 4-8).Ice on rivers – Episode 406, 2-5-18 (especially for middle school grades).Polar Plunge®for Special Olympics – Episode 356, 2-20-17.Snow physics and chemistry – Episode 407, 2-12-18 (especially for high school grades).Snow, sleet, and freezing rain – Episode 461, 2-25-19.Snow terms – Episode 300, 1-25-16.Surviving freezing – Episode 556, 12-21-20.Winter precipitation and water supplies – Episode 567, 3-8-21.Winter weather preparedness – Episode 605, 11-29-21.Water thermodynamics – Episode 195, 1-6-14. Bird-related Episodes for Winter American Avocet – Episode 543, 9-21-20.Brant (goose) – Episode 502, 12-9-19.Canvasback (duck) – Episode 604, 11-22-21.&l

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Earth to Humans!
Dr. Sylvia F***ing Earle!

Earth to Humans!

Play Episode Listen Later Dec 8, 2021 85:01


Close your eyes, and picture yourself underwater. See the light sway above you, as it gets darker and darker the further down you go. Welcome to the deep waters of the ocean, a place where today's guest has spent a considerable part of her life, swimming alongside the ocean's many flora and fauna. Dr Sylvia Earle is an icon in marine biology and ocean conservation and has been featured in popular documentaries like Seaspiracy, Mission Blue and Chasing Ice. She has won many awards and accolades including the Carl Sagan Award for Public Understanding of Science, the National Audubon Society's Rachel Carson Award, and has authored more than 150 publications including a new book alongside National Geographic called Ocean: A Global Odyssey.She's also the first woman to walk on the ocean floor.The team here at Earth to Humans is a HUGE fan of Dr. Earle and her work and we've had a hard time containing our excitement in anticipation of this episode's release. We talk octopus intelligence, empathy in science and reasons why there is still so much reason to hope (even though everything seems really f@$%ed). She thinks we humans can overcome the mountain of our environmental negligence, and after this interview, we might be inclined to believe her. Join private conversations with top authors and access exclusive bonus content! See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE
RON TIPTON - The Appalachian Trail

WILDERNESS AND WILDLIFE

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 16, 2021 31:47


Ron Tipton has spent most of the past 40 years as an advocate for public land preservation, national park protection and for the Appalachian Trail. A graduate of the George Washington U. National Law Center, from 1978 to 2013 he was part of the advocacy and/or management team of four conservation organizations: The Wilderness Society, National Audubon Society, World Wildlife Fund, and National Parks Conservation Association. (NPCA)  From 2013 to the end of 2017 Ron served as the President & CEO of the Appalachian Trail Conservancy and greatly expanded its fundraising, increasing its annual budget from $6.4 million to nearly $10 million. Ron led a staff & board process that focused on continuing to provide a high quality hiking experience for increasing numbers of hikers on the Appalachian Trail; protecting the landscape surrounding the 2,190  mile Trail. Ron retired from ATC at the end of 2017 and joined its Partnership Board in 2020.ForTo hear more of these interviews with wildlife advocates, go to our website: js-wilderness.comSupport the show (https://www.patreon.com/user?u=25149153)

Wildlife Observer Network
Brothers in Birding | Vesper Martini/Sparrow | Episode 9

Wildlife Observer Network

Play Episode Listen Later Nov 1, 2021 79:26


Still finding their cadence, the brother return to share levity, wisdom, and ketchup with what's been going on since Episode 8: Parent life update, birding festivals, lifers, James Bond, new punk album release, Audubon for All (union at National Audubon Society), and dogs on leashes. Credits: Executive Producer: Tony Croasdale; Audio Production: Tykee James; WON Artwork: Robin Irizarry; WON Stinger by Alexander Jenson (music by His Hero is Gone) Help our reach by rating us where you're listening to Wildlife Observer Network and sharing this episode on social media We have Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram! Please support our creativity with monthly payments through Anchor or Patreon. Or you can make a one-time contribution on our website. You can also help us right now by giving us a rating and sharing this episode on social media so your family, friends, and followers know you're a part of the Wildlife Observer Community. Want to become a contributor? Email us: urbanwildlifecast@gmail.com https://anchor.fm/wildlife-observer-network https://www.patreon.com/WildlifeObserverNetwork --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/wildlife-observer-network/support

Ripple Effect
69: Water for the Lake

Ripple Effect

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 28, 2021 39:41


Marcelle Shoop, Saline Lakes Program Director for the National Audubon Society, brings welcome news of legal efforts to find a means of bringing water to the Great Salt Lake. The National Audubon Society with working partners Rio Tinto Kennecott, Central Utah Water Conservancy District, Division of Wildlife Resources, received authorization to bring almost 20,000 acre feet of water to the Lake.

Mongabay Newscast
Indigenous bioacoustics: listening to the land for conservation and tradition

Mongabay Newscast

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 27, 2021 42:09


Indigenous-led conservation initiatives are being aided by the growing field of bioacoustics, with many communities around the world creating listening networks that monitor their lands and help them advocate for their conservation. We speak with two Indigenous leaders and scientists on this episode -- Stephanie Thorassie of the Seal River Watershed Alliance in Manitoba, and Angela Waupochick, a researcher of forested wetlands for Menominee Tribal Enterprises in Wisconsin -- about their projects and how bioacoustics techniques are aiding them.  We hear sound clips of bears and birds shared by Waupochick and also Jeff Wells of the National Audubon Society, which  partners with the Seal River Watershed Alliance to study the region's importance to wildlife toward establishing a new, 12-million-acre Indigenous Protected Area. Further reading: • ”Indigenous-managed lands found to harbor more biodiversity than protected areas” • Canada working towards new future for Indigenous-led conservation (Indigenous Protected Areas) Please invite your friends to subscribe to the Mongabay Newscast wherever they get podcasts, or download our free app in the Apple App Store or in the Google Store to get access to our latest episodes at your fingertips. If you enjoy the Newscast, please visit www.patreon.com/mongabay to pledge a dollar or more to keep the show growing, Mongabay is a nonprofit media outlet and all support helps! See all our latest news from nature's frontline at Mongabay's homepage: news.mongabay.com or find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram by searching for @mongabay. Episode artwork: Polar bears at the mouth of the Seal River. Photo by Jordan Melograna of the Indigenous Leadership Initiative.   Please share your thoughts and ideas! submissions@mongabay.com.

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

“The history of Earth Day is pretty remarkable. The net result is 20 million people came out on the streets. It remains the largest civic day of action in human history. There's no other country, no other world that ever had 20 million people coming out on the streets around a single issue. That was on April 22, 1970, and right after that, it became apparent with that many people that Congress and State legislators had to do something about it because, frankly, they were afraid of that many people all speaking in one voice.The philosophy of Earth Day is very much about building a big movement, making sure it's diverse, constantly improving the ways that people access information, and have access to mechanisms for legal relief.Over the course of the next couple of decades it became year-round, it went international. This organization now works 365 days a year. At this point, we're in 192 countries with about a billion people participating, so we take advantage of that bully pulpit to really educate people about critical issues.”Kathleen Rogers is the President of EARTHDAY.ORG. Under her leadership, it has grown into a global year-round policy and activist organization with an international staff. She has been at the vanguard of developing campaigns and programs focused on diversifying the environmental movement, highlighted by Campaign for Communities and Billion Acts of Green. Prior to her work at EARTHDAY.ORG, Kathleen held senior positions with the National Audubon Society, the Environmental Law Institute, and two U.S. Olympic Organizing Committees. She's a graduate of the University of California at Davis School of Law, where she served as editor-in-chief of the law review and clerked in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.· www.oneplanetpodcast.org "Rebirth" by Juan Sánchez is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Kathleen Rogers is the President of EARTHDAY.ORG. Under her leadership, it has grown into a global year-round policy and activist organization with an international staff. She has been at the vanguard of developing campaigns and programs focused on diversifying the environmental movement, highlighted by Campaign for Communities and Billion Acts of Green. Prior to her work at EARTHDAY.ORG, Kathleen held senior positions with the National Audubon Society, the Environmental Law Institute, and two U.S. Olympic Organizing Committees. She's a graduate of the University of California at Davis School of Law, where she served as editor-in-chief of the law review and clerked in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia.· www.oneplanetpodcast.org






This interview is the first in our new One Planet Podcast series, which is available both on The Creative Process and on its own channel from the end of March. The podcast features environmental groups and notable changemakers from around the world, including European Environment Agency, Citizens' Climate Lobby, EarthLife Africa, One Tree Planted, Global Witness, Earth System Governance Project, Marine Stewardship Council, National Council for Climate Change, Sustainable Development and Public Leadership, Association des Amis de la Nature, Forest Stewardship Council, Polar Bears International, and many others.Episodes feature a host of ways you can take action and get involved in local or international environmental movements so that we can work together for a better tomorrow.· "Rebirth" by Juan Sánchez is licensed under a Creative Commons License.

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

"I came to conservation as a lover of nature, as a young girl growing up outside of Boston, Massachusetts. We just had a tiny backyard. But I was enthralled by whatever lived there from a very early age. So I kept up with my love of nature all through life by the same path that I was also going on in theater for the most part. And later film. And conservation came out of my love for animals because it became clear in the 70s, about fifty years ago, that there were many species that were beginning their decline and continue to do so today."Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

Sustainability, Climate Change, Politics, Circular Economy & Environmental Solutions · One Planet Podcast

Jane Alexander is an actress, writer, and conservationist. She chaired the National Endowment for the Art from 1993-1997. A Tony Award winner and member of the Theatre Hall of Fame, Alexander has performed in more than a hundred plays. Her long film career includes four Academy Award nominations, for The Great White Hope, All The President's Men, Kramer vs. Kramer, and Testament. She has been honored with two Emmys, for Playing for Time and Warm Springs. Alexander was a Trustee of the Wildlife Conservation Society, a board member of the American Bird Conservancy, the American Birding Association, and a Commissioner of New York State Parks. She sits on the board of the National Audubon Society, the Global Advisory Group of Bird Life International, and the Conservation Council of Panthera. In 2012 the Indianapolis Prize inaugurated the Jane Alexander Global Wildlife Ambassador Award, with Alexander as its first recipient.· www.creativeprocess.info

Always Be Birdin'
The Fight For Equity: Defenders United and Audubon For All on Unionizing

Always Be Birdin'

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 28, 2021 62:22


It's been a while, but, we're back with the first episode of the second year of the Always Be Birdin' podcast with a vengeance. In episodes past, I called attention to the National Audubon Society article in Politico where there was accusations of racism, sexism and retaliation within the organization and I asked why isn't anyone talking more about this seeing as National Audubon is considered THE go to for all things conservation and birds.  This episode has been and remains to be my most downloaded episode, but what's changed? Since then, third party law firm, Morgan & Lewis put out their findings which called for a redistribution of power, the Union, Audubon for All, was birthed and the then Executive Director, David Yarnold, has left the organization. Other non-profit environmental organizations such as Defenders of Wildlife have followed suit and are also unionizing.   Today I bring back two of my favorite people and past guests, Rosie Sanchez of Defenders of Wildlife and Tykee James of National Audubon, to address the question... "why unionize?" Both Rosie and Tykee talk details of where both organizations are at (neither union has been voluntarily recognized) as well as highlight some of the ways you as listeners can help. We also get deep in conversation around what it truly means when the people in power positions refuse to listen to their workers, how that is a direct reflection on society as a whole and why it's important to dismantle white supremacy and fear for a better future for everyone. This episode is a call back to the discussion Rosie and I had in episode 8 and the issues I bring up about National Audubon in episode 9. Let's kick off year 2 of the podcast with a hard hitting BANG!--Support Audubon For All here :https://www.birdunion.org/https://www.instagram.com/audubonforall/Support Defenders United here :https://linktr.ee/DefendersUnitedhttps://www.instagram.com/defenders_staff/--Support the podcast by donating here :https://www.buymeacoffee.com/AlwaysBeBirdin 

Virginia Water Radio
Episode 590 (8-16-21): Osprey Rescue Reinforces Role of Fishing-line Recycling

Virginia Water Radio

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 16, 2021


CLICK HERE to  listen to episode audio (4:30).Sections below are the following: Transcript of Audio Audio Notes and Acknowledgments Images Sources Related Water Radio Episodes For Virginia Teachers (Relevant SOLs, etc.). Unless otherwise noted, all Web addresses mentioned were functional as of 8-16-21. TRANSCRIPT OF AUDIO From the Cumberland Gap to the Atlantic Ocean, this is Virginia Water Radio for the week of June 28, 2021.  This is a revised version of an episode from August 2013. MUSIC – ~11 sec – instrumental That's part of “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” an adaptation of a traditional tune called “Fisher's Hornpipe,” by Williamsburg musician Timothy Seaman on his 2004 album, “Virginia Wildlife.”  The music sets the stage for a “reel” story about fishing equipment and a summer bird of prey.  We start with a series of mystery sounds.  Have a listen for about 20 seconds, and see if you can guess how the first two sounds add up to the third. And here's a hint: misplaced line makes for a tangled, feathered fisher.SOUNDS - ~19 secIf you guessed, an Osprey running afoul of some fishing line, you're right!  You heard he call of an Osprey, or “Fish Hawk,”; the sound of fishing line, being reeled in; and part of a rescue of an Osprey chick stuck in fishing line.  The latter sound was taken from the “Osprey Cam,” the Chesapeake Conservancy's real-time video transmission from an Osprey nest on Kent Island, Maryland.  On July 29, 2013, the camera showed that one of that year's three chicks had gotten its legs caught in fishing line.  Some viewers of the bird's predicament went to the site, waded out to the nest with a ladder, and climbed up and disentangled the chick. Unwittingly, this lucky Osprey chick had starred in a documentary about the value of fishing-line recycling stations.  Birds, sea turtles, and other animals can get stuck in, or eat, improperly discarded fishing line, nets, or other plastic items.  Such material can also get caught in boat propellers or intakes.  Recycling programs for fishing line are one way to help reduce these threats.  Virginia began a statewide fishing-line recycling program in 2009, run jointly by the Department of Wildlife Resources—formerly the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries—and the Marine Resources Commission.  Recycling is now available at many boat ramps, parks, and marinas, as well as at some outdoor-equipment businesses.  At those locations, anglers can look for the distinctive plastic tubes with a curved top, and help put plastic back to use, instead of on a beak or fin. Thanks to Lang Elliot and the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs, to Timothy Seaman, and to the Chesapeake Conservancy, respectively, for permission to use this week's sounds of an Osprey, fishing line, and the Osprey chick rescue.  Thanks also to Mr. Seaman for this week's music, and we close with about 20 more seconds of “Bass Fisherman's Reel.” MUSIC – ~20 sec – instrumental SHIP'S BELL Virginia Water Radio is produced by the Virginia Water Resources Research Center, part of Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources and Environment.  For more Virginia water sounds, music, or information, visit us online at virginiawaterradio.org, or call the Water Center at (540) 231-5624.  Thanks to Stewart Scales for his banjo version of Cripple Creek to open and close this show.  In Blacksburg, I'm Alan Raflo, thanking you for listening, and wishing you health, wisdom, and good water. AUDIO NOTES AND ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Virginia Water Radio episode revises and replaces Episode 175, 8-19-13.The Osprey call sounds were from the Stokes Field Guide to Bird Songs-Eastern Region CD set, by Lang Elliott with Donald and Lillian Stokes (Time Warner Audio Books, copyright 1997), used with permission of Lang Elliott.  Lang Elliot's work is available online at the “Music of Nature” Web site, http://www.musicofnature.org/. The fishing line sound and musical excerpt from “Bass Fisherman's Reel,” on the 2004 album “Virginia Wildlife,” is copyright Timothy Seaman and Pine Wind Music, used with permission.  More information about Timothy Seaman is available online at https://timothyseaman.com/en/.The sounds of the rescue of an Osprey chick caught in fishing line were taken from a video recorded by the Chesapeake Conservancy's “Osprey Cam,” available online at http://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/Osprey-Cam, used with permission.  For more information about the camera or the Conservancy, contact the Conservancy at 716 Giddings Avenue, Suite 42, Annapolis, Maryland 21401; phone (443) 321-3610; e-mail: info@chesapeakeconservancy.org. Click here if you'd like to hear the full version (1 min./11 sec.) of the “Cripple Creek” arrangement/performance by Stewart Scales that opens and closes this episode.  More information about Mr. Scales and the group New Standard, with which Mr. Scales plays, is available online at http://newstandardbluegrass.com. IMAGES Young Osprey in Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Virginia.  Photo by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), made available for public use by the USFWS' National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/12049/rec/9, as of 8-16-21.Osprey in flight, 2016 (location not identified).  Photo by Alvin Freund, made available for public use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's National Digital Library, online at http://digitalmedia.fws.gov.  The specific URL for this image was https://digitalmedia.fws.gov/digital/collection/natdiglib/id/17870/rec/11, as of 8-16-21.Fishing-line recycling container at South Holston Lake, Washington County, Virginia, April 15, 2013. SOURCES Used for Audio Boat US Foundation, online at https://www.boatus.org/clean-boating/recycling/fishing-line-recycling/. Chesapeake Conservancy, “Webcams/Osprey,” online at https://www.chesapeakeconservancy.org/ospreycam. Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation, “Commission, “Reel. Remove. Recycle – Don't Leave Your Line Behind,”online at https://mrrp.myfwc.com/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “All About Birds,” online at http://www.allaboutbirds.org.  The Osprey entry is online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/.  Video from an Osprey camera at Savannah, Georgia, is available online at https://www.allaboutbirds.org/cams/savannah-ospreys/. Outdoor News, “State Agencies Initiate Fishing Line Recycling Program,” 2/10/09. [Easton, Md.] Star Democrat, Osprey cam chick Ozzie is rescued, 8/7/13. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries):“Fish and Wildlife Information Service,” online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/; the Osprey entry is online at https://services.dwr.virginia.gov/fwis/booklet.html?&bova=040095&Menu=_.Taxonomy&version=18845; “Recycle Your Fishing Line” is online at https://dwr.virginia.gov/fishing/recycle-your-line/. Virginia Marine Resources Commission, “Introducing the Virginia Fishing Line Recycling Program,” online at https://mrc.virginia.gov/rec_assessment/VFLRP_AD.shtm. For More Information about Birds in Virginia and Elsewhere Chesapeake Bay Program, “Birds,” online at https://www.chesapeakebay.net/discover/field-guide/all/birds/all. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Birds of the World,” online at https://birdsoftheworld.org/bow/home(subscription required). Cornell University Lab of Ornithology, “Merlin Photo ID.”  The application for mobile devices allows users to submit a bird photograph to get identification of the bird. Information is available online at http://merlin.allaboutbirds.org/. Cornell University Lab of Ornithology and the Audubon Society, “eBird,” online at https://ebird.org/home.  Here you can find locations of species observations made by contributors, and you can sign up to contribute your own observations. National Audubon Society, online at https://www.audubon.org/. University of Michigan Museum of Zoology, “Animal Diversity Web,” online at https://animaldiversity.org/. Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources (formerly Department of Game and Inland Fisheries), “List of Native and Naturalized Fauna in Virginia, August 2020,” online (as a PDF) at https://dwr.virginia.gov/wp-content/uploads/virginia-native-naturalized-species.pdf. Virginia Society of Ornithology, online at http://www.virginiabirds.org/.  The Society is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study, conservation, and enjoyment of birds in the Commonwealth. Xeno-canto Foundation, online at http://www.xeno-canto.org/.  This site provides bird songs from around the world. RELATED VIRGINIA WATER RADIO EPISODES All Water Radio episodes are listed by category at the Index link above (http://www.virginiawaterradio.org/p/index.html).  See particularly the “Birds,” ‘Overall Importance of Water,” and “Recreation” subject categories. FOR VIRGINIA TEACHERS – RELATED STANDARDS OF LEARNING (SOLs) AND OTHER INFORMATION Following are some Virginia Standards of Learning (SOLs) that may be supported by this episode's audio/transcript, sources, or other information included in this post. 2020 Music SOLs SOLs at various grade levels that call for “examining the relationship of music to the other fine arts and other fields of knowledge.” 2018 Science SOLs Grades K-4: Living Systems and Processes2.5 – Living things are part of a system.4.3 – Organisms, including humans, interact with one another and with the nonliving components in the ecosystem. Grades K-5: Earth ResourcesK.11 – Humans use resources.1.8 – Natural resources can be used responsibly, including that most natural resources are limited; human actions can affect the availability of natural resources; and reducing, reusing, and recycling are ways to conserve natural resources.3.8 – Natural events and humans influence ecosystems.4.8 – Virginia has important natural resources. Grade 66.9 – Humans impact the environment and individuals can influence public policy decisions related to energy and the environment. Life ScienceLS.9 – Relationships exist between ecosystem dynamics and human activity. Earth ScienceES.6 – Resource use is complex.ES.8 – Freshwater resources influence and are influenced by geologic processes and human activity. BiologyBIO.8 – Dynamic equilibria exist within populations, communities, and ecosystems, including that natural events and human activities influence local and global ecosystems and may affect the flora and fauna of Virginia. 2015 Social Studies SOLs Civics and Economics CourseCE.3 – Citizenship rights, duties, and responsibilities.CE.7 – Government at the state level.CE.10 – Public policy at local, state, and national levels. Government CourseGOVT.8 – State and local government organization and powers.GOVT.9 – Public policy process at local, state, and national levels.Virginia's SOLs are available from the Virginia Department of Education, online at http://www.doe.virginia.gov/testing/. Following are links to Water Radio episodes (various topics) designed especially for certain K-12 grade levels. Episode 250, 1-26-15 – on boiling, for kindergarten through 3rdgrade.Episode 255, 3-2-15 – on density, for 5th and 6th grade.Episode 282, 9-21-15 – on living vs. non-living, for kindergarten.Episode 309, 3-28-16 – on temperature regulation in animals, for kindergarten through 12th grade.Episode 333, 9-12-16 – on dissolved gases, especially dissolved oxygen in aquatic habitats, for 5thgrade.Episode 403, 1-15-18 – on freezing and ice, for kindergarten through 3rd grade.Episode 404, 1-22-18 – on ice on ponds and lakes, for 4ththrough 8th grade.Episode 406, 2-5-18 – on ice on rivers, for middle school.Episode 407, 2-12-18 – on snow chemistry and physics, for high school.

music relationships university game world education college water state video zoom living tech research society government foundation public environment dark fish maryland normal web natural md rain birds humans ocean cd snow rescue citizens agency stream commission fishing priority biology native remove environmental bay images dynamic grade bio resource suite recreation recycling index citizenship commonwealth processes menu pond arial reel signature virginia tech scales accent atlantic ocean life sciences govt natural resources williamsburg msonormal compatibility colorful annapolis times new roman ls sections civics watershed organisms zoology freshwater calibri chesapeake ozzie taxonomy seaman policymakers earth sciences osprey wildlife service new standard acknowledgment washington county conservancy wildlife conservation cambria math ornithology style definitions worddocument xeno saveifxmlinvalid ignoremixedcontent punctuationkerning breakwrappedtables dontgrowautofit trackmoves trackformatting lidthemeother snaptogridincell wraptextwithpunct useasianbreakrules lidthemeasian x none mathpr latentstyles deflockedstate msonormaltable centergroup stormwater donotpromoteqf subsup undovr latentstylecount mathfont brkbin brkbinsub smallfrac dispdef lmargin defjc wrapindent rmargin intlim narylim ar sa virginia department defunhidewhenused defsemihidden defqformat defpriority lsdexception locked qformat semihidden unhidewhenused latentstyles table normal audubon society sols unwittingly bmp name title name normal name strong name emphasis name colorful shading name subtle reference name colorful list name intense reference name colorful grid name book title name default paragraph font name light shading accent name bibliography name subtitle name light list accent name toc heading name light grid accent name table grid name revision name placeholder text name list paragraph name no spacing name quote name light shading name intense quote name light list name dark list accent name light grid name colorful shading accent name medium shading name colorful list accent name medium list name colorful grid accent name medium grid name subtle emphasis name dark list name intense emphasis national audubon society cripple creek birdsongs hornpipe usfws florida fish living systems ebird grades k reinforces name e msohyperlink wildlife resources light accent dark accent colorful accent name list name plain text name date name table elegant name note heading name table professional name block text name table subtle name document map name table web name normal indent name balloon text name table theme name list bullet name normal web name plain table cumberland gap name list number name normal table name grid table light name closing name no list name outline list name grid table name signature name table simple name body text name table classic name body text indent name table colorful name list continue name table columns name list table name message header name table list name salutation name table 3d name table contemporary name body text first indent outdoor news kent island inland fisheries virginia society michigan museum all about birds audio notes tmdl lang elliott water center donotshowrevisions lang elliot virginia standards
The Librarian Linkover
Eliana Fenyes - Development Research Associate at National Audubon Society

The Librarian Linkover

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 9, 2021 16:33


Eliana Fenyes, Development Research Associate at National Audubon Society, discusses how she uses data AND research in her role.

Bird Sh*t Podcast
35: Let's Create a Bird Union with Audubon for All!

Bird Sh*t Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 30, 2021 50:30


We hope you're ready for some tea. The National Audubon Society is front and center of a lot of important conversations regarding race, inclusivity, and equality—both in the workplace and the great outdoors. In the past few months, the majority of Audubon's employees have declared that they want to form a union to protect employee's rights and have a seat at the table. Some Audubon employees have formed Audubon for All, the official name for the union at the National Audubon Society. But, sadly, they have run into some roadblocks with The Audubon Society's executive leadership, who still refuse to recognize the union. Cue the corporate bullsh*t. We sit down with Tykee James and Sharon Bruce, two Audubon Society employees and backers of Audubon for All. They share more about the union, their goals, their struggles, and the uneven playing field between the Audubon Society's executive leadership and on-the-ground employees.Plus, some listeners share what bird they would want to be and why!  BIRD SHIT WE DISCUSSEDUSEFUL RESOURCESFollow (and support!) the Audubon for All union on Instagram (@audubonforall) and Twitter. Make sure you sign their letter of support! You can also tweet @AudubonSociety and tell them to get it together. BIRDS WE MENTION (in order)• Barn Owl• American White Pelican• Common Raven• Chimney Swift• Carolina Wren• Emu• Cassowary• Black Hawk-Eagle• Golden Eagle• Loggerhead Shrike• Killdeer• Pigeons (always pigeons)Support the show (https://ko-fi.com/birdshitpodcast)

Impact: The Conservation Photography Podcast
All About Photography Mentorships - An Interview with Sabine Meyer of Audubon Magazine

Impact: The Conservation Photography Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 1, 2021 45:51


#075: We commonly talk about things like gear, settings, storytelling, pitching… all these important yet process-oriented topics around how to create images and get them out into the world.But one part of this field that isn't talked about nearly as frequently, and which is vitally important to success inside of conservation visual storytelling, is the topic of mentorship.This is a topic I'm frequently dipping into because inside of Wild Idea Lab, we tackle questions like:What does a mentorship look like?How do you find a mentor?What structure does a mentor-mentee relationship take once you find someone that you wanna be mentored by?And what are some of the dos and don'ts of being a really good mentee?This is because mentorship is a big, BIG part of finding success and growth. That's why I asked Sabine Meyer, Director of Photography at National Audubon Society and a Mentor in the upcoming Mentor Program at Conservation Visual Storytellers Academy, to talk with us about her philosophy around mentorship and her experiences in 30 years of working in visual storytelling. The way that Sabine thinks about mentorships is truly uplifting and helpful. You'll walk away from this episode with a wonderful outlook on what mentorship can do for you in your evolution as a photographer or filmmaker. Get the full show notes + links at JaymiH.com/75Never miss an episode by signing up at JaymiH.com/ImpactAre you subscribed to the podcast? If not, I’m excited to invite you to subscribe today. Not only do I unroll new episodes weekly, but I also add in a ton of bonus episodes (which you will likely miss out on if you aren't subscribed! Oh no!)If you love listening to the podcast, I’ll be so grateful if you leave me a review on iTunes. The reviews help others find me, and I also just love to hear from you! Just click here to review, select “Ratings and Reviews” and “Write a Review” Then, you’re off to the races! Let me know what it is you like best about the podcast. Thank you so much!

America's National Parks Podcast
Spring Migration in the Parks

America's National Parks Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later May 17, 2021 14:53


Point Reyes National Seashore has recorded more than 450 species of birds, including 38 that are threatened or endangered. There are multiple factors that make it such a popular and birdy destination. For one, it has many unique habitats that provide food and shelter, such as coastline, forest, wetland, and open fields. The park’s peninsula also juts out into the ocean, scooping migrants into the park as they travel along the coast. Due to these special features, the National Audubon Society has also named it an Important Bird Area.

Gund Institute Podcasts
Deeohn Ferris: Let's Talk About Race, Equity, Climate Adaptation and Driving Community Resiliency

Gund Institute Podcasts

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 28, 2021 57:28


The Institute for Sustainable Communities (ISC) leads equity-centered, transformative community-driven climate solutions and sustainability projects in the US, India, China, Bangladesh, and Southeast Asia. As the first African-American woman to lead a US-based international climate organization, president and CEO Deeohn Ferris is changing the landscape in a white male-led field. In this GundxChange talk, Ferris discusses equitable environmental, economic, social and health solutions in response to climate change driven natural disasters disproportionately affecting the prosperity and resiliency of low income and communities of color. To learn what's possible, visit www.sustain.org. Deeohn Ferris, President at ISC, is an environmental lawyer, racial and social justice practitioner, and systems change thought leader. She began her career at US EPA and became the first Director of Special Litigation in the enforcement office. As CEO of the Sustainable Community Development Group, she promoted equity, health, land use, and community resiliency best practices. Prior to ISC, Deeohn was the VP for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at the National Audubon Society, where she prompted organizational changes to broaden opportunities for people of color, women, youth, people with different abilities and of different cultures. Learn more about the Gund Institute: https://www.uvm.edu/gund​​​​​ Explore Gund events: https://www.uvm.edu/gund/events​​​​

NHISG Entertainment
G's Power Hour - Host Gretchen DS - NHISG Entertain - National Audubon Society

NHISG Entertainment

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 31:00


G's Power Hour - Host Gretchen DS - NHISG Entertain - National Audubon Society

The Daily Gardener
April 26, 2021 Zen Garden Ideas, John J. Audubon, Norah Lindsey, Carolina Growing Seasons, The Resilient Farm and Homestead by Ben Falk, and Charles Darwin’s Funeral

The Daily Gardener

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 26, 2021 20:21


Today we celebrate a man who is remembered for his contributions to art and ornithology. We'll also learn about a socialite, gardener, and garden designer whose story has been largely unappreciated. We’ll hear some thoughts on gardening in the Carolinas. We Grow That Garden Library™ with a book about resilient homesteading that incorporates an innovative approach to permaculture. And then we’ll wrap things up with the incredible behind-the-scenes story of the funeral of one of the world’s greatest scientific minds: Charles Darwin.   Subscribe Apple | Google | Spotify | Stitcher | iHeart To listen to the show while you're at home, just ask Alexa or Google to “Play the latest episode of The Daily Gardener Podcast.” And she will. It's just that easy.   The Daily Gardener Friday Newsletter Sign up for the FREE Friday Newsletter featuring: A personal update from me Garden-related items for your calendar The Grow That Garden Library™ featured books for the week Gardener gift ideas Garden-inspired recipes Exclusive updates regarding the show Plus, each week, one lucky subscriber wins a book from the Grow That Garden Library™ bookshelf.   Gardener Greetings Send your garden pics, stories, birthday wishes, and so forth to Jennifer@theDailyGardener.org   Curated News Zen Garden Ideas: Create Your Own Backyard Zen Garden | Garden Design | Janet Loughrey   Facebook Group If you'd like to check out my curated news articles and original blog posts for yourself, you're in luck. I share all of it with the Listener Community in the Free Facebook Group - The Daily Gardener Community. So, there’s no need to take notes or search for links. The next time you're on Facebook, search for Daily Gardener Community, where you’d search for a friend... and request to join. I'd love to meet you in the group.   Important Events April 26, 1785 Today is the birthday of the ornithologist, artist, and naturalist, John James Audubon, who was born in Santo Domingo, Haiti. John's folio series called “The Birds of America” featured 435 life-size color prints of American birds. And John’s favorite state for birding was Louisiana. Honored as the namesake of the National Audubon Society, his birthday, today (April 26th), was designated as National Audubon Day to commemorate his birth and work. In 2011, Google celebrated his birthday with a Google Doodle. It was John James Audobon who said, “In my deepest troubles, I frequently would wrench myself from the persons around me and retire to some secluded part of our noble forests.” He also said, "When the bird & the book disagree, believe the bird."   April 26, 1873 Today is the birthday of the British socialite and garden designer Norah Lindsay. After marrying Sir Harry Lindsay, Norah began gardening at their Manor home and garden in Oxfordshire called Sutton Courtenay - which was given to them as a wedding present from Harry’s cousin. Norah’s gardens overflowed with flowers, and she hosted regular parties and even masked balls at her estate, which also allowed her to show off her gardens. Norah recognized the powerful draw of gardens. She once described Sutten Courtenay as having a “shining quality,” writing, “some gardens, like some people, have a charm potent to enslave and yet as intangible as dew or vapour.” Although she adored Italian gardens, Norah’s gardens were not formal but rather romantic and wild, relaxed and gentle. She memorably told one gardener that she “loved lilies, lazily lolling.” Norah was influenced by William Robinson, an advocate for wild gardening, and Gertrude Jekyll, the English gardener, and writer. Like Jekyll, Norah designed her gardens with drifts of color and soft transitions. And although her gardens seemed effortless, there was a method to Norah’s approach to design. Norah had an intuitive sense of scale and impeccable taste in plants. Beautiful, charming, and witty, Norah was sadly not a writer. Her legacy lives on in many of the gardens she created and her only daughter Nancy - who also loved gardening and horticulture. The British gardener, garden designer, and landscape architect Russell Page referred to Norah in his book The Education of a Gardener, saying, "Norah Lindsay could by her plantings evoke all the pleasures of a flower garden. She captured the essence of midsummer... or gave the pith of autumn… She lifted herbaceous planting into a poetic category and gave it an air of rapture and spontaneity.” By the time Norah turned 51, her marriage and her bank account had both fallen flat. In a letter to a friend, Norah summed it up simply: "No husband, no money, no home." To provide for herself, Norah began designing gardens for her royal and wealthy friends - a career that would last for two decades. Norah’s friends and clients were writers, gardeners, old-Hollywood stars, and politicians - and included Edward, Prince of Wales, Waldorf and Nancy Astor, Charlie Chaplin, Marshall Field III, George Shaw, and Edith Wharton. And, thanks to her wealthy clients, Norah was able to garden all over Europe - which meant that she became adept at understanding different soils, growing zones, and spaces - modifying her designs to accommodate new challenges. One of Norah’s friends and clients was the Duke of Windsor. He once remarked, “If you had the money, she was the one to spend it.” Yet, surprisingly, Norah’s biographer wrote that Norah lived two very different lives. By night, she often dined with the rich and powerful. By day - starting at 5 am - Norah was in the garden with her garden crew. And when her long day of garden work was done, Norah took a train back home; she didn’t own a car. One particular friend of Norah’s worth noting was the estate owner, gardener, and garden designer Lawrence Johnston who went by Johnny. Johnny owned Hidcote Manor, “HID-cut,” and Norah helped him design the magnificent 10.5-acre garden there. Johnny was planning to leave Hidcote to Norah, but that plan was thwarted when Norah died unexpectedly at 75 - shortly after being diagnosed with kidney cancer. Once, when she was in the midst of her career, regularly buying plants for clients, Norah wrote to a friend, “When I die, Magnolia will be written on my heart.” Today many regret that Norah did not write books to document her work. Little remains outside of her personal letters that capture Norah’s charm, cleverness, and quick wit - and her fresh perspective on gardens and gardening. The American garden historian, Allyson Hayward, wrote an excellent biography of Norah in 2007 called Norah Lindsay: The Life and Art of a Garden Designer.   Unearthed Words In the Carolinas, there are two growing seasons: warm and cool.  The cool season runs from about October or November through April or May (depending on where you garden).  The warm season runs from May or June through September or October.  If you plan your Carolina garden around no other guiding principle than this, you will be well in front of people who don’t. ― Katie Elzer-Peters, Carolinas Fruit & Vegetable Gardening: How to Plant, Grow, and Harvest the Best Edibles   Grow That Garden Library The Resilient Farm and Homestead by Ben Falk This book came out in 2013, and the subtitle is An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach. In this book, Ben shares what he's learned gardening on a hill farm In Vermont Mad River Valley. Ben shares his incredible ingenuity and intelligent approach to working the land And restoring the biosphere. The author of A Sanctuary of Trees, Gene Logsdon, wrote this about Ben's book, “Grow rice in New England? Yes. Heat water to 155 degrees F on cold winter days at a rate of a gallon a minute by piping it through a compost pile? Yes. How about dinner tonight of your own rack of lamb garnished with homegrown mushrooms? Yes. Your choice of scores of different vegetables and fruits even in winter? Yes. Plus, your own dairy products from your own sheep. All the while, the soil producing this magic, on a site once thought little more than a wasteland, grows yearly more fertile and secure from natural calamity." An early adopter of permaculture principles, Ben is constantly testing ideas for better homesteading on his property in Vermont. Ben founded Whole Systems Design, LLC - a land-based response to biological and cultural extinction and the increasing separation between people and elemental things. So he’s a practitioner expert when it comes to permaculture. This book is 320 pages of Inspiring and practical advice to create your edible sanctuary and resilient landscape. You can get a copy of The Resilient Farm and Homestead by Ben Falk and support the show using the Amazon Link in today's Show Notes for around $25   Today’s Botanic Spark Reviving the little botanic spark in your heart April 26, 1882 On this day, the funeral for Charles Darwin was held at noon sharp at Westminster Abbey. Thousands attended it. The deputy organist at Westminster Abbey, John Frederick Bridge, felt Darwin deserved to have an original funeral anthem and so, the day before the funeral he wrote original lyrics inspired by the Book of Proverbs and set them to music: “Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, and getteth understanding. She is more precious than rubies, and all the things thou canst desire are not to be compared unto her. Length of days is in her right hand, and in her left hand, riches and honor. Her ways are ways of pleasantness, and all her paths are peace.” Bridge also wrote original funeral hymns for Robert Browning and  Alfred, Lord Tennyson. Attendees needed tickets to get into the funeral. The ten pallbearers included Sir Joseph Dalton Hooker (The son of the famous botanist William Jackson Hooker and Darwin’s closest friend), Thomas Henry Huxley (English biologist and anthropologist), Alfred Russel Wallace (British naturalist and evolutionary theorist - and a surprising friend to Darwin), James Russell Lowell (U.S. Ambassador), and William Spottiswoode "Spots-Wood" (President of the Royal Society). Darwin was buried at the Abbey next to the eminent scientist Sir John Herschel and just a few feet away from Sir Isaac Newton. On the Sunday following the funeral, the Bishop of Carlisle, Harvey Goodwin, said in his sermon, there is no “necessary conflict between a knowledge of Nature and a belief in God.” One of Darwin’s pallbearers, William Spottiswoode, delivered a eulogy for Darwin at the Royal Academy a few days after the funeral, on April 29, 1882. William said: “If patience and perseverance in good work… if a continual overcoming of evil with good in any way constitute elements of greatness, then the man of whom I speak—Charles Darwin—was truly great.” On his deathbed, at Down House, Charles Darwin told his wife, Emma, "I am not the least afraid of death—Remember what a good wife you have been to me—Tell all my children to remember how good they have been to me." And he told repeatedly told his children, "It's almost worthwhile to be sick to be nursed by you.” Darwin’s beloved dog, Polly, died naturally, two days after her master. Today, gardeners can visit Down House and explore the home and gardens of Charles Darwin. And, if you would like to pay homage to Darwin in your own garden, you can purchase one of David Austin’s favorite and best-selling roses: Charles Darwin. The Charles Darwin yellow rose is gorgeous and wonderfully fragrant - with notes of soft floral Tea and pure lemon. Thanks for listening to The Daily Gardener. And remember: "For a happy, healthy life, garden every day."