Podcasts about Niagara

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Best podcasts about Niagara

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Latest podcast episodes about Niagara

D’Amato & Szabo: Wine Thieves
Exploring the sub-appellations of the Niagara Peninsula and future crus with Shauna White and Ilya Senchuk

D’Amato & Szabo: Wine Thieves

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 54:07


Welcome back to Wine Thieves. On Today's episode we take a deeper look at VQA Ontario wines, and more specifically the Niagara Peninsula and its 10 sub-appellations as we try to unravel the mystery of the cru, the single parcels of vineyards that have, or yet may rise, to the top of the heap of Ontario VQA wines.With grapegrowing experience stretching back to the 1970s, it is becoming more clear which sites are best suited to which grape varieties. John and Sara speak to guests Ilya Senchuck of Leaning Post in Niagara and  Shauna White of Adamo Estates in Hockley Valley about their quests to find worthy single vineyards. This episode was created in partnership with VQA Wine Coutry Ontario.

American Shoreline Podcast Network
The Great Portage of 1829 | North Coast Chronicles

American Shoreline Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 22, 2021 61:09


On the fifth episode of North Coast Chronicles: Tales from the Great Lakes, entitled, "The Great Portage of 1829," historian Bel Bachmann and trade and compliance specialist with the Canadian St. Lawrence Seaway Management Corporation, Benoit Nolet, join host Helen Brohl to share the origins, construction, and operation of the Welland Canal. Providing portage around Niagara falls for ships now carrying 40 million tons of cargo per year, the first canal was built at a time in history when ships operated under sail and the original 40 individual locks were built by hand to raise ships 326 feet from Lake Ontario to Lake Erie. What veteran of the War of 1812 had the vision to build the Canal and why? What group of people wielded the axes, picks, and shovels to dig the first canal? How does a modern day vessel get into and out of a lock with only one foot of air on either side? And, what is a vacuum mooring? St. Catherine's, Ontario and Lock 3 at the Welland Canal is your next stop on the Great Lakes Circle Tour!

Generation Now
Episode 4: Social media, influencing and being your own boss with Courtney Todd

Generation Now

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 21, 2021 39:32


How are my favourite people... aka all who are reading this right now! This week I sat down with Courtney Todd (AGAIN!) and we caught up on how she started her business, tips for setting yourself up for success, lessons she's learned while food and hotel influencing and so much more! So exciting to see how far Courtney has come in her journey and so happy I was able to share the inside scoop with all you listeners.JOIN ME! Let's read together, here are the next couple of books on my TBR:The Flatshare by Beth O'Leary: https://amzn.to/2Xx4hCOThe Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid: https://amzn.to/3jnsbZcOnce you're done with the episode, join the #generationnow community by following @generationnowpodcast on Instagram or @generationnowpodcast on Tik Tok. Also, make sure to follow Courtney: @bycourtneytodd on Instagram to be in the know with all the amazing content she posts and join Niagara's Travelling Bookclub: @niagarastravellingbookclub. You can also visit her website to learn more: https://bit.ly/3CiXcoR. If you loved this episode, make sure to check out these ones next:Season 2, Episode 1: Building and scaling your business, passive income and setting yourself up for success with Kaela SteadEpisode 50: Side hustles to full-time gigs with Stephanie IannacchinoEpisode 49: Career growth, coping with social media overload and growing your social media account with Sara Alice NewtonEpisode 30: Influencers, podcasts and starting your own business with Bailey StanworthEpisode 29: Graphic design, freelancing and living in NYC with Emma McGoldrickIntro music: Coffee by LiQWYD https://soundcloud.com/liqwyd; Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0; Free Download / Stream: https://bit.ly/coffee-liqwyd; Music promoted by Audio Library https://youtu.be/y3ksZqtAfI 

Disgorgeous
Episode 177: Harvest Moon Part Two: A Man Without a Winery (ft. Zack Klug)

Disgorgeous

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 11, 2021 83:38


Zack Klug came again to explain what wine is and where it comes from and also what philosophy does. He's one of our favorite winemakers and his wines are dope and not only should you seek out the treasures he's made, but get ready for what's next baby: flx hybrids!!!!! ////List////Liten Buffel, Niagara Pinot Noir, ‘Parking Lot,' 2018//Liten Buffel, Niagara cab sauv, ‘Faucheaux, ‘2018//Liten Buffel, ‘Colors and Allegory,' 2017////Support the show (https://www.patreon.com/Disgorgeous)

The Office ASMR - A Podcast to Sleep To
The Office S06E04 - Niagara pt. 1 (Sleep Podcast)

The Office ASMR - A Podcast to Sleep To

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 9, 2021 30:14


It's amazing: a three ounce fetus, is calling the shots! It's so bad ass. Connect over on Twitter: http://twitter.com/asmroffice Don't miss Scrubs ASMR where I narrate every episode of Scrubs to help you fall asleep

Grand Forks Herald Minute
UND Hockey Weekend Preview, Week 1 vs Niagara

Grand Forks Herald Minute

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 8, 2021 19:36


The Herald's Brad Schlossman previews UND's opening series against Niagara on Friday and Saturday. Schlossman goes over the expected lineup and which newcomers he's looking forward to seeing suit up at the Ralph.

Choses à Savoir HISTOIRE
Quel exploit fut réalisé par Annie Edson Taylor ?

Choses à Savoir HISTOIRE

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 7, 2021 2:13


Annie Edson Taylor est la première personne à avoir descendu les chutes du Niagara enfermée dans un tonneau et à avoir survécu à cette chute vertigineuse. Mais elle ne tira guère de profit de son exploit.Un plongeon dans un tonneauNée en 1838, Annie Edson Taylor eut une vie assez mouvementée. Orpheline de père à 12 ans, elle perd son mari après quelques années de mariage. Institutrice puis professeur de danse, elle change souvent d'emploi.Aussi, parvenue à l'âge de la retraite, elle doit s'assurer une certaine sécurité financière en prévision de ses vieux jours. Pour cela, elle trouve une solution pour le moins originale.Elle décide, le 24 octobre 1901, de descendre les chutes du Niagara enfermée dans un tonneau. Elle en fait fabriquer un sur mesure. En chêne, le baril est renforcé par des éléments métalliques et équipé d'un matelas, pour amortir les chocs. Des trous sont ménagés, pour lui permettre de respirer.Annie prend place à l'intérieur du tonneau, dont le couvercle est vissé. Le baril est laissé sur l'eau, un peu avant les chutes. Puis il plonge dans la cataracte.Une vingtaine de minutes plus tard, le tonneau est récupéré. Annie Edson Taylor n'est pas blessée, hormis une petite coupure à la tête.Un exploit peu rentableAnnie Edson Taylor devenait ainsi la première personne à survivre à un plongeon dans les chutes du Niagara. Elle espérait donc tirer du profit de son exploit.Mais ses espoirs furent déçus. Au départ, elle fait des conférences sur son aventure et gagne un peu d'argent. Mais il lui est dérobé par l'agent qu'elle avait embauché pour promouvoir sa téméraire entreprise.Le tonneau lui-même, qu'elle pensait utiliser pour sa publicité, lui est volé. Elle dépensera une partie de ses économies pour le retrouver, avant de le perdre à nouveau.Annie Edson Taylor usera de tous les moyens possibles pour exploiter financièrement sa descente des chutes du Niagara. Elle ouvre un stand sur place, pour les touristes et entreprend de raconter son aventure dans un roman et un film. Mais rien n'y fait. Elle meurt dans la misère en 1921. See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

I Have Seen Niagara
Beyond The Western Door: Bottled Glory

I Have Seen Niagara

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 5, 2021 19:52


This week's episode gives us a window into the future with a swirling crystal sphering of scenes from our next season, Psychic Network Niagara! Every season, we take a sharp turn with tape deck investigator G Lucas Crane as we probe deeper into the mysteries of our Niagara with a mystical sonic textual deep dive, plunging us beyond words, beyond narrative, Beyond the Western Door. Voices: Jonah Levy Isabel Kagan, Kevin Thurston, Kayla Elrod, Admiral Grey, Miriam Atkin, Angela Moore, Dr. Bank

Pre-Shift
#61 - Modelo Niagara

Pre-Shift

Play Episode Listen Later Oct 1, 2021 61:28


Bottle or draft? Jonesy feels old seeking his High Roller settlement. Thomas has to confront a stealing co-worker. Frank hates RV's and wants to party with Nic Cage. 3am tacos, NFL picks, Vegas fitness, and Teremana - The People's Tequila!

Eww! That's Creepy
#58 Unsolved Murders: Edward Mitt Croley / Niagara County Jone Doe

Eww! That's Creepy

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 17, 2021 27:46


Hello hell cats! We are back with another episode and another unsolved murder. Melissa is going to be telling Jackie about two unsolved murders in New York that occurred in the early 1990's. Please be aware that this episode will discuss graphic murders and assault, listener discretion is advised. And please take a few seconds to look at the below sketch of the Niagara County John Doe, who is still unidentified!    https://www.namus.gov/UnidentifiedPersons/Case#/10212 https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2015/04/20/upshot/missing-black-men.html https://bigfrog104.com/cny-cold-case-files-the-case-of-the-unidentified-skeleton https://cbs6albany.com/news/local/cold-case-homicide-of-14-year-old-edward-mitt-croley https://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Cold-Case-Albany-teen-s-1991-killing-remains-14810667.php https://dailygazette.com/2008/01/10/0110_scott/ https://www.wgrz.com/article/news/unsolved-nysp-hopes-dna-evidence-can-help-solve-1991-cold-case/71-5e62961e-e0ab-4eee-8e18-e80f83ac589f http://www.doenetwork.org/cases/1054dmny.html

Engines of Our Ingenuity
Engines of Our Ingenuity 2641: Ghosts of Niagara

Engines of Our Ingenuity

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 15, 2021 3:49


Episode: 2641 Niagara Falls and the development of hydroelectric power.  Today, ghosts of Niagara.

The Andrew Hines Real Estate Investing Podcast
Quickly Scaling for Real Estate Cash Flow in Ontario with Michal Wach

The Andrew Hines Real Estate Investing Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 12, 2021 46:32


In E137, Michal Wach comes back on the show, after originally appearing in episode 033, and gave an update on how he's continued to scale his portfolio quickly. Michal has been focused on adding value to units in the Niagara region, including converting side splits and back-splits into 3 unit buildings win Welland. While the market appreciation has certainly helped him, Michal's meticulous and long-term approach helps hedge him against market changes. Michal is now working as a real estate coach and is ready to leave his full time job which is especially inspiring. There is much to be learned from him. Please enjoy! Listen on Apple Podcast, Spotify, Google, Stitcher and more @ https://linktr.ee/theandrewhines Connect with Michal Wach instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wachproperties facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mike.wa.5 Connect with Andrew Hines on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/theandrewhines facebook: https://www.facebook.com/theandrewhines Andrew Hines Audio · E137 Quickly Scaling For Real Estate Cash Flow In Ontario With Michal Wach Music Info, Artist: JPB, Song: High, NCS Release: Feb 1 2015, No Copyright Copyright Free

The John Batchelor Show
1673: Memories of 9-11-01 at Toronto, Ontario. @ConradMBlack

The John Batchelor Show

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 10, 2021 12:55


Photo: Toronto from top of Rossin House (S.E. corner of King and York Streets looking towards Niagara); 1840s  CBS Eyes on the World with John Batchelor CBS Audio Network @Batchelorshow Memories of 9-11-01 at Toronto, Ontario. @ConradMBlack .. National Post    The greatest significance of the dramatic and evil assault on New York's World Trade Center and the Pentagon in Washington 20 years ago was that it initiated a new form of quasi-military violence against the Western democratic powers that had emerged at the end of the Cold War as overwhelmingly the most influential political, economic and cultural force in the world. The national security policy of the leader of the Western alliance, the United States, was enunciated in two speeches to the United States Congress by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1941. In his State of the Union address in January of that year he said that America “must always be wary of those who with ‘sounding brass and tinkling cymbal' would preach the ‘ism of appeasement'.” In his war message of December 8, 1941, following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and many other sites in the Pacific, Roosevelt said, “we will make very certain that this form of treachery never again endangers us.” The burden of these assertions was that the United States would not be an appeasement power and that it would thereafter retain sufficient deterrent strength that no country would attack it again as Japan had.     Between Roosevelt and George W. Bush, 10 presidents, five of each party, had essentially upheld that double formula successfully. The United States did not appease competing or adversarial states, although it attempted to compromise with them; and no other country has dared to risk the retaliatory response of American military might. The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, were the fruit of the imagination of the most militant enemies of America and the West: an attack by people who deliberately committed suicide in conducting the attack—not only were unafraid of dying but were eager to die—by forces that could not be directly linked in any command structure to any sovereign state. It was, after 50 years, the double evasion of the Roosevelt formula: forces so shadowy it was not clear how they could be appeased if anyone wished to do so, and so fanatical that they could not be deterred from even the most heinous acts because of their ardent desire to die for their cause. Clearly, and in the most dramatic possible way, a new threat had emerged.  The spectacle on television of the attacks on the World Trade Center towers is rivaled only by the film of the assassination of Pres. Kennedy as the most vividly and widely remembered incident in the lifetime of anyone now living.    It must be said that the American and allied response was impressive. For the first time, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) invoked the war clause and the North Atlantic Council, NATO's governing authority, unanimously stated that an Alliance member had been attacked in an act of war and every country in the alliance responded as if it were an act of war against themselves: “An attack upon one is an attack upon all.” Forces from a large number of NATO countries were dispatched to Afghanistan, [which w]as the training and staging area for the 9/11 outrages. They quickly overthrew the Afghan government, destroyed the training facilities of the terrorist groups and drove them out of Afghanistan; and virtually every country in the world other than a few militantly Islamist or very primitive states united in a vast system of information exchange and paramilitary cooperation.     Those who remember 9/11 well will remember the widespread speculation and the noisy threats of terrorist spokespeople to the effect that this was merely the introduction of an endless series of massive terrorist assaults upon the West. Of course, there have been some such assaults, although very few recently and some of them were very deadly—though none as horrible or spectacular as the 9/11 attacks 20 years ago. We must not be so depressed and scandalized by the shameful end of the NATO presence in Afghanistan, at the instigation of the current U.S. president, that we fail to recognize the very thorough and almost leak-proof protection that the antiterrorist forces of the Western Alliance and its affiliates, such as Israel and Japan, have given the civil population of the West and its allies these 20 years.                     The disorderly withdrawal from Afghanistan has been an appalling fiasco but the West was certainly not militarily defeated. The American government decided, as the Soviet Union decided in the 1980's and the British Empire decided in the middle of the 19th century, that Afghanistan had few resources, was primitive, landlocked, and terribly inhospitable, had practically no strategic value and was accordingly not worth the military effort to maintain control of the urban areas as NATO was doing with only about 10,000 members of its Armed Forces until a month ago. There is room to dispute this judgment, and I don't agree with it myself, but it was a public relations and not a military defeat. The effect of this withdrawal will be to test whether the Islamist terrorist forces wish to use Afghanistan again as the launching place for their criminal violence or not. If they do, obviously, Afghanistan will be attacked again and probably with much greater violence than it was 20 years ago. Afghanistan has been regarded as rich only in heroin, but the theory has recently arisen that it is rich in rare earths as well.  It sounds like Marxist Herbert Marcuse's theory that the U.S. was in Vietnam because of the oil (which still has not been discovered). In any case, if China wants to plunge into mineral exploration in Afghanistan and add it to its famous Belt and Road, it is welcome to it.     Terrorism isn't really war: it isn't an effort of one sovereign authority to try to overcome and defeat another. It is an attempt by people who possess no sovereign authority, no legitimacy whatever, to strike at innocent people with such violence that it produces sketchily outlined concessions from legitimate sovereign countries. It has been successful only when it has been the advance activity of ultimately successful revolutionary movements within certain countries. It is conceivable that it could undermine and heavily influence, as it has in the last 20 years, some countries highly susceptible to militant Islam. But even those countries will not explicitly adopt terrorist techniques because the retaliation from the states they attacked would be so overwhelming, it would completely over-power the small number of fanatics and programmed idiots who want to die for their cause.     The terrible events of 20 years ago and their sequels have not threatened our civilization as Nazism and Soviet communism did: Great Powers armed to the teeth and led by satanic dictators. Terrorism horrifies all decent people and kills a comparatively small number, but as an instrument of advancement of the cause in which it is inflicted, terrorism is a failure. The West's error, and it was the mistake of George W. Bush, was to try to eradicate terrorism and war by promoting democracy. This required nation-building so profound that there were not the time or the resources to complete it effectively in the barren soil of primitive and undemocratic societies. And it failed to provide for the democratic selection of anti-democratic political movements: Hamas in Gaza, Hezbollah in Lebanon, and the Iraqi electorate may prefer dictatorship to democracy.     Humiliating debacle though it was, the departure from Afghanistan does represent a withdrawal by the West from an overextended position, and an opportunity for the principal Muslim terrorist organizations to try more conventional and less sociopathic methods of advancing their cause. It is obvious that there will be no toleration, anywhere in the West, or by China and Russia (pending Russia taking its rightful place as a western country) for terrorism or any of its espoused objectives. The terrorist attacks in New York and Washington 20 years ago were permanently shocking, but as the dramatic beginning of a campaign to shatter Western civilization, they and their sequels have been almost as conspicuous a failure as were Nazi Germany's recourse to aggressive war in 1939 and Imperialist Japan's assault on Pearl Harbor and across the Pacific in 1941.    ..  

I Have Seen Niagara
Legends of the Falls, part 1: The Wagon Wheel

I Have Seen Niagara

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 7:31


Season 2 begins with a trip to Niagara Falls for news reporter Zach El Keebaugh, who is sent to do a feature on urban legends of Niagara. His first stop: The Wagon Wheel, a notorious dive bar where legends are made... and perhaps El Keebaugh is the next one. Zach El Keebaugh: Zach Trebino. Vomiting magician: Chad Raines. Bartender: Miriam Atkin. Randy Newman: Ric Royer. Written by L.A. Fontaine.

Two Guys Talking Wine
Another Stump the Chump - with Derek Barnett - Episode 255

Two Guys Talking Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 30:01


We raid more of Michael's cellar with some of Niagara's most honed palates. This time we try to stump the chump with Derek Barnett for Meldville and Karlo estates. How did the guys fare on this episode of Stump the Chump?

Vacation Mavens
197 Crossing the Canadian Border & A Road Trip to Buffalo

Vacation Mavens

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 7, 2021 43:42


This week Kim and Tamara are catching up on their respective August travels. Kim shares what it is like to cross the land border between Canada and the USA right now, plus what you need to know before you go. Meanwhile, Tamara almost made it to the Canadian border on her Western New York road trip, but not quite. She tells us about her eating adventures along the Upstate Eats Trail in Syracuse, Rochester, and Buffalo, New York. ABOUT OUR SPONSOR: ROOM STEALS Today's episode is sponsored by Room Steals.  Listeners may remember Room Steals from our discussion on finding hotel deals in Episode 185, but Room Steals is a Chrome browser extension that works alongside existing booking sites to show you what the wholesale price is for that room. Just install the browser extension and search for a hotel as you usually would on Hotels.com, Booking.com, Expedia, or Google. Once you've done your initial search, Room Steals will show you in a pop-up if that same room is available for less. If it is, you can click on that pop-up and book it directly through Room Steals. Downloading and using Room Steals is free; however, if you want to book a discounted room you have to pay an annual membership fee. Listeners can save 20% off the annual membership fee with promo code vacationmavens.  If you travel multiple times in a year, the subscription will quickly pay for itself. One listener already saved $400 using Room Steals on her first booking!  To learn more, visit roomsteals.com. That's roomsteals.com and use promo code vacationmavens to save 20% off your membership to Room Steals, and we thank them for their support. Crossing the Canadian Border The land border is still currently closed for Canadians looking to enter the USA, but US citizens are permitted to visit Canada. To cross the border, US citizens need to show a negative COVID test result taken within 72 hours of crossing (note 72 hours NOT 3 days so test timing matters). Tests need to be PCR tests done through a lab (not an at-home test). Anyone age-eligible needs to be fully vaccinated to enter Canada and be prepared to show your vaccination card. Children under 12 crossing with a vaccinated parent may need to be tested again at the border crossing. You also need to have a quarantine plan (identify a hotel where you would stay if you needed to quarantine in Canada.) Canada can also do random COVID testing at the border. You currently do NOT need a negative COVID test to return from Canada to the United States if you are crossing via a land border (anyone arriving into the US by air still needs to have a negative COVID test taken within 72 hours of boarding the plane.) You can upload all your documents into the Arrive CAN app prior to travel. Keep in mind that if you are driving through Western Canada you will want to pay close attention to any wildfires and road closures when planning your route. Be sure to check the Canadian government website for the latest updates. Upstate Eats Trail Road Trip Stops The Upstate Eats Trail runs from Binghampton to Buffalo to Rochester to Syracuse, New York with local food stops along the way This area also has a lot of history with the Erie Canal, suffrage movement, and Underground Railroad See Tamara's full blog post about the Upstate Eats Trail In Syracuse, Green Lakes State Park is home to a glacial lake with a beautiful blue color like you see in the some of the lakes up in Canada. In Downtown Syracuse, Dinosaur BBQ is a popular restaurant with excellent barbecue. Salt City Market is a food hall in Downtown Buffalo with many different types of cuisine from Burmese to Jamaican, Thai, and more. The Marriott in Downtown Syracuse is a beautiful historic hotel and has a great location for exploring downtown. On the way from Syracuse to Rochester, stop in Auburn, New York at the Harriet Tubman House National Historic Site and the New York State Equal Rights Center. In Rochester, stop at Bill Gray's for their red and white hot dogs with meat sauce. One location is right on Lake Ontario. Nearby you can grab a soft serve frozen custard Abbott's. Rochester is famous for the garbage plate, which was invented at Nick Tahou Hots. A garbage plate has potatoes (usually fries), macaroni salad, and is topped with either hamburgers or hot dogs and covered with meat sauce, onions, and other toppings. If you are visiting Rochester with kids, be sure to visit the Strong Museum of Play. This interactive museum focuses on play and has areas with interactive play as well as a Toy Hall of Fame and toys from different decades. High Falls is another spot to check out in Rochester, which is a 90' waterfall in the center of town. There is a nice bridge and viewing point overlooking the falls. Genessee Brew House is located right near the falls. Famous for Genessee Cream Ale, they now have a craft brewery and restaurant. Buffalo is known for a wide selection of food beyond wings, 35 craft breweries, 5 distilleries, street art, history and a revitalized waterfront. Tamara stayed at the Downtown Marriott in Buffalo in the Canalside district, which is where the boat tours leave and where you can rent kayaks, paddleboards, and water bikes. Buffalo River History Tours runs boat tours that explain the history of the river and the grain silos that line the banks. River Works is another entertainment district along the river that is home to ice hockey/roller derby rinks, a ropes course, a brewery, restaurant, tiki bar, entertainment venue and soon a Ferris wheel and zip lining. Silo City is home to a large number of grain silos and elevators that are being converted into lofts and commercial / exhibition space. Duende is a fun bar in Silo City that features live music on some evenings, outdoor space, and fun cocktails or local craft beers. General Mills still has a plant in Buffalo that manufactures Cheerios and Lucky Charms, and the area around it smells like cereal. There are many breweries in Buffalo and one favorite is Resurgence Brewing. Ted's Hot Dogs is famous for its spicy meat sauce. Anchor Bar is home to the original buffalo wings. Other local Buffalo foods to try include beef on weck, sponge candy, and Buffalo-style pizza. If you enjoy architecture, be sure to visit Frank Lloyd Wright's Martin House. See more things to do on a Buffalo girls' trip. Full Episode Transcript [00:00:00.000] - Kim Tate We're saying goodbye to summer. Here's the latest of what we've been up to.   [00:00:15.440] - Announcer Welcome to Vacation Mavens, a family travel podcast with ideas for your next vacation and tips to get you out the door. Here are your hosts, Kim from Stuffed Suitcase and Tamara from We3Travel.   [00:00:29.940] - Kim Tate Today's episode is brought to us by our continuing sponsor, Room Steals. Room Steals is an extension that you can add to your browser. And while you're shopping for your next hotel room, you can see if you're getting the very best rate.   [00:00:43.230] - Tamara Gruber I don't know if I had mentioned to you, but my family is planning on doing a Thanksgiving get away this year with all of Glenn's family. It is a multi generational trip, hopefully to Aruba. It was something that was supposed to happen a couple of years ago and was cancelled. I don't know if it's going to happen, but right now that's what our plan is. And so I was like, you know what? It's Thanksgiving week. I don't think that there would be any deals on Room Steals, but let me just give it a quick look.   [00:01:08.730] - Tamara Gruber So I looked and we were going to do the Ritz Carlton in Aruba, and it looks like we could save almost $900 if we use Room Steals because it depends on what room types. Some would be like $400. Some would be 600 or would be $800. So now I need to go and tell my father in law, but he's going to pay for quite a few rooms. So if you think about if that's like $800 per room, you know, when you're doing, like, five rooms, that's a lot of money.   [00:01:37.110] - Kim Tate That's a lot of money.   [00:01:37.930] - Tamara Gruber It's a lot of money. So anyway, if anyone is thinking of planning some travel, I definitely suggest checking out Room Steals. As we mentioned, it's a Chrome browser extension that works alongside all of these different booking sites, like hotels or Booking or Expedia or even Google. And the nice thing is, you can see what the rate would be for free. And then if you want to book that rate, that's when you can sign up for Room Steals membership. And they are offering our listeners 20% off the annual membership fee with the promotion code, vacationmavens. It is Vacation Mavens. All one word, all lower case. Go ahead and check it out at Room Steals dot com.   [00:02:18.200] - Tamara Gruber So, Kim, I was hoping to use this episode to talk about our big announcement of a big trip that we're doing that we're going to see each other on for the first time in how long? I know. I don't know. I don't think we have an announcement to make.   [00:02:33.330] - Kim Tate I don't think we can announce it yet, but I can at least say what we're crossing our fingers for. We are crossing our fingers that Tamara and I will be going to Portugal in October. So I'm still hoping I'm crossing my fingers and my heart.   [00:02:49.080] - Tamara Gruber I think anyone that's trying to plan any trips right now is very much in this state of is it happening? Is it not happening? Especially if it's international. We're all trying to make the best decisions and look at the most recent information. And just recently we've gone through, do we do this or not? And we're like, okay, Portugal has the second best vaccination rate in Europe. Their cases are flattening out. They've got all these great measures in place.   [00:03:18.380] - Tamara Gruber Everything was coming together, all getting organized. We're ready to go. And it's like one of those things where just when you're about to pull the trigger, it's like because Europe announces that they are taking the US off of their safe list of countries that they're accepting into the European Union. So at first that's like, what is that going to mean? You read into it a little bit more. It looks like it probably will be mostly targeted towards unvaccinated travelers, but it's really up to each individual country now to determine what they're going to decide to do.   [00:03:55.110] - Tamara Gruber And so I think probably a lot of them will do is that you need to be both vaccinated and have a negative test for arrival and then implementing that vaccine passport that they're using throughout Europe to be able to check into hotels and go to restaurants and things like that. So it is definitely something to keep your eye on very closely as it can change at anytime.   [00:04:18.380] - Kim Tate I mean, we're over a year into this, so hopefully we've all learned to keep things fluid, but it's definitely a a situation that's up in the air. And like Tamara said, we're just trying to really follow all the rules and regulations, make sure. And the thing is, you have to make sure you're doing the research yourself because I saw someone recently. They showed up to the airport and they had done their own research and knew that they had to get a test and all this stuff. But people were at the airport and being denied their flight because they didn't have a test to show the airport check in, and they were complaining.   [00:04:52.500] - Kim Tate Well, the airline never sent us this information. They never told us this was needed, so you can't rely on getting your information from one source. You have to really kind of do the leg work yourself.   [00:05:03.120] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I think there's a lot of that, like, just not understanding what needs to happen. And I think sometimes I pay a little too much attention to the news, but you need to definitely follow all that information. I just put up a little Instagram story the other day just with some steps to take, make sure that you register for the Smart Traveler enrollment program, the Step program through the State Department, make sure you are following and read through everything on the embassy page to understand what the rules are and following those kind of resources, especially on social media, is that probably gets updated more quickly.   [00:05:39.220] - Tamara Gruber So you definitely need to get some information. But things are always changing even here in the US, right. We were just kind of talking about how difficult it is even to plan a travel podcast, because some of the things that we wanted to talk to you guys about this fall. Now it's probably not the best time to visit those destinations. So between fires and storms and other things, travel is continued to be fluid. But road trips tend to still be good. And you and I both made a road trip recently, right.   [00:06:09.540] - Kim Tate We did.   [00:06:10.360] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:06:10.890] - Kim Tate I think it's hopefully still in our ability. However, there's some interesting stuff, even with road tripping, it we had experience when we were in Canada, but yeah, I think that things right now. I mean, just as we've always said, things, you have to really pack your patience and do your research and be flexible and fluid.   [00:06:29.340] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. So you got to finally visit Paul's family, which I'm so glad you were able to do that. So what was it like driving across the border? I guess both ways, especially since we're a little bit unequal partners in that. We are now allowed into Canada. But Canadians are not allowed to cross our border. So there's all these different rules to sort out. We talked about it a little bit last time, but now that you've been through it, maybe you could just talk about that would like, yeah, definitely.   [00:06:53.880] - Kim Tate So it's probably good to let everyone know what the experience was. In actuality, we got up to the border. We made good time. We were the only car at the border crossing where we went, and we were using one of the border crossings. That's not as busy up here. We have three that we well, actually, there's four that we can use kind of across the Washington, our side of the border that we do when we're traveling up to Edmonton, we normally pick ones that are a little bit further east than the traditional Vancouver ones.   [00:07:22.280] - Kim Tate So we passed at a slower location, and it was we were the only people there. We got up there and they wanted to see our passports. And then I had put our vaccine cards in my passport and it dropped, of course. And he's like, I just want your passports now. So he didn't want to see my card, but he saw that we had it. I'm guessing. So he gave that to us and looked at our passport, scan them and everything. And then he wanted to see our negative COVID test.   [00:07:52.420] - Kim Tate And so I pulled mine up on my phone. But the girls, they don't have digital ones because they're minors, so they don't have the digital account. So we had gotten print outs in advance, and he looked because I know that mine. We actually we got tested separately and mine and Mia was exactly three days before. And whereas Paul and Lizzy there was two days before, but early in the morning and he looked at his watch because he was looking for the 72 hours. So I was curious how that would work if they really hold to the 72 hours or it would be just kind of like three days before.   [00:08:28.270] - Kim Tate But he looked at his watch because ours got processed at 05:00 p.m.. And he wanted to make sure that the time that you got the test or the time that the results came for us. It was the time that the test was administered. So what happened, though, is we collected. We gave our sample probably around 1:20, but the test results said sample process at 05:00 p.m.. So there was like a holding period before they actually ran our sample. But our results didn't come in for two days after that.   [00:08:58.220] - Kim Tate But it's not based on when you're basically, I would say, is have your sample collected no sooner than 72 hours before you think you're going to pass that, you know, that border. And I know there's different rulings on if you're originating in one place and then connecting somewhere. And I think there's some stuff with that as well.   [00:09:20.230] - Tamara Gruber Well, you really have to account for traffic there, too, just yet.   [00:09:23.610] - Kim Tate I know that's what I was saying. So that's where we were, because it's like, okay, well, we want to leave the house at this time, but knowing my family, we're probably going to know we give it that time. So I want to give myself an hour cushion. But then we had, like I said, we had quite a bit of a cushion from just when the processing was when the test was processed. It was a few hours after we'd given our samples.   [00:09:48.540] - Tamara Gruber Did you do that through like, a standard state testing site. We did pharmacy or anything.   [00:09:54.690] - Kim Tate We did it through our normal clinic site. So our hospital, like our doctor's clinic has a drive through clinic set up for all the patients. And so we were able to just drive through there and do our little swabs and stick and imagine it has to be PCR. It has to be PCR. And Canada does not allow those Abbott ones.   [00:10:19.370] - Tamara Gruber Unless they've started self administered one.   [00:10:21.800] - Kim Tate Yeah, it has to be through a lab and stuff in there. They have different rules. So you just need to really make sure you're doing it the right way and stuff. So we got them and no problem. So he checked that. Now we had used the app that was the arrive can app, and I had it pulled up and in there. And again, I wonder how much they noticed this and don't ask for it then, because he didn't ask us for vaccination cards, and he didn't ask to see the app.   [00:10:46.760] - Kim Tate But I had it already, like in the hand on my lap. So then we got through. It's kind of funny how we did this because we drove separately. So Paul and Mia were right behind us, and they got up there and he wanted to see their arrive can, and he wanted to see their vaccination cards in addition to everything else. So I don't know how that worked, but yeah, so we had everything in order. So we had the arrived can filled out. The tricky thing about the arrive can is they actually make you create a quarantine, not create, but tell them what your quarantine plan is because because they can spontaneously request a test at the border.   [00:11:24.150] - Kim Tate And I'm guessing this is done more when you're flying. But I did have a friend recently say that it happened to their kids because they weren't able to get vaccinated. But those tests don't come through for three days or can be three days. And so when they give you the results, they've already let you into the country. But when they give you the results, if you're positive, you have to go into quarantine immediately at that point, and you have to follow that plan that you input into this app.   [00:11:52.290] - Kim Tate So we just put that we would stay at a residence in that was near his family. So that's just something to be mindful of that you do have to know what your arrangements will be. And you can't just say, oh, we'll just stay with family because it has to be in a situation where you can not touch or be around anyone else. So you have to be able to get your own food. You have to be able to not be with anyone who is not part of your traveling party.   [00:12:18.500] - Tamara Gruber Well, that's challenging. But you didn't have to make a reservation just in case.   [00:12:23.220] - Kim Tate No, I did not have to make a reservation. They just wanted to know what you would do. And I thought for some people who were going to Vancouver, I wondered if you could just put your home address in there and say, hey, I just turn around and go right back home.   [00:12:35.540] - Tamara Gruber Right.   [00:12:36.050] - Kim Tate But I don't know if the US. So that was the other. So then we get to the other flip side of it, which was once. The reason we drove up separately is because we actually parked one car at the airport, and we were driving up to together to visit Paul's family. And then we were able to me and I flew back early on our own to at an airport and picked up the car and drove home because she had a camp that started the day. And normally we do that drive in two days.   [00:13:00.300] - Kim Tate It's a little long for a one day drive. So we had that experience when we were ready to cross back in the border, we went through the same again, very small border crossing, and it was closed off. And so I was a little worried because I was like, okay, I didn't check the hours. But it was like, 10:00 a.m.. I was like, sure, truly, it's open at 10:00 a.m.. Maybe it's a weekend. And there was a border patrol agent there and got out of his car and it was like, pull forward.   [00:13:25.670] - Kim Tate And I was like, okay. And I rolled down the line. I'm like, Is this crossing not open? And he's like, Well, the border has been closed since March of 2020. Don't you know that? And I was like, no we are Americans. And so he's like, sdo you have American passports? And I was like. Yes, here they are.   [00:13:42.030] - Kim Tate And so he looked at him and he took them. And I was like, we're just visiting my husband's family, my in laws. And we're just coming back home. And he's like, okay, and move the thing. And he's like, drive forward to the booth. So we drove forward. I went through the process. And that was so like, they didn't want to test. They didn't want anything. They were just like, welcome home. Then we went through.   [00:14:02.340] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I was listening to the Miles to Go podcast. And he also recently had gone up to Canada, I think, to visit family. And apparently you don't need a test to come back into the US when you are at a land crossing. Yes, you only do for a flight. Which seems so odd. I don't know why you wouldn't just have the same rule. But did you know that ahead of time, I had you gotten tested, just in case.   [00:14:27.690] - Kim Tate When I recorded the previous podcast, I had mentioned that we were going to buy those Abbott Binax and just do a testing. But then I had two friends who had both crossed recently. One had been crossing regularly to visit her family, and then the other one had just gone up to visit his family. But both of them said they've never been. There's nothing with testing required when you're crossing at the land border. So we did not buy those Abbott tests. And we just took it at words at the word.   [00:14:56.040] - Kim Tate And sure enough, they did not ask for any kind of test. So interesting. Yeah, it is kind of interesting. I don't know how that works, but we're thankfully lucky enough that we didn't have to do that extra step and expense.   [00:15:07.050] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Glad everything worked out and that you have a family.   [00:15:10.620] - Kim Tate It was so nice. I'm so glad we went. And it was good to be around my, you know, one niece, she had a new baby. So we were able to see him. And it was great.   [00:15:22.310] - Tamara Gruber It was nice.   [00:15:23.400] - Kim Tate We went to West Edmonton Mall. So for those people are curious, we didn't do it. We did mostly just hang out with family. But we did go out to eat a couple of times. They had some patio seating. And with it being summer, it was actually really nice to be in Edmonton and we went to West Edmonton mall, and the girls got some back to school shopping done. And we happened to be during a big hockey tournament. So there's a bunch of kids playing. They have a big ice rink in the middle of their West Edmonton wall.   [00:15:53.520] - Tamara Gruber As they do in Edmonton.   [00:15:54.990] - Kim Tate Yeah, exactly. It's like, is anyone surprised that they have a big hockey rink? If anyone doesn't know West Edmonton mall, I used to be kind of the largest mall in North America, and it and Mall of America, which is in Minnesota. I think they used to go back and forth. I don't know who's the current reigning champion because they would add on and do different things. But anyways, while the girls were shopping, we kind of stood and watched the kids play a hockey tournament. And it was a fun, very Canadian that.   [00:16:27.300] - Kim Tate Yeah, it was. And we got Tim Hortons coffee. So Tim Bits, it was a very Canadian esque situation. My sister in law is actually a pilot, a small plane pilot. She's working up her. She just got commercial pilots, but she's working up her hours and stuff. But she took Paul and the girls up in her little four seater plane up for a flight one day. So that was another fun thing they got to do. And they loved that. It's neat. Yeah. I stayed on the ground.   [00:16:56.350] - Kim Tate I did not go.   [00:16:57.540] - Tamara Gruber I'd be in after my one experience with the glider plane. I'm okay on small planes.   [00:17:04.130] - Kim Tate I remember when you and I have that chance to go on the helicopter in Ireland.   [00:17:09.170] - Tamara Gruber And we both were like.   [00:17:10.250] - Kim Tate No, maybe not a good idea.   [00:17:11.750] - Tamara Gruber See the helicopter for me is more about the motion sickness.   [00:17:15.560] - Kim Tate Yeah, that's what I was worried about.   [00:17:17.180] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I was little planes. I'm just not a fan of the little plane inside.   [00:17:20.680] - Kim Tate Yeah. For me, I was pretty sure that I just know I'm not a calm flyer. Like I have fear flying. I used to have it really bad. And then as I flew more, I've gotten over it. But turbulence and stuff is just a problem. But I also know on the smaller planes, the motion sickness would really get to me if I couldn't be looking out continually and stuff.   [00:17:42.110] - Tamara Gruber Especially when they're like, oh, let's Zoom in to see the scenery. I really enjoyed our float plane that we did in Alaska when we went to see the bears and stuff, but it was short. So I did get to the motion sickness wasn't too bad, but yeah, well, I was up right near the Canadian border. I thought of you.   [00:18:01.870] - Kim Tate Exactly. You didn't quite cross. Yeah. Had you considered it?   [00:18:04.910] Initially, I was tempted. But it's funny because a friend of mine met me in Buffalo, and I'll explain the trip in a minute. But she's from New Jersey, and she actually never had Tim Hortons, which here in New England. There are some Tim Hortons around okay. So it's not like a brand new thing, but she was like, oh, what is that? I've never heard of it. And we're like, what have you never heard? It's important. So anyway, we're very used to our Dunkin Donuts here.   [00:18:29.570] - Kim Tate And, yeah, that's something. I don't even know if I've ever had a Dunkin Donuts. I can't think if I ever have.   [00:18:37.360] - Tamara Gruber Well, you know, I'm not a coffee person, so I don't get into that hole to be all I can evaluate the Donuts.   [00:18:43.490] - Kim Tate Yeah, I have to say that Tim Hortons, I like Tim Hortons more than McDonald's, but that's about where the level is at. So for people who are wondering, it's not like, you know, in Seattle, I'm so spoiled because we have a coffee stand booth of, you know, like, small source coffees at every corner. So it's a little different. So it's definitely like, drive through coffee. So I don't know if I could compare honestly what Duncan ones versus McDonald's versus Tim Hortons. I don't know if I could do any justice to that in there.   [00:19:13.740] - Kim Tate Yeah, but, yeah, I want to hear all about because I know you went up to Buffalo to do a big foodie trail. So what was that like?   [00:19:20.150] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I had talked to the tourism board from Visit Buffalo back in January. So this is a trip that they hosted me on because what intrigued me about Buffalo is it kind of has some similarities to where I live here in Providence. They talked about a big revitalization of their waterfront, a good foodie scene, craft breweries, things like that. So I thought, you know what that sounds like a fun summer getaway summer or fall. I didn't really want to go up to Buffalo in the winter. And so they've put together this entire Upstate Eats trail.   [00:19:55.190] - Tamara Gruber So it's really more Western New York. You could hit Binghamton, which is down more like Upstate, but a little closer to where the Finger Lakes and then cut through the Finger Lakes up to Buffalo. What I did, though, since I'm coming from Rhode Island, is I went right across Interstate 90, and I stopped first in Syracuse and spent a night there, and then one night in Rochester and then three nights in Buffalo. So I got to experience three stops along the Upstate Eats Trail and kind of got to see the unique foods of that area, which I just have so much fun discovering what foods are really unique and special.   [00:20:34.050] - Tamara Gruber And sometimes it's just like a twist on something like a hot dog. But it's just the thing that they have up there. So I found that when I moved to Rhode Island, so many people that live in Rhode Island have lived there all their lives, and they may not recognize that these things are not everywhere. But when I moved to Rhode Island, I'm like, oh, there's so many very unique foods. And I remember writing a post about the must try foods in Rhode Island. So it's become my thing to really discover those unique foods that you only find in certain places.   [00:21:04.500] - Tamara Gruber And I found a lot of other things along the way because that area just has so much history between the suffrage movement, the Underground Railroad, just overall industrialism and stuff. There's just so much history to explore there, too. So there were a lot of places in between those cities that I wanted to stop at. That I didn't always have a chance to. So I did a few on the way back. I'm working on a whole blog post that I'll link to in our show notes when this comes out about the different stops along the way.   [00:21:35.150] - Tamara Gruber But, yeah, my first surprise was that when I got to Syracuse, they have a glacial Lake there. That is that beautiful color that you see, like in Canada. I'm like, wait, I didn't know that we had this in New York, but then Syracuse, downtown. Syracuse is big for the University, Syracuse University, but it has a good downtown. There's a lot of diversity there. I didn't have. I didn't get a chance to do some of the things I would have liked to have done because it was a Monday in museums and some other things were closed.   [00:22:08.220] - Tamara Gruber But it's also that area is because of the Great Lakes. You see so much distribution and things. So the Erie Canal was a huge deal in terms of getting goods from the Great Lakes down into other parts of the state. So they have an Erie Canal Museum. And there's also stops along the Underground Railroad. They're in Syracuse. So the thing that I got to do, of course, was eat. I asked people, where should I eat? And certain places always came up in Syracuse. It was dinosaur barbecue.   [00:22:44.720] - Tamara Gruber So it was just like a big, famous place for barbecue. Which is funny. I was actually in my grocery store yesterday, and I had to buy a barbecue sauce, and I saw that they have dinosaur barbecue sauce. I'm like, either I've never noticed that before or I just didn't know where it came from. Right.   [00:22:59.330] - Kim Tate Right. Yeah.   [00:23:00.260] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:23:01.080] - Kim Tate Like the sauce, right.   [00:23:02.610] - Tamara Gruber I didn't realize that that was a restaurant. So I did that. And then kind of just spent my time walking around town. And then in the evening, I went to they have a food hall.   [00:23:12.710] - Kim Tate I love those.   [00:23:13.800] - Tamara Gruber So this food Hall, Salt City Market, was right next to the hotel where I was staying at, which was like a Marriott, which was beautiful. It was an old historic hotel that had been renovated and changed into a Marriott. And the food hall had all kinds of different cuisine. I had, like, I think I got a Jamaican meat pie. And then they had another place they made, like, homemade, I think, a peach pie, different things. They had Vietnamese and Burmese and Cambodian. So tons of different cuisines that you could try and sample.   [00:23:44.870] - Tamara Gruber So that was the cool thing. I always like when I see these kind of interesting food experiences. Yeah. Definitely.   [00:23:51.200] - Kim Tate We were talking about that when I was in Irvine. It's neat because we get so stuck in kind of the standard stuff. And maybe when you're traveling far away, you think of it. But yeah, that's nice.   [00:24:00.980] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. And then in Rochester, I went up. Well, first I stopped like an Auburn, and I stopped the Harriet Tubman house and did a tour there, just trying to take in a little bit more of the history. I've been through this area a couple of times and stopped at a few historic sites. And we're trying to put it all together at some point that I've seen a lot of it and also in Auburn, and they have an equal rights. It's like a New York State equal rights center.   [00:24:24.520] - Tamara Gruber So it deals with women's rights, civil rights and LGBTQ rights. So it's like this whole kind of all of the luminaries within New York who have fought for equal rights of some type. So that was an interesting little stop, too. Then in Rochester, I went to a place called Bill Grays, and they're famous for their red hots. So the red hot and their white hot. So apparently it's like you're talking about.   [00:24:52.000] - Kim Tate Like, the candy, right? No.   [00:24:53.610] - Tamara Gruber Exactly.   [00:24:54.210] - Kim Tate Oh, sorry.   [00:24:55.140] - Tamara Gruber I'm talking about hot dogs. Okay.   [00:24:57.600] - Kim Tate Sorry.   [00:24:58.410] - Tamara Gruber It's confusing, right?   [00:25:00.280] - Kim Tate That's what I thought.   [00:25:01.210] - Tamara Gruber Too, when I saw the red hots listed. So there's just all these different hot dog joints. They use specific hot dogs that are produced there. And this particular place, Bill Grays, has a white one. So it's like a white hot dog. Kind of looks like a sausage or something or what. But it's not those bright red hot dogs that you've seen. And sometimes in Maine, those are just kind of crazy from outer space. Hot dogs. There's kind of like a regular hot dog or a white hot dog.   [00:25:31.170] - Tamara Gruber But they put a meat sauce and onion and a bunch of other stuff on it. I'm kind of used to usually and onions. Yeah. But it's not chilly. It's kind of close. So that's kind of what makes it unique, like, where you go. And I know how there's always like, oh, I like this one because they do something in their particular style. I think everyone develops a style that they like. So anyway, I try to wait one just to see what it was like. And it's fine.   [00:25:59.910] - Tamara Gruber So I did that. And then I was right on Lake Ontario there. So I took a little to walk on the Lake. And every time I'm on the Great Lakes, I'm just amazed by, of course, how big they are. But you and the beach also felt like it was a nice, soft sand beach. And this is actually really nice.   [00:26:15.840] - Kim Tate You know, that's an area I've never been to or discovered. So that's nice. I think it's I'm sure it feels like it's overlooked by a lot of people. But I'm sure there's a lot of people who know about it. Probably it's probably got a great tourism industry.   [00:26:29.210] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. But I don't think when you think of New York, you think generally, of course, New York City, you think maybe the catskills, the other index, the finger likes things that we've talked about. And I think this section of Western New York isn't thought of as a tourist destination unless it's Niagara. But I will say Buffalo is only like half an hour from Niagara Falls, so it's easy to add in a few days there and expand what you can do in that area. It's also there's a lot of great ice cream stand.   [00:26:59.900] - Tamara Gruber It's a lot of this kind of, like, fast casual types of food. It definitely brought my tum along, but it was fun to explore the different styles. But one thing that they have in Rochester that is just so cool is the Museum of Play. And I've heard about this for a long time. Everyone always says it's something you have to do when you go to Rochester. So even though I wasn't going with a kid, I was by myself. I still went to the Strong. It's the National Museum of Play, and it has this whole reading area where it's focused on different genre or characters from books.   [00:27:38.710] - Tamara Gruber And it's like an amazing children's Museum, but with a real focus on play. So there's an area where it has toys from different generations. There's a Toy Hall of Fame. So it kind of reminds me of a place that you and I went to in Kansas City.   [00:27:55.550] - Kim Tate Where in Kansas City.   [00:27:57.130] - Tamara Gruber Where you look back and you're like, oh, I remember light bright. Remember that. Remember all this kind of different toys? So there's, like, the nostalgia factor. But then there's also an area where there's a whole Sesame Street thing or like a movement thing where you're building paper airplanes and learning, trying to see how far you can make them fly. There's a Wegman, which is like the big grocery store chain up there. So it's like the little like you would go to at a children's Museum where you're pretending to shop and pretending to check out.   [00:28:27.820] - Tamara Gruber And I imagine if I lived up there, I would have had a membership and been taking my kid there all the time. So much fun. They had a whole butterfly garden. There were, like a pinball arcade, like another type of arcade, just so much to do. That's very interactive. You could easily spend hours and hours. They are you're with kids. So if you do make it to that area with kids, definitely check out the Strong Museum of Play and also downtown. There's this area called High Falls.   [00:28:59.080] - Tamara Gruber That is basically I think it's like a 90 foot waterfall in the middle of town. It's like one of these surprising things that you're in the middle of what feels like not industrial city. But you have a strong presence there of Kodak and some other large commercial buildings. And there's really interesting architecture downtown. So you don't really expect to see this big waterfall in town. There's a great bridge that you can walk and get a good view of it. It's right by the genes. Have you heard of Genesee Cremale?   [00:29:33.210] - Tamara Gruber Jenny Cream ale? Is that just like an East Coast thing?   [00:29:36.130] - Kim Tate But I was like.   [00:29:36.780] - Tamara Gruber I haven't heard it very much. I think what people's grandfather's drink, it's like an old cream ale. So it's like one of the breweries that's been around for a long time. But now they still produce that. But they also have more of, like a craft brewery side as well. So I actually had dinner there because it's kind of like the next generation of these original breweries. And I did not try the cream ale, but I tried some others, and those were pretty good. And the other thing that Rochester is really famous for is called a garbage plate.   [00:30:06.930] - Tamara Gruber So it's one of their famous dishes that was created. And I was feeling exactly. It was so funny. I was talking to the tourism in person, and she was saying like, yeah, some people are like, why would you want to advertise your city with something with garbage in the name? But at the same time, so many people search for that because they know that that's the thing to eat there. So it's like, where are you going to get the best garbage plate. So I went to the place that invented the garbage plate, which is like a total little hole in the wall kind of place.   [00:30:35.970] - Tamara Gruber But now everywhere you go for dinner, if it's a casual place has their version of the garbage plate. So they might call it the everything plate or something like that. But it is basically like a pile of French fries, a bunch bunch of macaroni salad, which is like a strange combination to begin with, topped with either like burgers or cheeseburgers or hot dogs without buns. And then on top of that, just like this meat sauce and onions and ketchup and mustard. And who knows what else?   [00:31:07.910] - Tamara Gruber I'm not even sure. So it's just like this pile of carbs and meat I just presented to you on a plate. It's pretty funny. I think it's the kind of thing where if you are looking for something after a late night, it would hit the spot. I was really surprised at the place that I went to that originated it closed at, like, six. I'm like, is this more like a two in the morning kind of thing to eat?   [00:31:31.730] - Kim Tate Maybe they need to open up a thing in Colorado or Seattle? I'm just kidding.   [00:31:42.760] - Tamara Gruber But it was good to experience that because it was something that everyone's like, you got to try the garbage plate.   [00:31:47.830] - Kim Tate Yeah, it sounds. I don't know.   [00:31:50.500] - Tamara Gruber Oh, well, I like fries. So fries.   [00:31:53.420] - Kim Tate I like fries, but are you talking about macaroni salad, like the creamy potato salad thing?   [00:32:00.080] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. I thought it was going to be like, Mac and cheese. Yeah. But it's like macaroni salad, like the mayonnaise based one. Yeah.I like macaroni salad, like on a picnic and stuff.   [00:32:13.160] - Tamara Gruber But, like, apart from the so it would not be good for the people that are like, I don't like my food touching.   [00:32:19.670] - Kim Tate Yeah. Exactly.   [00:32:20.800] - Tamara Gruber Definitely not good.   [00:32:21.680] - Kim Tate My husband is not one of those people. He would probably be if he ate meat. He would be all over it, I'm sure.   [00:32:29.170] - Tamara Gruber But it's something like if you go there, you have to try it. Try it.   [00:32:32.870] - Kim Tate No, that's awesome. I'm glad you tried it. So you could report back. I'm sure there's some people listening right now on this podcast. They're like, oh, yeah. I'm craving one right now.   [00:32:40.240] - Tamara Gruber And people were, like, telling me where to go to favorite was funny. Yeah. But then I drove from Rochester over to Buffalo, and Buffalo was definitely so fun. I mean, if you're looking for a place where there's a wide selection of food, it's not just Buffalo wings. There are 35 craft breweries, five distilleries. There's a ton of street art. They have all these different areas that they've developed along the river front that are being revitalized. There's history. So there's a lot to do there now pretty busy for our three days there.   [00:33:19.270] - Tamara Gruber So we had a great time. It's like a lot of what interests me. I think when you go to a place and luckily, the friend that met me, there was not somebody that travels a lot, but she was really happy to have discovered something that she would have never thought to go to. And I was like, That's what I love to do. And she's like, Well, I need to travel with you more often. I'm like, yeah, come along.   [00:33:40.060] - Tamara Gruber So it was fun. But a couple of things that I'll call out. So we stayed at the downtown Marriott in Buffalo, which is a rate in the Canal Side District. So this is an area that has different boat tours going out from. We took one called the Buffalo River History Tour, and there's also one that go out more onto Lake Erie. And you can also rent kayaks and paddle boards and even those water bikes if you just want to explore the river front on your own. So you can do all of that rate in this Canal Side district.   [00:34:14.370] - Tamara Gruber And there's also a naval or more of a military ships park there. So if you like to climb onto an old naval ships and submarine, that kind of thing. So that would be a fun thing to do, I think, with kids as well. And it's just an area where they have, like, a carousel. And there's a little beer garden, and they do a lot of outdoor events. So they would do music there. I know the day that we were checking out, I look down from our hotel room and you could see this big lawn.   [00:34:42.550] - Tamara Gruber And there was a big yoga class taking place out there because it's very community driven to have a lot of entertainment, like free entertainment available for people as well. So that's one area there's this other area called River Works, which was about a mile from where we were staying. But we walked because it was pretty easy. And there they actually they're building out more of a whole entertainment center or district. I should say they have a couple of ice or roller banks, so they will do curling, their ice hockey, roller Derby.   [00:35:18.610] - Tamara Gruber They have a ropes course. There's a couple of bars there's a brewery, there's a Tiki bar. There's one of those floating Tiki bars that leaves from there as well. And what they're building right now is like a Ferris wheel. And then they're going to have zip lining between grain silos and some other rides and entertainment there. So it's going to be like this whole district. There's quite a bit of it. They are already and you can tell that they do concerts because the inside of the one restaurant was huge and clearly had a stage where they would have live entertainment.   [00:35:52.540] - Tamara Gruber So definitely like a fun place there. And another section that's being developed. It's called Silo City. So one of the things that Buffalo is really famous for is all these green silos, because their position on the Great Lakes, like corn and wheat would come in from the Midwest. And then they would put it onto trains or into the canals or whatever. And they would also process some of it there. They're actually still a General Mills plant there. And so when you're going by, it smells like Cheerios.   [00:36:26.580] - Kim Tate That's funny.   [00:36:27.570] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. So like Cheerios or I don't know, something very sweet, because what's the one with the little leprechun, Lucky Charms, because they have a mural right next to the plants with those two things on it. So I'm like, really, it makes you hungry when you're near there that they have the largest collection of green silos in one area in the world. But a lot of them are abandoned now. And so when you go along the river front, you learn about this history. You see all these big old structures, but they're like, prime real estate for developing into different kinds of things.   [00:37:01.820] - Tamara Gruber So some of them this area of Silo City, they're into, like, lofts. And so that will be like part residential, part commercial. And they have an entertainment space and some of them or they will do, like art exhibits or poetry readings or live music, something like that. And we went to one of the bar. Well, there's 1 bar that's there as well called Duende, and we went good cocktails, local craft beer. And they had live music playing outside or just like a very cool settings. So there's a lot of these cool little places, you know, when you're just walking somewhere and you're like, oh, this is neat.   [00:37:40.820] - Tamara Gruber This is cool. This is not chain restaurants or overly busy, overly commercial. It has this nice modern vibe to it. And so we took a walking tour one day, and we met at one of the breweries called Resurgence Brewery. And again, that was a really cool space that felt like it was probably an industrial building and that's been transformed into this brewery. And that's something that we see here in Providence a lot, too. And great beer. So it was a lot of fun. And we definitely did a range of things for the food scene.   [00:38:16.420] - Tamara Gruber We went to Ted's Hot Dogs, which is famous for their spicy meat sauce that they put on their hot dog, of course, went to Anchor Bar because Buffalo wings were invented there. Okay.   [00:38:28.330] - Kim Tate I never knew. I figured it's funny how that becomes such a thing. Are you a Buffalo Wings fan to start with?   [00:38:37.160] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, I love buffalo wings but I like them crispy with a lot of sauce.   [00:38:44.110] - Kim Tate I don't like the skin to be kind of rubbery. No, I like it crispy. And I also like lots of sauce. It's tricky finding those, because so often I find that they're not fried enough.   [00:38:57.580] - Tamara Gruber I agree. And I actually will say I Anchor Bar not my favorite wings that I've ever had, but it's definitely a tourist attraction. It's the kind of thing where you can buy swag from the T shirts and all that. And it's like a food challenge.   [00:39:10.850] - Kim Tate Like you have to eat a plate of wings to earn a shirt or something.   [00:39:13.750] - Tamara Gruber All the locals are, like, the only people that go to Anchor Bar, the tourist.   [00:39:18.380] - Kim Tate But fine.   [00:39:19.130] - Tamara Gruber They have a good business for that. Everyone has their own favorites, and they also have Buffalo style pizza. They have something called sponge candy, which I remember when I was told about it. I expect it to be like those marshmallowy kind of candies that you get in a sampler box. But it's not. It's actually like the circus peanuts kind of. And I wonder if it was going to be like that, too, but it's actually more of like a coffee, like a square, like an inch square crunchy butter crunch or coffee type of candy.   [00:39:51.880] - Kim Tate So I'm near bubbles in it. That's where it's sponge.   [00:39:55.240] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. And actually, what we found out was if you just leave it out when it's not sealed, then it I get spongy. It was not as crispy the second day. Yeah, it wasn't, again, my favorite, but it was interesting to seek it out. And it's just one of those things that you see everywhere, and people just don't understand that you don't know what sponge candy is.   [00:40:15.440] - Kim Tate Yeah. That's funny.   [00:40:16.850] - Tamara Gruber Yeah, it was fun just exploring all of that. I would definitely recommend it if you enjoy the kind of things that I talked about, then give it a shot. Actually, I was looking into flying there, and I think they have direct flights from 20 different cities across the country, so maybe easier to get to than you might expect.   [00:40:38.980] - Kim Tate That sounds cool. It sounds like you had a lot of good experiences.   [00:40:41.870] - Tamara Gruber We did, and I got to hang out with a friend of mine that I used to be very close to. That just don't get to see very much anymore. So that was nice as well. The other thing we did was we visited one of the Frank Lloyd Wright houses.   [00:40:53.960] - Kim Tate Oh, yeah. I saw that.   [00:40:55.130] - Tamara Gruber Yeah.   [00:40:55.630] - Kim Tate That's the one architect I knew. And you were like, which architect? Yes.   [00:41:00.260] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Exactly. I know it's pretty easy between his style and the fact that he is probably the most famous architect. It's an easy guess, right?   [00:41:08.980] - Kim Tate Exactly. Well, it sounds like we both had kind of a nice little end to our summer, and you got to eat some good food. I got some good family time. And now, as we mentioned earlier, cross our fingers that we will see each other in person in October.   [00:41:24.520] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. We will let you guys know so you can follow along. Yeah. Otherwise, good luck with back to school shall even mention that that are going back to school.   [00:41:33.890] - Kim Tate Should you even mention what?   [00:41:35.330] - Tamara Gruber That we both have seniors?   [00:41:38.320] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:41:38.540] - Tamara Gruber I know.   [00:41:40.330] - Kim Tate For those of you who know that we are in the stressful College application time frame of our lives right now, right?   [00:41:49.210] - Tamara Gruber Yeah. Well, especially for me. It's like the last is the last that it's like.   [00:41:55.330] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:41:55.960] - Tamara Gruber The thing of having only one is that it's your first and last at the same time.   [00:42:00.130] - Kim Tate Right? I guess for me, it's also the first one. I feel kind of guilty because my first one's kind of mad that she didn't know more advance. And so she's telling her little sister everything and making me feel really bad. Why didn't you have me take more AP classes?   [00:42:15.740] - Tamara Gruber I'm like. I don't know. So anyways, well, I'm pretty sure if you were, like, take all of these AP classes, she would have said, I don't want to take all these AP classes.   [00:42:27.260] - Kim Tate Well, it's just weird. It's sad how competitive it's gotten because she doesn't love history and routine, so I would never push her into those APS. So she took all the APS she could with math and science. But when you're going against people who've had seven and ten APS, it's a little hard to show up before, but she's a great student, and I'm sure she's going to end up where she's supposed to end up and have a great College experience.   [00:42:54.170] - Tamara Gruber I and Hannah will tell her she's better off that she didn't take a push because it's not really fun class.   [00:43:01.900] - Kim Tate Yeah.   [00:43:02.200] - Tamara Gruber Exactly. Yeah. So anyway, best of luck to everyone out there this year, back to school because obviously continues to be challenging.   [00:43:12.660] - Kim Tate Those who are going back to school. Enjoy your travels. I'm on your time not having to manage it, but, yeah. Thanks for joining us again. And we will look forward to talking to you guys again.   [00:43:23.260] - Tamara Gruber Soon. Take care.  

美文阅读 More to Read
美文阅读 | 尼亚加拉大瀑布 The Falls of Niagara (狄更斯)

美文阅读 More to Read

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 28:25


Daily Quote You may encounter many defeats, but you must not be defeated. In fact, it may be necessary to encounter the defeats, so you can know who you are, what you can rise from, how you can still come out of it. (Maya Angelou) Poem of the Day Love at Sea By Algernon Charles Swinburne Beauty of Words The Falls of Niagara Charles Dickens

D’Amato & Szabo: Wine Thieves
Episode 42: VQA Ontario Wine: The Historical Archives

D’Amato & Szabo: Wine Thieves

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 2, 2021 67:41


What do a British diplomat, a Paris wine shop owner, and a Mosel winegrower have to do with Ontario wine? Listen in to find out - they all defined or shaped Ontario's wine industry in some way.  In this rich episode on the history of the Ontario wine industry, you'll also hear many more legends, tales and genuine anecdotes archived from the mists of distant times in the voices of those who witnessed them. Be there for the death of labrusca wines, and the birth of an appellation system, the scourge of hungry birds and the triumphs of international awards.With a collective experience in the wine industry of well over a century, our guests today include legendary wine writer Tony Aspler, President of Cave Spring Vineyard Len Penachetti, Stratus winemaker Jean-Laurent (“JL”) Groux, and Vineland Estates winemaker Brian Schmidt.  We'll take a look at some of the early plantings in Niagara as well as the confluence of factors in the late 1980s that paved the way to grow the Ontario wine industry into what it is today including, GATT (the general agreement on tariffs and trade), the Wine Content Act, and the aforementioned creation of the Vintner's Quality Alliance, or the VQA as we call it, the appellation authority in Ontario. Tariffs, trade and technicalities aside, the Thieves are most interested in the stories told by many of those that were at the forefront of this burgeoning industry. Grab a glass and listen in to what Sara and John have uncovered from the archives. This episode was created in partnership with Wine Country Ontario although the opinions expressed are entirely those of the Wine Thieves and guests.

Our Numinous Nature
HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL: PAINTING THE AMERICAN WILDERNESS | Documentarian | Vin Tabone

Our Numinous Nature

Play Episode Listen Later Sep 1, 2021 118:00


Vin Tabone is the New York film producer of a PBS-aired, two-part documentary on The Hudson River School: a genre of dramatic, mid-19th century landscape paintings depicting the grandeur & the divine in America's wildernesses. We learn about: the main artists in the movement starting with founder Thomas Cole; the reception from New York City critics; their adventuresome travels to jungles, icebergs, Europe & the Wild West; their use of reoccurring symbols such as storm clouds & tree stumps; and the moral & religious messages they strived to convey. Vin shares fond memories of his childhood on the Hudson, seeing the paintings for the first time, & trips to the unspoiled locations. For story time, he reads "The Bewilderment" from Thomas Cole's journal: a blind & dizzying account of being lost in a stormy, black forest. The last section takes a mystery-provoking sharp turn into a handful of Vin's uncanny & paranormal experiences, adding ever more wonderment to the Our Numinous Nature canon.  Aired on PBS & ALL ARTS channel, watch Vin's documentaries The Hudson River School: Part 1: Artistic Pioneers & Part 2: Cultivating a Tradition via Amazon Prime Video. Reference Images:*Thomas Cole, Lake with Dead Trees [1825]*Thomas Cole, Home in the Woods [1847] *Thomas Cole, The Course of Empire  series [1833-1836]*Thomas Cole, The Voyage of Life series [1842] *Frederic Church, Heart of the Andes [1859]*Frederic Church, Niagara [1857] *Albert Bierstadt, The Rocky Mountains, Landers Peak [1863]*Albert Bierstadt, The Last of the Buffalo [1888]*Albert Bierstadt, Mount Corcoran [1876-1887] *Asher Durand, Kindred Spirits [1849]*Jasper Cropsey, Autumn - On the Hudson River [1860]*Martin Johnson Heade, Hummingbird & Passionflowers [1875-1885] *Sanford Gifford, The Mouth of the Shrewsbury River, [1867] Follow Our Numinous Nature & my naturalist illustrations on InstagramCheck out my shop of shirts, prints, and books featuring my artContact: herbaceoushuman@gmail.com

D’Amato & Szabo: Wine Thieves
VQA Ontario Riesling

D’Amato & Szabo: Wine Thieves

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 58:52


This week the Wine Thieves embark upon the all-important discussion of riesling grown in Ontario, Canada. Ontario's cool-climate wine growing region, enjoys a special status as one of the few regions in the “modern world” where Riesling is a signature grape variety. It is home to vineyards that are now over 40 years old and as of this year, riesling makes up 15% of all VQA Ontario production by volume. The early 1970s gave rose to a quality wine swell in Ontario, at which time riesling dominated the list of vinifera plantings. John and Sara will explore how this came to be and discuss how wine styles today may have been affected by the early viticultural pioneers of riesling. The Thieves invite Emma Garner, winemaker of Thirty Bench Estates, Gabe Demarco, viticulturist and winemaker of Cave Spring Cellars and Charles Baker of Stratus Vineyards who has established a significant following for his single-vineyard, small lot riesling production. They'll discuss regional differences across Ontario and Niagara from the coveted Beamsville Bench to the richer styles of the Lincoln Lakeshore and Niagara-on-the-Lake and from the cooler reaches of Prince Edward County to the southern, sunshine drenched shores of Lake Erie. Increasing demand for sparkling riesling, why the variety is queen of Icewine, and the dynamic balance between acid and sugar in riesling are all on the discussion table.  Pour yourself a glass and join us for this "electric" episode of Wine Thieves! 

American Shoreline Podcast Network
The Heart of Man: Grape Growing and Winemaking in the Great Lakes | North Coast Chronicles

American Shoreline Podcast Network

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 27, 2021 60:45


Join Helen as she talks with Lorri Hathaway, award-winning co-author of The History of Winemaking in Michigan about 150 years of winemaking in the Great Lakes, along with Edward Heineman and his son Dustin from Heineman's Winery - one of the oldest operating family-owned wineries! First launched in the 1800s by savvy businessmen as well as immigrants from German wine country, winemaking began with the use of native grapes such as Concord, Delaware and Niagara. Nineteenth century vintners around the southern Great Lakes enjoyed the good life until the temperance movement heats up and forces many out of business while others survive selling grape juice. Listen as we learn about the simple, sweet wines of yore, the growth of sophisticated palate wines, and why the Great Lakes are the perfect location for grape growing!

Scott and Kat After 9
An Entire Generation Will Never Be Able To Own A Home

Scott and Kat After 9

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 25, 2021 34:16


Today: Reports say vaccine passports are coming in the next two weeks, onlyFans backtracks on last week's announcement, Coupons in the fast-food apps, Flower scented roads, Scott was in Niagara on the Lake this weekend, and the federal leaders are all talking about housing affordability. They better act fast because the dream is dying for millions of people. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Office Deep Dive with Brian Baumgartner

He directed Dinner Party, Niagara, and Office Olympics, among many others. And since then, the man, the legend, and everyone's favorite “bundle of joy” has completely rocked the comedy genre. Director and producer Paul Feig joins Brian this week to jump head first into the big questions: why did the real documentary crew make us relate to the show? How did Paul end up directing Dinner Party? And the most important of all - was Michael *really* the bad guy? Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com

Two Guys Talking Wine
What's Up At Karlo Estates And Meldville with Derek Barnett - Episode 252

Two Guys Talking Wine

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 17, 2021 37:17


We have had the chance to sit down with some great guests this summer. This week we catch up with Derek Barnett about how things are looking in Prince Edward County, and in Niagara. What can we expect from Meldville and Karlo Estates in the near future?

Remember This
Greg: Distilling it all down

Remember This

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 3, 2021 7:11


Greg, 37, shares his outlook on life and career after leaving the corporate world to pursue his dream of opening his own distillery. This episode was submitted via the Remember This app. If you would like to easily create your own audio story, visit http://RememberThisPodcast.com

Midnight Train Podcast
Haunted Rock Venues

Midnight Train Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Aug 2, 2021 119:05


BECOME A PRODUCER! http://www.patreon.com/themidnighttrainpodcast   Find The Midnight Train Podcast: www.themidnighttrainpodcast.com www.facebook.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.twitter.com/themidnighttrainpc www.instagram.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.discord.com/themidnighttrainpodcast www.tiktok.com/themidnighttrainp   And wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.   Subscribe to our official YouTube channel: OUR YOUTUBE   Support our sponsors www.themidnighttraintrainpodcast.com/sponsors   Ep. 112 Haunted Venues   On today's episode we're going on tour!!! That's right Moody and myself are heading back out on the road and this time we're bringing Logan to carry our shit instead of us lugging everyone else's shit! Why are we heading out on tour you ask? Well it's because we are doing a tour of haunted music and theater venues throughout the world! This is an episode we've been wanting to do for a while especially because we've been to quite a few of these places! There's even one in our home town! Like we have at that certain Cleveland venue, we're sure some of our listeners have spent a ton of their time at some of the venues on the list. This is gonna be a fun one for us so hopefully you guys love it too! First up we've got a big one that will be on every list of haunted venues. The House Of Blues in Chicago. So the history of the building took a bit to find because every search for the house of blues in any city comes up with the main house of blues page but with a little digging we found some info on the building's history. The House of Blues is part of a complex called The Marina City complex. The Marina complex is also known as the Corn cob apparently, and looking at it… You can see why. If you're listening in Chicago and are like "what the fuck, nobody calls it that", will remember our mantra.. Don't blame us, blame the internet… Although we did find that reference in a couple spots. The Marina is a mix of residential condos and commercial buildings built between 1961-1968. The complex consists of two 587-foot, 65-story apartment towers, a 10-story office building which is now a hotel, and a saddle-shaped auditorium building originally used as a cinema. When finished, the two towers were both the tallest residential buildings and the tallest reinforced concrete structures in the world. The complex was built as a "city within a city", featuring numerous on-site facilities including a theater, gym, swimming pool, ice rink, bowling alley, stores, restaurants, and, of course, a marina. WLS-TV (ABC Channel 7) transmitted from an antenna atop Marina City until the Willis Tower (formerly known as Sears Tower) was completed. Marina City was the first post-war urban high-rise residential complex in the United States and is widely credited with beginning the residential renaissance of American inner cities. These days the complex is home to the Hotel Chicago, 10pin bowling lounge, and several restaurants including… You fucking guessed it... Dick's Last Resort bitches!!! Oh and also the complex is home to the house of blues. The house of blues was built in the shell of the cinema which was out of use for quite some time. The story is that the hob is haunted by the spirit of a little girl that died due to an illness. There are many reports of weird things happening. The most circulated story seems to be that of a little boy who was playing with some of his toys toys. As he was playing he stepped away for a moment and when he came back he saw a little girl playing with his toys. She asked him if he'd like to play with her. FUCK THAT SHIT!!!! The little boy screamed and the girl vanished. Oddly enough, I did find a comment on one website from a man named Skyler seeming to corroborate this story. The comment reads as follows:              " This can not be… no way… I have performed there 2 times. once was in 2013, and there was a boy in the back playing with his cars. a few minutes after he screamed and started to cry. I was feeling bad,, but this can't be him… also know that in 2015 in march i had another performance and all the lights turned off. This is too creepy."   Was this the same boy that the story is referring too? Who knows. We also found several comments from people staying in what we assume is the hotel Chicago as it's in the complex and pretty much right next to the house of blues. There's comment also claim the hotel is haunted. One of the claims says this:            "It's haunted!!! I saw a middle aged/older woman (dressed in clothing from a period long ago) in my room when I stayed there in 1999/2000. I woke in the early morning to see a woman staring at me. I went through a rational thought process of it being my female business colleague (who stayed in a separate room) and I thought, oh well she can sleep in the other bed (it was a double room & I was in the bed furthest away from the front door) and then quickly snapped out of it and said to myself she has her own room why would she be in my room, I opened my eyes again and that's when I could see it was a woman clearly (w/ angry face) staring at me. I then thought this is a stranger/intruder in my room – I laid there with my eyes just open enough to see – she was there staring at me & she still didn't look happy. I laid there thinking of what to do – I decided I was going to reach and turn the light on and then charge her or run after her when she ran for the door (fortunately, there was a switch right next to the bed). HOWEVER, when I reached for the light and turned it on she was gone. This is what makes this story interesting — I called the front desk and simply asked, ‘had anything significant ever happened at the site of the hotel' (b/c as the person above points out, its not an old or historic looking building (e.g. PreWar). I asked another question that any tourist could have just asked (I don't recall what it was right now). She said immediatley, “No, why did you see a ghost?” My response was, yea, I saw a ghost, I'm in my twenties and not some nut job.” I asked if anyone else had ever reported seeing a ghost and she said, “No.” Anyway, when I met up with my colleague, she could tell I was shaken up and I was pretty pale (like “I had seen a host.”). My story has never changed in all this time. I did stay at the hotel 1 other time after (not in the same room) & didn't see anything – but I slept with the bathroom light on… Scary & Cool experience for sure!"   Sounds spooky!    Next on our list of haunted venues we are heading to Milwaukee! Which is actually pronounced meely waukay, which is Algonquin for the good land. Now the Rave is amazing for several reasons: first it's the location of one of Moody's favorite tour stories which also involves Jon and our friend Brad from Voudoux.  2: it's huge and creepy as shit. 3: the pool... The Rave/Eagles Club is a 180,000 square foot, seven-level, live entertainment complex in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The building contains eight independent clubs with capacities ranging from 400 to 3500. The Eagles Ballroom is the building's showpiece, featuring a 25,000 square feet (2,300 m2) oval wooden dance floor, originally installed when the building was constructed, in addition to a large, old-fashioned domed ceiling and a stage on one side. Originally a ballroom, it has hosted everything from boxing matches to concerts to ethnic dances. The ballroom head hosted huge acts ranging from Bob Dylan to Green day, from the grateful dead to slayer and of course none other than Lil Pump.    Along with the eagles ballroom, the building houses the Rave hall, The eagles hall, the Rave bar, The Rave craft beer lounge, The penthouse lounge, and the eagles club.  Since its construction in 1926, the Eagles Club has known several incarnations. Prominently among them, it housed the Fraternal Order of the Eagles, a notable organization whose considerable impacts on America's cultural landscape remain in effect today.   In 1939, the idea of using the building for music presentations took hold, reinventing its purpose. The grand ballroom became a popular venue for big band music, such as band leaders Guy Lombardo and Glen Miller and their orchestras. Soon, other types of music, theatre and performing arts also offered shows and concerts in the large, elegant ballroom; from 1939 through the mid-sixties. Comedians like Bob Hope and Red Skeleton did stand-up comedy. In 1959, people who bought a $1.50 ticket to the Winter Dance Party, were treated to the music of Buddy Holly and the Crickets, Big Bopper, Dion and the Belmonts, and Richie Valens. This would be the last show for buddy Holly before he died. In 1964, The Eagles Club had its first rock concert, with the Dave Clark Five performing on the ballroom stage. The 1970s brought even more famous groups and people, such as Eric Clapton, Crosby, Stills and Nash and other rising rock stars.When the Athletic Club was closed, a homeless men's shelter opened up temporarily in the basement area, providing shelter for the destitute which is life-saving during the freezing winter months. By the late 1980s, The Eagles Club was in a state of disrepair and The Eagle Club put it out on the real estate market, after getting it listed on The National Register of Historic Places, in 1986.  In late 1992, the Eagles Club was rescued when it was bought by Wauwatosa businessman Anthony J. Balestrieri and his wife, Marjorie, who performed in the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra. They began the long process of restoring the historic beauty of the elegant ballroom and interior art, as well as the outside facade. They also restored and renovated other areas turning the building into the multi venue building it is today.    We wanted to include this history because: A. We love the history of places like this and B. It shows how many things this building way used for and how many people have passed through the building. We all know where there tons of history there tends to be ghost stories!    Let's get into the spooky shit! Remember the pool we mentioned earlier… Well at one point a 17 year old boy had a fucking heart attack and died in the pool. Later, at least two more children would die in the pool. This would ultimately cause the closure of the athletic club.  Also the man who ran the homeless shelter was said to be extremely cruel and abusive to the men staying there.    The basement area which is the home of the former men's shelter, is one of the more haunted areas. The shelter manager mentioned earlier is thought to be the reason behind the heavy negative energy felt there. Cold spots are often felt by staff in the late hours after closing. Shadow people have often been reported by staff as well as band members packing up after a show.    Next is the pool area, which we've seen and it's fucking creepy. A little girl is said to roam around the area. People have heard her laughter and have said her presence can bring a sense of dread. Staff have said they have heard shuffling footsteps and have smelled a strong odor of bleach in the pool area.    In the boiler room under the pool, a former employee still hangs and he doesn't like people in his area. "Jack" was once recorded telling a group on a ghost hunt to "get out, get out now" Apparently, you can find a video of this on YouTube, we'll try and find it to post on our page.   The ballroom has had its share of apparitions hanging around during sound checks and after shows when everyone has left. An employee told a story of when he was standing on the floor of The Eagles Ballroom, making sure that the people going to the roof patio didn't “get lost” and go into the Eagles Ballroom by design.  He said that one of his fellow workers had seen what they thought was a man, standing in one of the second floor boxes located above the Eagles Ballroom. He called security and when they approached this person, he ran down the aisle but disappeared before the staff person that was behind him and the security person cutting off his escape could try to grab him.    One other common theme is people hearing either happy laughing children or sad crying children. Some staff have stated they've seen entities of children playing in groups.    We've been here.. This place is awesome. Also another fun tidbit… not to far away from the Rave is the ambassador hotel. Which of you're up on your serial killers, you know is the place where Jeffrey Dahmer killed his first victim in Milwaukee. Steven Tuomi was Jeffrey Dahmer's first victim in Milwaukee. Dahmer met Tuomi in September of 1987. At the time, Dahmer was out on probation after molestation charges of a minor. The two men spent the night together drinking heavily and visiting multiple bars. Later that night, they ended up in a room together in the Ambassador, room 507, which is a room some Dahmer historians have requested to stay in. Dahmer killed Toumi while he was in a drunken stupor. Upon waking up to find Tuomi dead, Dahmer put the body in a suitcase and took it to his grandmother's house where he was living. In the basement, he acted out necrophiliac desires and then dismembered the body. Supposedly when Dahmer awoke to find Tuomi dead, the body was in an awkward position hanging off the side of the bed. Some visitors have reported instances of waking up to discover their partner in a similarly awkward position.   Visitors to room 507 have reported a variety of experiences, such as a heaviness to the room that they can't quite explain. Some people get woken up in the middle of the night by odd circumstances. There's an extra little bit for ya!!!   Info on the Hauntings and most of the historical facts on the Rave was taken from an excellent article on hauntedhouses.com   Next up we're gonna head across the pond, so to speak. We're heading to London and the famous Royal Albert Hall! This place has a long and rich history behind it. The Royal Albert Hall was built on what was once the Gore estate, at the centre of which stood Gore House. The three acre estate was occupied by political reformer William Wilberforce between 1808-1828 and subsequently occupied between 1836-1849 by the Countess of Blessington and Count D'Orsay.   After the couple left for Paris in May 1851, the house was opened as the ‘Universal Symposium of All Nations', a restaurant run by the first celebrity chef, Alexis Soyer, who planned to cater for the Great Exhibition in Hyde Park.   After the exhibition and following the advice of Prince Albert, Gore House and its grounds were bought by the Exhibition's Royal Commission to create the cultural quarter known as Albertopolis. A complex of public Victorian buildings were developed to house exhibits from the Great Exhibition and to further the study of art, science and industry. On May 20, 1867 7,000 people gathered under a purpose-built marquee to watch Queen Victoria lay the Hall's red Aberdeen granite foundation stone, which today can be found underneath K stalls, row 11, seat 87 in the main auditorium. The Queen announced that “It is my wish that this Hall should bear his name to whom it will have owed its existence and be called The Royal Albert Hall of Arts and Sciences”, as a 21 gun salute was heard from Hyde Park and a trumpet fanfare from HM Life Guards sounded. By December 1870 construction of the Hall had moved on so much that HM Queen Victoria and her daughter Princess Beatrice visited the Hall to listen to the acoustics.   Almost three months later, on 25 February 1871, the Hall's first concert was held to an audience for 7,000 people comprising the workmen and their families, various officials and the invited public. Amateur orchestra, The Wandering Minstrels, played to test the acoustics from all areas of the auditorium.    This place has been running as a venue for 150 years! Again… History breeds ghosts and Hauntings! There's so much history in this building that we are not going to be able to include but please check out the official website for the royal Albert Hall to really drive into the history of this place. You won't be sorry you did. We gave you the beginnings to show how long this place has been around. We're gonna get right into the spooky shit though!    On 13 July 1930 the Spiritualist Association rented the Royal Albert Hall for a seance for Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, following the death of the Sherlock author on 7 July.   Conan Doyle was a spiritualist and believed in the existence beyond the grave. Upon his death 10,000 people gathered expectantly in the Hall to watch a medium take to the stage, hoping to witness some supernatural activity and hear a message from Conan Doyle from the other side…          Lady Doyle: “Although I have not spoken to Arthur since he passed, I am certain that in his own time and his own way he will send a message to us” Time Magazine, 21 July 1930   Lady Conan Doyle took to the stage alongside members of his family, with a vacant chair on her right reserved for her late husband.Time Magazine, who attended the seance, reports:   ‘Mrs. Estelle Roberts, clairvoyant, took the stage. She declared five spirits were “pushing” her. She cried out their messages. Persons in the audience confirmed their validity. Suddenly Mrs. Roberts looked at Sir Arthur's empty chair, cried: “He is here.” Lady Doyle stood up. The clairvoyant's eyes moved as though accompanying a person who was approaching her. “He is wearing evening clothes,” she murmured. She inclined her head to listen. A silent moment. Her head jerked up. She stared at Lady Doyle, shivered, ran to the widow, whispered. Persons nearby could hear: “Sir Arthur told me that one of you went into the hut [on the Doyle estate] this morning. Is that correct?” Lady Doyle, faltering: “Why, yes.” She beamed. Her eyes opened widely. The clairvoyant to Lady Doyle: “The message is this. Tell Mary [eldest daughter]…' Time Magazine, 21 July 1930   At this the audience rose in a clamor, and the great organ of the Hall began to peal, the noise drowning out the answer of Mrs Roberts.   But what was the message delivered to Lady Doyle that night? Did the ghost of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle really visit the Royal Albert Hall on that night in 1930?   Seances are always fun and definitely work as we found out...yea...right….   Here's some more stories taken straight from the RAH website!   THE GIRLS Beneath the Door 6 foyer, in the carpeted basement area, there is one spot where two young women, known as ‘the girls', briefly appear each  November 2nd a little before 2am, when the building is almost deserted, except for some security staff.   Over the years, several staff members reported hearing ‘the girls' laughing, and seeing their animated and excited silhouettes appear, clothed in the fashion of slightly risqué Victorian ladies (extravagant long dark dresses embellished with lace from neck to bodice, with many ruffles, especially around the sleeves and hem, and their hair styled in cottage-loaf buns with ringlets hanging over their ears). The Duty Security Incident Book indicates that there had been appearances by ‘the girls' for the three years prior to 1991. They have been seen passing across the foyer space, which is bounded by double doors at each end, leading on one side to the staff canteen (where we still eat today) and on the other to the kitchen corridor, and then disappear. That is why some believe that ‘the girls' may be responsible for unexplained accidents, tappings and footsteps that occur behind locked doors late at night in the kitchens. Assistants Chefs, who have to clean the kitchen every night after use, often used to hear noises and have been frightened whilst in that area.    FATHER WILLIS Whenever restoration work is carried out on our organ, its original constructor Henry Willis, fondly nicknamed ‘Father Willis', returns as a stooped ghost wearing a black skull cap. When the organ was being reconstructed in 1924, workmen saw a little old man walk down the stairs late one afternoon. On returning to their workshop and relating the facts, their foreman asked what the man was wearing. When told that he was donning a black skull cap, the foreman decided it was the ghost of Father Willis, the original builder of the organ, long since dead, who would not approve of the alterations being undertaken. Since then there have been many reports of a sudden cold atmosphere in the area behind the organ.   When interviewed in 2018, Michael Broadway, the Hall's organ custodian was asked if he had ever seen signs of the legendary ghost of Henry Willis. He answered: “I remember the organ builder Clifford Hyatt telling me about this over forty years ago. The tuner […] was making the final visit of the Willis contract before the Harrison & Harrison rebuild in the 1920s. When he got up on to the Great passage board he saw Father Willis there saying ‘They shan't take my organ from me'. A lovely story, but I haven't seen him. There are many questions I would ask him and hopefully have his approval of the way I look after this instrument. Perhaps he has no reason to be disturbed.”    THE MAN IN WHITE During a Jasper Carrott comedy event in May 1990, the Duty Manager was ordered to clear the Middle Choir seats and to post a Steward at either end to avoid anyone entering as it is very distracting for a performer to have people walking across the back of the stage during the show. That's why a very angry Stage Manager demanded on radio to know why there was someone crossing the stage. The description was of a man dressed in white, walking oddly as if on drugs. The Stewards insisted no one had passed them and on further investigation no one except Jasper Carrott was onstage, but several people had seen the figure cross the stage from left to right.   THE VICTORIAN COUPLE A staff member during the 2000s reported having seen a couple in Victorian clothing walk across the second tier near to Door Six and vanish into a box. As a venue whose history is so closely tied to the Victorian times, this didn't seem particularly odd (people dress up sometimes…)   But in 2011, a Head Steward was finishing off his shift one evening and had made sure that all members of the public had left the second tier. On going downstairs into the auditorium, he noticed a couple sitting in the box so he returned to the second tier but found no one in the box. He assumed they had left while he was on his way back, so once again he returned to the auditorium… Only to see them again. So he went back to the second tier, and that's when he heard the couple chattering. He assumed they were in the box but on opening the door, there was no one there.   There are several more accounts on their website and tons and tons of stories all over the web about experiences at the historical venue. It sounds like it's one crazy place!!!   We've got a couple more for you guys.                Next up is another club we've been too, the Masquerade in Atlanta. The Masquerade features three indoor venues with capacities ranging from 300 to 1000, appropriately named Heaven, Hell and Purgatory.  The Masquerade was founded in 1988 at the historic DuPre Excelsior Mill, a former excelsior mill at 695 North Avenue in the Old Fourth Ward neighborhood. The venue had both indoor and outdoor concert space. It was sold in 2006 and moved in late November 2016 after it was made part of a new mixed-use development called North + Line. The building was designated as historic by the city and all of the original parts will be saved through adaptive reuse. The masquerade had hosted tons of national and local acts from cannibal corpse to the greatest entertainer in history, Weird Al Yankovic.     This night club is said to be visited by the spirits who died in fire and tuberculosis outbreaks long ago, both of which killed several members of the building's former staff. Apparitions have been seen and unexplained footsteps have been reported.One popular story is that of a large and tall black man who is always seen walking around the nightclub. The staff believes that it is this man who turns the musical amplifiers every night.   The staff has also reported hearing footsteps from unidentified sources, as well as cold spots all throughout the building. Horrifying screams can also be heard coming from the back of the stairs even when there is no one there. They believe that the screams come from the young woman who died in a freakish accident in the nightclub. Nowadays, there are rumors that real vampires come to the nightclub and even live there.  Some people believe that this rumor has been spread to promote business as vampires have suddenly become very popular.   Next up were heading to Nashville and a place the Moody had been to, but not for music, for the national beard and mustache competition. He did not place unfortunately. The auditorium opened as the Union Gospel Tabernacle in 1892. Its construction was spearheaded by Thomas Ryman, a Nashville businessman who owned several saloons and a fleet of riverboats.When Ryman died in 1904, his memorial service was held at the tabernacle. During the service, it was proposed the building be renamed Ryman Auditorium, which was met with the overwhelming approval of the attendees. The building was originally designed to contain a balcony, but a lack of funds delayed its completion. The balcony was eventually built and opened in time for the 1897 gathering of the United Confederate Veterans, with funds provided by members of the group. As a result, the balcony was once called the Confederate Gallery.[5] Upon the completion of the balcony, the Ryman's capacity rose to 6,000. A stage was added in 1901 that reduced the capacity to just over 3,000. Though the building was designed to be a house of worship – a purpose it continued to serve throughout most of its early existence – it was often leased to promoters for nonreligious events in an effort to pay off its debts and remain open. In 1904, Lula C. Naff, a widow and mother who was working as a stenographer, began to book and promote speaking engagements, concerts, boxing matches, and other attractions at the Ryman in her free time.  Naff gained a reputation for battling local censorship groups, who had threatened to ban various performances deemed too risqué. In 1939, Naff won a landmark lawsuit against the Nashville Board of Censors, which was planning to arrest the star of the play Tobacco Road due to its provocative nature. The court declared the law creating the censors to be invalid W.C. Fields, Will Rogers in 1925, Charlie Chaplin, Bob Hope with Doris Day in '49, Harry Houdini in '24, and John Philip Sousa (among others) performed at the venue over the years, earning the Ryman the nickname, "The Carnegie Hall of the South". The Ryman in its early years also hosted Marian Anderson in 1932, Bill Monroe (from KY) and the Bluegrass Boys in '45, Little Jimmy Dickens in '48, Hank Williams in '49, The Carter Sisters with Mother Maybelle Carter in 1950, Elvis in '54, Johnny Cash in '56, trumpeter Louis Armstrong in '57, Patsy Cline in '60, Lester Flatt & Earl Scruggs (bluegrass) in '64, and Minnie Pearl in '64. The Grand Ole Opry was first broadcast from the Ryman on June 5, 1943, and originated there every week for nearly 31 years thereafter. Every show sold out, and hundreds of fans were often turned away. During its tenure at Ryman Auditorium, the Opry hosted the biggest country music stars of the day and became a show known around the world. Melding its then-current usage with the building's origins as a house of worship, the Ryman got the nickname "The Mother Church of Country Music", which it still holds to this day. The last Opry show at the Ryman occurred the previous evening, on Friday, March 15. The final shows downtown were emotional. Sarah Cannon, performing as Minnie Pearl, broke character and cried on stage. When the plans for Opryland USA were announced, WSM president Irving Waugh also revealed the company's intent to demolish the Ryman and use its materials to construct a chapel called "The Little Church of Opryland" at the amusement park. Waugh brought in a consultant to evaluate the building, noted theatrical producer Jo Mielziner, who had staged a production at the Ryman in 1935. He concluded that the Ryman was "full of bad workmanship and contains nothing of value as a theater worth restoring." Mielziner suggested the auditorium be razed and replaced with a modern theater. Waugh's plans were met with resounding resistance from the public, including many influential musicians of the time. Members of historic preservation groups argued that WSM, Inc. (and Acuff, by proxy) exaggerated the Ryman's poor condition, saying the company was worried that attachment to the old building would hurt business at the new Opry House. Preservationists leaned on the building's religious history and gained traction for their case as a result. The outcry led to the building being added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Following the departure of the Opry, the Ryman sat mostly vacant and deteriorating for nearly 20 years, as the neighborhood surrounding it continued to see the increasing effects of urban decay.  In 1986, as part of the Grand Ole Opry 60th-anniversary celebration, CBS aired a special program that featured some of the Opry's legendary stars performing at the Ryman. While the auditorium was dormant, major motion pictures continued to be filmed on location there, including John Carpenter's Elvis (1979), Coal Miner's Daughter (1980 – Loretta Lynn Oscar-winning biopic), Sweet Dreams (1985 – story of Patsy Cline), and Clint Eastwood's Honkytonk Man (1982). A 1979 television special, Dolly & Carol in Nashville, included a segment featuring Dolly Parton performing a gospel medley on the Ryman stage. In 1989, Gaylord Entertainment began work to beautify the Ryman's exterior. The structure of the building was also improved, as the company installed a new roof, replaced broken windows, and repaired broken bricks and wood. In October 1992, executives of Gaylord Entertainment announced plans to renovate the entire building and expand it to create modern amenities for performers and audiences alike, as part of a larger initiative to invest in the city's efforts to revitalize the downtown area. The first performance at the newly renovated Ryman was a broadcast of Garrison Keillor's A Prairie Home Companion on June 4, 1994. Beginning in November 1999, the Opry was held at Ryman Auditorium for three months, mostly due to the success of the January shows, but partly due to the ongoing construction of Opry Mills shopping mall next door to the Grand Ole Opry House. The Opry has returned to the Ryman for all of its November, December, and January shows every year since then, allowing the production to acknowledge its roots while also taking advantage of a smaller venue during the off-peak season for tourism and freeing the Grand Ole Opry House for special holiday presentations.The Ryman has also served as a gathering place for the memorial services of many prominent country music figures. Tammy Wynette, Chet Atkins, Skeeter Davis, Harlan Howard, Bill Monroe, Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash, Billy Block, George Hamilton IV, Earl Scruggs, and Jim Ed Brown have all been memorialized from the Ryman stage. In 2018, the Ryman was named the most iconic structure in Tennessee by Architectural Digest. And just because….On June 9, 2019, Wu-Tang Clan performed the first pure rap concert ever at the Ryman. The concert was sold out.   Again, we like to give history on these places for context and honestly it's just interesting to us so whatever. But this again illustrates the point that many crazy things happened here over the years as many many people have passed through this auditorium… Including Moody.   Ok, so let's get to the ghosts and spooky shit. Ryman's spirit was fine with most performances but would rise if the people onstage were getting a bit risqué. Apparently, he disrupted shows by stomping around the room so loudly that spectators were forced to leave. Famously, the ghost wreaked havoc while the opera Carmen was taking place. Probably because it tells the story of a gypsy temptress.    During the grand ole Opry period, rumors surfaced that the venue was cursed since apparently, most singers that performed there wound up dead. A total of 37 people met their fate in the most gruesome ways, dying from O.D.s, car accidents, fires, or slaughterings. Among the artists believed to have succumbed to the curse are: Stringbean Akeman, Patsy Cline, Texas Ruby, and many more. In a blog post by Virginia Lamkin titled Haunted Ryman Auditorium, the author explains that when the show relocated to the Opryland USA theme park, 14 additional acts died. It is believed that the curse followed because a large portion of the Ryman Auditorium stage was cut out and brought to the new location.   The spirit often referred to as “The Grey Man,” is believed to have been one of the Confederate soldiers who frequented the auditorium during post-war gatherings. Some say they've witnessed him sitting in the balcony while artists rehearse. He watches the stage steadily but disappears as soon as anyone gets too close.   ”The lady,” on the other hand, isn't a spectator; she's a performer. Believed to be the ghost of Patsy Cline, she has been heard singing by staff. Usually, her performance happens late at night as they prepare to close. Patsy Cline, who died tragically in a plane crash, has also been linked to the Opry Curse. Could the curse not only kill but also trap artists in the venue?   Speaking of Opry Curse victims, Hank Williams is said to have been another casualty. The successful singer/songwriter passed away in 1953, after mixing prescription drugs with alcohol. Similar to the other artists haunting the auditorium, Hank's voice has been heard clear as day by employees. They have also heard his songs being played onstage, without explanation. Along with Patsy, Hank Williams' soul has lingered in the old venue ever since he passed.   The info on the history of the ryman comes mostly from their own website while the stories of the hauntings we found on the website ghostcitytours.com   Next up is the Phoenix theater in Petaluma California. The club has been in existence since 1905 and has changed in both structure and purpose, mostly due to severe damage caused by several fires. Petaluma's Phoenix Theater has been entertaining Sonoma County residents for over 116 years. Hosting everyone from the likes of Harry Houdini to Green Day, the fabled teen center and music venue has a varied and interesting history.   The entertainment center opened in 1904 as the Hill Opera House. The structure was designed by San Francisco architect Charles Havens, who also designed Petaluma's Carlson-Currier Silk Mill in 1892. The Beaux Arts-style theater hosted operas, theatrical performances, high school graduations and music for over 15 years until the early 1920s when it was gutted by fire.   In 1925, the venue reopened as the California Theatre playing silent films accompanied by music. A Jan. 24, 1925, Press Democrat article proclaimed the showplace the “largest playhouse in Petaluma and one of the finest theaters of Northern California.” A packed house attended the opening night performance which include a double feature picture show and live entertainment.   The theater switched to movies with sound in later years and lost major sections of its roof to a second fire in 1957. Petaluma's Tocchini family bought the floundering venue in 1967 switching to a program of live music and entertainment.   In 1983, the theater was renamed the Phoenix - reflecting its ability to be reborn from the ashes. Tom Gaffey, a young man who had grown up in Petaluma and worked at both the California and the Showcase theaters, was hired as manager, a position he holds to this day. The theater gained unwanted attention after a late-night performance by the band Popsicle Love Sponge performed a questionable act with the body of what was believed to be a dead chicken. The late-night shows ended, but the movies continued for a short time.   Today the venue serves as a graffiti-covered teen center and venue for rock, punk, reggae and more. In 1996, it hosted the last show of the Long Beach ska band Sublime as well as rock and punk legends the Ramones, Red Hot Chili Peppers, X, Metallica and Primus. The guiding principle of the Phoenix has always been that it's "everyone's building" and this was formalized in the early 2000's when the Phoenix became a 501(c)3 nonprofit  community center.   This place sounds pretty awesome. This following except it's taken directly from their website :               The Phoenix Theater is open seven days a week, generally from 3pm to 7pm, for drop-in “unstructured” use. Our building interior is large and soulful, with several rooms to accommodate a variety of activities. On a typical afternoon, you'll find kids playing acoustic music (we've got two pianos and a big stage), skateboarding (across the large wooden floor and up one of four quarter-pipe ramps), doing homework in the tutoring room, or sitting in one of the overstuffed sofas: reading, talking with friends, or napping. There's always a staff member onsite, but the atmosphere is casual.    On top of this they have free music programs from lessons to recording to production to podcasting to band management and everything in between. Also they have many programs for teens in the art community to hone their skills. Not only that they have a teen health center to help inform teens and help them make better, more  conscientious choices regarding their personal health. They also have services for  transitive health and STD help as well. We feel like every town needs a place like this. Especially if it's haunted!!! Speaking of which we found an interview that Gaffney did where he talks about some of his experiences and other things that have happened. The following was taken from petaluma360.com:   Gaffey began by talking about his earliest days. “It was my job to close the theater down. By 10:15 it would just be me, and whatever people were watching the movie. Near the end, I'd go up to the projection booth. After the audience exited, I'd turn off the projector, come down onto the stage where the sound equipment was, turn off the amps, check doors, balcony, bathrooms, lock the doors, hit the security alarm, then go out the door by the box office.”   On three separate nights, as he was leaving, the box office phone rang.   Gaffey explained the building had five phone stations. The light on the box office phone indicated the call was from the projection booth.   “I'd have to turn off the alarm and pick up the phone. ‘Hello? Hello? Hello?' But there was nobody there.   “You can't believe in ghosts when you're shutting down a theater. You have to check.   “Three times I mustered my courage, turned the lights back on and burst into the projection booth. There was no one there.   “That was my first experience, when I was an unknown here, a spooky ‘welcome back.'”   Gaffey is quick to temper his conversation with “it could have been” and “maybe someone playing pranks.” He keeps an open mind. Ghosts or explainable experiences: it's for the individual to decide.   “Blue lights have been seen floating through the building. There's the Little Kid: he'd been seen even when I was a kid working down here. And one night, sleeping on stage as a teen, I could hear and feel big footsteps. I never felt afraid.   “The big guy has been felt by many over the years,” Gaffey said. “We named him Chris. Big Chris. He's the only ghost - if there are ghosts here - who's not from a show business background.” He added that psychics who've visited the theater have talked about Chris dating to the livery stable-era and that someone was murdered on this spot, possibly with a knife.   But Gaffey continued firmly, “My experiences in this building have been warm and protective. “Chris had the spirit of the Phoenix before it became what it is. Chris may have loved this spot. I think it's one of the coolest corners in town.” He commented he sensed from the warmth he felt as he was talking that Chris was on stage, observing.   Then there's the Little Kid - a boy. “That's an interesting one,” Gaffey said. “Again - a psychic had come in. First off, he talked about the guy in the attic [the projection booth], said he seemed to be older, white hair and faded green, almost khaki, clothing; tall, thin with angular knees and elbows.   The older man, the psychic told Gaffey, is trying to make good on something wrong he felt he did to a child. The psychic added the old man hadn't, however, done anything.   “I'm wondering,” Gaffey said, “if it's the little boy. This was the fly area” - the area to the rear of the stage where backdrops hung. “With stuff hanging here and ladder work, maybe the kid was injured. He's been seen by many. He's got shaggy hair, maybe less than five feet, wearing shorts or knickers, a wool suit and a cap, from the 1920s.”   In the 1990s, a security guard for the thrash metal band GWAR got down off a ladder and asked, “Who's that little kid back there in the exit?” When no one could find the boy, the guard quit.    There is much more to the interview and we would definitely recommend checking it out! We've got one one more venue for you guys even though there are a bunch more out there. Some of the more well known and covered places like Bobby Mackey's in Kentucky, The Avalon in Hollywood, Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carre in New Orleans, The rapids theater in Niagara falls NY among others we've left off but will definitely be back to cover at a future point as the history and Hauntings in these places is awesome.    So that brings us to our home town of Cleveland Ohio and to the World famous Agora Theater. Now this a place where we've both spent many nights jamming out to some great fucking shows. And yes.. Whether you like it or not… Here comes some history fuckers.    The first Agora in Cleveland, informally referred to as Agora Alpha, opened on February 26, 1966, at 2175 Cornell Road in Little Italy near the campus of Case Western Reserve University. In 1967, the Agora moved to a second building on East 24th Street near the campus of Cleveland State University. Once settled in their new location, the new Agora Ballroom, informally referred to as Agora Beta, played a role in giving exposure to many bands, both from the Cleveland area and abroad. Many artists such as Peter Frampton, Bruce Springsteen, Boston, Grand Funk Railroad, ZZ Top, Kiss and many others received much exposure after playing the Agora.[3] The Agora Ballroom was also the setting of the concert by Paul Simon's character in the opening minutes of the 1980 movie One-Trick Pony. The front facade of the Agora Ballroom was temporarily swapped for the one shown in the movie. It is also one of three locations used to record Todd Rundgren's live album Back to the Bars in 1978.   The East 24th Street building also housed Agency Recording Studios, located above the Agora. The onsite recording studio and the close proximity to radio station WMMS allowed for high-quality live concert broadcasts from the Agora. Some of these concerts were later released commercially, including Bruce Springsteen's “The Agora, Cleveland 1978”, the Cars' “Live at the Agora 1978”, Ian Hunter's “You're Never Alone with a Schizophrenic, Deluxe Edition” and Dwight Twilley Band's “Live From Agora”.   The popularity of the club led the Agora to expand during the 1970s and 1980s, opening 12 other clubs in the cities of Columbus, Toledo, Youngstown, Painesville, Akron, Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Tampa, Hallandale, Hartford, and New Haven. However, the Cleveland location is the only one still in existence today.   In 1984, the Agora was damaged by a fire and closed.   The building currently known as the Agora first opened on March 31, 1913, with an English performance of Aida as the Metropolitan Theatre. It was the brainchild of Max Faetkenheuer, an opera promoter and conductor who had also been involved in the construction of the monumental Hippodrome Theatre on Euclid Avenue five years earlier. The new opera house was well received and did well early on, but later struggled to stay profitable. Among various uses, the Metropolitan was home to a Cleveland's Yiddish theatre troupe in 1927. This brief episode in its history came to an end a few months later in 1928 after the troupe was involved in a bus accident on the way to a performance in Youngstown; the actors were too injured to perform and the venture went bankrupt. By 1932, the venue had turned into a vaudeville/burlesque house called "The Gayety," hosting "hoofers, comics and strippers." The Metropolitan returned to its original use for a short time during the mid-1940s staging comedic musicals, but by the end of the decade stage productions had ceased and the theatre became a full-time movie house. From 1951–78, the theater offices were home to radio stations WHK (1420 AM) and WMMS (100.7 FM); the theater itself was known as the WHK Auditorium. In 1968–69 the theater was known as the Cleveland Grande. In the early 1980s, it briefly re-opened as the New Hippodrome Theatre showing movies. Following the fire which damaged the Agora Ballroom on East 24th Street, club owner Henry LoConti, Sr. decided to move to the 5000 Euclid Avenue location. Following extensive renovations, the new Agora Metropolitan Theater, the third Cleveland venue to bear the Agora name, opened in October 1986. The Agora has two rooms: a 500-person capacity, standing-room-only ballroom with adjoining bar, and an 1800-seat theater.   As far as some spooky shit goes, we were able to get some info straight from the source! We spoke with Mike who works at the agora and we got some cool stuff from him. In an email mine related the following information.            "Prior to our merger with AEG Presents, I used to lead our ‘Ghost Tours' with a group called Black Sheep Paranormal.   While I didn't know what to expect, and I wasn't exactly familiar with paranormal investigations, that quickly changed working with the group.             One of the members of the Black Sheep Paranormal group was a retired police officer. Pretty easy to say he's seen some shit, and could be characterized as fearless. Another member told him to check out the men's room, where we have a utility closest between our sinks and stalls. From past experiences, we usually get some decent activity from that closest. However, nothing occurred this time. After giving up on this spot, the team member decided to use the bathroom. Seconds later, he hears **CLAP, CLAP, CLAP** from behind his neck, and he exited the bathroom about as white as a ghost.   Oh man… Good thing he was in the bathroom in case he pissed himself!! This next story is pretty crazy. He talks about "The Cleaning Lady"!             "One of the known spirits at The Agora, who we call “The Cleaning Lady,” as you could have guessed, was responsible for cleaning the venue many decades ago. While I'm not exactly sure what happened to her, she was said to have fallen off our balcony, and died. One night, during an investigation, we were sitting in silence at the top of our balcony on the left hand side. As we sat there, we started to hear sweeping sounds. As the broom sweeps started to happen for a few seconds, all of the sudden, the sound traveled from the left side of the venue, all the way to the right side of the venue. We couldn't really explain it, but that's exactly what happened."   Wow! That's awesome! This next one would probably freak a lot of people out… but it's definitely cool.           "Another occurrence was when we were up in one of the suite boxes up in the balcony. The venue was blacked out, and from where we were sitting, you could still see the bar area in our lower level. The bar had a mini fridge up against the wall that had lighting in it. We draped it off with a black table cloth, but there was still exposed light coming from the fridge. As we're sitting there, we see a shadow fading in, and fading out of the light. Almost as if a person was pacing back and forth. We were able to see this because of the light from the fridge. As this shadow figure is pacing back and forth for a good 30 – 60 seconds, one of our team members calls out “if anyone is over by the bar, please make a sound.” And I shit you not, with no hesitation, a stack of plastic cups falls off the bar and onto the ground. That was definitely one of my favorite experiences."   Hopefully we get some action like that on our ghost hunt! Mike goes on to say that he actually got to see an apparition as well!       "Over the years, we've heard and seen many things. We've had items that turn up missing, seen plenty of white anomalies, and other occurrences. Apparitions are rare, but sounds are usually constant. We've heard bangs on our doors, we've heard voices, we've even heard music; big band music to be specific. The apparition I've seen was an unreal experience. We were sitting in the balcony, and we just saw this shadow figure in one of the seats across/behind us. The figure was perfectly human-shaped, but you could see through it. It definitely seemed like it was staring at us the whole time. Sadly, my story telling doesn't do this moment very much justice.   He said that a lot of the investigation stuff was mainly communication based with the spirits. He said they would ask  questions and they frequently got answers. We asked about how the spirits would answer and he told us:             "Most of the time in our investigations, we used dowsing rods for the questions, and asked them to cross the rods in a ‘yes or no' type of questioning. They were always responsive in this form. As long as we got it started, we usually were able to keep the questions going. Obviously, noises would happen all the time. I remember one evening just working (no event going on), but we use to have these ‘garage' type doors for our balcony entry. And for whatever reason, the spirts would not stop banging on them. Like something out of a movie, non-stop banging. That was the same day where my coworker went to use the bathroom, and as she was coming back to the office she heard “There she goes…” in a whisper type voice.   Damn! That's some crazy shit! We would like to thank Mike for his time and this incredible stories of the strange stuff that occurs at the agora! Hometown spooky shit is always awesome!  Top ten horror movie musicals https://screenrant.com/horror-musicals-best-ever-imdb/

chicago victorian long beach california fields american america speaking south new orleans amateur english nashville ny live doyle hollywood comedians cars world house arts rock shadow san francisco hell ghosts sublime united states blues east tennessee elvis clint eastwood cold willis northern california confederate algonquin niagara wisconsin daughter haunted sears tower supposedly hank williams green day cbs roberts royal albert hall showcase haunting green sciences hartford venues kiss milwaukee mrs cleveland bars sherlock eagles garrison keillor std tampa ramones seconds exhibition eric clapton ky kentucky akron bob dylan columbus john carpenter masquerade wu tang clan new haven time magazine minnie pearl opry sir arthur conan doyle moody avalon metallica corn toledo jeffrey dahmer zz top yiddish grand funk railroad country music hosting oddly johnny cash metropolitan purgatory weird al yankovic agora dolly parton charlie chaplin famously paul simon bruce springsteen marina city last resort rave marian anderson john philip sousa crickets hometown countess stage managers conan doyle lil pump waugh queen victoria ambassadors hyde park rah clap will rogers prince albert carnegie hall dahmer gwar beaux arts house of blues stills little italy louis armstrong primus one trick pony steward wauwatosa sr sonoma county petaluma similar buddy holly doris day bob hope earl scruggs apparitions ryman aberdeen harry houdini persons red hot chili peppers case western reserve university all nations cleveland ohio bill monroe believed melding willis tower todd rundgren national register historic places athletic club opryland little church patsy cline ghost tours grand ole opry waylon jennings wsm prairie home companion dave clark five youngstown peter frampton wmms schizophrenic censors cleveland state university ryman auditorium tammy wynette sweet dreams press democrat stewards big chris bobby mackey fraternal order vieux carre albert hall petaluma california deluxe edition richie valens acuff aeg presents never alone big bopper skeeter davis grey man royal commission milwaukee symphony orchestra chet atkins horrifying princess beatrice cleaning lady gaffney tuomi ian hunter great exhibition lulac blue grass boys architectural digest phoenix theater jasper carrott sir arthur glen miller tobacco road belmonts little kids california theatre prominently winter dance party william wilberforce harlan howard guy lombardo old fourth ward jim ed brown sarah cannon honky tonk man painesville north avenue euclid avenue preservationists gayety naff mother church mother maybelle carter prewar hallandale grand ole opry house coal miners become a producer
The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Patricia Pfeffer - Message to Irene

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:28


A startling non-fiction work by psychic-author Patricia Pfeffer, is the result of six years of messages from Moore; messages from the beyond that were channeled through the author's mother, Irene, via automatic writing. Irene passed at age 92 on August 5, 2005. Her handwritten writings of Moore's "messages" came into the author's possession at that time, and she has since transcribed them all to present them in this much more readable form. The result is one unforgettable non-fiction chronicle about life and death. John's paranormal messages to Irene contain advice and instruction on living life in this dimension from someone who sees it from the next. John tells it "the way it is", in eloquent lyrical prose. Interestingly, John T. Moore is not a made-up character - Pfeffer's extensive research reveals authentic photographs and U.S. military records that verifies Moore's existence, military service, and death; many of which are included in this 295-page volume. Born with psychic skills, this mother of three and grandmother of four, Patricia Pfeffer fills her life with adventures in both inner and outer space. A Licensed Pilot, Real Estate Entrepreneur, past member of AGVA, AFTRA, and Actors Equity as professional singer-actress, she spent twenty-five years working with pre-schoolers in developmental training. She has maintained a focus on life, living and learning, the thrust of which has been studying our unknown inner realms by exploring those elusive, obscure and unidentified abilities in the psychic area. Listed in six different Who's Who publications, Past President - local Board of Realtors, Founder-President of CEI, a non-profit corp. http://www.patriciapfeffer.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Mary Ellen - Angel Scribe

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:29


Mary Ellen, is author of the best-selling books, Expect Miracles and A Christmas Filled With Miracles and creator of the highly popular online Angels and Miracles Newsletter. Mary Ellen reminds us that miracles are waiting to be claimed and that there are three steps to manifesting miracles in your life. (1) Set your intention to be a vehicle for having miracles move through you, touching the lives of others. (2) Let God and the Angels know you are willing. (3) Show up. Miracles often do not look like what you think they will. Miracles are often disguised as acts of kindness and you may be an answer to someone's prayers. She has two free inspirational on-line newsletters; Angels and Miracles and her highly popular pet newspaper column Pet Tips 'n' Tales. She resides in Cottage Grove Oregon with her husband and their famous swimming Silver Persian Cats. - www.AngelScribe.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Fabio Araujo - Prophecies

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:27


About 20 years ago Fabio had a premonition. There was a kind of voice (strong thought, actually) commanding "write about prophecies". Fabio began to research prophecies, read books in many languages about it, saved money and went to Europe to spend 3 months visiting libraries, checking books and manuscripts. Last week, one of his books, about prophecies, reached 1st position in Amazon.de among the books about prophecies, above world-wide authors, such as James Redfield, the author of the Celestine Prophecy etc. He has a few books published in the US. Fabio is Brazilian and he lives in Brazil. - www.iappublishing.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Patrick Sims - Demonic Entities

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:27


In religion and mythology, occultism and folklore, a demon (or daemon, daimon; from Greek daimôn) is a supernatural being that is generally described as a malevolent spirit; however, the original neutral connotations of the Greek word daimon does not carry the negative ones that were later projected onto it, as Christianity spread. In Ancient Near Eastern religions as well as in the derived Abrahamic traditions, including ancient and medieval Christian demonology, a demon is considered an "unclean spirit" which may cause demonic possession, to be addressed with an act of exorcism. In Western occultism and Renaissance magic, which grew out of an amalgamation of pagan Greco-Roman, Jewish and Christian tradition, a demon is considered a spiritual entity that may be conjured and controlled. - www.manaministries.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Richard Freeman - Cryptozoologist

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:28


Richard Freeman (born Nuneaton, England, in 1970) is a cryptozoologist, author, zoological journalist, and WebTV Presenter. He is also Zoological Director of the Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ), and co-edits both the journal, Animals & Men and several editions of the annual CFZ Yearbook. Richard Freeman has written, co-written, or edited a number of books, and has contributed widely to both Fortean and zoological magazines, as well as other newspapers and periodicals, including Fortean Times and Paranormal Magazine. He has also lectured across the UK at events such as the Fortean Times Unconvention, the Weird Weekend, Microcon and at museums such as the Natural History Museum and the Grant Museum of Natural History in London. When interviewed by author Nick Redfern in 2005, Freeman claimed an early obsession with the classic science fiction series Dr Who (with Jon Pertwee) had sparked an interest in all things weird. After school he became a zookeeper at Twycross Zoo in the West Midlands and became head keeper of reptiles, working with more than 400 exotic species from ants to elephants (but with a special interest in crocodilians). After leaving the zoo, he worked in an exotic pet shop, a reptile rescue centre, and as a gravedigger. In 1995, Freeman began studying zoology at Leeds University. Whilst on holiday from the university, he learned of the CFZ and bought a copy of the Centre's journal Animals & Men, which left him impressed enough to subscribe and begin contributing. He eventually became the CFZ's Yorkshire representative and, once the course had ended, moved to Devon to become a full-time member of the Centre. He is now the Zoological Director and co-editor of Animals & Men. - http://www.cfz.org.uk ******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Sandi Athey - Professional Intuitive

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:29


Whether it's a love life problem, challenges with finances, or a career that just isn't panning out, Sandi Athey can help you to get back on track. She'll help you discover their own inner voice, while at the same time helping you cut through life's noise to hear your own intuition. She'll share with you how to uncover the blocks that are stopping you from creating the life they desire. With over 20 years of experience as a professional intuitive, Sandi knows how to use the power of her insight to gain better understanding of the motivations that drive human behavior. She'll share knowledge gained over many years of instruction from traditional Native American teachers and leaders of diverse religious organizations. - www.sandiathey.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Dr. Mark Pitstick - Soul Proof

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:27


Mark Pitstick, M.A., D.C., has over thirty-five years experience and training in hospitals, mental health centers, pastoral counseling settings, and holistic private practice. His training includes a premedical degree, graduate theology/pastoral counseling studies, masters in clinical psychology, and doctorate in chiropractic health care. He was certified in past life regression therapy by Brian Weiss, M.D., and the after-death contact technique by Raymond Moody, M.D. Dr. Pitstick also wrote Radiant Wellness: A Holistic Guide for Optimal Body, Mind & Spirit. His books have been endorsed by Drs. Wayne Dyer, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, Deepak Chopra, Bernie Siegel, Ken Ring, Alan Cohen, and others. A frequent radio and TV talk show guest, Mark hosted "Soul-utions," a nationally syndicated radio show about soul issues and practical spirituality. He leads nationwide workshops on spiritual awareness and radiant wellness. Dr. Pitstick has been a review editor and contributor to many magazines and e-zines. Mark founded the Radiant Wellness Centers that utilize advanced holistic health care approaches. - www.soulproof.com******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Skip Atwater - President of the Monroe Institute

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:27


In the midst of the Cold War both the Soviets and the Americans employed psychics to spy on each other's activities. These were the so-called remote viewers. Both the CIA and the US Army conducted remote viewing intelligence programs. The US Army's program, known by the code name Star Gate, was initiated in the late 1970's by the gifted natural psychic, Skip Atwater. For ten years Skip was the Operations and Training Officer during which time he recruited and trained an elite group of professional remote viewers, through whom he conducted thousands of intelligence-collection missions. Skip inevitably came into contact with Robert Monroe, the founder of The Monroe Institute. The Monroe Institute dedicates itself to the transformation of human consciousness. A major constituent of this transformation process is in part accomplished through the application of Hemi-Sync technology. The Hemi-Sync is perhaps best known for its capacity to induce an OOBE (Out Of Body Experience), otherwise known as astral projection. More information on the Monroe Institute can be found at http://www.monroeinstitute.org/******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Mary Lynn - Psychic

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:27


Over the past 20 years, Lynn Stevenson has been guiding her clients as an intuitive along the paths they have chosen, advising them of what is ahead. Now, as a Certified Power Coach, she has the ability and opportunity to help her clients walk down the path to reach the end goal. With a regular client base extending beyond the borders of Canada into the United States, Europe, Africa and Australia, Lynn's business has grown into what it is today: Fastrac Coaching & Leadership. Lynn's intricate background has revolved around the music industry, the paranormal, and print media. Aside from being the subject of articles and interviews, Lynn has also been the host of her own radio and television shows, as well as a regular columnist in various media. Lynn has self published two books. In the music industry, Lynn was a regular face at the Country Music Association in Nashville, working alongside industry insiders behind the scenes of many awards and fan-based functions, as a trustworthy volunteer and as a psychic consultant. She later became involved with the Canadian Country Music Association and several record labels, most prominently, Sony Music Nashville. I teach workshops now on various subjects ~ mostly to do with the Law of Attraction. A few years ago we had The Rescue Mediums at our house. Our house was build in the late 1870's at the Rectory for the Anglican Church and is quite active. - www.ml-ideas.com.******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Sinthia - Healer

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:28


Sinthia was born with this ability to heal and see the energy in the different ways, like colors, entities, higher beings, etc. Sinthia has done this for more than fifteen years, her preparation has been with different Teachers from Mexico to India. The objective of this preparation is to heal our lives, physical, mental, emotional and spiritual. Sinthia gives courses, conferences, and group therapy in group, etc. Recently she was contacted with two Guides or Teachers who gave me some healing techniques and taught me many others things about important subjects. ******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Pastor Chris Ward - Case Files of an Internet Exorcist

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:25


The cases discussed in this book are based on actual events that were encountered by an exorcist. There are fifteen chapters of actual exorcisms, four practical easy-to-use training appendixes on how to conduct an exorcism, and the last interview with evangelist, healing and deliverance minister, Frank Marzullo, Sr. Recorded here are the true demonic encounters of people who contacted Dr. Ward through his website, http://www.logoschristian.org. He had two goals in writing this book -- that others would be set free from demonic experiences and that the methods of a successful exorcism would be passed on and preserved for future generations of exorcists. - http://logoschristian.org******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

The 'X' Zone Radio Show
Rob McConnell Interviews - Bishop Mehran Saam - The Raelian Movement

The 'X' Zone Radio Show

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 30, 2021 41:30


Rael, founder and leader of the Raelian Movement (www.rael.org), today issued a statement in response to Stephen Hawking's speculations about hostile extraterrestrials. Widely previewed in the popular media, Hawking's pessimistic ruminations are part of an upcoming Discovery Channel television series. "With these views, Hawking demonstrates that he's not only physically handicapped but mentally handicapped by the degenerative disease of 'evolutionism' or 'Darwinism,' " Rael said. "His fears about murderous, invading aliens are based on the theory of evolution - the myth of evolution, to be more precise. He's afraid humans are inferior to aliens who might invade. That's logical, but only if you accept the myth of evolution." Rael called evolution "a magical, irrational concept" that does great harm. "Hitler's views about superior Aryans; slavery and apartheid; and Hawking's delirium of aliens wiping out humanity all fit perfectly with the evolution myth," he said, adding that he admires the stance taken by Swedish scientist Soren Lovtrup. "Lovtrup said Darwinian evolution will one day be considered the greatest deceit in the history of science and that it's anti-science and false," he said. "I agree." And the truth about the origin of life on Earth? "It's the result of intelligent design, not by just one so-called godly designer but by extraterrestrial designers, plural, called the Elohim," Rael said. "With intelligent design, you automatically have intelligent organization of the universe as well, organization based on peace and love, not on monsters ready to invade and destroy humanity." Why? "Intelligent designers wouldn't allow anyone to destroy their creation," Rael said. "What's more, with cosmic laws based on intelligent design, violent species wind up self-destructing before they can spread their violence to other planets." Is this a lesson for humanity? "We can use weapons of mass destruction to eliminate ourselves," Rael explained. "We don't need alien invasions for that; we're powerful enough and stupid enough to do it ourselves unless peace and love prevail. Stephen Hawking is doing a terrible thing by instilling fear. Fear leads to poor health, bad behaviors and the militaristic policy of weapons accumulation that can lead to humanity's self-destruction. The world needs peace, love and global disarmament, not fear. And we must eliminate the myth of God and the myth of evolution, since both of these myths perpetuate fear and violence." - www.rael.org******************************************************************To listen to all our XZBN shows, with our compliments go to: https://www.spreaker.com/user/xzoneradiotv*** AND NOW ***The ‘X' Zone TV Channel on SimulTV - www.simultv.comThe ‘X' Chronicles Newspaper - www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com ******************************************************************

Chump Talk
Episode #161: Featuring Jack DeBoer | NCAA

Chump Talk

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 28, 2021 39:58


In episode #161 the boys are joined by Jack DeBoer, who plays hockey in the NCAA. In this episode Jack talks about growing up in the KW area when Pete coached the Rangers, playing minor hockey in so many different places, being able to play college hockey for Boston University and now Niagara, and stories from being around the NHL with his father Pete being the head coach for the Vegas Golden Knights. Tune in for another great episode. #ChumpTalk

This Date in Weather History
1890: The "Great Cyclone" strikes S. Lawrence, MA

This Date in Weather History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 26, 2021 2:52


The Boston Globe reported on July 26, 1890 that "At first the trees swayed a little and the grain bent down on the hills. Then shingles flew off from old roofs and the orchards sent down their unripe fruit. After about 30 seconds of an avalanche of wind broke and came tearing down upon the tenement houses and workshops and stores with the force of a Niagara. Big elms and maples that were planted with care away back in the days of the Salem witches, bowed their graceful tops to the streets, and snapped off near the roots as if they had been of chalk. Fences were lifted from trimly kept gardens and taken away to the estate of neighbors, 200 yards distant, and outhouses fell like grain before the reaper.” On July 26, 1890, what was described as a tornado or cyclone swept down upon South Lawrence, Massachusetts. This event can be described in today's terms as a brief tornado or a powerful microburst, which is a sudden downdraft of air over a small geographic area. The Lawrence tornado, called the “Great Cyclone,” struck South Lawrence at 9:10 to 9:15 AM on Saturday, July 26, 1890. It took about two minutes to pass through any point. Damages were estimated at about $60,000. Eight people were killed and 65 were injured. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Services Podcast

Top stories from issues of the past week's Niagara Gazette

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Nicole Moore: Surviving a Shark Attack

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 28:25


On Jan. 31, 2011, Nicole Moore waded into the Caribbean Sea outside a resort in Cancun and was viciously attacked by a bull shark. She lost 60 per cent of her blood, an arm, was left with a permanently disfigured leg, and in intervening years had countless surgeries. She laid it all out in her book, "Shark Assault: An Amazing Story of Survival" - which brought her to The Agenda in 2016 for a conversation about pain, loss, and resiliency. Then, Hamilton-Niagara Hub journalist Justin Chandler recounts how Niagara-on-the-Lake's experience during the Spanish Flu is commemorated there. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)
Delving into Niagara's Spanish Flu

The Agenda with Steve Paikin (Audio)

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 23, 2021 8:00


Every year since the Spanish flu outbreak in 1919, people have made a pilgrimage to Niagara-on-the-Lake to honour the Polish men who died at a military training camp - and the Elizabeth Ascher, the "angel of mercy" who cared for them. Hamilton-Niagara Ontario Hub journalist Justin Chandler recounts this unique history. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Sound Off Podcast
Lena Shulman: Where Shall We Begin?

The Sound Off Podcast

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 20, 2021 44:48


Researching for podcast episodes is different in the pandemic. I often have met the person long before I interview them. Perhaps we shared a coffee or drink, maybe we worked together or I saw them speak at a conference. Perhaps I grew up listening to them, worked in the same market or interviewed them for a job. The pandemic has turned some of episodes into radio Lava-Life dates. That's what happened with this episode with Lena Shulman from Vancouver's Jack-FM.In this episode, I spent a fair amount of time asking her the questions on her online profile, but the real gold was in the after dinner drinks where I found her her family emigrated from the former Soviet Union and later Israel on their way to Canada. As we spoke it was apparent that Lena also knew multiple languages. Her broadcast career started on campus at the University of Toronto where she was studying history. From there she opted for a producer position at Corus Radio Toronto and made her way across Canada to Lloydminster, Saskatoon, Niagara and then back to Vancouver's Jack 96.9 FM where she co-hosts the morning show with Drex and Bob Addison, aka No Fun Bobby.Lena made mention of a book by Roy Williams called Pendulum. You can order a copy of it here. You can find out more about Lena and see some of great stuff she is up to on our episode page.Thanks also to the people who make this show possible every week including:PromosuiteJustin Dove at Core Image StudiosMegatraxSee Privacy Policy at https://art19.com/privacy and California Privacy Notice at https://art19.com/privacy#do-not-sell-my-info.

Matt Talks Wine & Stuff with Interesting People
103: 'Matt Talks Wine & Stuff with Interesting People Episode 97 = Taylor Emerson, Black Bank Hill Winery

Matt Talks Wine & Stuff with Interesting People

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 19, 2021 52:43


On the latest podcast Matt is joined by Niagara region Black Bank Hill Winery vintner Taylor Emerson … in PERSON!! (Spaced out, both double vaxxed)  Taylor has released his first vintage so we discuss how scared/excited he is, how he got into the wine world, the joy of single vineyard Niagara wines and making a Cabernet Sauvignon dominant wine in Ontario.  

Today In History
Today In History - Members of the Niagara Movement meet for the first time

Today In History

Play Episode Listen Later Jul 11, 2021


https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/members-of-the-niagara-movement-meet-for-first-timeSupport the show on Patreon

Niagara Frontier Radio Reading Services Podcast

Top stories from issues of the past week's Niagara Gazette

Our Fake History
Episode #135- Who Won the War of 1812? (Part III)

Our Fake History

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 16, 2021 86:44


Every spring thaw between 1812 and 1814 seemed to inaugurate a completely new war in North America. The momentum in the War of 1812 would swing wildly between the Americans and British until the two sides eventually hammered out a peace in 1814. Before the war was over the Niagara frontier would be desolated, York and Washington would both be ravaged by fire, and thousands would be dead. The war also remained somewhat inconclusive. Can Sebastian make a thoughtful case about who the true "winner" of 1812 really was? Tune-in and find out how rocket's red glare, bombs bursting in air, and the worst campaign slogan ever, all play a role in the story.

WBFO Brief
‘It just doesn't seem like there are enough candidates': Niagara County holds job fair

WBFO Brief

Play Episode Listen Later Jun 10, 2021 3:23


There were a record 9.3 million job openings across the U.S. in April, the highest since the Bureau of Labor Statistics began tracking the data in 2001. The Niagara County Department of Employment and Training held a job fair Wednesday in hopes of helping local employers fill some of those openings.

Stuff You Missed in History Class
SYMHC Classics: Annie Edson Taylor, Niagara Daredevil

Stuff You Missed in History Class

Play Episode Listen Later Apr 17, 2021 34:27


This 2018 episode covers Annie Edson Taylor, the first person to go over Niagara Falls in a barrel. Taylor's whole barrel trip was part of a much bigger story of daredevils at this natural wonder, which is tied to its industrialization and commercialization Learn more about your ad-choices at https://www.iheartpodcastnetwork.com